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  • 1.
    Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Cognitive aspects of community interpreting: Toward a process model2016In: Reembedding Translation Process Research / [ed] Ricardo Muñoz Martín, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2016, p. 195-214Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses cognitive aspects of professional community interpreting. We give an overview of earlier research into community interpreting, arguing that cognitive aspects have largely been neglected. We propose that in building a model of the mental processes of the community interpreter, different kinds of monitoring are a crucial and pervasive component. Monitoring contributes to and enables the double function of the interpreter: translating and managing the interaction of the interpreted encounter. We furthermore stress the importance of the notion of professional self-concept for explaining the interpreter’s decision-making and exemplify this by analyzing turn-taking in two Swedish-Spanish interpreted encounters.

  • 2.
    Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, The Institute for Interpretation and Translation Studies.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Exploring retrospection as a research method for studying the translation process and the interpreting process2009In: Methodology, technology and innovation in translation process research: a tribute to Arnt Lykke Jakobsen / [ed] Inger M. Mees, Fabio Alves, Susanne Göpferich, Frederiksberg: Samfundslitteratur , 2009, p. 109-134Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Retrospection in interpreting and translation: explaining the process?2014In: Monografías de Traducción e Interpretación MonTi Special Issue (ed. R. Muñoz Martín), ISSN 1889-4178, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 177-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For studying the processes involved in translation and in interpreting, retrospection is one of the few research methods equally suitable for both areas. At the first workshop on research methods in process-oriented research, in Graz in 2009, we presented the results of a pilot study of retrospection as a research method, published as Englund Dimitrova and Tiselius (2009). The study involved data from two groups (15 years of professional experience vs. no professional experience), each with 3+3 subjects (interpreter subjects vs. translator subjects, all with Swedish as their L1). The source text was a 10-minute plenary speech in English from the European Parliament, interpreted simultaneously into Swedish. For the translation data, the translator subjects translated the original European Parliament transcript of the speech, 1,093 words, writing in Translog. After the task, subjects did immediate retrospection. The first analysis of the data indicated that a challenge when using retrospection is that subjects tend to report having forgotten about some of their processes.

     

    In this paper we report an analysis of the process data in relation to the retrospective protocols. Our focus is on reported problems and the occurrences of problem indicators in the process. It was found that most reported problems are confirmed by the presence of problem indicators in the process. However, the majority of problem indicators found in the process do not correspond to any reported problem. Hence, the subjects’ problem reports can only explain a limited number of the potential problems in the process. The need for further research into retrospection as a research method in Translation Studies is pointed out.

  • 4. Granhagen Jungner, Johanna
    et al.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Blomgren, Klas
    Lützén, Kim
    Pergert, Pernilla
    Language barriers and the use of professional interpreters: a national multisite cross-sectional survey in pediatric oncology care2019In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 58, no 7, p. 1015-1020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Healthcare personnel are responsible for providing patient-centered care regardless of their patients' language skills, but language barriers is identified as the main hindrances providing effective, equitable and safe care to patients with limited proficiency in a country's majority language. This study is a national multisite cross-sectional survey aiming to investigate communication over language barriers in pediatric oncology care. Material and Methods: A survey using the Communication over Language Barriers questionnaire (CoLB-q) distributed to medical doctors, registered nurses and nursing assistants at six pediatric oncology centers in Sweden (response rate 90%) using descriptive statistical analyses. Results: Professional interpreters on site were the most common solution when using an interpreter, although relatives or even children were used. The use of professional interpreters on site differed among the professions and in different clinical situations, such as medical encounter, education or procedure preparation. All professions reported that the use of professional interpreters greatly increased care relationships, patient safety and patient involvement in care. Conclusions: Healthcare personnel seem to believe that professional interpreters are crucial when caring for patients and family members who do not speak the majority language, but there is an obvious discrepancy between this belief and their use of professional interpreters.

  • 5. Granhagen Jungner, Johanna
    et al.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Blomgren, Klas
    Lützén, Kim
    Pergert, Pernilla
    The interpreter's voice: Carrying the bilingual conversation in interpreter-mediated consultations in pediatric oncology care2019In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 102, no 4, p. 656-662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to explore interpreters' perceived strategies in the interaction in interpreter-mediated consultations between healthcare personnel and patients/families with limited Swedish proficiency in pediatric oncology care. Methods: This study had an inductive approach using an exploratory qualitative design. A total of eleven semi-structured interviews were performed with interpreters who had experience interpreting in pediatric oncology care. Results: The interpreters' perceived strategies were divided into four generic categories; strategies for maintaining a professional role, strategies for facilitating communication, strategies for promoting collaboration, and strategies for improving the framework of interpreting provision. These four generic categories were then merged into the single main category of carrying the bilingual conversation. Conclusions: The interpreters stretch their discretionary power in order to carry the bilingual conversation by using strategies clearly outside of their assignment. Practical implications: The study contributes to the understanding of the interpreter-mediated consultation in pediatric oncology care, and this can be used to improve the care of patients and families in pediatric oncology care with limited knowledge of a country's majority language.

  • 6. Granhagen Jungner, Johanna
    et al.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Lützén, Kim
    Blomgren, Klas
    Pergert, Pernilla
    Creating a Meeting Point of Understanding: Interpreters' Experiences in Swedish Childhood Cancer Care2016In: Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1043-4542, E-ISSN 1532-8457, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 137-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Children and families with a foreign background and limited Swedish proficiency have to communicate through interpreters in childhood cancer care centers in Sweden. Interpreter-mediated events deal with many difficulties that potentially hinder the transfer of information. The purpose of our study was to explore interpreters' experiences of interpreting between health care staff and limited Swedish proficiency patients/families in childhood cancer care.

    DESIGN: Using purposive samples, we interviewed 11 interpreters individually. The interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    FINDINGS: Analyses of the data resulted in the main theme of creating a meeting point of understanding, constructed from 3 subthemes: balancing between cultures, bridging the gaps of knowledge, and balancing between compassion and professionalism.

    DISCUSSION: Our result shows that in order to create a sustainable meeting point of understanding, it is necessary to explain both the context and cultural differences. These results suggest that the responsibility for information transfer lies with both the health care profession and the interpreters. Tools have to be developed for both parties to contribute to creating the meeting point of understanding.

  • 7. Granhagen Jungner, Johanna
    et al.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Wenemark, Marika
    Blomgren, Klas
    Lützén, Kim
    Pergert, Pernilla
    Development and evaluation of the Communication over Language Barriers questionnaire (CoLB-q) in paediatric healthcare2018In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 101, no 9, p. 1661-1668Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To develop a valid and reliable questionnaire addressing the experiences of healthcare personnel of communicating over language barriers and using interpreters in paediatric healthcare. Methods: A multiple- methods approach to develop and evaluate the questionnaire, including focus groups, cognitive interviews, a pilot test and test-retest. The methods were chosen in accordance with questionnaire development methodology to ensure validity and reliability. Results: The development procedure showed that the issues identified were highly relevant to paediatric healthcare personnel and resulted in a valid and reliable Communication over Language Barriers questionnaire (CoLB-q) with 27 questions. Conclusion: The CoLB-q is perceived as relevant, important and easy to respond to by respondents and has satisfactory validity and reliability.& nbsp; Practice implications: The CoLB-q can be used to map how healthcare personnel overcome language barriers through communication tools and to identify problems encountered in paediatric healthcare. Furthermore, the transparently described process could be used as a guide for developing similar questionnaires.

  • 8.
    Lindström, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Tesfazion, Malin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Making theory work in practice: Theory and practice: intertwined and inseparable at TÖI, Stockholm University2018In: Proceedings: Nordic Seminar Umeå February 2018: Theory in practice – Practice in theory / [ed] Stefan Coster, Sveriges teckenspråkstolkars förening , 2018, p. 68-80Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The BA-programme in Swedish Sign Language and Interpreting, 180 ECTS. university level in Sweden. It is a three-year BA programme divided into six semesters of courses that are both practically and theoretically organized and it leads to a BA in Translation Studies with a focus on SSL interpreting. The first students enrolled in 2013 and graduated in 2016. There was a pause between the first and the second intake so, the second cohort will graduate in June 2018. Since 2015, intake has been regular every autumn, hence the third cohort are due to 2019 and the fourth one to 2020.

  • 9.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, The Institute for Interpretation and Translation Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    A Sociological Perspective on Expertise in Conference Interpreting: A case study on Swedish Conference Interpreters2010In: Translation Effects: Selected Papers of the CETRA Research Seminar inTranslation Studies 2009 / [ed] Omid Azadibougar, Leuven: CETRA , 2010, p. 1-24Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates how conference interpreters with Swedish as A-language working in international institutions understand the concept of expertise. Ten interpreters with Swedish mother tongue and working in the Swedish booth at the European institutions were interviewed in two focus groups (n=5) about their opinion of professional identity. The result was then compared to the findings of a survey of the official discourse of conference interpreting at the European institutions and the International Association of Conference Interpreter (AIIC). Some possible norm-related activities were identified. This paper investigates how conference interpreters with Swedish as A-language1 working in international institutions understand the concept of expertise. Ten interpreters with Swedish mother tongue and working in the Swedish booth at the European institutions were interviewed in two focus groups (n=5) about their opinion of professional identity. The result was then compared to the findings of a survey of the official discourse of conference interpreting at the European institutions and the International Association of Conference Interpreter (AIIC). Some possible norm-related activities were identified.

  • 10.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Accuracy2015In: Routledge encyclopedia of interpreting studies / [ed] Franz Pöchhacker, London: Taylor & Francis, 2015, p. 3-4Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Deliberate practice: The unicorn of interpreting studies2018In: Translation – Didaktik – Kompetenz / [ed] Barbara Ahrens, Silvia Hansen-Schirra, Monika Krein-Kühle, Michael Schreiber, Ursula Wienen, Berlin: Frank & Timme, 2018, p. 131-144Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deliberate practice, as described in expertise theory of cognitive psychology, stems, at least in part, from Ericsson, Krampe and Tesch-Römer’s seminal 1993 study of violin students from the Music Academy of West Berlin. In their article, Ericsson et al. take issue with the belief that truly exceptional performers are unique because they possess different types of innate giftedness. They say such reasoning is oversimplified and suggest that a truly scientific account of such skills would have to describe the development leading up to exceptional performance, as well as the “genetic and acquired characteristics that mediate it” (1993: 363, italics added). Furthermore, they argue that a scientific mapping of exceptional performance must identify critical differences between exceptional and ordinary performers. And, finally, they suggest that when researchers argue that there are genetic differences, those differences must be proven to be genetically heritable as being hereditary. Because it would be difficult for researchers to provide this evidence, Ericsson et al. recommend researchers investigate environmental factors that could “selectively promote and facilitate the achievement of such performance” instead (1993: 363). Based on their research, Ericsson et al. suggest one crucial environmental factor is deliberate practice.

    Of course, the issue of deliberate practice is not without controversy. One of the main counterarguments to Ericsson et al.’s proposal is that even if practice is important, researchers cannot rule out the contribution of ability factors. Some have suggested it is unfair to less able individuals to claim that hard work is enough to achieve excellence (Detterman 2014). Furthermore, several studies have shown that deliberate practice is a weak explanation of the variance in performance in many areas (Macnamara, Hambrick and Oswald 2014; Menz and Hambrick, 2010). Ericsson counters these studies by stating that the structure of expert performance is so unique it “cannot be extrapolated from the performance–ability relations observed in the general adult population” (Ericsson 2014: 81).

    Deliberate practice in interpreting poses another challenge for the researcher because the few studies done on the construct in this field have failed to show the mere occurrence (let alone the effect) of deliberate practice in interpreting (Tiselius 2013; Albl-Mikasa 2013). It is possible that interpreting researchers cannot find an effect for deliberate practice because they have incorrectly defined the construct. Alternatively, deliberate practice in interpreting may be a unicorn: a noble creature with the power to redeem novice interpreters be they only pure, which unfortunately exists only in fairy tales. With only two studies in the field, we do not have sufficient evidence to decide whether deliberate practice is an unproven fact or only a fiction.

    This article describes the theoretical foundations of deliberate practice, differences between practice and deliberate practice, and how the construct has been studied in the fields of cognitive psychology broadly and interpreting specifically. It will also investigate criticisms of deliberate practice in the field.

  • 12.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Institutt for Fremmedspråk, Universitetet i Bergen, Norge.
    Experience and Expertise in Conference Interpreting: An investigation of Swedish conference interpreters2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation investigates the process and product of interpreters with different levels of experience and explores the expertise approach (cf. Ericsson, Charness and Hoffman 2007) as applied to interpreters. The expertise approach claims that highly skilled performers, regardless of their chosen field, use the same type of strategies in order to reach the top levels of their profession. An important feature of the expertise approach is deliberate practice, a specific type of practice that highly skilled performers engage in so as to improve their performance.

    The dissertation is based on four different studies featuring two different sets of participants. Two data sets – a cross-sectional material with nine participants on three different levels of interpreting experience (none, short and long), and a long-term material with three interpreters recorded at two different points in time – were analysed in terms of both processing and product data. The interpreting process was studied by retrospectively analysing and categorizing processing problems, monitoring and strategies, while the interpreting product was analysed by using holistic rating scales for intelligibility and level of information transfer of the interpreting product. In-depth interviews were also conducted with the long-term participants in order to investigate their perception of deliberate practice and their own view of their skill development. An important and integral part of the dissertation, apart from the results, was the development of the holistic rating scales (adapted from Carroll 1966), and the development of an in-depth interview study.

    The conclusions of the dissertation are that there are measurable differences of interpreting skill between performers with little or no interpreting experience and performers with long interpreting experience, but this finding could not be supported by the long-term (intra-individual) study. Differences between the groups in the cross-sectional material could also be observed from the process data. Experienced interpreters

    16

    encountered fewer processing problems than less experienced interpreters and had more strategies at hand to solve problems. There were also clear differences in terms of instances of monitoring (i.e. controlling the interpreting process and output) between experienced interpreters and other subjects. Monitoring seemed to be a dividing line between experienced and inexperienced interpreters, and experienced interpreters had more processing capacity available to monitor themselves. This was also to a certain extent supported in the in-depth interviews, where the participants reported how they constantly evaluate themselves in terms of improving performance. A key assumption established in the beginning of the project – that experienced interpreters would claim, in the in-depth interviews, that they practise a great deal – was not supported, to our surprise. The interpreters recounted many practice-like activities but stated that they did not actually practise.

    The dissertation concludes by calling for more studies on deliberate practice in interpreting, suggesting that the term “interpreter expert” should only be used with caution in scientific studies and that the particular features of expertise and deliberate practice in interpreting should be discussed. 

  • 13.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Expertise2015In: Routledge encyclopedia of interpreting studies / [ed] Franz Pöchhacker, London: Routledge, 2015, p. 152-155Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies. Department of Foreign Languages, University of Bergen.
    Expertise without deliberate practice?: The case of simultaneous interpreters2013In: The Interpreters' Newsletter, ISSN 1591-4127, Vol. 1, no 18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deliberate practice (Ericsson 2007) is a type of focused, goal-oriented practice that is part of the process of developing expertise. A less explored area in interpreting research, deliberate practice is a construct that is not easily investigated using an experimental research design.

    This article reports on in-depth interviews with three interpreters. By exploring their background, training, views on interpreting, and perceptions of core areas of deliberate practice (such as practice, setting clear goals and being open to feedback), an impression of their practice habits emerges. The article concludes that deliberate practice as defined by Ericsson is not consciously employed by these interpreters. Some of the implications of these findings for the application of expertise theory in interpreting are outlined in the discussion. 

  • 15.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies. Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Exploring cognitive aspects of competence in signed language interpreting: First impressions2018In: Hermes - Journal of Language and Communication Studies, ISSN 0904-1699, E-ISSN 1903-1785, no 57, p. 49-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sign language interpreting of dialogues shares many features with the interpreting of dialogues between non-signed languages. We argue that from a cognitive perspective in dialogue interpreting, despite some differences between the two types of interpreting, sign language interpreters use many of the same processes and handle similar challenges as interpreters between non-signed languages. We report on a first exploration of process differences in sign language interpreting between three novice and three experienced Swedish Sign Language interpreters. The informants all interpreted the same dialogue and made a retrospection of their interpreting immediately after the task. Retrospections were analyzed using tools for identifying reported processing problems, instances of monitoring, and strategy use (see Ivanova 1999). Furthermore, the interpreting products (both into Swedish Sign Language and into Swedish) and their differences were qualitatively analyzed. The results indicate that there are differences between the two groups, both in terms of the retrospective reports and in terms of the interpreting product. As expected, monitoring seems to be a factor determined by experience. The experienced interpreters seemed to have more efficient ways of handling turn taking and the internalization of new vocabulary. The study also concludes that to use instruments devised for simultaneous conference interpreting (Ivanova 1999; Tiselius 2013), the instruments need to be adapted to the dialogue setting, even though in the case of sign language interpreting the simultaneous interpreting technique is used even in dialogue interpreting.

  • 16.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, The Institute for Interpretation and Translation Studies.
    Exploring different methods for studying expertise2008In: Proceedings of the 49th Annual Conference of the American Translators Association. / [ed] Hartmann, Nicholas, Alexandria: ATA , 2008, p. 119-148Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on a study aiming at testing the practicability of two methods and their possible applicability for investigating expertise in simultaneous interpretation. The two methods being Ivanova’s (ref. 1) method for investigating processing problems and their corresponding strategies as well as monitoring, and Carroll’s (ref. 2) method for measuring the quality in machine translation as compared with human translation. The methods were adapted to the context of the study.

  • 17.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Hva trenger tolkestudenten for å lære?2014In: Fleks: Scandinavian Journal of Intercultural Theory and Practice, ISSN 1894-5988, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students of public service interpreting come from a variety of backgrounds. A typical groupof interpreting students includes a mix of students from different immigrant communitiesand from Norway’s majority population group, as well as students from varied educationalbackgrounds. Students have also had varying private and professional experiences withinterpreting. This heterogeneity represents a challenge for teachers attempting to create alevel playing field for all students, but it is also an asset for students, for instance because itcreates communities of learning (Bielaczyc and Collins 1999). Furthermore, in theinterpreter training field there is a lively methodological and didactic discussion, often withevidence-based pedagogical papers (Napier 2013). There are, however, fewer publicationson general pedagogical approaches to interpreter training (Sawyer 2004 and Gile 2009being important exceptions). This article looks at interpreter training in Norway anddiscusses the pedagogical approach it represents. The aim is to suggest how a level playingfield in interpreter training can be created from a pedagogical and methodologicalperspective using common higher education methodologies such as critical incidenttechnique (Chell 2004), constructive alignment (Biggs 2003) and experiential learning (Kolb1984), several of which are already in use in interpreter training in Norway.

  • 18.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies. Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Interpreting in The Zone: Jack Hoza, Interpreting in the Zone: How the Conscious and Unconscious Function in Interpretation. Gallaudet University Press, 288 pp. ISBN 978-1-56368-666-52018In: International Journal of Interpreter Education, ISSN 2150-5772, E-ISSN 2150-5772, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 67-71Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Maktforhold i tolk-medierte institusjonelle samtaler2013In: Impuls : Tidsskrift for psykologi, ISSN 0801-2911, no 3, p. 35-40Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [no]

    De fleste tolk-medierte samtaler in Norge foregår innenfor noen typ av institusjon f eks introduksjonssenter, skole, helsestasjon, sykehus, domstol, politi og så videre. De tolk-mediere samtalen er altså en institusjonell samtale. Tolking i institusjonelle samtaler er ikke bare et hjelpemiddel for gjensidig forståelse, oljen som smørjer låsen så at nøkkelen fungerer, det er også ytterligere et filter på kommunikasjonen. Det finnes flere utfordringer for deltakerne i et tolket samtal for å få samtalen å fungere. Det er ikke bare tolkens ansvar att kommunikasjonen i en tolk-mediert samtale fungerer, det er også tolkebrukernes.

  • 20.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Modeller för processer i tolkning2018In: Tolking: Språkarbeid og profesjonsutøvelse / [ed] Hilde Haualand, Anna-Lena Nilsson, Eli Raanes, Oslo: Gyldendal Akademisk, 2018, p. 38-60Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I detta kapitel beskrivs ett antal modeller för att analysera, illustrera och förklara tolkning. I det här kapitlet vill jag skapa förståelse för vad modeller i tolkning beskriver samt för hur deras teoretiska utgångspunkter kan påverka den beskrivningen. Modellerna är valda för att de fått stort genomslag både inom tolkforskning och tolkutbildning. Några är testade empiriskt, andra är utvecklade ur ett empiriskt datamaterial och ytterligare andra är utvecklade ur observationer och erfarenheter från lärare och forskare. Förhoppningen att läsaren får olika instrument att se på och analysera sin egen tolkning.

  • 21.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, The Institute for Interpretation and Translation Studies.
    Revisiting Carroll's Scales2009In: Testing and Assessment in Translation and Interpreting Studies / [ed] Claudia V. Angelelli, Holly E. Jacobson, John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2009, p. 95-121Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This pilot study describes the assessment of interpreting with an application of the scales originally devised by Carroll (1966) for machine translation. Study participants (interpreters, n=6; non-interpreters, n=6) use Carroll’s scales to grade interpreted renditions (n=9) in simultaneous mode by conference interpreters with three different levels of experience. Grading was conducted using transcripts of the interpreted renditions. Although the numbers of graders and graded renditions were small, the data indicates that interpreters and laypeople agree on the grading of intelligibility and informativeness in interpreted renditions.

  • 22.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, The Institute for Interpretation and Translation Studies.
    The development of expertise – or not: Three simultaneous interpreters' development over timeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the performance of three simultaneous interpreters is studied. Excerpts of their performance at interpreting training and today are studied. Furthermore, their present day performance is compared with other experienced interpreters. It is assumed that the three interpreters may be possible experts according to the expertise theory (Ericsson, Charness & Hoffman 2007). However, the results in this study indicate that their development over time may not support the assumption that they are experts in the strictest sense of the theory.

  • 23.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies. Wester Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    The (un-) ethical interpreting researcher: ethics, voice and discretionary power in interpreting research2019In: Perspectives: studies in translatology, ISSN 0907-676X, E-ISSN 1747-6623, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 747-760Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses different aspects of research ethics, the researcher’s voice and discretionary power in interpreting studies. Research ethics is laid down in international conventions, which in turn are reflected in national regulations and ethical vetting. Discretionary power is understood as the leeway for making conscientious decisions within the rules and regulations governing a certain field. Although research ethics in interpreting has as yet received little scholarly attention, it is important that the field discusses aspects such as informed consent and the collection, analysis and reporting of data. This article uses three case studies to discuss how researchers can handle such ethical issues. Interpreting researchers often are or have been active interpreters, and this is yet another potential challenge for the field. Such duality potentially means that the researcher needs to navigate two ethical systems, that of the interpreter and that of the researcher – systems that may come into conflict with each other. It may also entail the risk of the researcher’s voice taking over the participants’ narrative.

  • 24.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    "This led me to start thinging about how this happened, and what the process behind it would be": An interview with professor Birgitta Englund Dimitrova2011In: Methods and Strategies of Process Research: Integrative approaches in Translation Studies / [ed] Alvstad, Cecilia; Hild, Adelina; Tiselius, Elisabet, Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2011, p. 345-360Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Alvstad, CeciliaUniversity of Oslo.Hild, AdelinaState University of New York.
    Methods and Strategies of Process Research: Integrative approaches in Translation Studies.2011Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The volume includes contributions on the cognitive processes underlying translation and interpreting, which represent innovative research with a methodological and empirical orientation. The methodological section offers an assessment/validation of different time lag measures; discusses the challenges of interpreting keystroke and eye-tracking data in translation, and triangulating disfluency analysis and eye-tracking data in sight translation research. The remainder of the volume features empirical studies on such topics as: metaphor comprehension; audience perception in subtitling research; translation and meta-linguistic awareness; and effect of language-pair specific factors on interpreting quality. A special section is dedicated to expertise studies which look at the link between problem analysis and meta-knowledge in experienced translators; the effects of linguistic complexity on expert interpreting; and strategic processing and tacit knowledge in professional interpreting. The volume celebrates the work of Birgitta Englund Dimitrova and her contribution to the development of process-oriented research.

  • 26.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Alvstad, Cecilia
    University of Oslo.
    Hild, Adelina
    State University of New York.
    Methods and strategies of process research: Integrative approaches in Translation Studies (Introduction chapter)2011In: Methods and strategies of process research: Integrative approaches in Translation Studies / [ed] Alvstad, Cecilia; Hild, Adelina; Tiselius, Elisabet, Amsterdam and New York: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2011, p. 1-9Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Asymmetrical language proficiency in dialogue interpreters: Methodological issues2019In: Translation, Cognition and Behaviour, ISSN 2542-5277, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 305-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Language proficiency of dialogue interpreters, who typically work in the public service sector, is an under-researched area. Contrary to conference interpreters, for dialogue interpreters there is no generally accepted definition of proficiency levels of working languages. This article discusses language proficiency in dialogue interpreting. It presents a methodological problem, namely, how to define and determine a given interpreter’s stronger and weaker working language. In our article we discuss different methods for determining the individual interpreter’s stronger and weaker working languages, such as self-assessment, demographic, socio-linguistic questionnaire and test score (Dialang). We conclude that there is a need for more research into this area.

  • 28.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Hild, Adelina
    Expertise and Competence in Translation and Interpreting2017In: The Handbook of Translation and Cognition / [ed] John W. Schwieter, Aline Ferreira, Malden, MA: John Wiley & Sons, 2017, p. 425-444Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter will outline the main perspectives of the empirical study of competence and expertise in both translation and interpreting. We will cover such core issues as definitions and models of competence and expertise, the relationship between professionalism and expertise, and the multivariate nature of translation/interpreting expertise (cognitive vs. social), as well as the structure of deliberate practice in the field, the stages of competence/expertise acquisition, and how these stages can relate to training and professional experience. The chapter considers both exclusive and inclusive models of competence and seeks to critically link them to expertise. Furthermore, the chapter provides a survey of the methods employed to study the specific skills and knowledge included in these models. It will also consider areas that have received little attention to date in translation process research, namely, the role of selfregulation (motivation, metacognition, emotion regulation) in performance and in supporting deliberate practice. We conclude by outlining outstanding issues for further research as well as the implications of current research for the interpreting and translation professions.

  • 29.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Jenset, Gard B.
    Bergen University College.
    Process and product in simultaneous interpreting: What they tell us about experience and expertise2011In: Methods and Strategies of Process Reserach: Integrative approaches in Trnaslation Studies / [ed] Alvstad, Cecilia; Hild, Adelina; Tiselius, Elisabet, Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2011, p. 269-300Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The expertise approach (Ericsson 2008) has been used to explore the competence of translators and interpreters since the mid-1990s, and is now a well established sub-field in translation and interpreting process research (Jääskeläinen 2010). In the area of interpreting, Ivanova (1999), Liu (2001) and others have explored the expertise approach. The studies reported in this article follow up on this work, but go one step further and investigate both process and product. The aim of the two studies was to explore the differences in performance between interpreters with shorter and longer experience (possible experts). Participants (n = 9) with no, short or long experience interpreted the same speech and performed retrospection immediately after. The first study, dedicated to process, used Ivanova’s (1999) method for investigating the process. The second study, on product, let two groups, non-interpreters (n = 6) and interpreters (n = 6), rate the interpreting performances using Carroll’s (1966) scales for intelligibility and informativeness. It was found that the degree of experience influences the processing strategies used by interpreters and the types of problems they report. Experience also has an impact on how the product of experienced interpreters and that of less experienced interpreters is rated, both when rated by interpreters and by non-interpreters.

1 - 29 of 29
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