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  • 1.
    Alvarez López, Laura
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Português vernáculo brasileiro e a hipótese da semi-crioulização2003In: Revista da ABRALIN Associação Brasileira de Lingüística, ISSN 1678-1805, Vol. 2, no 1, 111-152 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the possible semi-creole status of Brazilian Vernacular Portuguese and questions some of the literature on semi-creoles in general. It presents some differences between Brazilian Vernacular Portuguese and creole languages and makes a revision of the semi-creoles. Finally, it proposes new delimitations for the semi-creole concept.

  • 2.
    Bartning, Inge
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The functions of a high-frequency collocation in native and learner discourse: the case of French c’est and Swedish det är2007In: International Review of Applied Linguistics, Vol. 45, no 1, 1-43 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Brosig, Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Aspect and epistemic notions in the present tense system of Khalkha Mongolian2015In: Acta Linguistica Petropolitana, ISSN 2306-5737, Vol. XI, no 3, 46-127 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, I will dicuss positive present tense forms in spoken Khalkha Mongolian. Khalkha is analyzed to have five non-finite aspect markers, the Progressive, Continuative, Habitual, Perfect, and Prospective. They mainly combine with the three suffixes ‑n, ‑aa and ‑dag. On its own, ‑n expresses an instantiated potential or neutral future and ‑aa combines epistemic possibility and resultativity. In combination with aspect markers, though, they express the evidential value of direct vs. indirect perception. As the resultant state of a perfect can be perceived directly, the division runs between direct sensual perception of the event and an event inferred from direct sensual perception vs. events that are concluded from assumptions, hearsay, and previous perception. The suffix ‑dag expresses habitual and generic semantics. It is most commonly used on its own, but can also take other aspect markers into its scope, e.g. expressing a habitually ongoing event. Next to its main use, it is even used to refer to mono-occasional events that diverge from what the speaker perceives as the normal course of events. In addition, absolute-final and other uses of the participle ‑h and final uses of the converb ‑aad are discussed.

  • 4.
    Brosig, Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    bilee sul ügiin utga, hereglee (The meaning and function of the particle bilee in Khalkha Mongolian)2012In: Hel zohiol sudlal, Vol. 5, no 37, 10-18 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the meaning and use of the evidential particle bilee and its shortened derived form lee in Khalkha Mongolian are investigated. In indicatives, bilee is used to indicate one's own recollection. Simple past is formed together with the past inferential -j. Similarly, with a hortative mood bilee indicates the recollection of one's mental state. Both confirmation and surprise can be found as connotations, but the notion of surprise even appears to have grammaticalized into the more specific construction -na lee which either expresses surprise or is used to beg for attention. In questions, bilee can both express that one has witnessed, but cannot recall a given event, or an event that the addressee is presumed to remember. With the imperfective -dag, bilee can sometimes induce mono-occasional readings, but these are even possible with -dag alone or most commonly with -dag baijee.

  • 5.
    Brosig, Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    BINNICK, Robert. 2012. The past tenses of the Mongolian verb. Brill.2013In: Linguistics, ISSN 0024-3949, E-ISSN 1613-396X, Vol. 51, no 1, 235-241 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Brosig, Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Dundad zunii mongol helnii baidal, eh üüsver, cagiin ain dürem (Tense, aspect and evidentiality in Middle Mongol)2012In: Proceedings of the 10th international congress of Mongolists: Volume II: Mongolian language and culture and their urgent problems / [ed] D. Tömörtogoo, Sh. Choimaa, E. Pürevjav, International Association for Mongolian studies, 2012, 33-37 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Brosig, Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Factual vs. evidential? The past tense forms of spoken Khalkha Mongolian 2015In: Empirical Approaches to Evidentiality / [ed] Ad Foolen, Helen de Hoop, Gijs Mulder, John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The basic past tense suffixes in spoken Khalkha are ‑sɑ̆ŋ, -ɮɑ, -tʃe and the peripheral -w. The basic opposition is between established knowledge (‑sɑ̆ŋ) and non-established (mostly new) knowledge, which is then further differentiated into firsthand (-ɮɑ) and non-firsthand sources (‑tʃe). This adds the factor “time of acquisition” to “source of information.” However, vivid recollection and deferred realization allow for using ‑ɮɑ and -tʃe, respectively. Additionally, -ɮɑ is used to establish a fictive scenario in discourse. In the corpus, past ‑sɑ̆ŋ is thrice as frequent as past -ɮɑ and -tʃe combined and due to its opposition to the latter seems to acquire a connotation of factual, reliable information. In declaratives, ‑w accounts for just 0.7% of past tense uses. It is used for events that surprised the speaker in the past. In questions, -tʃe is used to ask the hearer to give an answer based on inference. In self-directed discourse, -ɮɑ is used by a speaker who tries to remember something she once knew, irrespective of whether this knowledge was acquired as firsthand knowledge or not.

    All past markers have future uses. For an event for which the speaker has sensory or internal evidence (including when the speaker refers to her own intentions), -ɮɑ is fairly common. Clues as to whether a future or past interpretation hold are mostly syntactical, but stative aktionsart or the presence of the boundary-actualizing marker -tʃʰ- restrict the interpretation to the past. ‑ɮɑ can be used in questions about the future in which case the speaker seems to motivate her question on the basis of a presumption based on firsthand evidence. The morphological form of -ɮɑ in such contexts is different from the form used in past questions. ‑tʃe can be used when a future event is inferred, and ‑sɑ̆ŋ marks it as inevitable. Both are exceedingly rare in future contexts, so that they presumably only work in a salient future context. Future ‑w expresses preventive warnings.

  • 8.
    Brosig, Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Temperature terms in Khalkha Mongolian2015In: The Linguistics of Temperature / [ed] Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2015, 570-593 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides an overview of the linguistic properties of temperature terms in Khalkha Mongolian. It begins with a general overview of the temperature vocabulary, which is most elaborated in relation to coldness. It then considers in closer detail the application of these terms to tactile, ambient and personal-feeling temperature domains, and the terms' metaphoric extensions. The paper continues by investigating different ways of expressing degrees of temperature adjectives within a morphological system of intensification and attenuation. Finally, the syntax of temperature terms is discussed.

  • 9.
    Brosig, Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The aspect-evidentiality system of Middle Mongol2014In: Ural-Altaic studies, ISSN 2079-1003, Vol. 13, no 2, 7-38 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper contains an analysis of aspect, tense and evidentiality in Middle Mongol. This language has a fairly complex aspectual system, consisting of mostly periphrastic constructions built up from converbal, participial and final suffixes, and two different stative copula verbs. These express progressivity, habituality, genericity, perfectivity, perfect and resultativity on the present and past tense level. Present progressivity and resultativity can both be expressed by two different constructions that differ by their aspectual scope and/or actional properties. The three past tense suffixes mark factual, firsthand and secondhand information. This evidential trichotomy is restricted to the perfective aspect, while all other aspectual past tense markers only receive firsthand or secondhand marking. No aspectual distinctions seem to be made in the future, though both the future participle and the resultative participle can form contrafactual constructions.

  • 10.
    Brosig, Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The tense-aspect system of Khorchin Mongolian2014In: On diversity and complexity of languages spoken in Europe and North and Central Asia / [ed] Pirkko Suihkonen, Lindsay J. Whaley, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2014, 1-66 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Khorchin, a Mongolian dialect spoken in eastern Inner Mongolia, has a tense-aspect system slightly simpler than Middle Mongol and considerably simpler than Central Mongolian dialects (Khalkha, Chakhar). While it can express the time stability of ongoing events with many nuances, present habitual and generic events are not distinguished. The existence of a present perfect category is doubtful, but in any case it doesn’t extend to the past as participle-copula-combinations are impossible. Evidentiality was lost in the central verbal system, but a non-obligatory quotative/hearsay marker exists. This article is an attempt to fit these phenomena into a coherent system of tense, aspect and related notions and to explore some of its diachronic implications.

  • 11.
    Brosig, Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Yu Wonsoo (2011): A Study of Mongol Khamnigan spoken in Northeastern Mongolia2013In: Acta Orientalia Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae, ISSN 0001-6446, Vol. 66, no 2, 239-241 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Carlberg, Matilda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Att förstärka sinnelag och sinnesstämning: En korpusstudie av förstärkande förled hos svenska adjektiv2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    There is no description in the Swedish grammar regarding how adjectives can be reinforced with prefixes, also known as intensifiers. Research shows that this phenomenon have recieved greater attention in other languages. The purpose of this study was to describe and map the use of prefix reinforcements, and see if any patterns or rules could be found. The quantitative research is based on statistical data collected from informal blog texts in two Swedish corpora. Adjectives on two types of mood, solid and temporary, as well as positive and negative, were investigated. The results showed that some types were more inclined to take reinforcements than others. Temporary adjectives took on more than solid ones, negative more than positive, as well as the short and frequent adjectives where more often reinforced than the longer and uncommon ones

  • 13. Friedlaender, Jonathan S
    et al.
    Hunley, Keith
    University of New Mexico.
    Dunn, Michael
    Radboud University; Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics.
    Terrill, Angela
    Radboud University.
    Lindström, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Friedlaender, Françoise
    Linguistics More Robust Than Genetics: (Letter to the editors)2009Other (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    The Swedish MINT-project – or, the quest to pull apart and put together constituents of verbal and nonverbal interaction2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Hallonsten Halling, Pernilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Prototypical adverbs: From comparative concept to typological prototype2017In: Acta Linguistica Hafniensia. International Journal of Structural Linguistics, ISSN 0374-0364, E-ISSN 1949-0763, Vol. 49, no 1, 37-52 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While adjectives and their potential universality have been much debated, adverbs remain rather neglected in the typological and cognitive literature. From a typological perspective, adjectives can be dealt with using a comparative concept: rather than assuming from the outset the existence of a class of adjectives, a particular language-independent definition of adjectives is used as a heuristic for examining recurrent form-meaning combinations. In the present article, adverb is addressed as a comparative concept in the same vein: an adverb is a lexeme that denotes a descriptive property and can be used to narrow the predication of a verb. This comparative concept is applied to a sample of 41 languages from the whole world. The results show that although there are diverse structural possibilities in terms of different adverbial constructions of varying spread and productivity, simple adverbs are found in a considerable number of unrelated languages, even in some cases where adjectives cannot be found. Clear adverb subtypes reminiscent of semantic types of adjectives further emerge, leading to a discussion of whether the comparative concepts in this case allow us to uncover a substantial cross-linguistic prototype.

  • 16.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Andraspråksforskning med ASU-korpusen2013In: Nordand: nordisk tidsskrift for andrespråksforskning, ISSN 0809-9227, Vol. 8, no 1, 7-33 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ASU is a longitudinal corpus of L2 production by adult learners of Swedish, which is now accessible on the web for searching and analysis. This is a presentation of its intentions and structure, how to work with it, and how to access it. Some examples are also given of the research on L2 Swedish which has been carried out based on data from ASU.

    After a brief introduction on different kinds of corpora and their degree of accessibility, the next section discusses the various requirements that should be met by a longitudinal corpus, and how these have been handled in ASU. An aim for ASU has been to follow individuals longitudinally from the start of their acquisition of the L2 to an elaborate stage of proficiency, and to be able to observe a clear and coherent development over time. ASU is also characterized by the parallel collection of oral and written material, and by a control material from native Swedes. Foreign students at Stockholm University were recorded individually during conversations with Swedes, and in addition to this they also wrote essays. Corresponding data were collected from native Swedish students. The material was then transcribed and tagged morphologically.

    The corpus, which was compiled in its early form in the 1990s, is now converted into a modern format and has been connected to the user interface ITG, which is handled by the Swedish Language Bank (Språkbanken) at Gothenburg University. This is a flexible instrument for searching, analysing and editing data from the corpus. The article describes briefly how to work with corpus data using ITG.

    The corpus has been used for research on several areas of L2 Swedish. Some examples which are presented briefly here concern reference to future, syllable structure, possessive constructions, the utterance process, and the role of background languages in third language use.

    A description of how to access the corpus terminates the article.

  • 17.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Introduktion till ASU-korpusen: En longitudinell muntlig och skriftlig textkorpus av vuxna inlärares svenska med en motsvarande del från infödda svenskar. Version 2010-11-16.2010Other (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Jämförelsekonstruktioner i svenskan och grammatikaliseringen av jämfört med1995In: Språk & Stil, ISSN 1101-1165, Vol. 5 NF, 21-48 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Maskinell generering av böjningsformer och identifikation av ordklass1966In: Förhandlingar vid Sammankomst för att dryfta frågor rörande svenskans beskrivning 3, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, Institutionen för nordiska språk , 1966, 59-70 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Svenskan i ljuset av invandrares språkfel1977In: Nysvenska studier, ISSN 0345-8768, Vol. 57, 60-73 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Teoretiska ramar för andraspråksforskning2013In: Svenska som andraspråk: i forskning, undervisning och samhälle / [ed] Hyltenstam, Kenneth & Lindberg, Inger, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2013, 2, 27-84 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Über die deutsche Deutung des schwedischen Gravis-Akzents1972In: Germanistische Beiträge: Gert Mellbourn zum 60. Geburtstag am 21.5.1972 dargebracht von Kollegen und Schülern des Deutschen Instituts der Universität Stockholm / [ed] Lillebill Grähs, Anders Marell, Stockholm: Stockholms universitet, Tyska institutionen , 1972, 87-98 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Heinat, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Review of The Oxford Handbook of Compounding2010In: Linguist List, ISSN 1068-4875, no 21, 368Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Hunley, Keith
    et al.
    University of New Mexico.
    Dunn, Michael
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics.
    Lindström, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Reesink, Ger
    Terrill, Angela
    Radboud University.
    Inferring Prehistory from Genetic, Linguistic, and Geographic Variation2007In: Genes, Language, and Culture History in the Southwest Pacific / [ed] Friedlaender, Jonathan S, New York: Oxford University Press , 2007, 141-154 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Janson, Tore
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Att välja ur antiken2015In: Klassisk filologi i Sverige: Reflexioner, riktningar, översättningar, öden / [ed] Eric Cullhed, Bo Lindberg, Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, 2015, 41-50 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Janson, Tore
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Dillerin Tarihi2016Book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Janson, Tore
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Germanerna och vi: Reflektioner över ett populärvetenskapligt projekt2015In: Kungl. Vetenskapssamhällets i Uppsala årsbok 40/2013-2014 / [ed] Lars-Gunnar Larsson, Uppsala: Kungl. Vetenskapssamhällets i Uppsala , 2015, 9-19 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Janson, Tore
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Gotiskt klotter skriver historia2016In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no 4, 60-62 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Janson, Tore
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Hur rödhåriga var germanerna?2014In: Latinet i tiden. En festskrift till Hans Aili / [ed] Andersson, Elin, Kihlman, Erika & Plaza, Maria, Stockholm: Stockholms universitets förlag, 2014, 167-173 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Janson, Tore
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    När danska blev svenska2014In: Upplev litteraturen 3: Texter och tal / [ed] Carl-Johan Markstedt, Sven Eriksson, Stockholm: Sanoma utbildning , 2014, 244-251 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Janson, Tore
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Storia naturale del latino: La storia della lingua più famosa del mondo2015Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 32.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Action Nominal Constructions in the Languages of Europe2003In: Noun Phrase Structure in the Languages of Europe, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter , 2003Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Divjak, Dagmar
    University of Scheffield, UK.
    Rakhilina, Ekaterina
    Institute for the Russian language, Moscow, Russia.
    Aquamotion verbs in Slavic and Germanic: A case study in lexical typology2010In: New Approaches to Slavic Verbs of Motion / [ed] Hasko, Victoria & Renee Perelmutter, Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins , 2010, 315-341 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper contrasts the verbs plyt’/plavat’ in Russian and płynąć/pływać in Polish with their correspondences in Dutch, English and Swedish against a broader typological background. The three Germanic languages use several verbs for what is covered by a pair of derivationally related verbs in each of the two Slavic languages. The Germanic languages lexicalize the activity/passivity of motion, but vary considerably as to how they carve up the conceptual space. Russian and Polish, on the other hand, use plavat’/plyt’ independently of the activity/passivity of motion and focus on the uni- or non-unidirectionality of the motion. Nonetheless, it appears that the different lexicalizations in the Swedish-English-Dutch systems of aquamotion verbs are reflected in constructional differences in the Russian-Polish systems.

  • 34.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Rakhilina, Ekaterina V.
    S samymi teplymi chuvstvami (po gorjachim sledam stokgol'mskoj èkspedicii)1998In: Tipologija i grammatika / [ed] Raxilina, E. & Ja. Testelec, Moskva, 1998Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Kowalik, Richard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Case and case alignment in the Greater Hindukush: An areal-typological survey2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis concerns languages in the Greater Hindukush, the area in northern Afghanistan and Pakistan, where a total of about 50 languages are spoken. The thesis’ topic is case systems and case alignment systems of nouns in an areal-typological perspective. This is investigated by using a representative sample. The grammatical relations of S, A and P, and the cases marking these, are investigated. The three attested alignment systems are accusative, ergative and split, and are clearly geogra-phically distributed, which indicates that their status is areal-typological. Based on the sample, there seems to be a tendency for the languages in the Greater Hindukush to exhibit split align-ment systems built on tense-aspect. Most languages employ accusative alignment in imperfect-tive, and ergative alignment in perfective tense-aspects. A compa­rison with a worldwide sample (WALS) is only partly possible, as this sample uses more categories than accusative, ergative and split, but the present sample supports the results in those categories which can be compared. A predominant pattern in core case syncretism is observed, with an opposition of the nomi­native singular versus the nominative plural and the oblique in both numbers.

  • 36.
    Liljegren, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Notes on Kalkoti: A Shina Language with Strong Kohistani Influences2013In: Linguistic Discovery, ISSN 1537-0852, E-ISSN 1537-0852, Vol. 11, no 1, 129-160 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents some novel and hard-to-access data from Kalkoti, an Indo-Aryan language spoken in northern Pakistan. The particular focus is on showing how this Shina variety in a relatively short time span has drifted apart from its closest known genealogical relatives and undergone significant linguistic convergence with a Kohistani variety in whose vicinity Kalkoti is presently spoken. Among other features, we explore what seems like an ongoing process of tonogenesis as well as structural “copying” in the realm of tense and aspect.

  • 37.
    Lindström, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Literacy in a Dying Language: The Case of Kuot, New Ireland, Papua New Guinea2007In: Language Planning and Policy: Issues in Language Planning and Literacy / [ed] Anthony J. Liddicoat, Clevedon: Multilingual Matters, 2007, 185-208 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Kuot is a language in a critical situation. Most adults of lower middle age and older are full speakers but children are not learning it. In other words, it will become extinct in a few decades if nothing is done; but it is not too late if the community decides to turn it around, and do so fast. Thus far, the community has shown little interest. Into this situation, vernacular elementary education was introduced. While the community expects this to work for language survival, the aim of the education policy is the eventual transfer of literacy skills to English. This paper describes the tensions between these conflicting goals, and the various components that make up the specific situation of Kuot, including vernacular literacy, orthographic considerations arising from the language’s precarious situation, and the eventual extension of the internet era to Melanesia.

  • 38.
    Lindström, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Påminnande: en funktion av demonstrativer i samtalssvenska2000In: ASLA Information: Denna – den här – den där. Om demonstrativer i tvärspråklig belysning. En minnesskrift till Elsie Wijk-Andersson, ISSN 1100-5629, Vol. 26, no 2, 93-102 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta bidrag redovisar några av resultaten från en studie av demonstrativerna den här/den där (etc) i svenska samtal. Ett lite förvånande resultat av studien var att mer än en tredjedel av förekomsterna av dessa demonstrativer utgjorde förstaomnämnanden. Detta finner sin främsta förklaring i deras funktion att påminna; att signalera att en viss referent förväntas vara bekant för lyssnaren.

    Svenska demonstrativer har tre formtyper: den/det/de, denna/detta/dessa, och den/det/de här/där. Den senare typen är som grupp föremål för den studie som redovisas här. (Proximitetsskillnaden i uttrycken kommer inte att behandlas, och inte heller faktorer som har med genus eller numerus att göra.) De förekommer framför allt i talspråket och är inte så väl representerade i skriven svenska (se Fraurud, denna volym).

    Med ”påminnande” menas här att talaren signalerar att lyssnaren förväntas kunna identifiera en icke-topikal referent via kunskap som inte nödvändigtvis förmedlats i det aktuella samtalet. Exempel (1) illustrerar principen:

    (1) A ja ja just det vi pratar den här killen som var hos oss i somras som [ohörbart] konstitutionen

    B amerikanen

    Det är tydligt att A väntar sig att B känner till referenten, vilket bekräftas i Bs yttrande, och det är också klart att referenten inte är aktiverad för B.

    Påminnande visar sig vara en typisk funktion för den aktuella gruppen demonstrativer. Denna funktion är mig veterligen inte tidigare beskriven för svenska. Funktionen har också en koppling till sökande efter ord och avbrutna eller reparerade yttranden.

  • 39.
    Lindström, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Some Uses of Demonstratives in Spoken Swedish2000In: Corpus-based and Computational Approaches to Discourse Anaphora / [ed] Botley, S.P. & McEnery, A.M., Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2000, 107-128 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents work in progress on some aspects of the use of one set of demonstrative expressions in a corpus of conversational Swedish. The demonstratives under study are the compound forms den här and den där (Eng. approx. ‘this’, ‘that’), both as pronouns and determiners. These forms belong mainly to the spoken language, and have not received much attention in previous studies of Swedish. Typical cases of deictic, first-mention and anaphoric uses are illustrated, and cases that cause problems for the distinction between first mention and anaphor are discussed. A surprisingly large number of first mentions with demonstratives were found, many of which are used in what is here called the “you know” function of demonstratives, i.e., a means for the speaker of signalling his or her assumption of the listener having a previous representation of the intended referent. Among anaphoric uses, some interesting occurrences are discussed, which resemble cases previously described as ‘identificationally overspecified’ (Maes and Noordman, 1995).

  • 40.
    Lindström, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The Body in Expressions of Emotion: Kuot2002In: Pragmatics & Cognition, ISSN 0929-0907, Vol. 10, no 1-2, 159-184 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This contribution examines the use of body terms in expressions of emotion in Kuot, a non-Austronesian language of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea. It is found that expressions involving the word for ‘stomach’, daləp, correspond mainly to what we would consider to be psychological states, while expressions making use of neip ‘skin; body’ are largely concerned with physical states. Some other body parts also form part of emotive expressions.

  • 41.
    Lindström, Eva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Remijsen, Bert
    Aspects of the prosody of Kuot, a language where intonation ignores stress2005In: Linguistics, ISSN 0024-3949, Vol. 43, no 4, 839-870 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes the basic system of intonation and lexical stress in Kuot, a non-Austronesian language of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea. Kuot employs pitch (F0 variation) primarily to express structural information about the clause. Some intonation contours express functions that are commonly expressed by intonation crosslinguistically, such as final vs. nonfinal clauses and parts of clauses, and yes/no questions. In addition, Kuot has particular contours (or tunes) for question-word questions and negated sentences. Word stress, on the other hand, does not interact with intonation in terms of its encoding. It displays a very stable correlation with duration but no association with F0; in other words, there is no consistent marking of stress by means of F0 in Kuot. The position of Kuot word stress is lexically determined, yielding minimal stress pairs.

    In this article, we present a description of Kuot intonation on the basis of pitch extractions made from spontaneous speech. The results reveal that intonation in Kuot is anchored only at the boundaries of intonational phrases. A phonetic analysis of minimal stress pairs recorded in controlled environments demonstrates that lexically stressed syllables do not correlate with pitch.

    The findings are discussed against a background of prosodic typology.

  • 42.
    Lindström, Eva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Terrill, Angela
    Radboud University, Nijmegen.
    Reesink, Ger
    Dunn, Michael
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics.
    The Languages of Island Melanesia2007In: Genes, Language, and Culture History in the Southwest Pacific / [ed] Friedlaender, Jonathan S, New York: Oxford University Press , 2007, 118-140 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Miestamo, Matti
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Skolt Saami: A typological profile2011In: Suomalais-Ugrilaisen Seuran Aikakauskirja / Journal de la Société Finno-Ougrienne, ISSN 0355-0214, E-ISSN 1798-2987, Vol. 93, 111-145 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Miestamo, Matti
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Skolt Saami Documentation Corpus (SSDC-2016)2017Other (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Perkova, Natalia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Adjectives of temperature in Latvian2015In: The Linguistics of Temperature / [ed] Maria Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2015, 216-253 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the system of terms used to describe temperature in Latvian, with special focus on temperature adjectives as its core. The main aim of the research is to understand how the domain of temperature is conceptualised in Latvian. The semantics and distribution of eleven adjectives are analysed from different points of view in line with a lexical typological approach. The study shows that the system of Latvian basic temperature terms can be revised and re-evaluated as consisting of four terms rather than three (cf. Sutrop 1999). Some aspects of semantic shifts and regular metaphorical patterns in the relevant domain are discussed as well.

  • 46.
    Perkova, Natalia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Review of Aurelija Usonienė, Nicole Nau, Ineta Dabašinskienė (eds.), Multiple Perspectives in Linguistic Research on Baltic Languages. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2012.2012In: Baltic Linguistics, ISSN 2081-7533, Vol. 3, 179-192 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Perkova, Natalia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    С собой in Russian:comitative constructions of caused motion and their properties [С собой в русском языке:комитативные конструкции каузации перемещения и их свойства]2014In: Acta Linguistica Petropolitana, ISSN 2306-5737, Vol. X, no 2, 157-179 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is concerned with Russian constructions characterised by the use of the prepositional phrase с собой. The analysis of corpus data shows that several subtypes of the construction V + с собой can be singled out according to the predicate semantics. All the construction subtypes have a common semantic component, namely, joint motion of two participants. Causative semantics of predicates implies that one of the participants initiates this motion. The possessive subtype of the construction focuses on the resultant state of a causative event. Such properties of the construction as semantics of participants, compatibility with locative expressions and colloquial modification of the structure are also analysed.

  • 48.
    Wälchli, Bernhard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Ištiktukai "eventives": the Baltic precursors of ideophones and why they remain unknown in typology2015In: Contemporary approaches to Baltic linguistics / [ed] Peter Arkadiev, Axel Holvoet, Björn Wiemer, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2015, 491-521 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Wälchli, Bernhard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Logophoricity in Eastern Vidzeme: The Literary Latvian idiolect of Andrievs Niedra and Leivu Estonian2015In: Baltic Linguistics, ISSN 2081-7533, Vol. 6, 141-192 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eastern Vidzeme is an important, hitherto neglected, area for the study of logophoricity in the Circum-Baltic languages. This paper shows, on the one hand, that logophoricity in Latvian is not restricted to Latgalian dialects, but is almost fully consistent in the writings of the novelist Andrievs Niedra (1871–1942) originating from Tirza, and on the other hand, that Leivu Estonian, a moribund South Estonian language island in Northeastern Vidzeme between Gulbene and Alūksne, is the only Estonian variety having developed a logophoric pronoun.

    Given the high diversity of logophoricity in Latvian, it is important to study idiolects with large corpora, and written language deserves more study. Like Finnish dialects and Leivu Estonian, Niedra’s idiolect uses logophoric pronouns even for marking the report addressee in questions. Unlike in the Latgalian tales discussed by Nau (2006), logophoricity can be extended beyond the domain of report to thought. A distinction between allophoric (frame and report speaker are different) and autophoric reports (frame and report speaker are the same) is introduced. It is argued that logophoric pronouns are a non-deictic and non-coreference-based strategy to mark reports, that their function is not primarily reference tracking, and that logophoric pronouns in Latvian are constructionalized rather than grammaticalized.

  • 50.
    Wälchli, Bernhard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The incomplete story of feminine gender loss in Northwestern Latvian dialects2017In: Baltic Linguistics, ISSN 2081-7533, Vol. 8, 143-214 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to show that Northwestern Latvian dialects (also called Tamian) are insufficiently characterized by placing them on a simple linear hierarchy of feminine gender loss, which is how they are traditionally approached in Latvian dialectology. While Lithuanian and Central and High Latvian dialects all have very similar and fairly canonical gender systems, various Northwestern Latvian dialects display a wealth of underexplored non-canonical gender properties, such as the reactivated topic marker gender relic, honorific feminine gender, pronominal adjectives behaving differently from attributive adjectives, the noun ‘boy’ turning into a hybrid feminine noun, and a third controller gender restricted to some diminutives. Feminine gender loss is traditionally explained by Livonian (Finnic) substrate. It is shown in this paper that the developments in NW Latvian have multiple causes, one of them being apocope (loss of short vowels infinal syllables), a common feature of NW Latvian dialects which prompted many developments making NW Latvian different from Central Latvian dialects and which is also ultimately due to language contact. Apocope and other developments made the system more complex. The non-canonical gender properties described in this paper are the effect of subsequent developments reducing system complexity again.

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