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  • 1.
    Allentoft, Morten E.
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Pokutta, Dalia
    Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Willerslev, Eske
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Population genomics of Bronze Age Eurasia2015In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 522, p. 167-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Bronze Age of Eurasia (around 3000–1000 BC) was a period of major cultural changes. However, there is debate about whether these changes resulted from the circulation of ideas or from human migrations, potentially also facilitating the spread of languages and certain phenotypic traits. We investigated this by using new, improved methods to sequence low-coverage genomes from 101 ancient humans from across Eurasia. We show that the Bronze Age was a highly dynamic period involving large-scale population migrations and replacements, responsible for shaping major parts of present-day demographic structure in both Europe and Asia. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesized spread of Indo-European languages during the Early Bronze Age. We also demonstrate that light skin pigmentation in Europeans was already present at high frequency in the Bronze Age, but not lactose tolerance, indicating a more recent onset of positive selection on lactose tolerance than previously thought.

  • 2. Furmanek, Miroslaw
    et al.
    Gralak, Tomasz
    Mackiewicz, Max
    Pokutta, Dalia A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Archaeological Potential of the Early Bronze Age Barrow Burial Ground in Szczepankowice: A Geophysical Survey and Field Evaluation2015In: Śląskie Sprawozdania Archeologiczne, ISSN 0520-9250, Vol. 57, p. 93-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The site of Szczepankowice situated 24 kilometers southwest of Wrocław is considered to be one of the most important for studies of the Early Bronze Age in Central Europe. In this paper, we present a new assessment of the archaeological potential of the Szczepankowice (sites 1–4) and the surrounding area, based on research including metal detecting, field walking, excavations and geophysical prospection undertaken in 2012. The purpose of the evaluation was to determine the presence or absence, extent, condition, character, quality, and date of archaeological deposits within the area. Earlier discoveries including large quantities of boulders still found on the surface potentially indicated presence of funerary monuments such as barrows at Szczepankowice.

  • 3. Kadrow, Slawomir
    et al.
    Pokutta, Dalia A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    The Verteba Cave: A Subterranean Sanctuary of the Cucuteni-Trypillia Culture in Western Ukraine2016In: Journal of Neolithic Archaeology, ISSN 2364-3676, Vol. 18, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Eneolithic Europe, the complexity of mortuary differentiation increased with the complexity of the society at large. Human remains from the Verteba Cave provide a unique opportunity to study the lives, deaths and cultural practices of the Cucuteni-Trypillia culture in Western Ukraine. The subterranean sanctuary of Verteba was without a doubt a rallying point of both religious and social significance. Therefore, this investigation focuses on the role and character of ritual activities, the diversity and variety of religious orientations in the Eneolithic period and the question of how and for what reason this particular cave was modified from a natural space to a sacred place. We also seek to clarify the research potential of the site in relation to highly developed and relatively wide-spread religion with direct implications for the Cucuteni-Trypillia social structure.

  • 4. Obtulowicz, Lukasz
    et al.
    Pokutta, Dalia A.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Graves of Criminals in Renaissance Poland2014In: Śląskie Sprawozdania Archeologiczne, ISSN 0520-9250, Vol. 56, p. 313-341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2013, Mentor Consulting undertook the excavation of late medieval/early modern age cemetery located in central part of Gliwice city, Upper Silesia. The key discovery was a multi-period sequence of human activity on site dated from the Roman Iron Age until 17th century A.D. In the last chronological phases, graves of Renaissance convicts and criminals were recorded with unusual frequency within the cemetery. Particularly interesting were mortuary rituals such as decapitations and dismemberment. A small assemblage of grave goods and personal jewellery was recovered together with well-preserved human remains.

  • 5.
    Pokutta, Dalia A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Food, Economy and Social Complexity in the Bronze Age World: A Cross-Cultural Study2017In: Musaica Archaeologica, ISSN 2453-8612, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 23-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the fact that the greater part of ingredients, such as dairy products or alcoholic drinks, was known already in the Neolithic, food technology of the Bronze Age changed significantly. This paper aims to investigate prehistoric dietary habits and comment on the stable isotope values (13C/15N) of human/faunal remains from several large Bronze Age cemeteries in Europe and beyond. The human skeletal material derives from Early Bronze Age Iberia (2300–2000 BC), mainland Greece (Late Helladic Period III), Bronze Age Transcaucasia (the Kura-Araxes culture 3400–2000 BC), steppes of Kazakhstan (1800 BC), and Early Bronze Age China in Shang period (1523–1046 BC). The aim of this study is to determine distinctive features of food practice in the Bronze Age with an overview of the economy and consumer behaviors in relation to religion and state formation processes.

  • 6.
    Pokutta, Dalia A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Baron, Justyna
    Dąbrowski, Pawel
    Karlsson, Christina
    Bioarchaeology of Social Inequality in the Unetice Culture: A Case Study2015In: Forging Identities: the Mobility of Culture in Bronze Age Europe: report from a Marie Curie Project 2009-2012 with Concluding Conference at Aarhus University, Moesgaard 2012 / [ed] Paulina Suchowska-Ducke, Samantha Scott Reiter, Helle Vandkilde, Oxford: British Archaeological Reports , 2015, Vol. 1, p. 111-119Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The barrow in Kąty Wrocławskie was discovered near the city of Wrocław, SW Poland, in 1998. This paper presents the results collated from excavations, isotopic analyses (13C/15N), radiocarbon dating and lipid analyses of organic residues, found in this tomb. Social ranking/hierarchy shaped the lifestyle and identities, be they either individual or collective, upon which ultimately rigid or more flexible forms of stratification were built. However, archaeological debate regarding social inequality and leadership in the Unetice Culture is frequently reduced to bronze halberds, gold and the Leubingen barrow. We seek to determine the scale of social diversity among members of Early Bronze Age society. In this paper we present the biological profiles of the first group of Uneticean aristocracy buried in princely graves.

  • 7.
    Pokutta, Dalia Anna
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Food and Cooking in the Únětice Culture2014In: Apulum. Series Archaeologica & Anthropologica, ISSN 2247-8701, Vol. 51, p. 135-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food comprises an intrinsic part of our cultural profile. It encompasses everything that is important to people; it marks social differences and strengthens social bonds. Common to all people, yet it can signify very different things from table to table. In this paper I focus on food culture in Early Bronze Age Central Europe, with special reference to classic phase of the Únětice Culture, covering the territories of modern Germany, western Poland and Czech Republic approximately 1900-1700 B.C. While the results of recently completed isotopic analyses of diet (13C,15N) will be published in separate publication, this article covers culturally-based aspects of cooking, seasoning, lipid analyses of pottery, drinking habits and sweets consumption.

  • 8.
    Pokutta, Dalia Anna
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Journey to murder: Atypical graves of the immigrants in the Early Bronze Age Europe2014In: Sprawozdania Archeologiczne, ISSN 0081-3834, Vol. 66, p. 91-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Migrations had important effects on Bronze Age economy, adaptation of new inventions and technological cohesion, however their impact upon society remains under-studied. The knowledge of how individual longdistance mobility affected various forms of societal interaction is limited and fragmented, especially when it comes to murder.

    In archaeology the analyses of criminality encounter massive obstacles due to unknowable character of crimes, victims and social contexts of these. In this paper we present new data and results of isotopic analyses (14C, 87Sr/86Sr, 15N/13C) of the four individuals discovered in the mass grave in Milejowice, SW Poland, and associated with the Unetice Culture (2200–1700 BC). Our data indicate the presence of immigrants from other parts of Europe in prehistoric Silesia and shed a new light upon likely nature of crimes in the Bronze Age society.

  • 9.
    Pokutta, Dalia Anna
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Population Dynamics, Diet and Migrations of the Unetice Culture in Poland2013Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Pokutta, Dalia Anna
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Frei, Karin Margarita
    Isotopic study of Szczepankowice Early Bronze Age barrow burial ground (southwestern Poland)2011In: Silesia Antiqua, ISSN 0080-9594, Vol. 47, p. 70-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the current stage of an ongoing research project regarding isotopic analyses of the Unetice culture in Silesia District (SW Poland). This study provides a new model of contextual interpretation of barrow burial ground in classic phase of the Unetice culture (1900-1750 BC) in Central Europe. It combines several elements: archaeological landscape study of Szczepankowice necropoly, paleopathological and isotopic analyses of skeletons from barrows (first local strontium baseline for Silesia, and mobility case study) and finally radiocarbon dating.

  • 11.
    Pokutta, Dalia Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Howcroft, Rachel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Children, Childhood and Food: The Diets of Subadults in the Unetice Culture of Southwestern Poland2015In: Forging Identities: the mobility of culture in Bronze Age Europe: report from a Marie Curie project 2009-2012 with concluding conference at Aarhus University, Moesgaard 2012 / [ed] Paulina Suchowska-Ducke, Samantha Scott Reiter, Helle Vandkilde, Oxford: British Archaeological Reports , 2015, Vol. 1, p. 245-252Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dietary habits are a means by which social identity is expressed and negotiated and the foods consumed by children reflect both the social status of being a child and membership within other social groups that would eventually come to shape adult identity. Study of the diets of children in prehistory can, thus, provide information about the construction of childhood in the past and also about the perpetuation and negotiation of social structures. In this study, carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis was used to investigate the diets of subadults in the Únětice Culture of southwestern Poland. The results show that diets differed quite substantially between individuals, however diet changed very little during the lifetimes of each individual. This indicates that an individual’s social position was ascribed early in life and remained constant thereafter.

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