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  • 1.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Gustin, IngridStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.Larsson, AnnikaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.Thedéen, SusanneStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.Myrberg, NanouschkaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    On the Threshold: Burial Archaeology in the Twenty-first Century2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Back-Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Gustin, IngridStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.Larsson, AnnikaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.Myhrberg, NanouschkaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.Thedéen, SusanneStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Döda personers sällskap: Gravmaterialens identiteter och kulturella uttryck2009Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 3. Kemmers, Fleur
    et al.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Rethinking numismatics: The archaeology of coins2011In: Archaeological Dialogues, ISSN 1380-2038, E-ISSN 1478-2294, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 87-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper sets out to re-member coins into archaeological discourse. It is argued that coins, as part of material culture, need to be examined within the theoretical framework of historical archaeology and material-culture studies. Through several case studies we demonstrate how coins, through their integration of text, image and existence as material objects, offer profound insights not only into matters of economy and the 'big history' of issuers and state organization but also into 'small histories', cultural values and the agency of humans and objects. In the formative period of archaeology in the 19th century the study of coins played an important role in the development of new methods and concepts. Today, numismatics is viewed as a field apart. The mutual benefits of our approach to the fields of archaeology and numismatics highlight the need for a new and constructive dialogue between the disciplines.

  • 4.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    A Study of Punctuality: Using typo-chronology as Barthes’ studium and punctum2012In: Matters of Scale: Processes and courses of events in the past and the present / [ed] Nanouschka Myrberg Burström, Fredrik Fahlander, Stockholm: Department of archaeology and classical studies, Stockholm university , 2012, p. 75-89Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    A tale of buried treasure, some good estimations, and golden unicorns: The numismatic connections of Alan Turing.2015In: Myntstudier: Festskrift till Kenneth Jonsson. / [ed] Talvio, Tuukka and Wijk, Magnus, Stockholm: Svenska Numismatiska Föreningen , 2015, p. 226-230Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1940 a man decided to take some precautionary measures to protect his savings against the imminent threat of the Battle of Britain. To avoid being left without means in the event of a German invasion, prevent devaluation of his savings and possibly also to speculate in rising silver prices he bought two large silver ingots, worth £250 and weighing about 90 kilograms, loaded them into a pram, and went out to bury them in a small wood nearby. The man was Alan Turing (1912–1954), famous for his wartime success in breaking the German Enigma code with his team, and for his groundbreaking work on electric machines which were to develop into the first real computers. Turing is also well-known to many who work with coins as one of the scholars behind the Good-Turing frequency estimation formula, used within numismatics to calculate the number of coins of a specific type produced from an identified number of dies. This paper meanders from Alan Turing's hidden treasure on to his scientific work and to his various connections with numismatics: the Good-Turing formula, Joan Clarke, and commemorative coins.

  • 6.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Brita Ingrid Maria Malmer2018In: Svenskt kvinnobiografiskt lexikon, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Divina Moneta: coin finds in religious contexts2017In: XV International Numismatic Congress, Taormina, 2015, volume 2: proceedings / [ed] Maria Caccamo Cantalbiano, Roma: Arbor Sapientae , 2017, p. 1309-1316Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Coin finds in religious contexts raised a significant number of questions concerning the conception and use of coins and money in different geographical and temporal settings. Votive offerings, ritual minting and donations are but a few examples of how coins were, and still are, used as material mediators between humans and gods. In the Divina Moneta Round Table, the use of coins and money for religious purposes was discussed from an understanding of the particular material qualities of coins (such as metal, size or iconography) in combination with their connotations in the light of different socio-cultural phenomena (such as abundance, kingship or protection). These material and ideological aspects were related to patterns of deposition in religious contexts and to detailed numismatic evidence, drawing on cases of coins from various historical, geographical and numismatic contexts.

  • 8.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Divina Moneta: Coin finds in religious contexts2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Elina Screen, Sylloge of Coins of the British Isles, Nor­wegian Collections, part I (vol. 65) & II (vol. 66), Oxford 2013 & 20152016In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 111, no 1, p. 66-68Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Eva Marie Ulla Margareta Ehrensvärd2018In: Svenskt kvinnobiografiskt lexikon, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Florent Audy har disputerat2018In: Nordisk Numismatisk Unions medlemsblad, ISSN 0025-8539, no 3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Florent Audy har disputerat2018In: Svensk numismatisk tidskrift, ISSN 0283-071X, no 5, p. 121-121Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Händelser vid vatten: Maritima studier med allmänarkeologisk relevans2012In: Marinarkeologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1100-9632, no 3, p. 11-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Är den maritima arkeologin fast i ”specialiseringens dilemma”? På vilket kulturhistoriskt område kan maritim arkeologi säga något väsentligt som inte kan belysas utifrån andra premisser? Här föreslås en ökad, snarare än minskad, närhet till det empiriska materialet, men även till allmänarkeologisk teori och problemformuleringar. I skärningspunkten mellan människa, vatten och ting finns den maritima arkeologins särskilda förutsättningar och unika kvalitéer att förvalta och utveckla.

  • 14.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Imitation as citation: coin imitation as rhetoric and discourse2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Coinage began to be used from around AD 995 in Scandinavia. These early coins imitated contemporary Anglo-Saxon coins but not in a passive or unquestioning way, but as part of complex chain of citations by which imported artefacts were adapted and re-contextualized. For more than thirty years the English and Scandinavian coinages were closely connected through a network of humans and objects that moved, physically and conceptually, between mints and kingdoms. Different iconographical models were used in a strategic/rhetorical way by commissioners and artisans to create relations between cognitive nodes through association, referencing, paraphrasing and appropriation. When circulating, the coins linked users to an official and shared discourse, and maintained the created relations through the impact of their materiality. While many re-contextualizing practices in the Viking Age seem to deal with reconnection with the past, the coin-imitation practice apparently worked mainly within a contemporary conceptual framework, although there are components of ‘ancientness’ as well. Object agency and the hybrid, creative, characters of these coins provide starting points for a deeper understanding of the coins’ wider connotations and meanings, as well as for the imitative practice itself.

  • 15.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Introduction: Faith and Ritual Materialised: Coin Finds in Religious Contexts2018In: Divina Moneta: Coins in Religion and Ritual / [ed] Nanouschka Myrberg Burström, Gitte Tarnew Ingvardson, Abingdon: Routledge, 2018, p. 1-10Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Coins have played an important role in religious and ritual practice ever since they started to be produced. The claim is sustained by numerous sources: coin finds in archaeological contexts,written sources and images. Why people deposit coins is therefore a fundamental question for understanding both the use of the material object and the conceptual framework within which ritual activity occurred.

  • 16.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Jonathan Lindström, Biskopen och korståget 1206. Om krig, kolonisation och Guds man i Norden (Stockholm: Norstedts 2015)2017In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 137, no 2Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Linn Eikje Ramberg har disputerat2018In: Svensk numismatisk tidskrift, ISSN 0283-071X, no 1, p. 21-21Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Linn Eikje Ramberg har disputerat2018In: Nordisk Numismatisk Unions medlemsblad, ISSN 0025-8539, no 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Money, Coins and Archaeology2018In: Money and Coinage in the Middle Ages / [ed] Rory Naismith, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2018, p. 231-263Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter focuses on three themes: conceptions of "money" and "coins" within archaeology, coins as archaeological material, and coins as part of archaeological research history. The argument builds on many illuminating cases and examples from old and recent research within archaeology and numismatics, and theory and method are emphasised.

  • 20.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Shared values: Creative links and hybridity in an Anglo-Scandinavian techno-web2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In present-day Denmark, Norway and Sweden a coinage was initiated about AD 995, which imitated contemporary Anglo-Saxon coins. For more than 30 years the English and Scandinavian coinages were closely connected. Individuals (commissioners, moneyers, artisans) as well as objects (e.g. coin-dies) moved between the mints. Coinage is often perceived of as expressing sovereign rights in a certain area. Instead, the Anglo-Scandinavian coinage network was not limited by realms and borders, but cut across kingdoms from west (England) to east (Byzantium) through Scandinavia and the Southern Baltic. Despite the ongoing “state-formation processes” and competition between the areas, values like artisans and dies were shared within the network.

    The material underlines how “social” technology is; dependent on choices, cooperative skills, talent, capital, etc. The coin images, inscriptions and links offer unique openings for a situated study of a process of change in the past, of different levels and actors in the network, of patterns of movement, and of ideological and historical contexts. Imitations are often depreciated out from our contemporary notions of authenticity. Here, the creative and hybrid character of the material is instead underlined, opening up for a deeper understanding of the wider connotations and meanings of the objects.

  • 21.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Shared Values: Links and hybridity in the Anglo-Scandinavian coin-web2017In: 18th Viking Congress, Denmark, 6–12 August 2017: Abstracts – Papers and Posters, 2017, p. 13-13Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In present-day Scandinavia a coinage was initiated about AD 995, which imitated contemporary Anglo-Saxon coins. For more than thirty years the English and Scandinavian coinages were closely connected through a network of humans and objects that moved, physically and conceptually, between mints and kingdoms. Coinage is often seen as articulating sovereign rights in a certain area, but the Anglo-Scandinavian coinage network instead cut across kingdoms from west to east. Despite ongoing state-formation processes, key valuables like artisans and dies were shared in the network, causing change in power relations and conceptions of value.

    Different iconographical models were used in a strategic/rhetorical way by commissioners and artisans to create relations between cognitive nodes through association, referencing, paraphrasing and appropriation. When circulating, the coins linked users to an official and shared discourse, and maintained the created relations through the impact of their materiality. While many re-contextualizing practices in the Viking Age seem to deal with reconnection with the past, the coin-imitation practice apparently worked mainly within a contemporary conceptual framework, although there are components of ‘ancientness’ as well. Die-link studies here provide a source of theoretical inspiration for how to study linear as well as non-linear connections and networks in the past. Through the repetitive practices of coin-making, artefact types experience gradual changes and thus new categories and articulations are created. Object agency and the hybrid character of these coins provide starting points for a deeper understanding of the coins’ wider connotations and meanings, as well as for the imitative practice itself.

  • 22.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Sture Bolin, medeltidsforskare mellan historia och arkeologi2012In: Nordisk Numismatisk Unions medlemsblad, ISSN 0025-8539, no 4, p. 64-69Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Sylloge of Coins of the British Isles, British Museum Anglo-Saxon Coins. Part I: Early Anglo-Saxon Gold and Anglo-Saxon and Continental Silver Coinage of the North Sea Area, c.600–760 (Vol. 63), by Anna Gannon; Part II: Southern English Coinage from Offa to Alfred, c.760–880 (Vol. 67), by Rory Naismith2018In: English Historical Review, ISSN 0013-8266, E-ISSN 1477-4534, Vol. 133, no 564, p. 1274-1277Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The latest volume in the series Sylloge of Coins of the British Isles (Vol. 67) deals with the substantial and high-quality collections held by the British Museum. It is here reviewed jointly with the first part dedicated to the same collection (Vol. 63). The two volumes provide an important summary and update on the research on Anglo-Saxon coinage, and make it available and accessible to a general audience, collectors and scholars.

  • 24.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Sylloge of Coins of the British Isles, Norwegian Collections, Parts I (Vol. 65) and II (Vol. 66), by Elina Screen2017In: English Historical Review, ISSN 0013-8266, E-ISSN 1477-4534, Vol. 132, no 554, p. 102-103Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    The Chair: Situating knowledge and authority in Viking and Medieval Scandinavia2019In: Tidens landskap: En vänbok till Anders Andrén / [ed] Cecilia Ljung, Anna Andreasson Sjögren, Ingrid Berg, Elin Engström, Ann-Mari Hållans Stenholm, Kristina Jonsson, Alison Klevnäs, Linda Qviström, Torun Zachrisson, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2019, p. 153-155Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Scientia potentia est — knowledge is power. Few things embody this sentence better than the chair. We will explore it through an amulet from the Eketorp hoard (Närke, Sweden), deposited in a wetland in the 960s.

  • 26.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    The Hatched Cross: Gotlandic Coins of the 13th century Baltic Sea area2012In: Monetary History of the Baltic in the Middle Ages (12-16th C.) / [ed] Ivar Leimus, Tallinn: Eesti Ajaloomuuseum , 2012, p. 180-196Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the 12th century, some authority on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea started off a coinage, the first ever on Gotland and the first medieval coinage of Sweden as a whole. Quite remarkably, these and any following coins minted on the island never adjusted to the Swedish mainland royal coins in weights or iconography, but seem to have been independently administered even though the island was within Swedish power (for any period when it was not under somebody else’s control). In the 12th century and well into the 13th, Gotlandic coins had a strong impact on certain areas of the mainland, and in the 13th century they were even used as a model for new coinages in the Baltic Sea area. Interestingly, these first Gotlandic coins in several ways show where their inspiration came from, and thus perhaps who or what motivated their coming into being: trading partners and other guests from the southwestern parts of the Baltic and North Sea.

  • 27.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Things in the Eye of the Beholder: A Humanistic Perspective on Archaeological Object Biographies2014In: Norwegian Archaeological Review, ISSN 0029-3652, E-ISSN 1502-7678, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 65-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The object-biographical approach is popular and well-established in archaeology, providing useful structures for conducting investigations and creating historical narratives. The approach is attractive because it encourages the consideration of many different angles like networks, embodiment and memory. It also facilitates the appreciation of objects as agents and allows for multivocality and the treatment of multiple time layers. Still, the approach suffers from a built-in risk of constructing cumulative and pre-determined narratives, describing objects rather than providing an understanding of past worlds. These problems result from an archaeological eye which is directed mainly to the objects themselves' and the bio- (life) part, while little attention is paid to the -graphy (writing). Material aspects and scientific method are often carefully considered, while humanistic theory and methodology are little reflected upon. Here it is suggested that more weight should be given to humanistic traditions, where biographical writing as such has its own theory and strategies, one example here being object biographies in the shape of It-narratives'. The object-biographical field of archaeological study needs to be revitalized by renewed theoretical input, in particular with attention to the different strategies and myriad possibilities for writing object lives.

  • 28.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Things of quality: possessions and animated objects in the Scandinavian Viking Age2015In: Own and be owned: Archaeological approaches to the concept of possession / [ed] Alison Klevnäs, Charlotte Hedenstierna-Jonson, Stockholm: Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University , 2015, p. 23-48Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Fahlander, FredrikStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Matters of scale: processes and courses of events in the past and the present2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The study of process is fundamental to our understanding of past worlds. Yet, despite a growing interest in processual aspects of relations and transformations in recent strands of thought, the concept itself is rarely discussed in contemporary archaeology. In this volume, the authors aspire to put the concept back on the map by combining old and new perspectives. Applying concepts such as hybridity, resilience, punctum, and flat ontology, they present fresh and innovative analyses encompassing a wide array of issues of central importance to archaeology.

  • 30.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Ingvardson, Gitte Tarnow
    Divina moneta: Coins in Religion and Ritual2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This edited collection analyses the phenomenon of coin use for religious and ritual purposes in different cultures and across different periods of time. It proposes an engagement with the theory and interpretation of the ‘material turn’ with numismatic evidence, and an evidence-based series of discussions to offer a fuller, richer and fresh account of coin use in ritual contexts. No extensive publication has previously foregrounded coins in such a model, despite the fact that coins constitute an integrated part of the material culture of most societies today and of many in the past. Here, interdisciplinary discussions are organised around three themes: coin deposit and ritual practice, the coin as economic object and divine mediator, and the value and meaning of coin offering. Although focusing on the medieval period in Western Europe, the book includes instructive cases from the Roman period until today. The collection brings together well-established and emerging scholars from archaeology, art history, ethnology, history and numismatics, and great weight is given to material evidence which can complement and contradict the scarce written sources.

  • 31.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Ingvardson, Gitte Tarnow
    Preface2018In: Divina Moneta: Coins in Religion and Ritual / [ed] Nanouschka Myrberg Burström, Gitte Tarnow Ingvardson, Abingdon: Routledge, 2018, p. xvii-xviiiChapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Williams, Howard
    University of Chester.
    Chains of citations: Re-contextualization in the Viking Age.2013In: The European Archaeologist, ISSN 1022-0135, no 40, p. 84-88Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For Scandinavia and regions subject to Norse contact and settlement across northern and western Europe, the Viking Age heralded new patterns and processes by which material culture circulated through plunder, trade and exchange, but also through imitation, influence and adaptation. The theme of citation draws upon research into the agency and the social and mnemonic affects of material culture and monuments in instigating social change. Citation provides a useful pivot around which to consider the active reconfiguring and vocation of previous landscapes, monuments and material culture in the creation of new social and religious worlds by Viking-period communities and individuals. There are a number of reasons for adopting the original theme of citation, as an alternative to considering the cultural biography of things, monuments and landscapes, which is otherwise often investigated when approaching the phenomenon of re-contextualization. Citation helps us to think of the active roles of enmeshed networks of people and things in the emergence of creolizing cultures of the Viking Age. This network-based approach has numerous advantages in understanding socio-economic, political and religious change. Through networks linking together the Viking world, citations provided a distinctive medium for social communication, identity-creation and commemoration including how things and places were imitated, adapted, reinvented, depicted, denoted, displayed, combined, fragmented, recycled and/or deposited alongside the biographical emphasis upon curation and reuse. Thus, exploring citational strategies equips archaeologists with the conceptual tools to adequately understand the shifting and not always linear linkages between different artefact types and assemblages in the construction of identities and memories in the Viking world.

  • 33.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    A worth of their own: on Gotland in the Baltic Sea, and its 12th-century coinage2010In: Medieval Archaeology, ISSN 0076-6097, E-ISSN 1745-817X, Vol. 54, p. 158-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In about AD 1140, the island of Gotland initiated what was to become one of the most influential coinages of the medieval Baltic Sea area. This was part of a strategy to meet the impact and pressure from the world outside in a period characterised by large-scale political and ideological changes. In this situation, old and new networks were important to maintain autonomy from those aiming for dominance over the island. The coins, with an independent weight standard and an iconography inspired by NW German and Frisian coins, were one way of attracting partners to the island’s main harbour, where its inhabitants could maintain control and trading peace.

    Coins incorporate in them the dimensions of object, text and picture. A historical archaeology of coins needs not only focus on large-scale perspectives and formal power, but must also give weight to the archaeological context, the life biography of the coins and the social negotiations behind their production and use. Thus intention and reality, symbolism and social practice may be studied to find openings to the stories behind the objects. The different dimensions of the coins together with historical sources give away plenty of information on several levels: about the networks, ideological framework, artisanship and changing loyalties of this time and area.

  • 34.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    An island in the middle of an island: On cult, laws and authority in Viking Age Gotland2009In: From Ephesos to Dalecarlia: Reflections on body, space and time in medieval and early modern Europe, Stockholm: Statens historiska museum , 2009, p. 101-118Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present-day small village of Roma on Gotland in the Baltic Sea was the physical and symbolic centre of the island in the Iron Age and into Medieval times. The Cistercian monastery and the meeting place of the island’s assembly, the All-thing, two well-known features of medieval Roma, have often been taken as indications of an egalitarian and non-stratified society on Gotland during the Viking Age and Middle Ages. It is here proposed, however, that an older Iron Age cult site at Roma eventually came under the control of a chieftain or major landowner who introduced Christianity, founded a monastery and inaugurated the thing in Roma in Viking or early medieval times, just as his equals did elsewhere in Scandinavia. While the later medieval thing was probably located near the monastery, an alternative site on a small island is suggested for the older All-thing.

  • 35.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Botulf - helgon eller frifräsare?2010In: Gotländskt Arkiv, ISSN 0434-2429, Vol. 82, p. 34-45Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Botulf – Saint or Free Mover? (summary)

    “For Botulf ”. A cryptic inscription on a series of Gotlandic coins from c. 1210 is discussed in this article in relation to different types of references to the name Botulf on Gotland. Gravestones, farmsteads, mural paintings, toll lists and numismatic evidence all provide clues as to what or whom the inscription may be alluding to. Was Botulf, the English saint, popular on Gotland to the point of having dedication coins minted in his honour? Or was Botulf, the Gotlandic tradesman, taking advantage of a temporary change of powers on the island to gain a reputation for himself? Enigmatic and fortified Västergarn on Gotland’s west coast, the German Bishop Albert’s Riga, and the Hanseatic Steelyard of London all play roles in the story of Botulf of Gotland.

  • 36.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Arkeologi.
    Burning down the house.: Mythological chaos and world order on Gotlandic picture stones.2005In: Current Swedish archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 13, p. 99-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Gotlandic picture stone monuments of the oldest type constitute a material manifestation of a “concept” which basically deals with world order and balance, from the single picture to the monument as a whole. This concept is detectable in myths, sagas and material culture alike. Only by paying more attention to the female agents of the sagas it is possible to reach an understanding of the common content of ideas between the different expressions. That the elements play an important role in the sagas is reflected in the setting and execution of monuments and artefacts.

  • 37.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Arkeologi.
    De äldsta gotländska mynten i Elias Brenners "Thesaurus".2004In: Myntstudier, ISSN 1652-2303, no 1, p. 10-15Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    De tidigaste gotländska myntgrupperna präglades ca 1140-1288 och återfinns främst arkeologiskt, som fyndmynt. Många stora depåer (skatter) hittades för länge sedan och är också sedan länge skingrade, nedsmälta eller uppsplittrade på olika offentliga och privata samlingar. Detta är ett stort problem för den som vill forska med utgångspunkt från fynden, men det tidiga antikvariska intresset i Sverige gjorde ändå att en hel del mynt och information kom att tillvaratas av staten och av enskilda samlare och forskare.

    Dessa stora depåfynd och tidiga samlingar har utgjort grunden för den svenska numismatiska forskningen och de standardverk vi använder oss av idag. Genom att studera dem kan vi, med lite tur, i många fall hitta ledtrådar till fyndinnehåll och andra uppgifter kring de tidiga fynden, vilka annars gått förlorade. I denna artikel utgår jag från det mest kända av de tidiga verken över Sveriges mynthistoria; Elias Brenners stora numismatiska verk "Thesaurus Nummorum Sveo-Gothicorum", som publicerades första gången år 1691.

  • 38.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Det gotländska myntet från Bårarp2008In: Nordisk numismatisk unions medlemsblad, ISSN 0025-8539, no 1, p. 30-36Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    År 1932 gjordes ett mynt fynd i Bårarp, Halland, som kunde dateras till ca 1153-55 (mynt från Svend Grate) (Jensen 1983). Med utgångspunkt från detta fynd kunde en serie gotländska 1100-talsmynt 25 år senare tidfästas vilket blev en viktig hållpunkt i arbetet med den gotlåndksa myntningen.

  • 39.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Arkeologi.
    False monuments?: On antiquity and authenticity2004In: Public archaeology, ISSN 1465-5187, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 151-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What is a true monument of the past?

    Many ancient monuments have been reused over the centuries, rebuilt, added to or copied – processes which continue into the present. These monuments form part of the historical, traditional, social and mental landscape of individuals. Should their use or even their construction in the present be considered less meaningful than their use or construction in, say, the 18th century or the Neolithic?

    The demands made by Swedish legislation, for instance, that cultural remains should be “old” and “abandoned” expresses a decontextualizing and conservative view that is based in a conception of cultural remains as monuments, representing a specific event or time. But opposite views are expressed in the fields of arts and architecture, where accretions, deliberate additions and a living tradition are seen as valuable elements in their own right.

    This paper addresses the problem of authenticity in objects of cultural heritage, beginning with the case study of a stone labyrinth on the Swedish archipelago. I will raise questions concerning authenticity, heritage management and archaeological views of cultural relics. Is the age and date of construction really the most important aspect of cultural objects or could there be other attributes that tell us just as much about their previous use and the thoughts that have been associated with them?

  • 40.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Arkeologi.
    Falska fornlämningar?: Om fornlämningars autenticitet2002Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Begreppet autenticitet används i samband med kulturlämningar och restaureringsfrågor för att beskriva något sant eller äkta hos objektet. Det autentiska ska sökas i någon eller fler av objektets egenskaper. Det är något relativt som måste utrönas i varje enskilt fall, förändrar sig med tid och kontext, och lika väl kan finnas i en kontinuitet som i ett enskilt ögonblick. Begreppet används metodiskt främst i samband med byggnader. Att använda det även i samband med fornlämningar skulle tillföra ett nytt analysredskap för diskussion och värdering, och samtidigt ge tillgång till ett gemensamt språk för olika typer av kulturlämningar. Hur en sådan diskussion kan föras exemplifieras med två fornlämningar som uppfattats som ”falska” främst därför att de är sentida. Är detta hela sanningen?

  • 41.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Ingen människa är en ö: om orsak och verkan i skapandet av en lokal identitet2008In: Arkeologi och identitet / [ed] Bodil Petersson & Peter Skoglund, Lund: Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens historia, Lunds universitet , 2008, p. 89-100Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    The island of Gotland is often regarded as being ”unique”; a view very much based upon the multitude of historical remnants on the island and on the view of the gotlandic society as being essentially different and autonomous throughout history. Both Gotlandic material culture and medieval written sources may be interpreted as expressing strong local identity for the island. But put in another perspective, they may just as well be considered as representing strong links with other areas. Gotlandic early medieval mentality and society might be seen as partaking rather than refraining, and as leaning towards change rather than towards conservation. I argue, that the Gotlander’s modern interest in maintaining the picture of the unique island – for political and economical reasons as well as for reasons of self-esteem – has combined with the failure of the archaeological discipline to integrate the theoretical advances of the last decades with its interpretations, and thus has created a false picture of Gotland in the past as a well-defined entity with a society essentially different from its contemporaries. The totality of an assemblage of material remains, accumulated over a long time, should not be confused with any specific historical situation in the past, and in particular not with any given individual of that society. No man is an island!

  • 42.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Arkeologi.
    Moneymakers.: Om att slå mynt av sig själv2004In: Aktuell Arkeologi VIII, Arkeologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet, Stockholm , 2004, p. 77-92Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    The coinage of Gotland in the Baltic Sea was initiated about 1140, some forty years before the Swedish mainland coinage. It is characterised by its stability and its particular weight system, which suggests an autonomous right to strike coins. Why was this coinage initiated, and who was responsible for it? The anonymous iconography of the coins gives no obvious leads but was shaped to appeal to the users in a clear and understandable way. With analogies from the Viking Age coinage of Sigtuna, I argue that the coins carried and embodied multilevel messages and were used both to justify and to create power, through the use of references to myths and archaic symbols. The coins and their pictures are not to be regarded as simply an expression of the then-existing society and power, but also as creators of it. Rather than looking for explanations in the growth of trade or a monetary economy, I argue that coinage was primarily initiated to communicate and establish the legitimacy of the issuer.

  • 43.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Arkeologi.
    Mynt och möjligheter2007In: Fornvännen: Journal of Swedish antiquarian research, ISSN 0015-7813, no 3, p. 191-193Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Varför en diskussion kring numismatiken som vetenskap just nu? Kanske borde vi snarare fråga varför den dröjt så länge. En klimatförändring till explicita teoretiska frågeställningar och kulturhistoriskt mera specifika tolkningar har sedan länge pågått i övrig arkeologisk och historisk forskning, och självfallet berör den även myntforskningen. Både den akademiska och den museala världen har förändrat eller nödgats ompröva sina värderingar och prioriteringar under de senaste decennierna. Detta berör samtliga ämnen och är inte specifikt för numismatiken. Men det är ett ypperligt tillfälle att fundera över om den verksamhet och de målsättningar som finns är de vi vill ha – och om vi använder de rätta verktygen för att komma dit vi önskar.

  • 44.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History. Arkeologi.
    Numismatik mellan historia och arkeologi2005Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Numismatiken som vetenskap befinner sig i gränslandet mellan discipliner som arkeologi, historia och konstvetenskap. De vetenskapsteoretiska diskussioner som förs inom den nordiska numismatiken idag har mycket gemensamt med de som förs inom arkeologin. Temanumret diskuterar ur skilda synvinklar ett förhållningssätt där både de historiska och arkeologiska dimensionerna i det numismatiska materialet (mynten) kan tas tillvara och föra resultaten bortom det rena materialstudiet. Artiklarna ger exempel på detta utifrån författarnas specialområden.

  • 45.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Arkeologi.
    Numismatik mellan historia och arkeologi2005Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Numismatiken som vetenskap befinner sig i gränslandet mellan discipliner som arkeologi, historia och konstvetenskap. De vetenskapsteoretiska diskussioner som förs inom den nordiska numismatiken idag har mycket gemensamt med de som förs inom arkeologin. Temanumret diskuterar ur skilda synvinklar ett förhållningssätt där både de historiska och arkeologiska dimensionerna i det numismatiska materialet (mynten) kan tas tillvara och föra resultaten bortom det rena materialstudiet. Artiklarna ger exempel på detta utifrån författarnas specialområden.

  • 46.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History. Arkeologi.
    Numismatik mellan historia och arkeologi: Introduktion och pulstagning2005In: Meta: Medeltidsarkeologisk tidskrift, ISSN 0348-7903, no 3, p. 3-9Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    The articles of this thematic issue of META explore the conditions and further possibilities of numismatic research, in particular as related to the discourse of Historical Archaeology. This introduction also briefly deals with the formation of the Swedish and Scandinavian numismatic discourse, with some critical concepts and distinctions, and with the multi-faceted character of the coin material. What’s the colour of money?

  • 47.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Arkeologi.
    Nya C-uppsatser vid Numismatiska Forskningsgruppen2005In: Svensk numismatisk tidskrift, ISSN 0283-071X, no 5, p. 125-Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 48.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    PAX PORTA NY: Gotländsk uttolkning av ett fridskoncept2009In: Samlad Glädje II: Numismatiska Klubben i Uppsala 40 år / [ed] Ekström, Curt & Holmberg, Kjell, Uppsala: Numismatiska klubben i Uppsala , 2009, p. 149-154Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    In about 1140 AD, the island of Gotland, off the Swedish coast, initiated what was to become one of the most influential coinages of the medieval Baltic Sea Area. One of the types minted was inscribed PAX PORTA NY. The paper argues that these coins were part of a strategy adopted by the Gotlanders in the 1160s, to proclaim peace in the town of Visby and to direct their international partners to where control and trading peace could be maintained. The different dimensions of the coins (object, text and picture) give away plenty of information on several levels when combined with historical sources, and tell us about the networks, ideological framework, artisanship, and changing loyalties of this time and area.

  • 49.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Arkeologi.
    Rara runor.: Medeltida gotländska runmynt2005In: Myntstudier, ISSN 1652-2303, no 3, p. 1-12Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En grupp mynt med runor, tidigare tillskrivna Ulf Jarl (1231?-1248) kan efter rekonstruktion och förnyad uttydning av runskriften läsas BOTULF. Mynten visas också vara något tidigare än 1230-talet och härstammar förmodligen från Gotland. Men vem var Botulf? Namnet är typiskt gotländskt. Syftar det här på en gotländsk handelsman, en myntmästare, det engelska helgonet, eller på en tidigare okänd storman?

  • 50.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Room for all? Spaces and places for thing assemblies: the case of the All-thing on Gotland, Sweden2008In: Viking and Medieval Scandinavia, ISSN 1782-7183, E-ISSN 2030-9902, Vol. 4, p. 133-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Roma on Gotland in the Baltic Sea was an important place at the physical and symbolic centre of Iron-Age and Medieval Gotland. Roma has two particularly well-known historical features: the Cistercian monastery and the gathering-place of the Gotlandic all-thing. This article will consider the nature of the place, the foundation of the monastery, and the character of the thing, and will point to an alternative site for the all-thing. It will be suggested that an older Iron-Age cult site came under the control of a chieftain in the later Iron Age, and that in the Viking and early medieval phases a major landowner or chieftain/petty king may have introduced Christianity, established connections with the continental Church, founded a monastery and inaugurated a thing-place in Roma, just as his equals did in other areas of Scandinavia. The monastery and the all-thing have in the past been thought to indicate the existence of a particularly egalitarian and non-stratified society on Gotland in the Viking Age and Middle Ages. I propose that this was not the case. Through historical circumstance, Gotland never developed a noble class as on the mainland; this however does not mean there were not Viking-Age or early medieval lords with such aspirations.

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