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  • 1. Buen Sommerfeldt, Marianne
    et al.
    Hauge, Mona-Iren
    Øverlien, Carolina
    Nasjonalt kunnskapssenter om vold og traumatisk stress, Norge.
    Minoritetsetniske barn og unge og vold i hjemmet: utsatthet og sosialfaglig arbeid2014Report (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Cater, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Överlien, Carolina
    Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, Norway.
    Children exposed to domestic violence: a discussion about research ethics and researchers’ responsibilities2014In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 67-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children’s exposure to domestic violence has attracted increased interest from researchers. This greater interest necessitates discussion about the methods by which children’s exposure to and descriptions of violence are studied. This article (1) discusses ethical dilemmas in research involving interviewing children exposed to domestic violence in relation to constructions of children as competent and as vulnerable, and (2) suggests a conceptual framework to aid in the design of such studies. The ethical dilemmas discussed concern: (1) research being ethically justified, (2) consent and (3) confidentiality and unsought disclosures. We suggest that combining children’s rights to agency and protection in ethical research that involves interviewing children exposed to violence can be facilitated by using the concepts of closeness and distance.

  • 3. Evang, Are
    et al.
    Øverlien, Carolina
    Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, Norway.
    ‘If you look, you have to leave’: Young children regulating research interviews about experiences of domestic violence2015In: Journal of Early Childhood Research, ISSN 1476-718X, E-ISSN 1741-2927, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 113-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to investigate the competence of young children staying with their mothers in refuges for abused women as participants in qualitative interviews. Discourse of the verbal and non-verbal actions of seven young children (4–7 years old) was analysed using a theory originally developed to describe infant–mother interaction as a model. The analysis shows that the young children were able not only to communicate important aspects of what it means for a child to live in a family with domestic violence but also to regulate, limit and take the lead in the interviews, similar to the ways infants regulate their internal states during interactions with their caretakers. The findings emphasize the importance of including children this young in research and challenge taken-for-granted notions of adult power and helpless children.

  • 4. Hellevik, Per
    et al.
    Överlien, Carolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, Norway.
    Teenage intimate partner violence: Factors associated with victimization among Norwegian youths2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, no 44, p. 702-708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of the present study was threefold: (1) learn more about factors associated with teenage intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization; (2) explore aspects of digital media use in connection with teenage IPV; (3) and compare the impact IPV victimization has on boys and girls. Method: Survey data from 549 Norwegian students, mean age 15.2 years, who had experience(s) with being in intimate relationship(s), were examined. Experiences with psychological, physical, digital, and sexual violence were analyzed. Results: In total, 42.9% of the participants had experienced some form of IPV: 29.1% had experienced digital violence; 25.9% had experienced psychological violence; 18.8% had experienced sexual violence; and 12.8% had experienced physical violence. Factors significantly associated with teenage IPV victimization were female gender, older partners, domestic violence, bullying victimization, low academic achievements, and sending sexual messages via digital media. Girls reported to be significantly more negatively impacted by the victimization than boys. Conclusions: Some teenagers experience victimization in their intimate relationships, and for many digital media seems to play a central role in this violence. Teenagers who experience victimization outside their relationships or have risky lifestyles have a higher risk of experiencing IPV victimization. A focus on teenage IPV, and especially digital media’s role in this violence, is needed if this public health issue is to be combated.

  • 5. Moum Hellevik, Per
    et al.
    Överlien, Carolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Barter, Christine
    Wood, Marsha
    Aghtaie, Nadia
    Larkins, Cath
    Stanley, Nicky
    Traversing the Generational Gap: Young People’s Views on Intervention and Prevention of Teenage Intimate Partner Violence2015In: Domestic Violence and Protecting Children: New Thinking and Approaches / [ed] Nicky Stanley, Cathy Humphreys, London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2015, p. 34-49Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6. Selvik, Sabreen
    et al.
    Raaheim, Arild
    Øverlien, Carolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies (NKVTS), Norway.
    Children with multiple stays at refuges for abused women and their experiences of teacher recognition2017In: European Journal of Psychology of Education, ISSN 0256-2928, E-ISSN 1878-5174, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 463-481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous children around the world are forced to make multiple moves with their mothers in and out of refuges for abused women. Each time, they experience a sudden upheaval of their familiar environment. For these children, domestic violence and flight from violence is not an isolated event but part of their upbringing. Few statistics and little research exist on their living conditions and experiences. This article adopts the children’s perspective, examining the ways their teachers recognize their situation and offer them support. Experiences were collected in qualitative interviews with 20 children of ages 6–16 residing at Norwegian refuges. The choice of “mutual recognition” (Schibbye 2009) as a theoretical framework was inductively generated from the data. The constructivist grounded theory coding system was implemented as a data analysis method (Charmaz 2014). The analysis produced five different forms of teacher recognition—formal, practical, third-party, forced, and coincidental—through which teachers offered children various forms of support.

  • 7. Selvik, Sabreen
    et al.
    Øverlien, Carolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies (NKVTS), Norway.
    Children with multiple stays at Nordic refuges for abused women: conclusions, challenges, and causes for concern2015In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 98-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article sheds light on the situation of children in refuges for abused women in the Nordic countries, with a special focus on children with multiple stays. Almost as many children as women live in refuges, but research on this marginalised group of children is scarce. This article overviews and summarises existing quantitative and qualitative data to examine what we know about children in refuges in a Nordic context (Denmark, Iceland, Finland, Norway and Sweden). The literature shows that focus on children at the refuges is gradually increasing. However, major discrepancies among the Nordic countries exist in terms of which data are collected (if any), how it is presented, and what services and help are provided to children. The article also identifies and discusses some of the challenges faced by children with multiple stays at refuges: their prolonged exposure to domestic violence, disruptions in close relationships and repeated disruptions in preschool and school attendance. The available literature suggests reason for concern in regard to the risks of developing social and psychological difficulties, limited access to resources that can help develop resilience to violence, and school failure and drop-out. The article calls for further research on this particularly vulnerable group of children.

  • 8. Stanley, Nicky
    et al.
    Barter, Christine
    Wood, Martha
    Aghtaie, Nadia
    Larkins, Cath
    Lanau, Alba
    Överlien, Carolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, Norway.
    Pornography, sexual coersion and abuse, and sexting in Young people’s intimate relationships: A European study2018In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518, Vol. 33, no 19, p. 2919-2944Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New technology has made pornography increasingly accessible to young people, and a growing evidence base has identified a relationship between viewing pornography and violent or abusive behavior in young men. This article reports findings from a large survey of 4,564 young people aged 14 to 17 in five European countries which illuminate the relationship between regular viewing of online pornography, sexual coercion and abuse and the sending and receiving of sexual images and messages, known as “sexting.” In addition to the survey, which was completed in schools, 91 interviews were undertaken with young people who had direct experience of interpersonal violence and abuse in their own relationships. Rates for regularly viewing online pornography were very much higher among boys and most had chosen to watch pornography. Boys’ perpetration of sexual coercion and abuse was significantly associated with regular viewing of online pornography. Viewing online pornography was also associated with a significantly increased probability of having sent sexual images/messages for boys in nearly all countries. In addition, boys who regularly watched online pornography were significantly more likely to hold negative gender attitudes. The qualitative interviews illustrated that, although sexting is normalized and perceived positively by most young people, it has the potential to reproduce sexist features of pornography such as control and humiliation. Sex and relationships education should aim to promote a critical understanding of pornography among young people that recognizes its abusive and gendered values.

  • 9.
    Överlien, Carolina
    Nasjonalt kunnskapssenter om vold og traumatisk stress (NKVTS), Norge.
    Barn som opplever vold mot mor – definisjoner, konsekvenser og behov for hjelp2014In: Vold mot kvinner / [ed] Kjersti Narud, Oslo: Cappelen Damm AS, 2014, p. 161-176Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Överlien, Carolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Barn som upplever pappas våld mot mamma - vad säger forskningen?2007In: Nordisk sosialt arbeid, ISSN 0333-1342, E-ISSN 1504-3037, Vol. 27, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this review article is to present an overview of the, in the Nordic countries, relatively new research area ’children exposed to domestic violence’, and to discuss the implications of this research. The overview shows that the international research is primarily quantitative, focusing on children’s symptoms. Only a small part of the published research studies are qualitative. These studies use the term ‘experience’, rather than ‘exposed’, stressing the child’s subject status. The Nordic research is qualitative, and in line with early North-American studies, uses the term ‘to witness’. Although the field has greatly expanded, the field still have many unanswered questions concerning for example recilience, gender and ethnicity, and lack un understanding of the relational and contextual aspects from the child’s perspective.

  • 11.
    Överlien, Carolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    ‘Do you want to do some arm wrestling?’: children's strategies when experiencing domestic violence and the meaning of age2017In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 680-688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is, by analysing children's and young people's discourses, to investigate their strategies in response to domestic violence episodes, in relation to their age. The empirical data come from individual interviews with children and young people (ages 8–20 years) who had experienced domestic violence and lived at refuges for abused women. The thematic analysis shows that the children describe a wide range of strategies before, during and after a violent episode, that all children act regardless of age and that strategies vary according not only to age but also to situation and context. The theoretical framework used is the sociology of childhood, and the analysis engages with theoretical concepts of age, agency and positioning.

  • 12.
    Överlien, Carolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Institutionen som arena för skapandet av sexuell identitet. Samtal från ett särskilt ungdomshem2006In: Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift, ISSN 1104-1420, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 164-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med denna samtalsanalytiska studie är att studera hur institutionen kan vara en arena för skapandet av sexuell identitet, genom att analysera tal om sexualitet vid ett särskilt ungdomshem för unga kvinnor, 14 - 20 år. Studien visar hur frågan om sexualitet genomsyrar arbetet i vardagen på insti-tutionen och fungerar som en organisatorisk princip. Studien visar vidare hur personalen talar om de omhändertagna unga kvinnorna som asexuella och som offer för sexuella övergrepp.

  • 13.
    Överlien, Carolina
    Nasjonalt kunnskapssenter om vold og traumatisk stress (NKVTS), Norge.
    Våld i hemmet - barns strategier2012Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här boken handlar om barn som upplever våld i hemmet. Den baserar sig på 25 intervjuer med barn och ungdomar vars mammor har sökt skydd och hjälp på kvinnojourer. Boken presenterar också omfattande internationell forskning på området.

    Genom barnens berättelser får läsaren en bättre förståelse av hur barn upplever våld, liksom av hur barn agerar på olika sätt före, under och efter våldsepisoderna. Deras handlingar har som syfte att påverka situationen, de har ett tydligt mål, och kan därmed förstås som strategier och motstånd. Läsaren får även ta del av hur barnen upplever skolans, polisens och socialtjänstens sätt att bemöta deras utsatthet. Fram träder bilden av aktiva och ansvarstagande barn, men också av rädda och ensamma barn som inte känner att samhällets hjälpinstanser finns där för dem och som i brist på vuxna hellre vänder sig till jämnåriga vänner för stöd.

  • 14.
    Överlien, Carolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Våldsforskning om och medbarn och ungdom – metodiska och empiriska utmaningar2015In: Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift, ISSN 1104-1420, Vol. 22, no 3-4, p. 231-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, the interest in including children and adolescents in research on violence and abuse has increased. According to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, children have the right to be heard in issues that concern them and their lives. However, this puts great demands on researchers and the projects they design. This article discusses challenges in shedding light on children’s experiences and including them as informants. The starting point for discussion is three research projects aimed, in different ways, at measuring or exploring the dynamics of children exposed to violence. Using these studies as a backdrop, three main questions are asked. What con-cepts are used to describe children’s experiences and why is the choice of concepts important? Do our surveys measure what we think we measure, and do our interviews capture what we want to capture if our aim is to explore and understand children’s lifeworld? What are some of the central ethical dilemmas researchers face when conducting research on children and violence? Finally, the importance and implications of these methodological and empirical challenges are discussed.

  • 15.
    Överlien, Carolina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies (NKVTS), Norway.
    Aas, Geir
    The police patrols and children experiencing domestic violence2016In: Police Practice & Research, ISSN 1561-4263, E-ISSN 1477-271X, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 434-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using data from a study on police officers' encounters with domestic violence victims and a study on children experiencing domestic violence, this article examines how officers decide whether and how to communicate with children in emergency situations, and how children experience these encounters. Officers' views on such communication diverge; usually, communication is motivated by the need to determine next actions. Children recall little communication and describe officers as faceless, nameless and genderless. The authors argue for recognizing the preventive role of officers on emergency calls. Official policies and guidelines should formally acknowledge and clarify the importance of communication with children.

  • 16.
    Överlien, Carolina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Evang, Are
    Statens barnehus, Tromsø .
    ‘If you look, you have to leave’: young children regulating research interviews about experiences of domestic violence2014In: Journal of Early Childhood Research, ISSN 1476-718X, E-ISSN 1741-2927, no Aug 4, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to investigate the competence of young children staying with their mothers in refuges for abused women as participants in qualitative interviews. Discourse of the verbal and non-verbal actions of seven young children (4–7 years old) was analysed using a theory originally developed to describe infant–mother interaction as a model. The analysis shows that the young children were able not only to communicate important aspects of what it means for a child to live in a family with domestic violence but also to regulate, limit and take the lead in the interviews, similar to the ways infants regulate their internal states during interactions with their caretakers. The findings emphasize the importance of including children this young in research and challenge taken-for-granted notions of adult power and helpless children.

  • 17.
    Øverlien, Carolina
    Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, Norway.
    Children Exposed to Domestic Violence: Conclusions from the Literature and Challenges Ahead2010In: Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1468-0173, E-ISSN 1741-296X, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 80-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary: This article examines and discusses the research field of children exposed to domestic violence, a field which has greatly expanded during the last 10 years. The author presents an overview of this research, discusses its implications, and describes future challenges and contemporary knowledge gaps.

    Findings: The author argues that the field is dominated by studies that a) are quantitative, b) use the mothers as the informant and c) are represented by traditional psychology and social medicine, rather than social work. These studies have found substantial support for the negative emotional and behavioral consequences that children exposed to domestic violence suffer. However, many questions and problems remain unanswered. These questions include both the research field itself and the need for new approaches such as qualitative research including the voice of the child, longitudinal studies, and questions regarding methodology and research ethics.

    Applications: The author argues that there is a need for more qualitative research in general and social work research in particular. The implications for social work practice and policy are discussed.

  • 18.
    Øverlien, Carolina
    Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies (NKVTS), Norway.
    ‘He didn't mean to hit mom, I think’: positioning, agency and point in adolescents' narratives about domestic violence2014In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 156-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the narratives of adolescents who have experienced domestic violence. It focuses on what we can learn about being an adolescent who experiences domestic violence, using a narrative approach. Attentive to both form and content, the paper sheds light on why the narrative is being told, who the actors in the narratives are, who are positioned in the forefront/background and what the point of the narrative is. The analysis shows that through the storytelling, the father's position as the reluctant/dangerous/weak aggressor is negotiated, the mother is positioned both in the background as a victim and in the forefront as an actor resisting his violent behaviour. The children position themselves as actors with power to alter the progress, to protect and stop the violence. The point of the narratives is to describe the father as the aggressor, and to describe the important role of the children. This picture of the father, mother and child questions the traditional understanding of the father as the aggressor, the mother as the victim and the child as a powerless bystander being exposed to the violence, and underlines the complexities of the dynamics in families living with domestic violence.

  • 19.
    Øverlien, Carolina
    Nasjonalt kunnskapssenter om vold og traumatisk stress (NKVTS), Norway.
    «Jeg sier at skiltet har blitt ødelagt» – Strategier för hemlighållande bland barn på krisesenter2010In: Norges Barnevern, ISSN 0800-1014, E-ISSN 1891-1838, Vol. 87, no 1, p. 6-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents results from the first Norwegian nation-wide study on children in shelters for battered women and their situation. One of the qualitative findings; that children who live in shelters with their mothers have difficulties in keeping the shelterstay a secret is discussed specifically. The argument pursued is that the children are struggling to keep the shelter a secret, and that the secrecy creates problems in their everyday life and social relations. Moreover, the children develop a number of strategies to manage the issue of secrecy. Finally, the implications of this is discussed, as well as the secrecy as one of the dilemmas facing the new Norwegian shelter movement with an integrated children’s perspective.

  • 20.
    Øverlien, Carolina
    Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies (NKVTS), Norway.
    The Children of Patriarchal Terrorism2013In: Journal of family Violence, ISSN 0885-7482, E-ISSN 1573-2851, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 277-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an exploratory qualitative interview study of 25 children who experienced domestic violence, 10 children diverged from the rest of the group in regards to expressed strong fear. The questions asked were: what are the violent experiences of these children? What, from the children’s perspective, is the nature of the violence? A thematic analysis of the interviews with the 10 children identified six themes: a high degree of coercive control and exposure to ‘bizarre acts’, severe and repeated violence, perceived impossibility of physical interventions during the violent acts, violence permeating everyday life, strong feelings of fear and a constant state of readiness, and descriptions of life starting after the abusers leave the family. The results urges researchers, clinicians and policymakers to better distinguish between children who experience domestic violence in order to better target support and intervention.

  • 21.
    Øverlien, Carolina
    Nasjonalt kunnskapssenter om vold og traumatisk stress (NKVTS), Norge.
    Ungdom, vold og overgrep : Skolen som forebygger og hjelper2015Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [no]

    Hva er vold og seksuelle overgrep? Hvordan kan du vite om en ungdom er utsatt for vold og overgrep, og hvem kan bidra med råd, veiledning, beskyttelse og behandling?

    Ungdom som er utsatt for vold og seksuelle overgrep, finnes i ethvert klasserom. De sier de skulle ønske at læreren hadde fanget det opp og snakket med dem om det. Denne boken handler om hvordan man kan se og prate med ungdom, og hva man kan gjøre for å forebygge og hjelpe. Her er også fortellinger, fotografier og et kapittel skrevet direkte til ungdom. Boken er godt egnet som utgangspunkt for undervisning og samtaler og gir nødvendig kunnskap til lærere, lærerstudenter og andre yrkesgrupper som arbeider i skolen, og kommer i kontakt med ungdommer.

  • 22.
    Øverlien, Carolina
    Norwegian Center for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, Norway.
    Women’s Refuges as Intervention Arenas for Children who Experience Domestic Violence2011In: Child Care in Practice, ISSN 1357-5279, E-ISSN 1476-489X, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 375-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children often accompany their mothers to women's refuges, where they are at risk of developing behavioural and psychological difficulties. In these situations it is important for the children to be given the possibility to address their own experiences of violence. However, little is known about how children experience these interventions. This study examined children's perceptions about their everyday lives at refuges in Norway. In the first phase of the study, participants included 50 directors of women’s refuges in Norway, who were interviewed via telephone. The second phase included face-to-face interviews with 22 children from 7 refuges. The study asked what interventions do children in refuges receive and how do the children experience those interventions. Findings revealed that the children focused on two forms of interventions as particularly helpful: activities such as trips and outings; and individual counselling. The most important intervention for children who experienced domestic violence was to remove them from a violent environment. As such, the refuge in itself could be considered an intervention. In conclusion, the author describes why women’s refuges represent a unique opportunity for interventions with children.

  • 23.
    Øverlien, Carolina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Nasjonalt kunnskapssenter om vold og traumatisk stress (NKVTS), Norge.
    Hauge, Mona-IrenSchultz, Jon-Håkon
    Barn, vold og traumer: Møter med unge i utsatte livssituasjoner2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [no]

    Denne boken handler om barn og ungdom som har ulike erfaringer med vold og traumer, og hvordan de blir møtt av profesjonelle hjelpere.

    Gjennom fagtekster fra 18 forskere ved Nasjonalt kunnskapssenter om vold og traumatisk stress (NKVTS) kommer leseren tett på barn og unge som har det vanskelig, enten fordi de har opplevd en dramatisk hendelse, eller fordi de blir utsatt for vold i oppveksten. Tekstene gir forslag til hvordan det kan legges til rette for disse barna når vi møter dem på arenaer som skolen, sykehus, rettsapparat, krisesenter, barnevern eller i flyktningmottak. Dette er nødvendig kunnskap for å forstå, og dermed kunne iverksette, målrettede forebyggende og behandlende tiltak på flere arenaer. Med denne boken ønsker forfatterne å bidra med forskningsbasert flerfaglig kunnskap som gjør at barn og unge som er utsatt for vold og overgrep, eller som har opplevd skremmende, livstruende hendelser får best mulig hjelp og blir tatt best mulig vare på.

  • 24.
    Øverlien, Carolina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Norwegian Center for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies (NKVTS), Norway.
    Holt, Stephanie
    European Research on Children, Adolescents and Domestic Violence: Impact, Interventions and Innovations2019In: Journal of family Violence, ISSN 0885-7482, E-ISSN 1573-2851, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 365-369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The second European Conference on Domestic Violence (ECDV) was held in Porto, Portugal in September 2017. Given the interest in and focus on children and adolescents at both the first and second ECDV, and the identified need to gather research and researchers working in the field of children and domestic violence in Europe, the JOFV made a call for a special issue on European research on children, adolescents and domestic violence. The call has resulted in this double issue of 17 articles which comment on research conducted across Europe, authored from differed scientific backgrounds and reflecting diversity in topics and methods. The work reflects not only how far we have come in Europe on developing research based knowledge on children and domestic violence, but it has also has played an important role in identifying multiple gaps and address needs for the future.

  • 25.
    Øverlien, Carolina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Norwegian Center for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies (NKVTS), Norway.
    Holt, Stephanie
    Letter to the Editor: Research on Children Experiencing Domestic Violence2019In: Journal of family Violence, ISSN 0885-7482, E-ISSN 1573-2851, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 65-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Grounded in an ontological, theoretical and methodological position that views children's views and experiences of domestic violence as critical to our understanding of those experiences, this letter to the editor reflects on Kimball's (Journal of Family Violence, 31, 625-637, 2016) review of research since 1999 when Edleson's influential article on children exposed to domestic violence was published (Journal of Interpersonal violence, 14(8), 839-870). Welcoming Kimball's call for research that can capture the full effects of children's exposure', we nonetheless challenge Kimball's criticism of the paucity of research literature directly capturing children's voices. Rather, we argue in this letter that Kimball's (Journal of Family Violence, 31, 625-637, 2016) methodology excluded those published qualitative studies which have engaged directly with children and sought to understand their lived experience of domestic violence. We conclude by highlighting our alignment with Kimball's assertion for the need to capture the voice and experience of children, but argue that this knowledge already exists. We also argue that some questions can only be answered by children and adolescents themselves.

  • 26.
    Øverlien, Carolina
    et al.
    Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, Norway.
    Thoresen, Siri
    Dyb, Grete
    Childhood adverse experience: Yes or No? Mothers' Decision-Making Process When Responding to Survey Questions2013In: Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment & Trauma, ISSN 1092-6771, E-ISSN 1545-083X, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 192-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess how difficult it is for mothers to answer questions regarding adversities their children might have experienced, and to investigate their considerations in the decision-making process. A nonrepresentative community sample of 628 mothers of 6- to 8-year-old children responded to an online survey. The mothers answered questions regarding adversities, rated the acceptability of these questions, and reported on any difficulties they had in responding. Based on the mothers' reports, qualitative analyses were conducted to identify metacategories of arguments. The study highlights the need for increased awareness of the complexity involved in soliciting information about adverse experiences in research and clinical settings, and for caution in interpreting epidemiological results in this field.

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