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  • 1.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    A Narratable Self as Addressed by Human Rights2017In: Policy Futures in Education, ISSN 1478-2103, E-ISSN 1478-2103, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 252-261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper extends the critique in earlier research of human rights as exclusive of otherness and difference by introducing the work of Adriana Cavarero (2000) on a narratable self. Hence, the formation of human rights is thus about the relations between different narratable selves, not just Western ones. A narrative learning, drawing on Cavarero (2000), shifts the focus in human rights learning from learning about the other to exposing one’s life story narrative through relationality.

  • 2.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Human Rights Learning: The Significance of Narratives, Relationality and Uniqueness2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Whereas educational policy is mainly concerned with the content of Human Rights Education (HRE), philosophers of education have widely explored the subject and her social condition in terms of social justice education. This thesis draws on philosophers of education in exploring the subject rather than the content of HRE, focusing the study on ontological rather than epistemological aspects of learning. In this thesis learning is explored through narratives, as a relational process of becoming. The turn to narrative is taken against the dominant historical narrative of human rights as a Western project. This turn concerns how claims toward universalism of human rights exclude difference and equally concerns how notions of particularity overshadows the uniqueness in life stories. The concept of uniqueness serves to elucidate the complexity of the subject, not easily reduced into social categorizations, a concept drawn from Adriana Cavarero and Hannah Arendt.

  • 3.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    In a Man's words - the politics of female representation in the public2017In: Studier i Pædagogisk Filosofi, ISSN 2244-9140, E-ISSN 2244-9140, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 55-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What one decides fi t for appearance through writing and speech bears a political signifi cance that risk being distorted through both language, reception in the public, and through calls for gendered representations. How can work of female philosophers be interpreted as a concern for the world from that of having to respond to a male-dominated discourse through which speech becomes trapped into what one might represent as ‘other’? In this paper, I explore the public reception of two female thinkers who question, in diff erent ways, the domi-nant notion of the author or philosopher as a male subject; what kind of limitations does the relative notion of ‘female’ pose political action, and how can privilege constitute a hindrance to feminist solidarity?

  • 4.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Intersectional Dialogue - A Cosmopolitical Dialogue of Ethics2013In: Cosmopolitan Civil Societies: An Interdisciplinary Journal, ISSN 1837-5391, E-ISSN 1837-5391, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 45-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article is based on a critical cosmopolitan outlook on dialogue as not aimed at reaching consensus, but rather keeping dialogue of difference open, with the ability to reach common understanding of human rights on conflicting grounds. Intersectional dialogue is used as a concept that opens up possibilities to study, in a pragmatic sense, the ‘cosmopolitan space’ in which different axles of power met in the historical drafting of human rights. By enacting analysis of United Nations (UN) documents from 1948 on the process of drafting the Universal Declaration on Human Rights (UDHR) the conceptualization of intersectional dialogue is put to work. The utopian foundation for deliberative democracy as dialogue in the absence of power and interest does not acknowledge the reality in which the human rights were negotiated and debated. The paper questions the dominant narrative of a western philosophical ground for the universality of human rights.

  • 5.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Learning Human Rights Through One's Life Story: A Narratable Self as Addressed by Human RightsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Paideia and Cosmopolitan Education: On Subjectification, Politics and Justice2017In: Philosophy as interplay and dialogue: viewing landscapes within philosophy / [ed] Torill Strand, Richard Smith, Anne Pirrie, Zelia Gregoriou, Mariana Papastephanou, Zürich: LIT Verlag, 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Reconciling Universality and Particularity through a Cosmopolitan Outlook on Human Rights2012In: Cosmopolitan Civil Societies: An Interdisciplinary Journal, ISSN 1837-5391, E-ISSN 1837-5391, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 22-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human rights are today criticized as not compatible with different cultural values and the debate has circulated around Asian values and Islamic values as in dichotomy with human rights as universal ethics (Ignatieff, 2003). The theoretical dichotomy between universality and particularity is questioned pragmatically in this paper through a historical study. The working process of drafting the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) in 1946-48, which included thousands of people, is explored as a cosmopolitan space in which individuals from different cultural contexts met to negotiate human rights through cultural narratives. The process where particular values were negotiated with universal notion on human rights resulted in a common proclamation (UDHR) without a common philosophical or ideological ground. This paper puts forth a thesis that human rights discourse can work as a cosmopolitan space, in which particular value systems meet in processes characterized by conflict and cohesion. Hence human rights can be understood as a master narrative compatible with different conflicting cultural narratives (Gibson & Somers, 1994).

  • 8.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Re-Thinking Relations in Human Rights Learning: The Politics of Narratives2014In: Journal of Philosophy of Education, ISSN 0309-8249, E-ISSN 1467-9752, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 293-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human Rights Education (HRE) has traditionally been articulated in terms of cultivating better citizens or world citizens. The main preoccupation in this strand of HRE has been that of bridging a gap between universal notions of a human rights subject and the actual locality and particular narratives in which students are enmeshed. This preoccupation has focused on ‘learning about the other’ in order to improve relations between plural ‘others’ and ‘us’ and reflects educational aims of national identity politics in citizenship education. The article explores the learning of human rights through narratives in relations, drawing on Hannah Arendt and Sharon Todd. For this re-thinking of relations in learning human rights, the article argues that HRE needs to address both competing historical narratives on the drafting of the Universal Declaration on Human Rights (UDHR) as well as unique life narratives of learners.

  • 9.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    The Critical Potential of Using Counter Narratives in Human Rights Education2018In: Critical Human Rights, Citizenship, and Democracy Education: Entanglements and Regenerations / [ed] Michalinos Zembylas, André Keet, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    The praxis of ethics and justice in human rights learning: examining the limits of progressive education2017In: Ethics and Education, ISSN 1744-9642, E-ISSN 1744-9650, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 37-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    School and education can be seen as an extension of the home as Hannah Arendt stresses, where children are protected in a space in which they can learn and grow, a space that is not yet public. This distinction of education as “not yet public” can be seen in contrast to John Dewey who explores notions of democracy as a process in education, where education and school is regarded as a mini society. This paper explores several challenges with progressive education and, specifically, of human rights education, through the work of Arendt (1959) and Dewey (1990) on the notions of responsibility and children’s human rights. Where do we as educators draw the distinction between taking responsibility of raising awareness of global injustices and human rights violations with the next generation without falling pray to dissolution that the gap between political imaginary and reality faces us with, or risking violating children’s “safe space” in school that according to Arendt should be a space that is neither private nor public, but a free zone for thinking and learning with others? Do we bring into the classroom discrimination and segregation by drawing on social categorizations with the pretext of questioning the same on the basis of “equal rights”? If ethical and relational dimensions of education are to be taken seriously then human rights education is a risky practice since it involves children’s sense of being and it raises questions that may not be dealt with properly or solvable for the children exposed.

  • 11.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Toward Cosmopolitan Ethics in Teacher Education: An Ontological Dimension of Learning Human Rights2014In: Ethics and Education, ISSN 1744-9642, E-ISSN 1744-9650, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 29-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a globalization trend in teacher education, emphasizing the role of teachers to make judgments based on human rights in their teaching profession. Rather than emphasizing the epistemological dimension of acquiring knowledge about human rights through teacher education, an ontological dimension is emphasized in this paper of what it means to become a professional teacher. An ontological dimension of ‘learning to become’ can be captured in critical examination of a cosmopolitan awareness of teachers in relation to judgment and justice. I read the critique through studies on human rights in teacher education, which transforms notions of openness and respect in relations marked by difference.

  • 12.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Women and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights2018Book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Adami, Rebecca
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Bron, Agnieszka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    The Way to Democracy Through Education and Learning in Sweden2007In: Journal für Politische Bildung, ISSN 2191-8244Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Adami, Rebecca
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Hållander, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Testimony and Narrative as a Political Relation: the Question of Ethical Judgment in Education2015In: Journal of Philosophy of Education, ISSN 0309-8249, E-ISSN 1467-9752, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we explore the role of film in educational settings and argue that testimony and narrative are dependent upon each other for developing ethical judgments. We use the film 12 Angry Men to enhance our thesis that the emotional response that sometimes is intended in using film as testimonies in classrooms requires a specific listening; a listening that puts pupils at risk when they relate testimonies to their own life narratives. The article raises the importance of listening in training narrative ethos in relation to violence witnessed in film. The article contributes by enhancing an understanding of a relational dimension to testimony and narrative, which, in an Arendtian sense, is also put forward as a political relation.

  • 15.
    Moeschlin Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Breaking Points in Life Stories Leading to Learning Processes2009In: Dyskursy, Vol. 10, p. 99-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article contains a text analysis of two papers presented by professionals at an adult education course. The analysis was preformed using biographical approach, examining the intersections between learning and breaking down (of old perceptions and physical defenses). The aim of the study is to explore the question of what makes us learn in the process of questioning what we already think we know. The methods used involved a qualitative analysis of secondary data. Through the analysis we can see that biography in learning enables learners to explore their narrative with both emotional and practical knowledge. Moreover, it may trigger change and lead to a process of new learning as long as a facilitator who acknowledges the sentences that hold information of transformation is present.

  • 16.
    Schumann, Claudia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Feminist Philosophy and Education2017In: Philosophy: Education / [ed] Bryan Warnick, Lynda Stone, Delmar Cengage Learning, 2017, p. 101-120Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Schumann, Claudia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Towards a Critical Cosmopolitanism in Human Rights Learning: The Vienna Conference in 19932014In: Philosophy as a Lived Experience: Navigating through dichotomies of thought and action / [ed] Marianne Papastephanou, Torill Strand, Anne Pirrie, VDM Verlag Dr. Müller Aktiengesellschaft & Co. KG, 2014, p. 259-276Chapter in book (Other academic)
1 - 17 of 17
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