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  • 1.
    Axelsson Sohlberg, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Den skötsamme invandraren: Etnicitet och alkoholvanor i den svenska befolkningen2008In: Nykterhet i rörelse: Nykterhetens och Nykterhetsrörelsens utveckling efter 1970, SOBERs förlag, Sandviken , 2008, p. 261-298Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Axelsson Sohlberg, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    The development of drinking, non drinking and temperance movement2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Sohlberg, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Swedish Tobacco policy: from rational choice to ‘harm to others’2012In: A welfare policy patchwork: negotiating the public good in times of transition / [ed] Matilda Hellman, Gun Roos, Julius von Wright, Helsinki: Nordic Centre for Welfare and Social Issues (NVC) , 2012, p. 65-82Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter analyses the development of Swedish tobacco policy and tobacco regulation since the early 1990s. In addition, it looks at how this policy has been influenced by the World Health Organization, the European Union, the Nordic countries and various others stakeholders, and examines the effect of policy changes on smoking cessation in the Swedish population. The chapter is based on both primary and secondary sources such as policy documents, previous research and survey data. It is concluded that both the political and research focus has shifted from the provision of information to rational individuals to highlighting the effects of smoking to others. Swedish tobacco regulation has been influenced by policies in other Nordic countries, but it is largely a product of WHO and EU recommendations and directives. In an international perspective, Swedish tobacco policy seems to have been rather more reactive than proactive. It is also shown that policy decisions on pricing and availability, for instance, have a somewhat greater impact on smoking cessation than information. However, women tend to be more responsive than men to information campaigns and health warnings.

  • 4. Kühlhorn, Eckart
    et al.
    Axelsson Sohlberg, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    En analys av abstinens och alkoholkonsumtion: Med sikte på de nyktra och kyrkliga sektorerna i befolkningen2008In: Nykterhet i rörelse: Nykterhetens och Nykterhetsrörelsens utveckling efter 1970, SOBER förlag, Sandviken , 2008, p. 67-136Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Radwan, Samira
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Sohlberg, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    INTERNETALKOHOL: En kartläggning av självrapporterade alkoholbeställningar via Internet 2004 – 20122012Report (Other academic)
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  • 6.
    Ramstedt (red.), Mats
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Boman, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Engdahl, Barbro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Sohlberg, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Svensson, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Tal om alkohol 2010: en statistisk årsrapport från Monitorprojektet2010Report (Other academic)
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  • 7.
    Sohlberg, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alcohol consumption and the role of smokeless nicotine2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Sohlberg, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Changes in smoking in Sweden since the mid 20th century – the influence of age, gender, education, and socio-economic statusArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction/Aim: Identification of factors that predicts smoking initiation and cessation is of importance both for effective prevention strategies and cessation aid. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to characterise individuals that has started to smoke and individuals that quit smoking, with respect to age, sex, education, socio-economic circumstances, and family situation and analyse to what extent these variables predicts smoking initiation and smoking cessation. The results are discussed in relation to the policy and societal development in Sweden.

    Design/Method: The data consists of self-reported data on smoking experiences, obtained from the so-called Monitor-project during Oct 2009- May 2010. By the turn of each month 1 500 individuals, aged 16-84, from a representative sample in the Swedish population (n=12 008) were interviewed via telephone. The analyses consist of descriptive statistics as well as logistic regression models.

    Results: Smoking initiation and cessation is found to vary between socio-demographic and socio-economic factors, and the rapid decrease in smoking during the past decades has resulted in a rather vulnerable group of smokers in these aspects. The changes in smoking patterns can be understood and explained in relation to social and tobacco policy developments in Sweden.

    Discussion/Conclusions: The study concludes that the present situation, with a low smoking prevalence over all, however concentrated to rather vulnerable groups, such as young, low educated and single women, gives raise for the need of measures in the social-political framework. 

  • 9.
    Sohlberg, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Drinking patterns and the role of smokeless nicotine2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Sohlberg, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    How low can we go? Tobacco control in Sweden2016In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 339-341Article in journal (Other academic)
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    fulltext
  • 11.
    Sohlberg, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Identity changes in Smoking cessation- results from a Swedish sample of stable former smokersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research on recovering from different addictive behaviours has examined e.g. the need for change in lifestyle, the importance of social networks, and more medical aspects like how to overcome craving, and coping. However, as suggested by Koski-Jännes (2002), a recovery might require identity work to achieve a more permanent change. Thus, this is a study of the, eventual, long-term changes in identity among former smokers.

    Subjects were recruited from a representative sample of stable former smokers who previously had answered a postal survey (n=1683) concerning their process to a smoke-free life, and in relation to this been asked if they were willing to take part in a personal interview about their smoking cessation process. Out of convenience reasons, 150 interviewees were randomly selected among residents in Stockholm county (n=267), and out of these 75 had agreed to take part in a personal interview. After a second request 41 subjects were still willing to participate. Out of them, 10 women and 10 men were randomly chosen, and contacted at least three times via telephone during April and May 2012. The final sample consists of 19 former smokers (10 women, 9 men), who had been smoke-free for at least the latest 12 months before the interview.

    Finally, 19 personal, semi-structured, interviews were performed during May 2012. Respondents were asked to draw a life-line, and the interview circled around how they had experienced, understood, and interpreted the changes in their “smoking-career” – from initiation to cessation – with special emphasize on identity matters, and whether the changes in smoking also implied changes in respondents’ social and personal identity (Harré, 1983, Koski-Jännes, 2002).  The transcriptions of the semi-structured interviews were analyzed using basic Content Analysis (e.g. Morgan, 1993; White & Marsch, 2006).   The analyses showed that mainly women had benefited of an identity change in their smoking cessation process.  

  • 12.
    Sohlberg, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    In favour of tobacco control? Former smokers’ support for tobacco policies2019In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 496-510Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Tobacco control (TC) in Sweden is being continuously strengthened.

    Aims:

    The study aimed to examine attitudes towards different TC policies among former smokers, the difference between nicotine-free former smokers and those who use nicotine in the form of snus or nicotine replacement therapies (NRTs), and whether different TC strategies tend to become more acceptable over time.

    Methods:

    Respondents are part of a seven-year follow-up of former smokers in Sweden. Initially, 1400 respondents were contacted regarding participation and 705 answered a survey (response rate 50%). The present study used cross-sectional data on attitudes towards different TC policies and respondent’s level of support were measured on a 4-point scale. Analyses consist of percentage distribution of level of agreement, in total and between nicotine-free individuals and users of nicotine in the form of snus or NRTs, as well as logistic regressions in order to predict the odds for supporting the different policies. In addition, a percentage distribution of support for different policies introduced during different time-periods is shown.

    Results:

    There is an overall support for smoke-free environments. Nicotine users are, however, overall slightly more opposed, especially to policies aiming at denormalising smoking. Public support is important for successful implementation but resistance can pass, and interventions tend to become more acceptable over time.

    Conclusion:

    While smoke-free indoor environments can be justified by scientific evidence of harm to others, bans against smoking outdoors might be experienced as intrusive. Policies need to rest on scientific arguments and be seen as appropriate actions, underlining the importance of information for successful implementations.

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  • 13.
    Sohlberg, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Smoking cessation and gender differences – results from a Swedish sample2015In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 259-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Previous research has concluded that the prevalence of smoking, as well as reasons to quit and strategies to become smoke-free, varies markedly by gender.  However, we lack a more comprehensive understanding of the process that leads to a quit attempt and a positive long-term outcome, and also the gender specific mechanism behind a successful cessation. The aim is therefore to investigate motives for, mechanism in, and factors behind smoking cessation, with special regard to gender differences.

    Data/Method: During Oct 2009- May 2010 respondents were recruited via the so-called Monitor-project. By the turn of each month 1,500 individuals, aged 16-80, from a representative sample in the Swedish population (n=12 000) were interviewed via telephone. Via a screening process those who stated being previous daily smokers, but smoke-free for at last 12 months, were asked to answer a postal survey (n=1 683) concerning their process to a smoke-free life. The analyses consist of both descriptive statistics and factor analyses.

    Results: The results indicate that women’s smoking filled several functions in life, that they often quit for the sake of others, and that the cessation process was quite complex. Men tended to experience smoking as quite unproblematic and often quit out of more self-oriented reasons. Moreover, even though a majority quit smoking without any professional help or other means the use among those who did was clearly gendered.

    Conclusions: Gender differences were found in reasons to smoke, reasons to quit, and strategies to quit smoking why cessation strategies should be gender sensitive, taking special needs into account.

  • 14.
    Sohlberg, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Smoking cessation in Sweden - gender, pathways, and identity2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on smoking has to a great deal been conducted within a public health or a medical context, or focused on policy making. Fewer studies have taken their point of departure in a social sciences context, and still fewer have analysed why individuals start and cease to smoke, and how and why smoking patterns on an aggregate level change over time and vary between different population groups.

    The aim of this dissertation is to analyse changes in the Swedish tobacco consumption with special emphasis at elucidating the decrease in smoking during the past half-century from different angels. Thus, the first paper explore if and how changes in smoking patterns can be understood and explained with reference to Sweden’s development as a welfare state, and in relation to socio-demographic and socio-economic circumstances. The second paper focuses on the long-term pathways to smoking cessation, by discerning several distinct trajectories from smoker to non-smoker. The third paper analyses gender differences with regard to reasons to smoke, experiences of smoking, and central elements in the cessation process. Finally, in the fourth paper, the issue of to what extent smoking cessation can be described as a process of identity change is explored.  

    Smoking initiation and cessation vary by socio-demographic and socio-economic factors, and the rapid decrease in smoking has resulted in a rather vulnerable group of smokers in these aspects. The results also indicate that the cessation process is complex, with personal and structural factors interacting in the long-term process, leading to multiple pathways to a smoke-free life. Moreover, they point to gender differences in reasons to smoke and to quit, and in strategies to quit smoking. In addition, identity change seems to be important in remaining smoke-free. The stated inequality in gender and class points in the direction that structural changes and social policies might be of need to decrease smoking even further.

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    Sohlberg Dissertation
  • 15.
    Sohlberg, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Tal om tobak 2012: Tobakskonsumtionen i Sverige 20122012Report (Other academic)
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    fulltext
  • 16.
    Sohlberg, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Tal om Tobak. Tobakskonsumtionen i Sverige 2010.2011Report (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Sohlberg, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Tobacco: science and policy impact on world public health2011In: Nordisk Alkohol- og narkotikatidsskrift (NAT), ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 397-400Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Sohlberg, Tove
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Wennberg, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Developmental pathways to smoking cessation2014In: Drugs and alcohol today, ISSN 1745-9265, E-ISSN 2042-8359, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 96-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – To a great extent research about smoking cessation has focussed on effects from different support programs and means, in spite of that several studies have shown that over 90 percent quit smoking without such help. Factors that are important for the individual in the process from being a smoker to becoming smoke-free is less examined and also how these factors interact. The purpose of this paper is to describe typical careers or pathways that end up with a successful smoking cessation.

    Design/methodology/approach – Respondents were recruited during Oct 2009-May 2010 via screening-questions in the so-called Monitor – project. By the turn of each month 1,500 individuals, aged 16-84, from a representative sample in the Swedish population, were interviewed via telephone. Respondents who stated being previous daily smokers, but smoke-free for at least 12 months, and agreed to participate were asked to answer a postal survey (n=¼1,683) concerning their process to a smoke-free life. The analyses of data included the linking of individuals between different states in the stages toward becoming smoke-free.

    Findings – Several typical pathways were described and respondents with more severe smoking habits followed different pathways than individuals with milder problems. Nicotine replacement therapys or Swedish smoke-free tobacco was not found to be a component in any of the typical pathways.

    Originality/value – Smoking cessation is a heterogeneous phenomenon and individuals can follow several pathways to become smoke-free, therefore this study adds to a more nuanced picture of smoking cessation and also expands the knowledge concerning smoking cessation in individual long-term processes.

1 - 18 of 18
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