Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Brydges, Taylor
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Sustainable fashion in Canada: Unpacking the Spaces and Practices of "Made in Canada"2019In: Global Perspectives on Sustainable Fashion / [ed] Alison Gwilt, Alice Payne, Evelise Anicet Ruthschilling, Bloomsbury Visual Arts , 2019, p. 74-82Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Brydges, Taylor
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography. University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Hracs, Brian J.
    Consuming Canada: How fashion firms leverage the landscape to create and communicate brand identities, distinction and values2018In: Geoforum, ISSN 0016-7185, E-ISSN 1872-9398, Vol. 90, p. 108-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the increasingly global and competitive fashion industry, firms are adopting a variety of strategies to generate value and brand loyalty. While some emphasise the quality of material elements such as inputs, local production and design, others focus on immaterial aspects such symbolic value and exclusivity. In recent years, place-branding has become an important way to create connections between people, places, and products. Yet, the processes behind this type of branding remain poorly understood. In particular, limited attention has been paid to the ways in which landscapes – in all their forms – are being incorporated into place-branding practices. Drawing on 87 interviews, participant observation and an innovative analysis of Instagram accounts, this paper examines how a range of Canadian fashion firms leverage the landscape to create and communicate brand identities, distinction and values. It demonstrates how firms of different sizes and scales construct, harness, or reimagine landscapes and/or popular stereotypes to connect with Canadian identities and consumers. It also highlights how landscape-centric branding can be combined with broader value creation strategies such as local production. In so doing, this paper brings together the economic geography literature on place branding and the cultural geography literature on landscape and identity, and makes a methodological contribution to nascent examinations of social media and visual data sources in geography.

  • 3.
    Brydges, Taylor
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography. University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Hracs, Brian J.
    The locational choices and interregional mobilities of creative entrepreneurs within Canada’s fashion system2019In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 517-527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although creative industries and creative talent have traditionally clustered in established global centres such as London and New York, new forms of independent production, digital technologies and mobilities are reshaping this landscape. Drawing on 87 interviews and participant observation, this paper considers whether independent fashion designers in Canada still need to locate in the established centres to realize their ambitions. It explores how these entrepreneurs choose a ‘home base’ for their operations and demonstrates how they mobilize three forms of mobility (temporary, mediated, virtual) to access opportunities and resources within Canada’s fashion system.

  • 4.
    Brydges, Taylor
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Hracs, Brian J.
    What motivates millennials? How intersectionality shapes the working lives of female entrepreneurs in Canada’s fashion industry2019In: Gender, Place and Culture: A Journal of Feminist Geography, ISSN 0966-369X, E-ISSN 1360-0524, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 510-532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The contemporary fashion industry is based on a set of ‘gendered skills and attributes.’ Women numerically domin- ate fashion schools and the labour force of fashion firms, and also start and run the majority of independent fashion brands. Angela McRobbie and others have highlighted the importance of considering the gendered dynamics of fash- ion-related work. Yet, as the industry continues to evolve in the wake of global integration, the digital transition and intensifying competition, there is an ongoing need for research. Using an intersectional approach, this paper provides a novel case study of young ‘Millennial’ female independent fashion designers who operate within the emerging and under-explored Canadian fashion industry. Drawing on 87 interviews and participant observation, the paper demonstrates how entrepreneurial motivations, path- ways, practices and experiences are shaped by individual characteristics, such as gender, age, lifecycle and class. Particular attention is paid to the challenges and tensions associated with the D.I.Y. (do it yourself) model and how forms of work, including aesthetic labour, are performed and experienced in virtual spaces such as social media plat- forms. In so doing, the paper contributes to nascent research on Millennials and nuances our understanding of the gendered nature of creative labour. Crucially, the paper also moves beyond typical masculinist conceptualisations of entrepreneurship, which focus on high-growth and high- technology businesses, to highlight the legitimacy, preva- lence and importance of alternative motivations, networks, identities and business practices within contemporary markets and creative industries.

  • 5.
    Brydges, Taylor
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Hracs, Brian J.
    Lavanga, Mariangela
    Evolution versus entrenchment: Debating the impact of digitization, democratization and diffusion in the global fashion industry2018In: International Journal of Fashion Studies, ISSN 2051-7106, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 365-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the report The State of Fashion 2017, written by Business of Fashion and the McKinsey Institute (2016), industry executives used three words to describe the current state of the fashion industry: uncertain, changing and challenging. Indeed, the fashion industry is undergoing dramatic transformations, from digitization and the rise of ‘see now, buy now’ fashions, to brands redefining the function and timing of fashion weeks, and increasing levels of global integration and competition (Crewe 2017). As such, the fashion industry has been recognized as a valuable lens through which to explore significant and ongoing changes to the production, curation and consumption of goods, services, and experiences (Brydges et al. 2014; Brydges 2017; D’Ovidio 2015; Hracs et al. 2013; Lavanga 2018; McRobbie 2016; Pratt et al. 2012).Drawing inspiration from this stream of scholarship, we organized four sessions titled Trending Now: The Changing Geographies of Fashion in the Digital Age at the Royal Geographical Society and Institute of British Geographers (RGS-IBG) conference in London, 30 August – 1 September 2017. In these sessions, researchers and practitioners from a wide range of locations and disciplines – including fashion studies, media studies, cultural economics, business and geography – came together to share research related to the structures, labour dynamics, spaces, value propositions and practices of the contemporary fashion industry.While a range of issues were discussed, the sessions were connected by an overarching theme. Namely, the extent to which power in the fashion industry is expanding or consolidating. While there is a prominent discourse that states that structures, systems and spaces within the global fashion industry have been (and will continue to be) disrupted by new actors, technologies, practices and cities, we collectively questioned whether the fashion industry has really entered an era of democratization, or if established power structures remain entrenched. Through empirical case studies from a variety of geographic contexts – from India to Italy – about different actors and activities within the industry, each presentation contributed new evidence and perspectives to this debate. The discussion below distils some of the key themes that emerged.

  • 6. Joosse, Sofie
    et al.
    Brydges, Taylor
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography. University of Bern, Switzerland.
    Blogging for Sustainability: The Intermediary Role of Personal Green Blogs in Promoting Sustainability2018In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 686-700Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rise of social media radically broadens the sources and platforms used for environmental communication. Especially personal green blogs are worthy of study as they are spaces of everyday cultural politics through which people make sense of sustainability issues, and because they entail a radical break from conventional media in terms of legitimacy, form, and content of environmental communication processes. This paper studies the representation of sustainability on personal green blogs, and the communication processes through which these representations are constructed. It does so through a qualitative study of Swedish-language blogs. We study three blogs in-depth: a living experiment blog on sustainable food practices; a lifestyle blog centered around green family life; and a blog about consuming green beauty products. The analysis shows that all three blogs translate the complex landscape of sustainability to individual everyday practices. Yet, what these sustainability practices entail differs considerably between the blogs, ranging from a-political and doable lifestyle choices to an onset to radical redefining of consumption. Also, the communication processes on the blogs differ in quality and quantity. The paper uses these insights to reflect on the debates about how environmental communication is shaped by blogging and social media practices.

  • 7. Leslie, Deborah
    et al.
    Brydges, Taylor
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Women, Aesthetic Labour, and Retail Work: A Case Study of Independent Fashion Retailers in Toronto2019In: Working Women in Canada: An Intersectional Approach / [ed] Leslie Nichols, Canadian Scholars , 2019, p. 269-286Chapter in book (Refereed)
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf