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  • 1.
    Andersson Vogel, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    An Endeavour for Autonomy: How Girls Understand Their Lived Experiences of Being Referred to Secure Care2018In: Young - Nordic Journal of Youth Research, ISSN 1103-3088, E-ISSN 1741-3222, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 70-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In discussion of troubled adolescent girls, their mental health often is in focus and a discourse constructing girls as vulnerable victims therefore dominates Swedish social services and secure care. This article is an investigation of how the girls themselves are navigating the discursive terrain where understandings of troubled adolescent girls in secure care are regulated. The results show that even though the girls' stories show considerable similarities with what is previously known about troubled adolescent girls, their understandings of their lived experiences differ. The girls resist the dominating discourses that view them as victims by emphasizing their autonomy and own responsibility. However, in trying to distance themselves from devaluing interpretations, they take an attitude that ultimately obstructs their possibilities of getting help, since it inevitably puts them in opposition to the care system.

  • 2.
    Andersson Vogel, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Flickor vid de särskilda ungdomshemmen - vilka är de och vad ska vi göra med dem?2017In: Tvångsvård av barn och unga: rättigheter, utmaningar och gränszoner. / [ed] Pernilla Leviner, Tommy Lundtröm, Stockholm: Wolters Kluwer, 2017, p. 262-277Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Andersson Vogel, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Professionellas samverkan kring ungdomar i riskzonen för missbruk – en studie av MUMIN2015Report (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Andersson Vogel, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Särskilda ungdomshem och vårdkedjor: Om ungdomar, kön, klass och etnicitet2012Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis follows a group of youths placed in secure unit care who have participated in a chain-of-care project aiming to better plan their discharge and aftercare. The overall aim of the thesis is to link a detailed description of these young people with an analysis of the project they participated in, and to undertake one- and two-year follow-up studies. Analytic focus is on the significance of gender, class and ethnicity. The study is mainly based on structured interviews performed at the secure units upon entry into care, discharge and at a one-year follow up. Data have also been used from criminal records and interviews with project staff.

    When entering care, these youths exhibited extensive problems in both family conditions and own behaviour. The major problem in boys was criminality while girls reported poor mental health. Professionals judge youth of foreign background as more criminal than youth of Swedish background despite a lack of difference in self-reported data. Some difference is also noticeable regarding class.

    Analysis of the project shows that out-of-home care was the most frequent intervention after leaving secure unit care, while other interventions were difficult to uphold over time. Few girls received help with their mental health problems. At the one-year follow up, the youths reported an overall better situation, although extensive problems still remained. Above all, girls’ mental health problems remained as before. At the 2-year follow up the study group was compared with a control group in order to investigate effects of the project regarding criminality and recommitment to secure unit care. The comparison shows that the project had no effect. This is discussed in relation to poor organization and the difficulty of adjusting a project like this to the target group, along with the substantial part played by gender, class and ethnicity in how the youth are construed and treated.

  • 5.
    Andersson Vogel, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Sallnäs, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Lundström, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Good idea, bad prerequisite, zero result - the meaning of context in implementing aftercare for young people in secure unit care2014In: Journal of Children's Services, ISSN 1746-6660, E-ISSN 2042-8677, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 248-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose– The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to report results from a quasi-experimental study of outcomes of a leaving care project for youth placed in secure unit care and second, based on the (zero) results, to analyse and discuss the interplay between organisational boundaries, social work and the target group when implementing a project such as the one studied.

    Design/methodology/approach– The outcome study had a quasi-experimental design. The young people in the leaving care programme were compared with a matched reference group who did not get the special leaving care services. Data were collected (structured Adolescent Drug Abuse Diagnosis-interviews) when the young people entered secure units and on follow-up (registered crime and re-entry into care).

    Findings– The outcome study showed that the leaving care project had no effect on the young people's situation at follow-up regarding re-offending and re-entry into secure unit care. This is understood and discussed in relation to the poor implementation of the leaving care project along with an inbuilt conflict between state and local municipality that overshadowed the good intentions of the project.

    Research limitations/implications– The effect study has a quasi-experimental design, and hence differences between the project group and the comparison group at T1 cannot be fully precluded, although nothing is pointing in such a direction. The unclear content of the intervention makes it difficult to decode how the variation in the support given to the young people eventually impacted the results. The zero-results apply to group level, but that may not be valid for each and every one in the project.

    Practical implications– According to earlier research, a key person following young persons through different phases of the care trajectory may be of importance. Learning from the CoC project, one can conclude that such a key person should preferably take the role of advocate for the young person, and not be an administrator mainly concerned with coordinating other professionals. Further, when planning and financing is split between organisations, that split hinders efforts to actually mobilise support for young people leaving secure unit care.

    Originality/value– Few leaving care services are designed for youth with severe behavioural problems and hence, the research is scarce. This study contributes with important knowledge about leaving care interventions for the target group.

  • 6.
    Lundström,, Tommy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Sallnäs, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Vogel, Maria Andersson
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Utvärdering av en förstärkt vårdkedja för ungdomar som vårdats vid SiS-institution2012Report (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Stranz, Hugo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Andersson Vogel, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Wiklund, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Utvärdering av FREDA-bedömningsmetoder i arbetet med våldsutsatta2015Report (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Vogel, Maria A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Psykisk ohälsa, utsatthet och en legitimerande oro - diskursiva förståelser av flickor som placeras vid särskilda ungdomshem2016In: Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift, ISSN 1104-1420, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 109-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    State-run secure accommodation has a double public function, which places it in the borderland between welfare and legal systems. However, girls in these facilities seldom show criminal behaviour but often report severe mental health problems. Given this, it has been questioned whether this form of care is suitable for these girls. This article aims to investigate discourses about girls and secure care as they are manifested in interviews with social workers. The interviews are analysed as conversations, and therefore feature the researcher in the material. The analysis is inspired by Laclau and Mouffe’s Discourse Theory. The results show that a gendered dichotomy dominates the discourse about girls in contact with social services. Girls are constructed, in relation to boys, by concepts of mental health and vulnerability. This discourse is somewhat destabilized by the suburban girl who simultaneously is given meaning by discourses about the suburbs and their inhabitants as “the Others”. Further, there seems to be a discursive battle concerning girls placed in secure care, who are constructed both as vulnerable girls and as antisocial in terms that tie them to the constructions of boys. Central to this battle is the social workers’ great concern over the girls’ actions and their consequences. The secure accommodation is discursively constructed on one hand as an institution imbued with meaning of being a horrible place, and on the other hand as a function with the possibility to stop, hold and protect. By emphasizing the connection between the social workers’ concern and the secure accommodation as a holding and protecting function, referring a girl discursively constructed as a vulnerable victim to this locked and disciplining form of care is legitimized. 

  • 9.
    Vogel, Maria A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Enell, Sofia
    Staten och kapitalet: om statens institutionsstyrelses roll på barnavårdsmarknaden2018In: Socialtjänstmarknaden: om marknadsorientering och konkurrensutsättning av individ- och familjeomsorgen / [ed] Marie Sallnäs, Stefan Wiklund, Stockholm: Liber, 2018, p. 183-205Chapter in book (Other academic)
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