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  • 1. de Freitas, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Palmer, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    How scientific concepts come to matter in early childhood curriculum: rethinking the concept of force2016In: Cultural Studies of Science Education, ISSN 1871-1502, E-ISSN 1871-1510, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 1201-1222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to investigate how new materialist philosophies of matter can help us study the emergence of scientific thought in young children's activities. We draw extensively on the work of Gilles Deleuze to help us understand scientific concepts as concrete universals. In particular, we show how the concept of force is reanimated through this approach, becoming less deterministic, and more inflected with chance and indeterminism. We show how this approach to concepts moves beyond constructivist socio-cultural theories of learning, and reveals how concepts are 'material articulations of the world' intra-acting with all other matter and meaning. Finally, we discuss video data and artifacts from an ongoing ethnographic project in Stockholm entitled 'Children's relations to the city'. Our analysis of the classroom video data from this project shows how concepts are not timeless transcendent abstractions, but part of an unfolding event and learning assemblage. Thus the article contributes to research on conceptual change in children, with particular focus on scientific concepts.

  • 2.
    Eidevald, Christian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Engdahl, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Frankenberg, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Lenz Taguchi, Hillevi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Palmer, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Omsorgsfull och lekfull utbildning och undervisning i förskolan2018In: Undervisning i förskolan: en kunskapsöversikt / [ed] Sonja Sheridan, Pia Williams, Stockholm: Skolverket , 2018, p. 81-91Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Frankenberg, Sofia J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Lenz Taguchi, Hillevi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Bodén, Linnea
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Kjällander, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Palmer, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Tonér, Signe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Bidirectional collaborations in an intervention randomized controlled trial performed in the Swedish early childhood education context2019In: Journal of Cognition and Development, ISSN 1524-8372, E-ISSN 1532-7647, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 182-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the field of developmental science, there is a general agreement of the need to work together across academic disciplinary boundaries in order to advance the understandings of how to optimize child development and learning. However, experience also shows that such collaborations may be challenging. This paper reports on the experiences of bidirectional collaboration between researchers in a multidisciplinary research team and between researchers and stakeholders, in the first randomized controlled trial in Swedish preschool. The objective of the trial was to investigate the effects of two pedagogical learning strategies evaluating language, communication, attention, executive functions and early math. The interdisciplinary team includes researchers from early childhood education, linguistics, developmental psychology and cognitive neuro science. Educational researchers and theorists within the field of early childhood education in Sweden have during the last two decades mainly undertaken small-scale qualitative praxis-oriented and participative research. There is a widespread skepticism with regards to some of the core principles in controlled intervention methodologies, including a strong resistance towards individual testing of children. Consequently unanticipated disagreements and conflicts arose within the research team, as RCT methodology requires the measurement of effects pre and post the intervention. The aim of this article is to discuss the conditions for bidirectional collaboration both between researchers and stakeholders and between researchers in the research team. The findings illustrate strategies and negotiations that emerged in order to address ontological and epistemological controversies and disagreements. These include (a) the negotiation of research ethics, (b) making divergences visible and learning from each other, (c) using a multi-epistemological and methodological approach as a complement to the RCT design and (d) the negotiation of research problems that are shared between educators and researchers.

  • 4.
    Gerholm, Tove
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Hörberg, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics.
    Tonér, Signe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Frankenberg, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Kjällander, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Palmer, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Lenz Taguchi, Hillevi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    A protocol for a three-arm cluster randomized controlled superiority trial investigating the effects of two pedagogical methodologies in Swedish preschool settings on language and communication, executive functions, auditive selective attention, socioemotional skills and early maths skills2018In: BMC Psychology, E-ISSN 2050-7283, Vol. 6, article id 29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    During the preschool years, children develop abilities and skills in areas crucial for later success in life. These abilities include language, executive functions, attention, and socioemotional skills. The pedagogical methods used in preschools hold the potential to enhance these abilities, but our knowledge of which pedagogical practices aid which abilities, and for which children, is limited. The aim of this paper is to describe an intervention study designed to evaluate and compare two pedagogical methodologies in terms of their effect on the above-mentioned skills in Swedish preschool children.

    Method

    The study is a randomized control trial (RCT) where two pedagogical methodologies were tested to evaluate how they enhanced children’s language, executive functions and attention, socioemotional skills, and early maths skills during an intensive 6-week intervention. Eighteen preschools including 28 units and 432 children were enrolled in a municipality close to Stockholm, Sweden. The children were between 4;0 and 6;0 years old and each preschool unit was randomly assigned to either of the interventions or to the control group. Background information on all children was collected via questionnaires completed by parents and preschools. Pre- and post-intervention testing consisted of a test battery including tests on language, executive functions, selective auditive attention, socioemotional skills and early maths skills. The interventions consisted of 6 weeks of intensive practice of either a socioemotional and material learning paradigm (SEMLA), for which group-based activities and interactional structures were the main focus, or an individual, digitally implemented attention and math training paradigm, which also included a set of self-regulation practices (DIL). All preschools were evaluated with the ECERS-3.

    Discussion

    If this intervention study shows evidence of a difference between group-based learning paradigms and individual training of specific skills in terms of enhancing children’s abilities in fundamental areas like language, executive functions and attention, socioemotional skills and early math, this will have big impact on the preschool agenda in the future. The potential for different pedagogical methodologies to have different impacts on children of different ages and with different backgrounds invites a wider discussion within the field of how to develop a preschool curriculum suited for all children.

  • 5.
    Gerholm, Tove
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Tonér, Signe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Frankenberg, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Kjällander, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Palmer, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Lenz-Taguchi, Hillevi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    A randomized controlled trial to examine the effect of two teaching methods on preschool children’s language and communication, executive functions, socioemotional comprehension, and early math skills2019In: BMC Psychology, E-ISSN 2050-7283, Vol. 7, article id 59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    During the preschool years, children’s development of skills like language and communication, executive functions, and socioemotional comprehension undergo dramatic development. Still, our knowledge of how these skills are enhanced is limited. The preschool contexts constitute a well-suited arena for investigating these skills and hold the potential for giving children an equal opportunity preparing for the school years to come. The present study compared two pedagogical methods in the Swedish preschool context as to their effect on language and communication, executive functions, socioemotional comprehension, and early math. The study targeted children in the age span four-to-six-year-old, with an additional focus on these children’s backgrounds in terms of socioeconomic status, age, gender, number of languages, time spent at preschool, and preschool start. An additional goal of the study was to add to prior research by aiming at disentangling the relationship between the investigated variables.

    Method

    The study constitutes a randomized controlled trial including 18 preschools and 29 preschool units, with a total of 431 children, and 98 teachers. The interventions lasted for 6 weeks, preceded by pre-testing and followed by post-testing of the children. Randomization was conducted on the level of preschool unit, to either of the two interventions or to control. The interventions consisted of a socioemotional and material learning paradigm (SEMLA) and a digitally implemented attention and math training paradigm (DIL). The preschools were further evaluated with ECERS-3. The main analysis was a series of univariate mixed regression models, where the nested structure of individuals, preschool units and preschools were modeled using random variables.

    Results

    The result of the intervention shows that neither of the two intervention paradigms had measurable effects on the targeted skills. However, there were results as to the follow-up questions, such as executive functions predicting all other variables (language and communication, socioemotional comprehension, and math). Background variables were related to each other in patterns congruent with earlier findings, such as socioeconomic status predicting outcome measures across the board. The results are discussed in relation to intervention fidelity, length of intervention, preschool quality, and the impact of background variables on children’s developmental trajectories and life prospects.

  • 6.
    Lenz Taguchi, Hillevi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Palmer, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Dokumentation för lärande. SEMLA: Socioemotionellt och materiellt lärande i förskolan2017In: Förskolan och barns utveckling: grundbok för förskollärare / [ed] Anne-Li Lindgren, Niklas Pramling, Roger Säljö, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2017, p. 245-261Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Lenz Taguchi, Hillevi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Palmer, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Flickors (o)hälsa i skolans materielltdiskursiva miljöer: en agentisk realistisk analys2015In: Metodefest og øyeblikksrealisme: Eksperimenterende kvalitative forskningspassasjer / [ed] Ann Merete Otterstad, Anne B. Reinersten, Bergen: Fagbokforlaget, 2015, 1, p. 81-100Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Lenz Taguchi, Hillevi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Palmer, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Gustafsson, Lovisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Individuating sparks' and flickers' of a life' in dance practices with preschoolers: the monstrous child' of Colebrook's Queer Vitalism2016In: Discourse. Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, ISSN 0159-6306, E-ISSN 1469-3739, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 705-716Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What are the dominant images of the Child in contemporary Western societies? In order to challenge some dominant images of the Child, this essay explores the possibilities of analyzing an experimental dance practice with preschoolers aged 1-2 years with Claire Colebrook's theorizing on the war on norms'. Colebrook suggests a Queer Vitalism to push the limits of how to understand humanness generally, and more specifically, how to understand processes of subjectification. She moves from a post-structuralist understanding toward the Deleuzian notion of practices of individuation and processes of becoming-imperceptible. In this essay, we draw on Queer Vitalism to show how it is possible to understand children's constructions of subjectivity in events of experimental dance practices for preschoolers. The analysis is performed in close interactions with video-films from these workshops transformed to still photography. We aspire to show how these practices can be understood as counter-power strategies in the enactment of an image of a Monstrous Child. Such an image might transform the taken-for-granted image of the Child and preschool practices in subversive ways.

  • 9.
    Palmer, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Att bli matematisk: Matematisk subjektivitet och genus i lärarutbildningen för de yngre åldrarna2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate the processes through which mathematical and gendered subjectivity is constituted, reconstituted and maintained in different situations during Early Childhood Teacher Education (ECE). In three research articles it is investigated how student teachers’ subjectivity constitutions are expressed, formulated and reformulated in different discursive and material practices. With the support of feminist poststructural theories, student teachers’ subjectification processes are investigated in relation to the subject of mathematics, gender, different learning and teaching discourses, materials and environments. During the course of the work a theoretical transit is carried out: from Judith Butler’s theories (1990, 1993 and 1997) to Karen Barad’s (2007, 2008) theoretical territory. The empirical data was collected from three cohorts (2005-2007) of a ten-week long mathematics course included in a one-year ECE course called Investigative Pedagogy – Dialogue Reggio Emilia. Examples of the data include memory stories written by student teachers, pedagogical documentation from different mathematics projects, field notes from action research studies in ECE education, survey results and students’ reports. Methodologically, in relation to the first and second articles the thesis works with feminist discourse analysis, deconstructive and performative methodology and in relation to the third article with diffractive and intra-active methodology. The results show examples of how student teachers constitute mathematical subjectivity through complex networks of social relations, learning discourses, gender, material practices, time, space and place. Taking part in alternative, aesthetic interdisciplinary learning practices changes the understanding of student teachers’ mathematical subjectivity, although not always in predictable or uncomplicated ways. In the shift from a discursive and performative way of understanding mathematical subjectivity to an agentic realistic one, the understanding of mathematical subjectivity is widened to include things, materials and environments. This shift implies a decisive meaning for how pedagogical practices can be viewed and, in the long run, how mathematics didactics can be approached for student teachers and young children alike.

  • 10.
    Palmer, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    “How many sums can I do”?: Performative strategies and diffractive thinking as methodological tools for rethinking mathematical subjectivity2011In: Reconceptualizing Educational Research Methodology (RERM), ISSN 1892-042X, E-ISSN 1892-042X, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 3-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to illustrate how the understanding of mathematical subjectivity changes when transiting theoretically and methodologically from a discursive and performative thinking, as suggested by Judith Butler (1990, 1993, 1997), to an agential realist and diffractive thinking, inspired by Karen Barad’s theories (2007, 2008). To show this I have examined narrative memory stories about mathematics written by students participating in Teacher Education maths courses. I provide examples of such stories and present an in-depth analysis of one such story. The first part of the analysis has been carried out using performative methodological strategies – in relation to Judith Butler’s theories – while the latter part of analysis has been performed with the aid of diffractive methodological thinking – in relation to Barad’s theoretical perspectives. When summarising the different analyses, it becomes evident that the understanding of data – and of me as researcher – changes when transiting from one theoretical and methodological arena to another. Depending on which questions we pose, what methodological strategies we use, and which theoretical fields we get involved in, we would see and understand this differently.

  • 11.
    Palmer, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Hur blir man matematisk?: Att skapa nya relationer till matematik och genus i arbetet med yngre barn2011 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Palmer, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    'I'm not a “maths-person”!': Reconstituting mathematical subjectivities in a esthetic teaching practices2009In: Gender and Education, ISSN 0954-0253, E-ISSN 1360-0516, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 387-404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study I have investigated how alternative ways of teaching mathematics influence and affect Early Childhood Education (ECE) students’ attitudes towards maths and how they understand their own subjectivities as more or less mathematical during a 10-week alternative maths course. The investigated course adopts a feminist post-structural approach based on critical pedagogy and deconstructive theory and includes an interdisciplinary approach to investigative mathematics. The data used include the memory/narrative writings and processwritings of 75 female teacher-education students, collected from three different cohorts, in which the students describe their learning processes throughout the maths course. The study shows that, in the main, the students became much more positively inclined to the subject of mathematics after the maths course and agreed that this course had changed their understanding of their own mathematical subjectivity, albeit in different and varying ways.

  • 13.
    Palmer, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    ‘Is this the tallest building in the world?’ A posthuman approach to ethical problems in young children’s learning projects2016In: Global Studies of Childhood, ISSN 2043-6106, E-ISSN 2043-6106, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 283-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, I explore alternative ways of understanding ethics in preschool. In this, I draw on a posthumanist understanding of ethical concerns as entangled intra-actions of the world, rather than as a human affair. The examined data are part of an ongoing preschool project called ‘Children’s relations to the city’, in which children begin to investigate tall buildings in the immediate vicinity of the preschool and then turn their attention to other larger and more famous buildings in the world, such as Burj Khalifa, the World Trade Centre and Tapei 101. At first, the children seem to be interested in mathematics and science and collaboratively measure and compare the towers shown on pictures. The project then changes gear, and the children ask questions about the living conditions in faraway countries. This transfers the project from the local preschool to a global world in which complex ethical dilemmas emerge. The article discusses the ethics that can emerge when understanding children’s play and learning in preschool as always and already ethical and entangled with a more-than-human global world.

  • 14. Palmer, Anna
    Jag är stark, jag är bra med mitt svärd: Att utforska barns subjekt- och könsskapande via kollektivt minnesarbete2010In: Om världen och omvärlden: Pedagogik i praktik och teori med inspiration från Reggio Emilia / [ed] Marie-Anne Colliander, Lena Stråhle och Christina Wehner-Godée, Stockholm: Stockholms universitets förlag, 2010, 1, p. 201-216Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Palmer, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Kropp, knopp och matematik: Matematiskt lärande och feministisk pedagogik i lärarutbildningen och förskolan2011In: En rosa pedagogik: - jämställdhetspedagogiska utmaningar / [ed] Hillevi Lenz Taguchi, Linnea Bodén och Kajsa Ohrlander, Stockholm: Liber, 2011, 1, p. 132-141Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Palmer, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    ”Let’s dance!”: Theorising Alternative Mathematical Practices in Early Childhood Teacher Education2010In: Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood, ISSN 1463-9491, E-ISSN 1463-9491, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 130-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In light of the contemporary discussions on the biased relationship between gender and mathematical teaching and learning in the Western world, can we, by means of a reconceptualised early childhood education, influence how young children construct their gendered subjectivities in relation to mathematics? This project has been carried out with the aim of challenging the taken-for-granted mathematical teaching discourse and to produce more creative, in-depth and gender-sensitive mathematical learning situations for teacher students and their subsequent students in Early Childhood Teacher Education practices. To exemplify such work, from a data-collection of 75 student reports, this article investigates and analyses documentation collected from a maths project undertaken by an ECE teacher student. The poststructural and material feminist analysis performed shows that the materialdiscursive intra-actions (Barad 2007) taking place are conceivable to have both expected and unexpected gendered impacts on children’s ongoing subjectivity constructions. It also shows that it is difficult but possible to change taken-for-granted mathematical teaching practice as well as teacher students' understandings of maths teaching.

  • 17.
    Palmer, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Rethinking Mathematical Subjectivity: A Theoretical TranspositionArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to illustrate how the understanding of mathematical subjectivity changes when transiting theoretically from a discursive and performative thinking of subjectivity, as suggested by Judith Butler (1993, 1997, 1999/1990), to an agential realist thinking, inspired by Karen Barad’s theories (2007, 2008). To show this I have examined narrative memory stories about mathematics written by students participating in Teacher Education maths courses. I provide examples of such stories and present an indepth analysis of one such story. The first part of the analysis has been carried out using performative methodological strategies – in relation to Judith Butler’s theories – while the latter part of analysis has been performed with the aid of diffractive methodological thinking – in relation to Barad’s theoretical perspectives. When summarising the analysis, it becomes evident that power is not only produced through discourse when transiting from a discursive to an agential realist and material-discursive analysis. Rather, power is also produced in what emerges in the intra-activities in-between the material objects used in mathematical learning, the body, emotions and discourse,

  • 18.
    Palmer, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    "Ta det lugnt, tänk på att Lina är en tjej...": Kollektivt minnesarbete som verktyg för att utmana vårt tänkande om kön i pedagogisk praktik.2011In: En rosa pedagogik: - jämställdhetspolitiska utmaningar / [ed] Hillevi Lenz Taguchi, Linnea Bodén, Kajsa Ohrlander, Stockholm: Liber, 2011, 1, p. 142-156Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Palmer, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Kjällander, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Lenz Taguchi, Hillevi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Frankenberg, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    En relationell etik i arbetet med digitala verktyg: exempel utifrån två arbetssätt2019In: Digitalisering i en förskolan på vetenskaplig grund / [ed] Susanne Kjällander, Bim Riddersporre, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2019, p. 270-287Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Palmer, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Pedersen, Helena
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet som kritisk djurpedagogisk arena2017In: Posthumanistisk pedagogik: teori, undervisning och forskningspraktik / [ed] Bosse Bergstedt, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2017, p. 41-59Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Palmer, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Unga, JohannaStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.Hultman, KarinStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Svindlande matematik: Estetik, lek och utforskande i förskolan2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Taguchi, Hillevi Lenz
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Palmer, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    A more 'livable' school?: A diffractive analysis of the performative enactments of girls' ill-/well-being with(in) school environments2013In: Gender and Education, ISSN 0954-0253, E-ISSN 1360-0516, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 671-687Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    School girls in Sweden are reported to develop psychological (ill)health in relation to their school behaviour and over-achievements. The methods offered as prevention and treatments are aimed at the individual girl's self-management of stress, health and psychological state, putting the responsibility on the girls themselves. This feminist agential realist study aims to explore how the material-discursive school environment, that is, the entanglement of architecture, materialities, bodies, discourses and discursive practices - including the discourses on girls' health in research and media texts - are collectively responsible for, co-constitutive of and enacting female students' ill- and well-being. Doing a diffractive analysis, we register how we as researchers are involved and co-productive of this complex apparatus of knowing of school-related ill-/well-being. A diffractive analysis aims to not only analyse how this apparatus is made and what it produces, but also how it can be productive of new possible realities that might produce more livable school environments.

  • 23.
    Taguchi, Hillevi Lenz
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Palmer, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Reading a Deleuzio-Guattarian Cartography of Young Girls' School-Related Ill-/Well-Being2014In: Qualitative Inquiry, ISSN 1077-8004, E-ISSN 1552-7565, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 764-771Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article puts to work a Deleuzio-Guattarian methodology of cartography using data from a pilot study of young schoolgirls' school-related ill-health and well-being. Doing a cartography means setting up a map of various kinds of data produced by a multiplicity of desiring agents in various power-producing fields such as medicine, psychology, popular science, media, as well as narrative data from young girls and the two researchers themselves. Together, these data make up a wider machinic assemblage of Public Health in Sweden. As researchers, we understand ourselves as co-productive of this machinic assemblage that, in turn, is productive of a multiplicity of different Bodies without Organs (BwOs) that young schoolgirls fabricate for themselves. The analysis will show the specific types of BwOs that are fabricated, how they are fabricated, the modes of desire that come to pass on them, and thus what kinds of subjectivities of schoolgirls might be produced.

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