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  • 1.
    Branderud, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. Fonetik.
    Traunmüller, HartmutStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. Fonetik.
    Proceedings of FONETIK 981998Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Språkprojektet i Farsta/Fagersjö1998In: Samverkan för barn och ungdom: en antologi om konsten att bedriva projekt / [ed] Ulf Hammare, Stockholm: Resursförvaltningen skola och socialtjänst, Forsknings- och utvecklingsenheten , 1998, 72-97 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Bakgrundsspråkens interaktion vid tredjespråksinlärning1998In: Nordiske sprog som andetsprog / [ed] Möller, Janus & Quist, Pia & Holmen, Anne & Jörgensen, J.N., Köbenhavn: Danmarks Laererhöjskole , 1998, 41-59 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Heldner, Mattias
    Umeå University, Department of Philosophy and Linguistics.
    Is an F0-rise a necessary or a sufficient cue to perceived focus in Swedish?1998In: Nordic prosody: prodeedings of the VIIth conference, Joensuu 1996 / [ed] Stefan Werner, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 1998, 109-125 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Kasaty, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Koponen, Eeva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Klintfors, Eeva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Swedish Nominal Morphophonology Implemented within the Two-level Model in PC-Kimmo1998Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a description of Swdish morphophonology and an attempt to create a Swedish pronunciation morpheme lexicon as a part of a text-to-speech system at Telia Research AB.

  • 6.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. Avdelningen för teckenspråk.
    Teckenspråk i taktil form: Turtagning och frågor i dövblindas samtal på teckenspråk1998Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study focuses on turn-taking and questions in conversations between deaf-blind persons using tactile sign language, i.e. communicating by holding each others hands, and how sign language utterances change in the tactile mode when the nonmanual signals characteristic of turntaking and interrogative sentences in (visual) sign language are not used. The material consists of six video-recorded conversations (four with deaf-blind pairs and two where one person is deaf and one is deaf-blind). Parts of the material, viz. 168 sequences with questions and answers, has been transcribed and analyzed.

    The analysis shows that deaf-blind signers use their hands in two different conversation positions. In the monologue position both the signer's hands are held under the hands of the listener, whereas in the dialogue position both participants hold their hands in identical ways: the right hand under the other person's left hand and the left hand on top of the other person's right hand. It is described how the two positions affect the structure of one- and twohanded signs and how back channeling, linguistic as well as non-linguistic (with different kinds of tapping), is used in the two positions.

    The analysis shows that differences in the vertical and the horizontal planes are used in turn-taking regulation. Using four different conversational levels the signer can signal e.g. turn change by lowering his/her hands from the turn level to the turn change level at the end of his/her turn. The horizontal plane is devided into three different turn zones. The turn holder uses his/her own turn zone close to the body and finishes the turn by moving the hands to the joint zone midway between the interlocutors or into the listener's zone.

    The analyzed utterances function as questions, yes/no-questions (82) as well as wh-questions (55). It is hypothesized that yes/no-questions are marked with the manual signal extended duration of the last sign of the utterance, one of the interrogative signals of visual signing, but this was only true for 46 % of the yes/no-questions in the material. Since extended duration of the last sign also signals turn change in e.g. statements it is not regarded as an interrogative signal. Additional markers of yes/no-questions are among others the sign INDEX-adr ('you') with its variant INDEX-adr-long, used as a summons signal, and repetitions of signs or sentences. As for the wh-questions a majority are made with a manual wh-sign. Generally, if there are no interrogative signals the context and the content of the utterance will account for its interpretation as a question.

    To avoid misunderstandings, questions and non-linguistic signals are used in checking turns, where the signer requests back channeling or the listener requests repetition or clarification.

     

  • 7.
    Miestamo, Matti
    Allmän språkvetenskap /General linguistics Helsingfors universitet.
    Affirmaation ja negaation asymmetriasta maailman kielissä1998In: Kieliopillistumisesta, analogiasta ja typologiasta / [ed] Pajunen, Anneli, Helsinki: Suomalaisen Kirjallisuuden Seura , 1998, 182-216 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Roug-Hellichius, Liselotte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Babble, grunts, and words: a study of phonetic shape and functional use in the beginnings of language1998Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study follows in the tradition of those seeking to understand linguistic behavior from a cognitive and socio-biological perspective (Bates, Benigni, Bretherton, Camaioni and Volterra 1979, Lindblom 1992, Hauser 1996) by tracing the development of a non-linguistic vocal behavior in relation to communicative and early lexical advances. More specifically the study focuses on the occurrence of what are termed ìcommunicative gruntsî and their functional relationship to adult based word use in one Swedish boy from 11 to 19 months of age. The findings are based on audio and video recordings made bi-weekly in the childís home. The recordings have been subject to auditory and acoustic analysis of the childís vocal output and coding of co-occurring manual and visual gestures.

    The auditory results indicate that there is a progressive use of grunts over the first months of the second year of life and an increase in communicative grunts (as defined by co-occurring communicative gestures) prior to the onset of context-flexible word use. The auditory findings are corroborated by the results of the acoustic analysis where a shift in fundamental frequency, first and second formant frequency and utterance duration co-occurs with the onset of use of communicative grunts. Based on these findings it is concluded that there is a functional relationship between the use of words and the use of communicative grunts. Further, as the functional shift of the grunt co-occurs with changes in the phonetic domain, the communicative grunts are understood as adaptations to the articulatory and perceptual constraints governing speech communication.

    Two interpretations are provided to account for the significance of the communicative grunt to lexical development. The cognitive approach suggests that the functional relationship between words and communicative grunts holds as an index of cognitive readiness for adult based word use. The experiential approach suggests that the communicative grunt contributes to a representational reorganization allowing for the emergence of denotative word use in the child. Taking advantage of the different foci of the two interpretations, a third amalgamated view proposes that both motor advantages and internally defined conceptual functions may be relevant to an understanding of the phenomenon. It is thus suggested that the significance of the behavior may be that it provides the child with a vehicle by which conceptual content may be expressed, prior to the mastering of appropriate adult vocal forms.

  • 9.
    Strangert, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Department of Philosophy and Linguistics.
    Heldner, Mattias
    Umeå University, Department of Philospphy and Linguistics.
    On the amount and domain of focal lengthening in Swedish1998In: ICSLP'98 Proceedings: ICSLP'98, Sydney, Australia: ICSLP , 1998, 3305-3308 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Sundberg, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Mother tongue - Phonetic Aspects of Infant-Directed Speech1998Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Phonetic aspects of mother-infant interaction are discussed in light of a functionalist Mother-infant phonetic interaction (MIPhI) model. Adults addressing infants typically use a speech style (infant-directed speech, IDS) characterized by, for instance, extensive suprasegmental (prosodic) modulations. This type of speech seems to interest young infants whose active experience with the spoken language appears to focus their speech perception on the phonological properties of the ambient language during the first year of life.

    This thesis consists of four articles discussing phonetic modifications at the suprasegmental, segmental and phonological levels, based on data from six Swedish mothersí IDS to their 3-month-olds. The first study concerns the tonal word accent 2 in disyllabic words, and shows how the lexical, bimodal, tonal characteristics of this accent are enhanced in IDS as compared to adult-directed speech (ADS). The second is a cross-linguistic investigation of vowel formant frequencies in Swedish, Am. English and Russian IDS. It shows that vowels like /i/, /u/, and /a/ are more clearly separated in IDS than in ADS, in all three languages. The third study addresses the voiced /voiceless contrast in stop consonants as measured by voice onset time (VOT) and shows that stop consonants seem to be poorly separated in early IDS samples. The fourth study investigates the quantity distinction in V:C and VC: sequences and indicates that this phonological contrast is well maintained in the IDS.

    Adult data are discussed within the MIPhI model, assuming that suprasegmental and segmental specifications in IDS follow different phonetic specification paths adapted to the infantsí capacities as these develop over the first 18 months of life. The adultsí phonetic adaptations appear to reflect a selective strategy of presenting linguistic structure in a ìgift-wrappingî that is attractive and functional for the infant.

  • 11.
    Svartholm, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Bilingual education for the deaf: evaluation of the Swedish model1998In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Bilingual Education of Deaf Children / [ed] G.L. Zaitseva, A.A. Komarova & D.M. Pursglove, Moskva: Zagrey , 1998, 136-147 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Svartholm, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    La Educación Bilingüe de los Sordos: Principios Básicos1998In: Memorias IV Congreso Lationoamericano de Educación Bilingüe para Sordos / [ed] Paulina Ramírez & Luz Stella Cruz, Bogotá: Ministerio de Educación Nacional, Instituto Nacional para Sordos , 1998, 38-45 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Svartholm, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Ahlström, Margareta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Barndomshörselskadades erfarenheter och upplevelser av tvåspråkighet: en pilotstudie.1998Report (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Traunmüller, Hartmut
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Modulation and demodulation in production, perception, and imitation of speech and bodily gestures1998In: Proceedings of FONETIK 98, 1998, 40-43 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Traunmüller, Hartmut
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. Fonetik.
    The role of F0 in vowel perception1998Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is an on-line auditory demonstration.

  • 16.
    Williams, Sarah
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Language switches in L3 production: Implications for a polyglot speaking model1998In: Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0142-6001, E-ISSN 1477-450X, Vol. 19, no 3, 295-333 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 16 of 16
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  • nn-NO
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