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  • 1.
    Lund, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    ‘I feel sorry for them and I should do something, but I don't’: Spatial imaginaries and resistance to feminist change in the dramatic arts2019In: Emotion, Space and Society, ISSN 1755-4586, E-ISSN 1878-0040, Vol. 30, p. 27-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article engages with how emotions play a significant role in keeping, and changing, social structures and cultural beliefs when a heteronormative gender order is problematized. The stage is university level programs in performer training and their work to integrate theoretical knowledge on gender into students' creative and pedagogical practice. The results show that changes in space, new spatial imaginaries, bring about a power disturbance and status relations that require a re-monitoring of who we are in the eyes of others. The article illustrates how fear can reveal where individuals’ and groups interests lie and orient them toward what must be done to preserve or develop these interests in a desirable direction. The reason feelings of fear, anger and shame emerge in reaction to changing power and status relations is that a decline in status and power entails a loss of agency as well as emotional and economic security, and in a deeper sense existential meaning and identity.

  • 2.
    Lund, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Mette Andersson: Kampen om vitenskapeligheten: Forskningskommunikasjon i et politisk betent felt2019In: Norsk sosiologisk tidsskrift, ISSN 1590-7929, E-ISSN 1936-4660, Vol. 3, no 2Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Lund, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Preparedness as a counter-memory. School desegregation, social chances and life chances2019In: Ethnic and Racial Studies, ISSN 0141-9870, E-ISSN 1466-4356, Vol. 42, no 13, p. 2318-2325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How should we understand the conundrum of love for the segregated school – a system built to keep you in your place? In Gone Home. Race and Roots through Appalachia, Karida L. Brown looks at African American teacher’s work in segregated schools and shows how desegregation could be felt in both gains and losses in the black community. Those teachers prepared their students for a world of integration without freedom. This essay proposes a counter- memory of segregation, a relational agency of teachers past that remains to this day. Former students’ commemoration of teachers, principals, and schools dating from the time of institutionalized racial exclusion works as a symbolic reminder in a still-racist world, representing not only the need to be prepared, but also to stay prepared.

  • 4.
    Lund, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Time, memory and class: The unintended consequences of the bourgeois gaze2018In: Ethnography, ISSN 1466-1381, E-ISSN 1741-2714, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 548-564Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, I argue that currently there is a middle-class bias that dominates in sociological culture and structures the ways the discipline operates as a form of bourgeois gaze. These forms of regulation and structuration within the discipline are also visible in Paul Willis's book Learning to Labour (1977), and they need to be illuminated, problematized and challenged if the discipline is to be able to contribute meaningfully and critically to an enlargement of its approach to sociological analysis, including the analysis of class and youth culture. My attempt is to make an exposure and reconsider Learning to Labour through the lens of time, memory and class, by performing an additional reading of the ‘the lads’ orientation toward different temporalities and conscious practices of memory work.

  • 5.
    Lund, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Lund, Stefan
    "Eftersom vi skrattar åt det så fastnar det bättre": Humor och relationell lärarauktoritet2018In: Auktoritet / [ed] Mats Trondman, Malin Lennartsson, Göteborg: Daidalos, 2018, p. 239-258Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6. Trondman, Mats
    et al.
    Lund, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Light, mind and spirit: Paul Willis’s Learning to Labour revisited on and beyond its 40th anniversary2018In: Ethnography, ISSN 1466-1381, E-ISSN 1741-2714, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 433-445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is an introduction to a Special Issue dedicated to Paul Willis’s classic Learning to Labour at its 40th anniversary, and beyond. His theoretically informed and theorizing ethnographic study is read, explored, and utilized all around the globe. Its use also stretches across the borders of social, cultural and educational sciences and to manifold research areas and settings. Besides laying out its main content, that is, the answers to the question of how working-class kids let themselves get working-class jobs, this article argues that the most significant contribution of Willis’s study is the way it illuminates, both theoretically and empirically, the meaning of cultural production and cultural auton- omy in the midst of ongoing social reproduction of class. This introduction ends by presenting the eight contributions to the actual Special Issue, and with an invitation to Paul Willis himself to take issue with cultural production and cultural autonomy. 

  • 7. Trondman, Mats
    et al.
    Lund, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Slutord: En vetenskap om barn och ungdom – karaktär och elementära former2018In: Barn- och ungdomsvetenskap: Grundläggande perspektiv / [ed] Thomas Johansson, Emma Sorbring, Stockholm: Liber, 2018, p. 653-668Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Trondman, Mats
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Willis, Paul
    Lund, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Lived Forms of Schooling: Bringing the Elementary Forms of Ethnography to the Science of Education2018In: The Wiley Handbook of Ethnography of Education / [ed] Dennis Beach, Carl Bagely, Sofia Marques da Silva, John Wiley & Sons, 2018, p. 31-50Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter discusses the “elementary forms of ethnography” and an ethnographic imagination that can illuminate lived forms of schooling. These elementary forms include lived experience, cultural understanding, theory, or rather theorization, and social criticism. The chapter shows what a particular understanding of ethnography can do for a science of education understood as schooling. Ethnography is as old as the modern formation of sociology and science of education more than a hundred years ago. Ethnography is a vital tool to be used in the interrogation of schooling thus understood as a cultural fact involving or aiming at the willing consent of pupils to achieve its purposes. At the heart of education as schooling as a cultural fact pure and simple is teaching and learning. Moreover, teaching and learning as schooling need to be grasped in their indispensible relationship.

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