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  • 1.
    Angner, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    A Course in Behavioral Economics2016 (ed. 2 uppl.)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A Course in Behavioral Economics 2e is an accessible and self-contained introduction to the field of behavioral economics. The author introduces students to the subject by comparing and contrasting its theories and models with those of mainstream economics. Full of examples, exercises and problems, this book emphasises the intuition behind the concepts and is suitable for students from a wide range of disciplines.

  • 2.
    Angner, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Det lätta och det rätta2018In: Filosofisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0348-7482, no 3, p. 3-10Article in journal (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Angner, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Economia Comportamentale: Guida alla Teoria della Scelta2017Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [it]

    Il tema del decision making è diventato centrale per la gestione della complessità nel mondo odierno: gran parte delle attività umane (finanza, scienza, medicina, arte e la vita in generale) può essere interpretata come una questione di persone che fanno un certo tipo di scelte. Questo volume è un’introduzione rigorosa, ma al tempo stesso accattivante, a uno degli sviluppi più recenti delle scienze sociali, avvalendosi anche dei risultati della psicologia cognitiva. L’economia comportamentale, infatti, parte dal presupposto che molte decisioni non siano assunte in base a criteri logici e razionali, ma che anzi spesso i comportamenti degli individui siano dettati da altri fattori; in base a questo assunto le “deviazioni dalla razionalità perfetta” non sono trascurabili (come ritenuto dall’economia neoclassica) ma anzi sistematiche e dunque abbastanza prevedibili, tanto da garantire lo sviluppo di nuove teorie descrittive della decisione. Partendo sempre dalle fondamenta della scuola economica neoclassica, il volume riesce a spiegare chiaramente i concetti fondamentali dell’economia comportamentale e illustrarne le intuizioni che vi stanno dietro. Una ricca selezione di applicazioni di economia, management, marketing, scienza politica e politica pubblica corredano la trattazione, mostrando quanto l’economia comportamentale possa essere uno strumento fondamentale per le persone e per il decisore pubblico. Non è richiesta una conoscenza avanzata della matematica.

  • 4.
    Angner, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy. Institute for Futures Studies, Sweden.
    We're all behavioral economists now2019In: Journal of economic methodology, ISSN 1350-178X, E-ISSN 1018-5070, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 195-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Behavioral economics has long defined itself in opposition to neoclassical economics, but recent developments suggest a synthesis may be on the horizon. In particular, several economists have argued that behavioral factors can be incorporated into standard theory, and that the days of behavioral economics are therefore numbered. This paper explores the proposed synthesis and argues that it is distinctly behavioral in nature – not neoclassical. Far from indicating that behavioral economics as a stand-alone research program is over, the proposed synthesis represents the consummate conversion of neoclassical economists into behavioral ones.

  • 5.
    Angner, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    What Preferences Really Are2018In: Philosophy of science (East Lansing), ISSN 0031-8248, E-ISSN 1539-767X, Vol. 85, no 4, p. 660-681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Daniel M. Hausman holds that preferences in economics are total subjective comparative evaluations—subjective judgments to the effect that something is better than something else all things told—and that economists are right to employ this conception of preference. Here, I argue against both parts of Hausman’s thesis. The failure of Hausman’s account, I continue, reflects a deeper problem, that is, that preferences in economics do not need an explicit definition of the kind that he seeks. Nonetheless, Hausman’s labors were not in vain: his accomplishment is that he has articulated a useful model of the theory.

  • 6.
    Angner, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    行为经济学教程2019Book (Other academic)
  • 7. Helms McCarty, Sara
    et al.
    Angner, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Scott, Brian
    Culver, Sarah
    Mandated volunteering: an experimental approach2018In: Applied Economics, ISSN 0003-6846, E-ISSN 1466-4283, Vol. 50, no 27, p. 2992-3006Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study employs a novel experimental paradigm to examine crowdout effects in volunteering. Using a framework modelled upon money donation experiments, we examine the impact of ‘forced’ volunteering on the amount of time volunteered. We find that subjects exposed to forced volunteering on the mean voluntarily donate less time than subjects in the control condition. Among religious subjects, the crowdout is 52.8%, suggesting warm-glow giving. Among non-religious subjects, the crowdout is 138%, implying altruistic giving. Thus, policies mandating volunteer activity may be associated with sizeable crowdout effects and might have heterogeneous effects across subpopulations.

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