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  • 1.
    Allertz, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Att motivera och/eller manipulera: En begreppsutredande litteraturstudie2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to theoretically investigate the concepts of the interpersonal actions 'to motivate' and 'to manipulate' and also to examine possible differences and similarities between the two. The method used is a conceptual review based on the Self-Determination Theory, related to the concept of motivation, and Machiavellianism, related to the concept of manipu-lation. The results show that 'to motivate', according to Self-Determination Theory, concerns influencing the intrinsic or extrinsic motivation, where intrinsic motivation is related to the feeling of self-determination, inner locus of causality, being or feeling competent and exercise activities for the pleasure of it, whilst extrinsic motivation is related to external locus of cau-sality, external pressure and engaging in activities for the purpose of reaching a goal or re-ward. 'To manipulate' is according to Machiavellianism based on the manipulator doing whatever it takes to reach a certain goal and gain something for himself with no regard of what methods being used. The comparative analysis showed that the crucial difference in how an behaviour is interpreted as either, or both, motivating and manipulative is based on who is doing the interpretation, what information she has and which aspects that are focused on.

  • 2.
    Aras, Elizabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Early Opportunities for Quality Learning: A Comparative Study of Swedish Preschools' Language Practice2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish preschool is internationally known for its high quality. Children in Sweden are given early educational opportunities to learn and develop prior to their school start. The Swedish preschool activity should include an overall language developmental approach; however, studies show that the children's conditions for language instruction vary intra-nationally. While the Swedish preschool curriculum reflects on children's desire to learn, the preschool staff should be aware of their own practical theory in order to arrange for learning. Research show that early childhood education of high quality benefits children's future school results. Thus, this research aims at studying children's opportunities for quality learning and development in the Swedish preschool, by exploring the content of preschool teaching. The role of the preschool is to provide all children with an education of high quality. This study aims at investigating what quality can mean in terms of preschool language instruction. To generate an understanding of quality, the study focuses on the structure and process inputs in six public preschools and two municipalities. To provide insights about the preschools' practices, a qualitative approach has been used to conduct interviews with preschool heads and employees from education administrations, as well as questionnaires with preschool staff and observations of learning environments. As the quality inputs vary between the preschools and municipalities it affects the outputs of the children's language development. This research makes it evident that the outcomes are mainly dependent on the preschool staff's abilities and competences of implementing development.

  • 3.
    Axelsson, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Education in Languages and Language Development.
    Litteracitetshändelser och litteracitetspraxis i flerspråkiga förskolor2009In: Teacher diversity in a diverse school: challenges and opportunities for teacher education / [ed] Bjørg-Karin Ringen, Ole Kolbjørn Kjørven, Antoinette Gagné, Oslo: Oplandske Bokforlag , 2009, p. 251-265Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Benson, Carol
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Centre for Teaching and Learning.
    Heugh, Kathleen
    Bogale, Berhanu
    Yohannes, Mekonnen Alemu Gebre
    Multilingual Education in Ethiopian Primary Schools2012In: Multilingual Education and Sustainable Diversity Work: From Periphery to Center / [ed] Tove Skutnabb-Kangas, Kathleen Heugh, London: Taylor & Francis, 2012, p. 32-61Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Benson, Carol
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Centre for Teaching and Learning.
    Kosonen, Kimmo
    A Critical Comparison of Language-In-Education Policy and Practice in Four Southeast Asian Countries and Ethiopia2012In: Multilingual Education and Sustainable Diversity Work: From Periphery to Center / [ed] Tove Skutnabb-Kangas, Kathleen Heugh, London: Taylor & Francis, 2012, p. 111-137Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Brodin, Jane
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Kommunikativ kompetens - begrepp och definitioner2005Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Brodin, Jane
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Non-verbal communication in children with severe disabilities2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The paper was presented at South West University "Neofit Rilsky", Blagoevgrad, Bulgaria, September 17-23, 2007.

    Target groups: Speech therapists, teachers, students

  • 8.
    Cleve, Linn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    "Det ingår liksom att anstränga sig lite": En studie om pedagogers förhållningssätt och tankar om språkstimulerande arbetssätt för flerspråkiga barn i förskolan.2010Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to shed light on how some teachers with different backgrounds, in a homogenous Swedish-speaking and a more multicultural area, think about and work with multilingual children in preschool. My research questions concerned the teachers’ vision of how a language stimulating environment should be designed. If multilingual children need a particular design - plus positive and negative aspects of the work with multilingual preschool children, as well as if there’s differences between the statements of the various professional roles. I also wanted to find out whether children's mother tongue was spoken in the everyday praxis or not - or if the child’s origins were highlighted in other ways. Interviews were used as my reasearch metod.

    My results showed that all teachers stress the use of a nuanced, rich and naming language in everyday praxis. For children with a mother tongue other than Swedish, it becomes more important with language aid, like pictures and concrete materials, according to teachers. Problematic aspects of speaking several languages in preschool were partly organizational - to obtain staff with multilingual skills - and partly to keep a balance in also emphasizing Swedish. In two of the preschools’ everyday activity, teachers speak languages other than Swedish. They do this referring to the positive cognitive effects on the child. Contrary to this, a preschool teacher at another preschool chose not to speak other languages in everyday activity. She feels that this sends out negative signals to the children whose first language is not spoken by any of the teachers. In general, there was a position with the teachers that problems and difficulties are in the profession, making an effort forms a part of the occupation.

  • 9.
    Cunningham, Una
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    How much linguistics do language teachers need?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The amount of linguistics required or available as part of an undergraduate degree with a major in a foreign language degree has varied through time and from country to country. Currently in New Zealand it is possible to graduate with a double major in in European or Asian languages without ever having come closer to linguistics than a grammar or pronunciation course. Language graduates may not have studied much in the way of linguistics during their degree study. This means that if they choose to enter initial secondary teacher education, they may be quite linguistically naive, despite years of language study.

     

    Current thinking on language education is that the combination of meaningful spoken and written input in the target language, and the possibility of meaningful interaction in the target language are enough to allow students to acquire communicative competence in the target language. However, all but the most radical believe that most learners will be helped by also learning about the target language – in effect learning something of the pragmatics, syntax, morphology, phonology and phonetics of the target language. Communicative competence is the goal for language education, and this paper examines the role of implicit and explicit linguistic knowledge and linguistic teaching in the learning and teaching of languages and the disconnect between language graduates’ linguistic understanding and language education.

  • 10.
    Cunningham, Una
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Teachability and Learnability of English Pronunciation Features for Vietnamese-Speaking Learners2013In: Teaching and Researching English Accents in Native and Non-native Speakers / [ed] Ewa Waniek-Klimczak, Linda R. Shockey, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, p. 3-14Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anyone who has tried to learn a language with a very different sound system will understand the challenges faced by speakers of a language as different as Vietnamese who are attempting to learn to speak English in a way that is intelligible to non-speakers of Vietnamese. Many learners have very limited opportunity to hear model pronunciations other than their teacher’s, and no opportunity at all to speak in English outside the classroom. Vietnamese-accented English is characterised by a number of features which ride roughshod over English morphosyntax, resulting in speech that is extremely difficult to reconstruct for the non-Vietnamese-speaking listener. Some of these features appear to be more difficult to learn to avoid than others. Phonotactic constraints in L1 appear to be persistent even in L2, and L1 phonological rules will, apparently, often apply in L2 unless they are blocked in some way. Perception of salient (to native listeners) target pronunciations is often lacking, and learners may not be aware that their pronunciation is not intelligible. Despite years of language study, many learners are unable to produce some native speaker targets. Vietnamese learners typically exhibit a set of characteristic pronunciation features in English, and the aim of this study is to see which of these are susceptible to remediation through explicit teaching. This explicit teaching is compared with a less direct, less interactive kind of teaching, involving drawing native and native-like pronunciation of problematic features of English pronunciation to the learners’ attention. The results of this study can then be interpreted in terms of teachability and learnability, which do not always go hand in hand. If we understand what kinds of phonetic features are teachable and how learnability varies for different features, we can target those features where there is a good return for effort spent, resulting in efficient teaching.

  • 11.
    Cárcamo García, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Las actitudes y creencias de aprendientes brasileños de ELE hacia las variedades diatópicas del español: El caso de las formas de tratamiento2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In Brazil, diatopic language variation gains importance in the teaching of Spanish as a foreign language, due to the geographic situation of Brazil between Spanish America and as a result of its economic and cultural relations, on the one hand, with the other Latin American countries, whose official language is Spanish, and on the other hand, with Spain. This paper focuses on the study of attitudes and linguistic beliefs towards diatopic varieties of Spanish by Brazilian students of Spanish as a Foreign Language (SFL), since such attitudes and beliefs play an important role in motivating students to learn, and therefore, in their acquisition level of the foreign language. Apart from systematically studying the perceptions and attitudes regarding the diatopic varieties of Spanish, this study seeks to specifically investigate attitudes towards the forms of address in Spanish (tú, vos, usted, vosotros and ustedes), because it is a variable linguistic topic, both geographically and stylistically. Furthermore, it studies the relationship between language proficiency of the students, their academic profile and their contact with speakers of varieties of Spanish as well as the general attitudes that they have towards Hispanic varieties. Based on empirical data, the discussion considers implications for teaching of SFL in a context where Spanish is conceived as a pluricentric language. To investigate all these variables, a questionnaire was distributed to 60 Brazilian students enrolled in the Spanish courses of the Language Learning Centre at the University of Campinas, who also follow their undergraduate and posgraduate studies at the same university. Using both direct and indirect observation techniques regarding attitudes, and quantitative and qualitative analysis, the paper concludes that there is a preference for the Latin American varieties compared to the Peninsular varieties amongst Brazilian students of Spanish. These results are different from the ones presented in previous research in this area. In the case of attitudes towards the forms of address in Spanish, the results show that there is no correspondence of these attitudes with the general attitudes towards diatopic varieties, since vos, which is exclusively characteristic of the Latin American varieties, is conceived as one of the least used and most unnecessary forms in Spanish.

  • 12.
    De Matos Lundström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Los aspectos pragmáticos en manuales suecos de español como lengua extranjera: Su contribución al desarrollo de la competencia pragmática en el bachillerato2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to try to determine to what extent and in what way four Swedish textbooks on Spanish as a foreign language (SFL) treat pragmatic aspects, as well as to evaluate the potential and relevance of the metapragmatic information and activities related to pragmatic aspects provided by the textbooks, for the development of pragmatic awareness and competence in Spanish. This study parts from the notion of pragmatic competence as a skill of knowing how to create and understand meanings in interaction effectively (Thomas, 1995), which in intercultural interaction probably requires extra-linguistic knowledge more than language skills (cf. Bravo, 2005). The hypothesis postulated at the beginning of the study was that the manuals would not fully explain why certain language is being used in certain contexts, that the pragmatic content would be scarcely varied and rather difficult to assimilate and that the exercises would not be designed primarily to develop a pragmatic competence. To some extent it can be said that the hypothesis is confirmed: the manuals could have been more comprehensive in terms of the topics covered, they could also have varied and explained those issues further. Despite the fact that there seems to be an effort to incorporate extra-linguistic information and communicative activities, the results indicate that there is a lack of emphasis on or progression on how to treat these issues. For example, there are no didactic models or suggestions in the teacher’s guide, nor is additional information provided elsewhere; usually the metapragmatic information is not combined with any activities, and the activities that aim to develop communicative skills are not combined with further metapragmatic information.

  • 13.
    Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, The Institute for Interpretation and Translation Studies.
    Expertise and Explicitation in the Translation Process2005Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book addresses the complexities of the translation process. Informed by theoretical and methodological advances in translation studies, research on writing and the expertise paradigm, it explores translation as a text reproduction task. With triangulation of data from Russian-Swedish translation – think-aloud-methodology and computer logging of the writing process - it makes a cross-sectional comparison of subjects with different amount of translation experience, highlighting crucial aspects of professional competence and expertise in translation. The book also elaborates a method for a combined product and process analysis, applying it to the study of one type of explicitation: increased cohesive explicitness of the target text. The results have implications for translation theory and pedagogy.

  • 14.
    Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Ehrensberger-Dow, Maureen
    Cognitive space: Exploring the situational interface2016In: Translation Spaces, ISSN 2211-3711, E-ISSN 2211-372X, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Eriksson, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Traunmüller, Hartmut
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Perception of vocal effort and distance from the speaker on the basis of vowel utterances.2002In: Percept Psychophys, ISSN 0031-5117, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 131-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sound pressure level of vowels reflects several non-linguistic and linguistic factors: distance from the speaker, vocal effort, and vowel quality. Increased vocal effort also involves an emphasis of higher frequency components and increases in F0 and F1. This should allow listeners to distinguish it from decreased distance, which does not have these additional effects. It is shown that listeners succeed in doing so on the basis of single vowels if phonated, but not if whispered. The results agree with a theory according to which listeners demodulate speech signals and evaluate the properties of the carrier signal, which reflects most of the para- and extra-linguistic information, apart from those of its linguistic modulation. It is observed that listeners allow for between-vowel variation, but tend to substantially underestimate changes in both kinds of distance.

  • 16.
    Eriksson, Kimmo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Autism-spectrum traits predict humor styles in the general population2013In: Humor: An International Journal of Humor Research, ISSN 0933-1719, E-ISSN 1613-3722, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 461-475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research shows that individuals with Asperger syndrome or high-functioning autism tend to have impaired processing of humor and laugh at things that are not commonly found funny. Here the relationship between humor styles and the broader autism phenotype was investigated in a sample of the general population. The autism-spectrum quotient (AQ) and the humor styles questionnaire (HSQ) were administered to six hundred US participants recruited through an Internet-based service. On the whole, high scores on AQ were negatively related to positive humor styles and unrelated to negative humor styles. However, AQ subscales representing different autism-spectrum traits exhibited different patterns. In particular, the factor poor mind-reading was associated with higher scores on negative humor styles and the factor attention to detail was associated with higher scores on all humor styles, suggesting a more nuanced picture of the relationship between autism-spectrum traits and humor.

  • 17. Fahey, Richard P
    et al.
    Diehl, Randy L
    Traunmüller, Hartmut
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. Fonetik.
    Perception of back vowels: effects of varying F1 - F0 Bark distance.1996In: J Acoust Soc Am, ISSN 0001-4966, Vol. 99, no 4 Pt 1, p. 2350-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a study of vowel height perception using front vowels, Hoemeke and Diehl [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 96, 661 - 674 (1994)] found that F1 - F0 distance was the best predictor of perceived vowel height for the phonological distinction [+/-high], while for two other vowel height distinctions F1 alone was the best predictor. Further, the [+/-high] identification function was defined by a sharp boundary located at 3 to 3.5 Bark F1-F0 distance. One hypothesis offered was that F1 - F0 distance had cue value for the [+/-high] distinction because of an underlying quantal region on the F1 - F0 distance dimension. However, the results are also predicted if it is supposed that F1 - F0 distance is a cue for vowel height only for pure height distinctions. The present study further tested these possibilities, using back vowels. The results allowed us to reject both as general explanations of vowel height perception. However, the results were consistent with a third possible explanation, namely, that phonetic quality is determined by the tonotopic distances between any adjacent spectral peaks (e.g., F3 - F2, F2 - F1, and F1 - F0), with greater perceptual weight accorded to smaller distances.

  • 18.
    Ganuza, Natalia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hedman, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Ideology vs. practice: Is there a space for pedagogical translanguaging in mother tongue instruction?2017In: New Perspectives on Translanguaging and Education / [ed] BethAnne Paulsrud, Jenny Rosén, Boglárka Straszer, Åsa Wedin, Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 2017, p. 208-226Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Ganuza, Natalia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hedman, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Modersmålsundervisning, läsförståelse och betyg – modersmålsundervisningens roll för elevers skolresultat2018In: Nordand: nordisk tidsskrift for andrespråksforskning, ISSN 0809-9227, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 4-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study explores the relationship between participation in mother tongue instruction (MTI), students’ reading comprehension, and their overall school results. The study expands on the results of an earlier study, which found that Somali–Swedish speaking students who had attended Somali MTI for several years, performed better on reading comprehension in Somali, than Somali–Swedish speaking students of the same ages, who had not taken Somali MTI (Ganuza & Hedman 2017a). The present study revisits the results of 36 participants in the earlier study, and explores the relationship between their scores on reading comprehension and their grades at the end of 6th or 7th grade; in MTI, Swedish as a second language, Mathematics, and overall grade points. Most importantly, the results show consistent positive correlations between participants’ reading comprehension in Somali and their school results. This correlation is also stronger and more comprehensive than the one found between their reading comprehension in Swedish and their school results. In the paper, we argue that these results indirectly point to a positive relationship between MTI and students’ school results, which, if confirmed by future studies, is quite remarkable considering the limited teaching time allotted to MTI and its’ marginalized position in the Swedish school system.

  • 20.
    Ganuza, Natalia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hedman, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Modersmålsundervisning: möjligheter och utmaningar2018In: En god fortsättning: nyanländas fortsatta väg i skola och samhälle / [ed] Tore Otterup, Gilda Kästen-Ebeling, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 163-180Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Ganuza, Natalia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hedman, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    The Impact of Mother Tongue Instruction on the Development of Biliteracy: Evidence from Somali-Swedish Bilinguals2017In: Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0142-6001, E-ISSN 1477-450XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates if participation in mother tongue instruction (henceforth MTI) impacts the biliteracy proficiency of young bilinguals, drawing on examples from Somali–Swedish bilinguals and Somali MTI in a Swedish school context. In the study, biliteracy was operationalized as reading proficiency and vocabulary knowledge in two languages, which was tested with measures of word decoding, reading comprehension, and vocabulary breadth and depth. The study was designed to allow for cross-sectional, longitudinal, and cross-linguistic analyses of data. Overall, the results showed that participation in MTI contributed positively to participants’ results on Somali reading comprehension, beyond the influence of chronological age, age of arrival, and reported home language and literacy use. Furthermore, higher results in Somali were associated with higher results on the same measures in Swedish, in particular for the reading measures. In sum, the results indicate that MTI has an impact on some aspects of literacy proficiency in the mother tongue, despite the restricted time allocated for it (<1 h/week). They also indicate that MTI, albeit indirectly, may benefit the stated proficiencies in the language of schooling.

  • 22.
    Hallengren, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Invandrarbarnens problem1976In: Svensk Tidskrift, ISSN 0039-677X, Vol. 63, no 1, p. 36-42Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Hayakawa Thor, Masako
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Thinking and seeing for speaking: The viewpoint preference in Swedish/Japanese monolinguals and bilinguals2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    “Linguistic relativity” has been studied for a long time. Many empirical studies have been conducted on cross-linguistic differences to find support for the influence of language on thought. This study proposes viewpoint (defined as the point from which the conceptualizer sees and construes the event) as a cross-linguistic difference, and explores whether the linguistic constraint and preference of subjective/objective construal can affect one’s cognitive activity as viewpoint. As Japanese is a subjectivity-prominent language whereas Swedish is not, data elicited from monolingual adolescences (aged 12-16) in Japan and Sweden were compared. A set of tasks which consisted of non-verbal tasks (scene-visualisation) and verbal tasks (narrative of comic strips) was performed in order to elicit the participants’ viewpoints. The same set of tasks was assigned to simultaneous Swedish-Japanese bilingual adolescences in Sweden. The bilinguals took the set of non-verbal and verbal tasks twice, once in Swedish and once in Japanese. The results demonstrated a clear difference between the monolingual groups both in the non-verbal and verbal tasks. The Japanese monolinguals showed a higher preference for subjective viewpoint. The bilinguals’ viewpoint preference had a tendency to fall between that of monolinguals of both languages. This finding indicates that the bilinguals’ viewpoint preference may be influenced by both languages. This study demonstrates for the first time that the speaker’s viewpoint can be affected not only in verbal tasks but also in non-verbal tasks. The findings suggest that a language may influence the speaker’s way of construing events. It is also implied that the influences from different languages in bilinguals can be bidirectional. However, the influence does not seem to be all or nothing. Regardless of the language, one’s event construal is more or less the same. Nevertheless, the findings indicate that the linguistic subjectivity in a language tends to counteract the universal construal.

  • 24. Heugh, Kathleen
    et al.
    Benson, Carol
    Stockholm University, Centre for Teaching and Learning.
    Yohannes, Mekonnen Alemu Gebre
    Bogale, Berhanu
    Implications for Multilingual Education: Student Achievement in Different Models of Education in Ethiopia2012In: Multilingual Education and Sustainable Diversity Work: From Periphery to Center / [ed] Tove Skutnabb-Kangas, Kathleen Heugh, London: Taylor & Francis, 2012, p. 239-262Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Jansson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Strimling, Pontus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Modeling the Evolution of Creoles2015In: Language Dynamics and Change, ISSN 2210-5824, E-ISSN 2210-5832, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 1-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Various theories have been proposed regarding the origin of creole languages. Describing a process where only the end result is documented involves several methodological difficulties. In this paper we try to address some of the issues by using a novel mathematical model together with detailed empirical data on the origin and structure of Mauritian Creole. Our main focus is on whether Mauritian Creole may have originated only from a mutual desire to communicate, without a target language or prestige bias. Our conclusions are affirmative. With a confirmation bias towards learning from successful communication, the model predicts Mauritian Creole better than any of the input languages, including the lexifier French, thus providing a compelling and specific hypothetical model of how creoles emerge. The results also show that it may be possible for a creole to develop quickly after first contact, and that it was created mostly from material found in the input languages, but without inheriting their morphology.

  • 26.
    Johnen, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies, Portuguese.
    Review of: "Arntz, Reiner: Fachbezogene Mehrsprachigkeit in Recht und Technik. Hildesheim: Olms 2001 (Studien zu Sprache und Technik 8)"2003In: Informationen Deutsch als Fremdsprache : Info DaF, ISSN 0724-9616, Vol. 30, no 2/3, p. 146-148Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Jonsson, Carla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Språk och kultur som resurser i undervisningen2008In: Att äga språk - Språkdidaktikens möjligheter: En antologi om och för lärare i skolan / [ed] Inger Nordheden, Arja Paulin, Stockholm: Stockholms universitets förlag , 2008, p. 143-158Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Jonsson, Carla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Språkutvecklande ämnesundervisning: Exempel från moderna språk2008In: Att äga språk - Språkdidaktikens möjligheter: En antologi om och för lärare i skolan / [ed] Inger Nordheden, Arja Paulin, Stockholm: Stockholms universitets förlag , 2008, p. 159-176Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Jonsson, Rickard
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Milani, Tommaso M
    Department of Linguistics, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg.
    Här är alla lika!: Jämlikhetsideologi och konstruktionen av den "Andre" i media och skola2009In: Utbildning och Demokrati, ISSN 1102-6472, E-ISSN 2001-7316, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 67-86Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Junefelt, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Mikhail Bakhtin - A missing link in hypothesis about children's linguistic and cognitive development.2008In: Perspectives and Limits of Dialogism in Mikhail Bakhtin.: Applications in Psychology, Education, Art and Culture. / [ed] Marios A. Pourkos, Crete, Greece: University of Crete , 2008, p. 197-213Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Junefelt, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Nordin, PiaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Proceedings from the Second International Interdisciplinary Conference on Perspectives and Limits of Dialogism in Mikhail Bakhtin, 3-5 June, 20092010Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    (Preface) This conference focused on the core of Bakhtin’s theory, which concerns dialogue and dialogicality. The conference themes reflected his notion that the “I” and the “self”, the “you” and the “other” are embedded in each other so that each affects the other and as a whole they create a centrifugal force around which communication and life circle. The choice of the two-faced Janus figure as the symbol of the conference reflects the inward and outward aspects of communication’s inherent dialogue and dialogicality. As an ancient Roman god of beginnings and doorways, of the rising and setting sun, looking in opposite directions, Janus has been associated with polarities, that is, seeing different and contrasting aspects and characteristics. As a metaphor it describes Bakhtin’s view on dialogues and dialogicality within or between “selves” and “others”. As a metaphorical symbol it captured the intent, purpose and outcome of the conference as reflected in this collection of papers.

  • 32.
    Karlander, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Backjumps: writing, watching, erasing train graffiti2018In: Social Semiotics, ISSN 1035-0330, E-ISSN 1470-1219, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 41-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with mobile semiotics. First and foremost, it discusses mobility as a semiotic device. The analysis engages with backjumps, a genre of train graffiti that draws inventively on various forms of movement. The term backjump refers to any fairly elaborate graffiti piece painted on trains in traffic, notably during the trains’ extended stops at terminal stations. The examples focus on the Stockholm metro, where a rigorous anti-graffiti policy has been firmly in place: graffiti is quickly cleaned off trains and a range of strategies is implemented to keep graffiti writing under wraps. By slyly inserting graffiti into the metro system, the mobility-driven backjump practice allows graffiti writers to temporarily subvert this semiotic regime. Furthermore, the forms of semiotic mobility at play are not limited to the movement of the trains. As the present study shows, mobile backjumps are entangled in other patterns of mobility, which jointly underwrite a number of interlinked semiotic processes.

  • 33.
    Karlander, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    State categories, state vision and vernacular woes in Sweden’s language politics2018In: Language Policy, ISSN 1568-4555, E-ISSN 1573-1863, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 343-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the politics of classification in contemporary Sweden. It analyses the language political dispute that has developed over the language political regulation of Övdalsk, a non-standard form of Scandinavian spoken in Älvdalen in northern central Sweden. The analysis focuses on the ways in which a discursive exchange over metalinguistic categories contributes to the efficacy of a state vision of linguistic divisions. In the wake of Sweden’s ratification of the European Charter for Regional and Minority Languages (ECRML), and the language political reforms in which the ratification was embedded, Övdalsk has emerged as a contentious issue. Over three decades (1990s–2010s), the question of what Övdalsk ‘is’—a ‘language’, a ‘dialect’ or something else—has surged repeatedly in political, public and scholarly deliberations (i.e. in expert reports, in policy documents and in scientific publications). Nevertheless, the interests placed in this muddled taxonomic issue have not yet been subjected to any sociolinguistic analysis. Drawing on Bourdieu’s work on the state, the article attends to the ways in which the exchange over Övdalsk has paid tribute to an increasingly entrenched symbolic order. Commenting on Sweden’s commitment to the ECRML more generally, the article accounts for how and why an officialised vision of linguistic division has been rendered symbolically effective. Accordingly, the article argues that a sensitisation to the forms of tacit agreement that underwrite contention is a suitable lens for grasping the maintenance of a political order as legitimate and effective.

  • 34.
    Kurnik, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Bilingual Lexical Access in Reading: Analyzing the Effect of Semantic Context on Non-Selective Access in Bilingual Memory2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Recent empirical studies about the neurological executive nature of reading in bilinguals differ in their evaluations of the degree of selective manifestation in lexical access as implicated by data from early and late reading measures in the eye-tracking paradigm. Currently two scenarios are plausible: (1) Lexical access in reading is fundamentally language non-selective and top-down effects from semantic context can influence the degree of selectivity in lexical access; (2) Cross-lingual lexical activation is actuated via bottom-up processes without being affected by top-down effects from sentence context. In an attempt to test these hypotheses empirically, this study analyzed reader-text events arising when cognate facilitation and semantic constraint interact in a 22 factorially designed experiment tracking the eye movements of 26 Swedish-English bilinguals reading in their L2. Stimulus conditions consisted of high- and low-constraint sentences embedded with either a cognate or a non-cognate control word. The results showed clear signs of cognate facilitation in both early and late reading measures and in either sentence conditions. This evidence in favour of the non-selective hypothesis indicates that the manifestation of non-selective lexical access in reading is not constrained by top-down effects from semantic context.

  • 35.
    Lindahl, Carolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Law, Department of Law. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    English in the Swedish Legal System and University Law Programme2006Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a critical overview of the current use of English within legal education and the legal profession in Sweden. In addition, it attempts to characterize attitudes towards the use of English within Swedish law practice. The paper will make use of information obtained from a selection of law firms, the Swedish National Courts Administration and the Swedish Public Office of Prosecution. It will also make use of comments and information from a selection of professionals and other bodies such as the European Commission, the Swedish Language Council and the Swedish Bar Association.  The central aim of this essay is to present a clear picture of the extent to which English is actually used within current Swedish legal practice. It directly addresses the question of whether the level of English that Swedish law graduates are exposed to in their legal studies adequately provides them with the skills required by the professional legal world.

    It is claimed that there is an apparent miscommunication between legal education and its corresponding profession, which is creating a very unfortunate situation for students. In addition, it is suggested that redesigning the Swedish law programme, as a response to the demands of English within the Swedish legal profession, is necessary to properly prepare students for legal practise in Sweden. The law programme must function as a platform for theoretical growth as well as the future, practical success of students. Striving for excellence among students should not be restricted to the theoretical aspect of a subject but must include the ability of students to put their theoretical knowledge to practical use. It is argued that English is a needed supplement in the successful practise of law in Sweden and as such must be an integrated part of the legal education program.

  • 36. Lindqvist, Christina
    et al.
    Bardel, Camilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Exploring the Impact of the Proficiency and Typology Factors: Two Cases of Multilingual Learners' L3 Learning2014In: Essential Topics in Applied Linguistics and Multilingualism: Studies in Honor of David Singleton / [ed] Mirosław Pawlak, Larissa Aronin, Cham: Springer, 2014, p. 253-266Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines lexical crosslinguistic influence (CLI) from L1 and L2 in two cases of L3 learning. It focuses on the role of the proficiency level of the background languages and of typological proximity in the activation of the background languages in L3 oral production. Earlier research has shown that both these factors play a role for CLI. Here we aim at further understanding the role of these factors, and how they are related to the proficiency level of the L3. The first case, which will be summarized briefly and used as a point of comparison in this chapter, concerns a Swedish learner of Italian L3, with English, French and Spanish as L2s (Bardel and Lindqvist 2007). The results showed that low-proficiency Spanish L2 was the background language that was most used in the beginning of the acquisition process of Italian, especially in code-switches of function words. High-proficiency French L2 was also used but in a different way, mostly in word construction attempts. Both the proficiency and the typology factor played a role, but their impact varied at different stages of development in the L3. The second case concerns a bilingual Swedish/Italian L1 speaker learning Spanish L3, with English and French as L2s. The data was gathered following the same procedure as in the first study, and consist of three recordings of interviews and retellings. The results indicate that the proficiency and typology factors are decisive for CLI here too, but in slightly different ways as compared to the first case. Italian L1 is used for both code-switches and word construction attempts, suggesting that a high-proficiency language may well be activated for both purposes, if it is similar enough to the target language. These results show that further investigation of both factors is necessary for our understanding of their interplay.

  • 37.
    Lindström, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Literacy in a Dying Language: The Case of Kuot, New Ireland, Papua New Guinea2007In: Language Planning and Policy: Issues in Language Planning and Literacy / [ed] Anthony J. Liddicoat, Clevedon: Multilingual Matters, 2007, p. 185-208Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Kuot is a language in a critical situation. Most adults of lower middle age and older are full speakers but children are not learning it. In other words, it will become extinct in a few decades if nothing is done; but it is not too late if the community decides to turn it around, and do so fast. Thus far, the community has shown little interest. Into this situation, vernacular elementary education was introduced. While the community expects this to work for language survival, the aim of the education policy is the eventual transfer of literacy skills to English. This paper describes the tensions between these conflicting goals, and the various components that make up the specific situation of Kuot, including vernacular literacy, orthographic considerations arising from the language’s precarious situation, and the eventual extension of the internet era to Melanesia.

  • 38.
    Lindström, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Topics in the grammar of Kuot, a non-Austronesian language of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea2002Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis describes certain areas in the grammar of the little-known Kuot language, spoken by some 1,500 people in New Ireland Province in Papua New Guinea. Kuot is an isolate, and is the only non-Austronesian (Papuan) language of that province. The analyses presented here are based on original data from 18 months of linguistic fieldwork.

    The first chapter provides an overview of Kuot grammar, and gives details of earlier mentions of the language, and of data collection and the fieldwork situation. The second chapter presents information about the prehistory and history of the area, the social system, kinship system and culture of Kuot speakers, as well as dialectal variation and prognosis of survival of the language. Chapter three treats Kuot phonology, with particular emphasis on the factors that govern allophonic variation, and on the expression of word stress and the functions of intonation. Word classes and the criteria used to define them are presented in Chapter four, which also contains a discussion of types of morphemes in Kuot. The last chapter describes in some detail the class of nouns in Kuot, their declensions, non-singular formation, and the properties of grammatical gender.

    Appendices give the full set of person-marking forms in Kuot, a transcription of a recorded text with interlinear glossing and translation, the Swadesh 100-word list for Kuot, and diagrams of kin relations and terminology

  • 39.
    Molloy, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Varför är trollet svart og styggt? Två lärares arbete med elevers föreställning om etnicitet och religion i mötet med äldre texter2012In: Teorier om tekst i møte med skolens lese- og skrivepraksiser / [ed] Synnøve Matre, Dagrun Kibsgaard Sjøhelle, Randi Solheim, Oslo: Universitetsforlaget, 2012, p. 187-202Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Montero-Melis, Guillermo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Non-native (and native) adaptation to recent input during motion event lexicalizationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Montero-Melis, Guillermo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Speakers in motion: The role of speaker variability in motion encodingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Montero-Melis, Guillermo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Thoughts in Motion: The Role of Long-Term L1 and Short-Term L2 Experience when Talking and Thinking of Caused Motion2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is about whether language affects thinking. It deals with the linguistic relativity hypothesis, which proposes that the language we speak influences the way we think. This hypothesis is investigated in the domain of caused motion (e.g., ‘The man rolled the tyre into the garage’), by looking at Spanish and Swedish, two languages that show striking differences in how motion events are encoded. The thesis consists of four studies. The first two focus on native speakers of Spanish and Swedish. Study I compares how Spanish and Swedish speakers describe the same set of caused motion events, directing the spotlight at how variable the descriptions are in each language. The results confirm earlier findings from semantic typology regarding the dominant ways of expressing the events in each language: Spanish behaves like a verb-framed language and Swedish like a satellite-framed language (Talmy, 2000). Going beyond previous findings, the study demonstrates—using the tools of entropy and Monte Carlo simulations—that there is markedly more variability in Spanish than in Swedish descriptions. Study II tests whether differences in how Spanish and Swedish speakers describe caused motion events are reflected in how they think about such events. Using a novel similarity arrangement task, it is found that Spanish and Swedish speakers partly differ in how they represent caused motion events if they can access language during the task. However, the differences disappear when the possibility to use language is momentarily blocked by an interference task. The last two studies focus on Swedish learners of Spanish as a second language (L2). Study III explores how Swedish learners (compared to native Spanish speakers) adapt their Spanish motion descriptions to recently encountered input. Using insights from the literature on structural priming, we find that Swedish learners initially expect to encounter in their L2, Spanish, those verb types that are typical in Swedish (manner verbs like ‘roll’) but that, with increasing proficiency, their expectations become increasingly attuned to the typical Spanish pattern of using path verbs (like ‘enter’).  These expectations are reflected in the way L2 learners adapt their own production to the Spanish input. Study IV asks whether recent linguistic experience in an L2 can affect how L2 learners think about motion events. It is found that encountering motion descriptions in the L2 that emphasize different types of information (path or manner) leads L2 speakers to perceive similarity along different dimensions in a subsequent similarity arrangement task. Taken together, the thesis argues that the study of the relation between language and thought affords more valuable insights when not posed as an either-or question (i.e., does language affect thought or not?). In this spirit, the thesis contributes to the wider aim of investigating the conditions under which language does or does not affect thought and explores what the different outcomes tell us about language, thought, and the intricate mechanisms that relate them.

  • 43.
    Norocel, Ovidiu Cristian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Heteronormative Constructions of Romanianness: A Genealogy of Gendered Metaphors in Romanian Radical-Right Populism 2000–20092011In: Debatte, ISSN 0965-156X, E-ISSN 1469-3712, Vol. 19, no 1-2, p. 453-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article investigates the recent history of the Romanian national construct as a matrix for gendered metaphors at the beginning of the twenty-first century, as it is heralded by the main radical-right populist party the Greater Romania Party (Partidul România Mare, PRM). Focusing on the Greater Romania Magazine (Revista România Mare, RRM) – the party's main media outlet – the analysis is centered on the PRM leader's editorials during a well-defined timeframe in the recent history of Romanian radical-right populism, from the preparations for presidential elections in 2000, which witnessed Tudor's surprising runoff, through the subsequent presidential elections in 2004, and up to EU parliamentary elections in 2009, which enabled the PRM to send three representatives to the EU Parliament. The staunchly restrictive definition of the family, portrayed as the exclusive heteronormative domain of the Romanian male, has been developed in time with the help of the “nation is a family” and the “strict father” conceptual metaphors to proscribe the existence of family narratives including ethnically diverse or any sexually different Others. The article accounts for the discursive (re-)definitions of Romanianness enabled by conceptual metaphors so as to accommodate centrally located heterosexist masculinities, and underlines the need for further explorations of the radical-right populist narratives of national purity.

  • 44. Palm, Clara
    et al.
    Ganuza, Natalia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hedman, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Language use and investment among children and adolescents of Somali heritage in Sweden2018In: Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, ISSN 0143-4632, E-ISSN 1747-7557Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores language use and investment among Somali-speaking children and adolescents in Sweden, through group interviews and survey data. Our findings indicate that there are incentives to invest in Somali language learning considering the reported language use patterns and the expressed positive attitudes towards Somali mother tongue instruction. The Somali language was perceived to be ‘naturally’ linked to Somali identity and to being able to claim ‘Somaliness’, not only by the adolescents but also by the surroundings. Thus, advanced Somali language proficiency was perceived as necessary for being able to pass as ‘culturally authentic’ (Jaffe, A. [2012]. “Multilingual Citizenship and Minority Languages.” In The Routledge Handbook of Multilingualism, edited by M. Martin-Jones, A. Blackledge, and A. Creese, 83–99. London: Routledge). Furthermore, being perceived as unproficient in Somali or unable to transmit the language to future generations was experienced as guilt-provoking. Nevertheless, the adolescents articulated a compliance with the dominant linguistic order in Sweden, and their school’s assimilatory language rules (‘Swedish-only’). This compliance was associated with good manners and moral behaviour, thus reflecting the potentially harmful and pervasive nature of assimilatory language ideology and policy for individual students. The findings exemplify in many ways the struggles it entails to maintain and develop a minoritised language in a majority language context and the complex ‘ideological enterprise’ of language learning with its educational and ethical dilemmas.

  • 45. Perego, Elisa
    et al.
    Del Missier, Fabio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. University of Trieste, Italy.
    Bottiroli, Sara
    Dubbing versus subtitling in young and older adults: cognitive and evaluative aspects2015In: Perspectives: studies in translatology, ISSN 0907-676X, E-ISSN 1747-6623, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Empirical evidence on the cognitive and evaluative effects of viewing a dubbed versus a subtitled film is limited, theoretical views on the subject are mainly speculative, and age-related differences have not been investigated in this sphere. To fill these gaps, we carried out two studies contrasting the effects of viewing a dubbed versus subtitled version of the same film excerpt in young and older adults, using a comprehensive array of verbal and visual measures. The findings clearly show that dubbing does not provide a cognitive or evaluative advantage over subtitling. Moreover, subtitling seems to be more effective than dubbing in supporting the lexical aspects of performance. Finally, although older adults always performed worse than young adults on all cognitive measures, they did not show a specific impairment in the subtitling condition. The results support the view that subtitled films are processed effectively and appreciated equally by both young and older adults.

  • 46.
    Salö, Linus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Domänförlust som språkideologisk representation: språkvårdens diskurser om engelska i Sverige2012In: Nordand, ISSN 0809-9227, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 21-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta bidrag framställer det svenska språkvårdsfältets diskurser om engelska, och begreppet domänförlusts framväxt som del i etableringen av en nationell språkpolitik i Sverige. Genomgången visar hur tonvikten gått från lånord mot frågor om svenskans position och status, med svengelska som representation för den förra diskursen och domänförlust för den senare. Båda manifesterar uttryck för ‖monoglottisk ideologi‖ (Silverstein 1996). Med redskap från Bourdieus fältteori knyts diskurserna till sina producenters positioner i språkvårdens fält. Domänförlust entextualiserades i samband med att diskussionen om Sveriges medlemskap i EU tog fart. Det hävdas i denna artikel att domänförlustsfrågan och EU-frågan är ideologiskt förenade, och att värnandet av svenskan måste ses i samma ljus som värnandet av Sveriges autonomi, och en aversion bland fältets agenter mot engelskans kulturpolitiska indexikaliteter. Domänförlust har använts som symbolisk tillgång för att få gehör för att svenskan är ett hotat språk, och tolkas här som en del av en strategi för att försvara en marknad där agenterna själva investerat sitt kapital.

  • 47.
    Salö, Linus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    The linguistic sense of placement: Habitus and the entextualization of translingual practices in Swedish academia2015In: Journal of Sociolinguistics, ISSN 1360-6441, E-ISSN 1467-9841, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 511-534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper adopts a Bourdieusian approach to discourse in contemporary Swedish academia. Habitus, entextualization, and translingual practice are employed as epistemological perspectives for investigating the place of Swedish in the text trajectories of two disciplines where English prevails in publishing. Data from meeting recordings, email correspondence, and interviews show that Swedish is the legitimate language throughout in the text production and that discipline-specific Swedish is practiced so long as it encompasses all participants’ repertoires. In fact, the researchers point to an almost physical awkwardness linked to the unwarranted use of English among themselves. Following Bourdieu, it is argued that these sensibilities pertain to the linguistic sense of placement of socialized agents and that the unease of being out of place prevents them from lapsing into what is socially perceived as unacceptable discourse in their translingual practices. 

  • 48.
    Salö, Linus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Är engelska vår tids latin? Om publiceringsspråk och nygamla stridigheter2017In: Folkbildning & Forskning: Årsbok 2017, Stockholm: Föreningen för folkbildningsforskning , 2017, p. 27-40Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Sandberg, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Cognition and communication in multilingual education: case studies from content and language integrated learning in the Swedish upper secondary school2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Schönström, Krister
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Swedish as a Second Language for the Deaf.
    Holmström, Ingela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Swedish as a Second Language for the Deaf.
    Kontrastivt arbetssätt med texter på teckenspråk och svenska2018Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I specialskolans kursplan i svenska för döva och hörselskadade står det att eleverna, förutom att utveckla kunskaper om det svenska språket och dess språkbruk, ska ges möjligheter att...

    utveckla kunskaper för att kunna göra jämförelser mellan svenskan och teckenspråket och urskilja likheter och olikheter mellan språken. På så sätt ska undervisningen bidra till att stärka elevernas medvetenhet om, och tilltro till, den egna språkliga och kommunikativa förmågan.(Lspec 11)

    Även kursplanen i teckenspråk för döva och hörselskadade innehåller en liknande formulering. Genom jämförelser mellan språken ska elevernas tvåspråkighet stärkas. Denna fördjupningsartikel syftar till att belysa det här kontrastiva arbetssättet och ger exempel på hur det kan användas i klassrummet när eleverna möter skolans textvärld.

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