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  • 1.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Joshi, Somya
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Reconfiguring civic participation: open source software in the political space2016Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Discourses on participation, democracy and politics are today profoundly questioned and challenged. Internet and the entrance of open source software into the governmental sphere have much contributed toward the shift in understandings of citizen participation, their rights and representation. In the field of participatory design such an inquiry is reflected in a shift of focus regarding the study of the use of technologies within government. From being concerned by issues on transparency and equity researchers are nowadays more prone to explore issues regarding the transformative power or/and performativity of open source software in contexts such as government. This paper describes the case of the political “Net Party” which in 2013 introduced the platform “Democracy OS” into the legislature of the Ciudad de Buenos Aires in Argentina. The question that motivates the study is: Do open source tools redefine the political space and reconfigure citizen civic participation? And if so, how? The paper contributes five analytical axes for scrutinizing the entrance of open source tools into the political space.

  • 2.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Joshi, Somya
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Understanding Limits from a Social-Ecological perspective2015In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 20, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The latest developments in the field of HCI have given rise to an increasing interest in issues pertaining to global warming, resource depletion and environmental degradation. Concern about such issues has contributed to give shape to the design space of sustainable HCI (SHCI); a space whose boundaries are at times blurred. On the one hand, some, design “sustainable” information technology based on visions of the world that do not really question limits to continuous economic growth and, on the other hand, others embrace the design of information technology from stances that acknowledges limits (i.e., economic, ecological, energetic). This paper introduces the perspective of social ecology into SHCI. This perspective provides us with a core set of principles that makes us situate computing at the intersection of physical (natural) and moral (human) qualities of our human environment systems. As such it confronts us with choices to be made in the challenging years to come and invites us to argue about the very purpose of information technology in a world of limitations.

  • 3. Füssl, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Oberlader, Manuel
    Beanland, Vanessa
    Spyropoulou, Ioanna
    G. Lenné, Michael
    Joshi, Somya
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rössger, Lars
    Leden, Lars
    Underwood, Geoff
    Carvalhais, Jose
    Methodological development of a specific tool for assessing acceptability of assistive systems of powered two-wheeler-riders2015In: IET Intelligent Transport Systems, ISSN 1751-956X, E-ISSN 1751-9578, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 12-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on the acceptability of assistive systems for improving the safety of powered two-wheelers (PTWs) is a pressing issue. The use of safety-enhancing assistive systems for motorised vehicles, including advanced driver assistance systems and in-vehicle information systems is widespread in many countries. Yet, there is only a limited number of equivalent intelligent transport systems (ITS) for PTWs, namely advanced rider assistance systems and on-bike information systems. This study describes the methodological development of a specific tool for assessing motorcyclists’ acceptability of ITS, as part of the motorcyclists’ profiling questionnaire (MOPROQ). There were three stages of development. First, a literature review was undertaken to assess the current state of the art regarding ITS for PTWs and to determine the most relevant facets of acceptability that should be measured. Second, a series of focus group interviews were conducted to explore riders’ attitudes towards ITS. Finally, the focus group results were used to develop a large-scale survey (MOPROQ), which was administered to an initial sample of over 6000 riders internationally. The designed tool can be used as a basis for the determination of rider acceptability of ITS systems in the future.

  • 4.
    Hansson, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Choi, Jaz Hee-jeong
    Cerratto Pargman, Tessy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Bardzell, Shaowen
    Forlano, Laura
    DiSalvo, Carl
    Lindtner, Silvia
    Joshi, Somya
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ting: making publics through provocation, conflict and appropriation2016In: Proceedings of the 14th Participatory Design Conference: Short Papers, Interactive Exhibitions, Workshops, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, Vol. 2, p. 109-110Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Swedish the word "ting" has different meanings. It can mean "things", "matters" and "a session at court" as well as the act of appropriating space. This one-day workshop starts in the notion of the artifact as a "ting", and design as something that raises a question, provokes a discussion, and creates a public through which agonistic encounters occur. This particular lens allows us to approach design beyond 'merely producing artifacts'. Instead, we come to see it as a production of provocations, speculations, and alternative interpretations of the social world as well as new sets of relationships between participants in this public.

    Because of the importance of the role and embodiment of the designer/artist in making publics, this workshop calls attention to self-reflective practices in participatory design, and questions how these practices can be embedded in the functionality of new publics and design practices.

  • 5.
    Hansson, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Forlano, Laura
    Choi, Jaz Hee-jeong
    DiSalvo, Carl
    Cerratto Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Bardzell, Shaowen
    Lindtner, Silvia
    Joshi, Somya
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Provocation, Conflict, and Appropriation: The Role of the Designer in Making Publics2018In: Desidades, E-ISSN 2318-9282, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 3-7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Joshi, Somya
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Belkacem, Kheira
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Koulolias, Vasilis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Zalavra, Vassiliki
    Inclusive Innovation in Governance: critical reflections from Botswana2014In: UKAIS 2014: UK Academy for Information Systems Conference Proceedings 2014, Oxford: AIS, UK Academy for Information Systems Conference Proceedings , 2014, p. Paper 32-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we examine the promise and potential of inclusive innovation via the lens of the Botswana Speaks Parliamentary Initiative. More specifically we look at the future of eGovernance in light of new technological inroads made by mobile broadband connectivity and ICT infrastructure in Sub-Saharan Africa. The authors of this paper were both designers (in the sense that they co-created the platform with the policy makers and citizens in Botswana), as well as observers (in the sense that they researched and analysed the findings iteratively throughout the project evolution). The first section of the paper is dedicated to providing a contextual background for readers on the unique case of Botswana, discussing the relevance and capabilities of the platform, while situating the project within the broader partner-driven cooperation model of development. The next section of the paper outlines the methodology used internally within the project, as well as the tools employed for data collection and analysis. Finally the paper provides a critical discussion on the relevance, confidence, interoperability and innovation provided by interventions such as Botswana Speaks. From the lack of basic facilities such as clean drinking water, to concerns surrounding unemployment and land reform, we showcase via our data, how technologies are being innovatively appropriated to address core development issues. Do the policy makers respond more transparently and effectively with the aid of such tools? Are the voices being aired and expectations being raised with no real meaningful change to follow? In this paper we start a much needed discussion on the above questions and end with key lessons learnt and future directions for our research.

  • 7.
    Joshi, Somya
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Every Little Bit Makes Little Difference: The Paradox within SHCI2018In: Digital Technology and Sustainability: Engaging the paradox / [ed] Mike Hazas, Lisa P. Nathan, Routledge, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Joshi, Somya
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    In Search of Fairness: Critical Design Alternatives for Sustainability2015In: Proceedings of The Fifth Decennial Aarhus Conference on Critical Alternatives, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2015, p. 37-40Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Caught between the infinite promise unleashed by technology proliferation and the unprecedented scale of resource depletion, waste and inequity, we inhabit a space where critical alternatives are sought more than ever. As a reflection of the above, we find in HCI, a slant towards technological fixes to existing sustainability problems, as opposed to a more holistic approach that includes behavioural and societal change. It is within this context that this paper is situated, where we propose a socio-ecological approach and argue our case for a life-cycle lens towards building systems that are in line with current understanding of the earth’s finite resources. We do so by presenting an illustrative case study of what such critical alternatives might look like, by examining the Fairphone movement. We contribute to a deeper understanding of how social value laden enterprises along with open technological design can shape sustainable relationships between our environment and us.

  • 9.
    Joshi, Somya
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    On fairness & sustainability: Motivating change in the networked society2015In: Proceedings of EnviroInfo and ICT for Sustainability 2015, Atlantis Press, 2015, p. 335-344Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Caught between the infinite promise unleashed by technology proliferation and the unprecedented scale of resource depletion, waste and inequity, we inhabit a space where critical alternatives are sought more than ever. As a reflection of the above, we find in HCI, a slant towards technological quick-fixes to existing sustainability problems, as opposed to a more holistic approach that includes behavioural and societal change. It is within this context that this paper is situated, where we propose a socio-ecological approach and argue our case for a life-cycle lens towards building systems that are in line with our current understanding of the earth’s finite resources. We do so by presenting an illustrative case study of what such critical alternatives might look like, by examining the Fairphone movement. We contribute to a deeper understanding of how social value laden enterprises along with open technological design can shape sustainable relationships between our environment and us.

  • 10.
    Joshi, Somya
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Gazis, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Pargman, Daniel
    Whose Future Is It Anyway? Limits within Policy Modeling2016In: LIMITS '16: Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Computing within Limits, ACM Press, 2016, article id 5Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the age of Big Open Linked Data (BOLD), we inhabit a landscape where future scenarios are imagined, modeled, planned for and embedded in policy. Between the euphoric techno-utopian rhetoric of the boundless potential of BOLD innovations and the dystopian view of the dangers of such innovations (e.g. ubiquitous surveillance etc.), this paper offers a critical understanding of the boundaries that are traversed by the implementation of BOLD within policy modeling. We examine BOLD as a tool for imagining futures, for reducing uncertainties, for providing legitimacy and for concentrating power. In doing so we further develop the LIMITs community's conceptualization of the societal limitations on computing, with specific reference to the assumptions, interpretations and trust that we place in these models when making socio-environmental policy decisions. We use an illustrative case of policy modeling, which provides a much-needed critical discussion of the inherent limitations and risks as well as the promises that are offered by BOLD.

  • 11.
    Joshi, Somya
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Koulolias, Vasilis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Garcia Moran, Francisco
    Loeffler, Elke
    Case study - How Public Services in Sweden Help Newcomers to Integrate in the Labour Market and Society through the Digital Platform Mobilearn2018In: Co-Production and Co-Creation: Engaging Citizens in Public Services / [ed] Taco Brandsen, Trui Steen, Bram Verschuere, New York: Routledge, 2018, no 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This case study illustrates how migrants in Sweden were involved in the development of a new online platform Mobilearn (Mobilearn, n.d.). In particular, it shows how migrants have shaped the design of a new digital tool in collaboration with service providers from a range of public agencies. The resulting digital tool, Mobilearn, provides a number of key services tailored to the needs of migrants and helps to make public services provided to migrants more efficient. It is therefore a case study of the co-creation of a core service. Mobilearn has received multiple awards and is now being disseminated in other countries.

  • 12.
    Joshi, Somya
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Wehn, Uta
    From Assumptions to Artifacts: Unfolding e-participation within Multi-level Governance2017In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 57-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of technological innovation within the context of governance processes is often embraced with rhetorical enthusiasm and seen as a de facto enabler for democratic decision‑making. Underpinning this enthusiasm is the leap of faith made from transparency to trust, from complexity to coherence. The belief that using new tools for e‑participation can generate dramatic transformation in public sector redesign and result in societal benefits is heralded as a shift towards public innovation. It is precisely this belief that we examine in this paper. We start our investigation by providing a conceptualization of what e‑participation means within the context of multi‑level governance. By using a cross case comparison of two European research projects, we provide an empirical base upon which we can examine the process of e‑participation and the implications of digital e‑participation tools for various levels of governance and public accountability. Furthermore we provide an interdisciplinary contribution in understanding the gap between what technological innovation makes possible and the acceptance or openness on the part of decision makers to embrace citizen input within policy processes.

  • 13. Wehn, Uta
    et al.
    Joshi, Somya
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Pfeiffer, Ellen
    Anema, Kim
    Gharesifard, Mohammad
    Momani, Abeer
    Addressing the social dimensions of citizen observatories: The Ground Truth 2.0 socio-technical approach for sustainable implementation of citizen observatories2017In: 19th EGU General Assembly, EGU2017: Proceedings, European Geosciences Union (EGU), 2017, Vol. 19, p. 2989-2989Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Owing to ICT-enabled citizen observatories, citizens can take on new roles in environmental monitoring, decision making and co-operative planning, and environmental stewardship. And yet implementing advanced citizen observatories for data collection, knowledge exchange and interactions to support policy objectives is neither always easy nor successful, given the required commitment, trust, and data reliability concerns. Many efforts are facing problems with the uptake and sustained engagement by citizens, limited scalability, unclear long-term sustainability and limited actual impact on governance processes. Similarly, to sustain the engagement of decision makers in citizen observatories, mechanisms are required from the start of the initiative in order to have them invest in and, hence, commit to and own the entire process. In order to implement sustainable citizen observatories, these social dimensions therefore need to be soundly managed. We provide empirical evidence of how the social dimensions of citizen observatories are being addressed in the Ground Truth 2.0 project, drawing on a range of relevant social science approaches. This project combines the social dimensions of citizen observatories with enabling technologies - via a socio-technical approach - so that their customisation and deployment is tailored to the envisaged societal and economic impacts of the observatories. The projects consists of the demonstration and validation of six scaled up citizen observatories in real operational conditions both in the EU and in Africa, with a specific focus on flora and fauna as well as water availability and water quality for land and natural resources management. The demonstration cases (4 EU and 2 African) cover the full 'spectrum' of citizen-sensed data usage and citizen engagement, and therefore allow testing and validation of the socio-technical concept for citizen observatories under a range of conditions.

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