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  • 1.
    Afsun, Donya
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Forsman, Erika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Halvarsson, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Jonsson, Emma
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Malmgren, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Neves, Juliana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Marklund, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Effects of a film-based parental intervention on vocabulary development in toddlers aged 18-21 months2011In: Proceedings from Fonetik 2011: Speech, Music and Hearing; Quarterly Progress and Status Report, Stockholm, 2011, p. 105-108Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    SPRINT is a language intervention project aimed to study the outcome of a parental home training program on children’s language development and future reading and writing skills. This study, which derives data from the SPRINT project, intended to examine the possible effects of a parental-based film intervention. It was conducted on toddlers aged 18-21 months from the Stockholm area with at least one parent who has Swedish as a first language. Parents of 78 children participated in the study and filled in 3 SECDI-w&s questionnaires rating their children's productive vocabulary. Children were randomized to either the intervention or the control group. Results indicated that the interventiongroup demonstrated significantly higher scores over time, F (2,78) = 5,192, p < .007. In the light of previous research it is concluded that this intervention contributes to an increase in productive vocabulary. However, the scores of the intervention group did not exceed the average range for Swedish children in the same age span. Furthermore the possible impact of parental education and thepresence of siblings on productive vocabulary was discussed.

  • 2.
    Al Taai, Lamia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, The Institute for Interpretation and Translation Studies.
    A Comparison of Arabic Literature Translation into English and Swedish: Inverstigating Domestication in the Translation of Arabic Cultural Words - Imarat Yaqubyan as acase in point2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Imarat Yaqubyan is a contemporary Arabic novel that encompasses an intensive and variable Arabic culture; this study contains a survey in tables of cultural words, according to Newmark’s categories, “material culture”, “social culture”, “originations”, and  “gestures and habits”, as well as their correspondences in the English and the Swedish translated novel versions. In this tripled language study, Arabic, English and Swedish, I undertake a qualitative comparison between the translation strategies used by each translator of the English and Swedish versions. For this purpose I apply the taxonomy of translation strategies established by Pedersen, which is divided first into SL-oriented strategies categorized into “Retention”, “Specification” and “Direct Translation”, and secondly the TL-oriented that includes “Generalization”, “Substitution” and “Omission”, as well as the “Official Equivalent”. Through my analyses process, I link Newmark’s metaphors types, terminology and the seven procedures of translating metaphors with Pedersen’s strategies.  In this study, Pedersen’s SL and TL-oriented translation strategies are considered to correspond to Venuti’s terminology of domestication and foreignization. Conclusions are drawn about the use of domesticating strategies in certain cultural words categories of both English and Swedish versions. The study devises the term “False Domestication”.

  • 3.
    Allertz, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Att motivera och/eller manipulera: En begreppsutredande litteraturstudie2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to theoretically investigate the concepts of the interpersonal actions 'to motivate' and 'to manipulate' and also to examine possible differences and similarities between the two. The method used is a conceptual review based on the Self-Determination Theory, related to the concept of motivation, and Machiavellianism, related to the concept of manipu-lation. The results show that 'to motivate', according to Self-Determination Theory, concerns influencing the intrinsic or extrinsic motivation, where intrinsic motivation is related to the feeling of self-determination, inner locus of causality, being or feeling competent and exercise activities for the pleasure of it, whilst extrinsic motivation is related to external locus of cau-sality, external pressure and engaging in activities for the purpose of reaching a goal or re-ward. 'To manipulate' is according to Machiavellianism based on the manipulator doing whatever it takes to reach a certain goal and gain something for himself with no regard of what methods being used. The comparative analysis showed that the crucial difference in how an behaviour is interpreted as either, or both, motivating and manipulative is based on who is doing the interpretation, what information she has and which aspects that are focused on.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Ida
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Gauding, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Graca, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Holm, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Öhlin, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Marklund, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Ericsson, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Productive vocabulary size development in children aged 18-24 months - gender differences2011In: Proceedings from Fonetik 2011: Speech, Music and Hearing; Quarterly Progress and Status Report, Stockholm, 2011, p. 109-112Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies have shown slight differences in language skills between genders, favouring females. In order to investigate gender differences in speech production for Swedish children, the productive vocabulary size of 295 children, aged 18-24 months, was measured by the validated instrument SECDI-2. The size of the productive vocabulary was found to grow rapidly during this age. Significant gender differences were found at 21 and 24 months, but not at 18 months. The girls’ mean scores were higher.

  • 5.
    Axelsson, Marcus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, The Institute for Interpretation and Translation Studies.
    En kat ved navn pluskvamperfektum: En jämförande studie av de skandinaviska översättningarna av L'élégance du hérisson2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The study investigates to what extent the Scandinavian translators use the same methods when translating. The Danish, Norwegian and Swedish translations of the French novel L’élégance du hérisson are analyzed using Vinay and Darbelnet’s (1958/1977) methodology. In the present study the translators are also questioned about so called situational factors that might have influenced the translation process and its outcome. There is a major focus on the methods that are characterized by indirect translation, since these in a clear way indicate differences. Results show that the translators use the same methods in 42 % of the cases in the analyzed material. Results also show that the indirect translation methods are widely used in the Danish target text and it hence also distances itself the farthest from the source text, whereas the Norwegian target text is rich in litteral translation and closest to the source text.

  • 6.
    Azbel Schmidt, Morena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Ordlista för tolkar: Svenska - albanska2011 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Azbel Schmidt, Morena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Ordlista för tolkar: Svenska - kurdiska2011 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Bakker, Peter
    et al.
    Research Centre for Grammar and Language Use, Aarhus University .
    Daval-Markussen, Aymeric
    Research Centre for Grammar and Language Use, Aarhus University.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Plag, Ingo
    Universität Siegen.
    Creoles are typologically distinct from non-creoles2011In: Journal of Pidgin and Creole languages ( Print), ISSN 0920-9034, E-ISSN 1569-9870, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 5-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In creolist circles, there has been a long-standing debate whether creoles differ structurally from non-creole languages and thus would form a special class of languages with specific typological properties. This debate about the typological status of creole languages has severely suffered from a lack of systematic empirical study. This paper presents for the first time a number of large-scale empirical investigations of the status of creole languages as a typological class on the basis of different and well-balanced samples of creole and non-creole languages. Using statistical modeling (multiple regression) and recently developed computational tools of quantitative typology (phylogenetic trees and networks), this paper provides robust evidence that creoles indeed form a structurally distinguishable subgroup within the world's languages. The findings thus seriously challenge approaches that hold that creole languages are structurally indistinguishable from non-creole languages.

  • 9.
    Bjerva, Johannes
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Marklund, Ellen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Engdahl, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Anticipatory Looking in Infants and Adults2011In: Proceedings of EyeTrackBehavior 2011, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Infant language acquisition research faces the challenge of dealing with subjects who are unable to provide spoken answers to research questions. To obtain comprehensible data from such subjects eye tracking is a suitable research tool, as the infants’ gaze can be interpreted as behavioural responses. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the amount of training necessary for participants to learn an audio-visual contingency and present anticipatory looking behaviour in response to an auditory stimulus. Infants (n=22) and adults (n=16) were presented with training sequences, every fourth of which was followed by a test sequence. Training sequences contained implicit audio-visual contingencies consisting of a syllable (/da/ or /ga/) followed by an image appearing on the left/right side of the screen. Test sequences were identical to training sequences except that no image appeared. The latency in time to first fixation towards the non-target area during test sequences was used as a measurement of whether the participants had grasped the contingency. Infants were found to present anticipatory looking behaviour after 24 training trials. Adults were found to present anticipatory looking behaviour after 28-36 training trials. In future research a more interactive experiment design will be employed in order to individualise the amount of training, which will increase the time span available for testing.

  • 10.
    Bjerva, Johannes
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Marklund, Ellen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Training in Anticipatory Looking Experiments with Adult Participants2011In: Proceedings of the 17th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences / [ed] Wai-Sum Lee & Eric Zee, 2011, p. 316-319Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The amount of training necessary to trigger anticipatory looking was investigated in adults (n=16) using a simple testing paradigm, in order to create a baseline for studies on infants’ language acquisition. Participants were presented with training containing implicit associations between two syllables (/da/ and /ga/) and visual events displayed on different areas on the screen. The training series were periodically interrupted by test trials where a syllable was presented but no visual event was displayed. Significantly altered looking behaviour, as measured by participants’ first gaze fixation latency towards the Non-target area (where the visual event should not be expected), was found after 28-36 training trials.

  • 11.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    English as a lingua franca in higher education: Implications for EAP2011In: Ibérica, ISSN 1139-7241, E-ISSN 2340-2784, no 22, p. 79-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The last decade has brought a number of changes for higher education in continental Europe and elsewhere, a major one being the increasing use of English as a lingua franca (ELF) as the medium of instruction. With this change, RAP is faced with a new group of learners who will need to use it predominantly in ELF settings to communicate with speakers from other first language backgrounds. This overview paper first discusses the changes that have taken place in the field of EAP in terms of student body, followed by an outline of the main findings of research carried out on ELF These changes and the results of recent ELF research have important implications for EAP instruction and testing. It is argued here that EAP needs to be modified accordingly to cater for the needs of this group. These revolve around the two major issues: norms and standards for spoken English and target use. If the aim of EAP instruction and testing is to prepare speakers for academic settings where English is the lingua franca, the findings of ELF research need to be taken into consideration and then integrated into EAP curriculum design and testing, rethinking norms and target use. The norms and standards used by EAP instruction must be based on this realistic English, and educational resources should be deployed more realistically, including the usage of ELF, thereby validating the pluralism of English. This paper argues that any practice that excludes this perspective would be reducing EAP qualitatively and quantitatively.

  • 12.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Pragmatic strategies in English as an academic lingua franca:  Ways of achieving communicative effectiveness2011In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 950-964Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper will report the findings of a study that has investigated spoken English as a lingua franca (ELF) usage in Swedish higher education. The material comprises digital recordings of lectures and student group-work sessions, all being naturally occurring, authentic high-stakes spoken exchange, i.e. from non-language-teaching contexts. The aim of the present paper, which constitutes a part of a larger study, has been to investigate the role pragmatic strategies play in the communicative effectiveness of English as a lingua franca. The paper will document types of pragmatic strategies as well as point to important differences between the two speech event types and the implications of these differences for English-medium education. The findings show that lecturers in ELF settings make less frequent use of pragmatic strategies than students who deploy these strategies frequently in group-work sessions. Earlier stages of the present study (Björkman, 2008a, Björkman, 2008b and Björkman, 2009) showed that despite frequent non-standardness in the morphosyntax level, there is little overt disturbance in student group-work, and it is highly likely that a variety of pragmatic strategies that students deploy prevents some disturbance. It is reasonable to assume that, in the absence of appropriate pragmatic strategies used often in lectures, there is an increased risk for covert disturbance

  • 13.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The pragmatics of English as a lingua franca in the international university: Introduction2011In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 923-925Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Björkstrand, Thomas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Ryttervik, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Tecken inom idrott2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Blåsjö, Mona
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    An interview with Britt-Louise Gunnarsson: Parallel language use in academic and professional communication2011Other (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Blåsjö, Mona
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    From percentage to prediction: University students meeting a parallel language of visuals and numerals2011In: Ibérica, ISSN 1139-7241, E-ISSN 2340-2784, no 22, p. 123-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A less-frequently discussed parallel-linguistic issue is the parallel language of visuals and numerals: the diagrams, tables, models, mathematical signs and different symbols that students have to deal with in their reading and writing. Texts are multimodal, that is they are constructed with visual objects and different sign systems as well as writing. For new students, it can be difficult to grasp how visuals and numerals can have different meanings in different contexts, such as academic disciplines. For teachers, the disciplinary use of the visuals and numerals is often so ingrained that they may have difficulty seeing the problems that students face. Drawing on the theoretical framework of social semiotics and the neo-Vygotskian perspective, this article shows how new students of economics in Sweden encounter a multimodal academic literacy. The article also discusses some of the difficulties relating to this situation and arguesfor a raised awareness among teachers in order to scaffold students intoacademic, visual literacies.

  • 17.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Language-specific patterns in event conceptualization: Insights from bilingualism2011In: Thinking and speaking in two languages / [ed] Aneta Pavlenko, Avon: Multilingual Matters, 2011, p. 108-142Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Jarvis, Scott
    Dept. of Linguistics, Ohio University.
    L2 effects on L1 event conceptualization patterns2011In: Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, ISSN 1366-7289, E-ISSN 1469-1841, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 47-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The finding that speakers of aspect languages encode event endpoints to a lesser extent than do speakers of non-aspect languages has led to the hypothesis that there is a relationship between grammatical aspect and event conceptualization (e.g., von Stutterheim and Nüse, 2003). The present study concerns L1 event conceptualization in 40 L1 Spanish – L2 Swedish bilinguals (all near-native speakers of Swedish). Spanish and Swedish differ as regards grammatical aspect: Whereas Swedish lacks this grammatical category, Spanish conveys aspect through verbal morphology and periphrasis. The principal aim of the study was to explore the relationship between event conceptualization patterns and proficiency with aspectual contrasts. The participants were asked to provide oral L1 Spanish descriptions of video clips projecting motion events with different degrees of endpoint orientation (see von Stutterheim, 2003). In addition, they took a grammaticality judgment test concerning verb and gender agreement, verbal clitics and aspectual contrasts. Compared with baseline data from monolingual Spanish speakers, the results on endpoint encoding show that the bilinguals mention the endpoints of motion events to a higher degree than the Spanish control group does. Moreover, it was shown that the weaker the bilinguals’ discrimination of aspectual errors on the grammaticality judgement test, the more prone they were to encoding endpoints. This result consequently furthers the hypothesis about the interconnectedness between grammatical aspect and event conceptualization. It was suggested that this finding indicate that the bilinguals are influenced by the Swedish-like tendency to attend to the boundedness rather than the ongoingness of events.

  • 19.
    Bylund, Emanuel Spångberg
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Ultimate attainment of event segmentation and temporal structuring patterns in speakers of L2 Swedish2011In: Vigo International Journal of Applied Linguistics, ISSN 1697-0381, Vol. 8, p. 29-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates ultimate attainment of patterns of segmentation and temporal structuring of events in L2 speakers. The participant group consists of 35 L1 Spanish - L2 Swedish adult bilinguals living in Sweden, with ages of L2 acquisition ranging from 1 to 19 years. Fifteen native speakers of Swedish and 15 native speakers of Spanish were engaged as controls. The participants provided online-retellings of a film excerpt. The results showed that the L2 speakers resorted to an event segmentation strategy with an intermediate degree of event resolution, which fell in between the monolingual Spanish high degree of resolution and the monolingual Swedish low degree of resolution. Regarding temporal structuring patterns, the results showed that the L2 speakers converged with the Swedish-speaking controls, linking the events by means of anaphoric adverbials (i.e., x then y). There was no effect of age of L2 acquisition on the L2 speakers' degree of conformity with Swedish native speaker behaviour.

  • 20.
    Börstell, Carl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Revisiting Reduplication: Toward a description of reduplication in predicative signs in Swedish Sign Language2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the use of reduplication with predicative signs in Swedish Sign Language (SSL), and also the related phenomena doubling and displacement.

    Reduplication in SSL typically expresses plurality of events and/or referents, but may also express intensification, ongoing event or generic activity. There is a distinction between external and internal events with reduplication: external reduplication expresses some event happening over and over at different points in time and/or with different referents, and is associated with a frequentative/habitual reading; internal reduplication expresses some event consisting of several e.g. movements/actions and is associated with an ongoing reading. Only external expression seems to be applicable to stative constructions, as one would expect. The study also found a phenomenon not previously described: oral reduplication without manual reduplication. This process is found to have the ongoing functions with telic predicates, such that it focuses on the telic predicate as a single event in progress, and thus replaces the function of manual reduplication, which, with telic predicates, would instead express several events. The reading of reduplicated signs is associated with the semantics of the sign reduplicated, and it is also associated with the phonological citation form of the sign—monosyllabic signs tend to get pluractional reading; bisyllabic signs tend to get an ongoing reading. Also, the reading expressed by reduplication is connected to the presence/absence of oral reduplication.

    Reduplication generally does not occur in negative constructions. This study shows that inherently negative signs may be reduplicated, but reduplicated predicates are negated according to other strategies than for non-reduplicated predicates, thus reduplication has the largest scope.

    Doubling and displacement are both associated mainly with plural referents, and it is in this respect that they are related to reduplication, and they both occur frequently with reduplication.

  • 21.
    Clyne, Michael
    et al.
    University of Melbourne.
    Norrby, Catrin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Address in pluricentric languages: The case of German and Swedish2011In: Línguas Pluricêntricas Pluricentric Languages: Variação Linguística e Dimensões Sociocognitivas Linguistic Variation and Sociocognitive Dimensions / [ed] Augusto Soares da Silva, Amadeu Torres, Miguel Gonçalves, Braga, Portugal: ALETHEIA – Associação Científica e Cultural , 2011, p. 147-160Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on address practices in German and Swedish, which bring out contrasts in address in the national varieties. It draws mainly on a large-scale project on address in a number of languages in Europe (Clyne, Norrby, Warren 2009). Data were collected in key localities of the national varieties in focus groups, interviews, chat groups and through participant observation. The results demonstrate that the dominant variation between address in the German and Austrian national varieties of German is the much greater use of titles in Austria and the much more widespread use of T in the workplace, both to superiors and at the same level of seniority. There is also variation within Germany, which highlights the issue of whether East and West German were separate national varieties during the division of Germany. In Sweden-Swedish, the V form was virtually abandoned in the 1960s and is now restricted to addressing especially very old and frail people in service encounters. In Finland Swedish, V is still employed in a way that has been abandoned in Sweden – expressing status and formality, reflecting conservatism and the influence of the Finnish language. This means that controversy as to whether V is exclusionary in Sweden is not relevant in Finland-Swedish. Our study of German and Swedish also demonstrates that knowledge of address in others’ varieties is largely stereotypical.

  • 22.
    Cunningham, Una
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Growing up with Two Languages: A Practical Guide for the Bilingual Family2011 (ed. 3)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Grammaticalization and Linguistic Complexity2011In: The Oxford handbook of grammaticalization / [ed] Narrog, Heiko and Heine, Bernd, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Gösta Bruce2011In: Kungl. Vitterhets historie och antikvitets akademiens årsbok, Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien , 2011, p. 85-93Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Remarks on rarity2011In: Expecting the unexpected: exceptions in grammar / [ed] Simon, Horst J. and Wiese, Heike, Berlin; New York: Mouton de Gruyter, 2011, p. 433-436Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Språket och människan2011 (ed. 1. uppl.)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Dahl, Östen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Gillam, J. Christopher
    Savannah River Archaeological Research Program.
    Anderson, David G.
    University of Tennessee.
    Iriarte, José
    University of Exeter.
    Copé, Silvia M.
    Linguistic Diversity Zones and Cartographic Modeling: GIS as a Method for Understanding the Prehistory of Lowland South America2011In: Ethnicity in ancient Amazonia: Reconstructing past identities from archaeology, linguistics, and ethnohistory / [ed] Hornborg, Alf; Hill, Jonathan David, Boulder, Colo: University Press of Colorado , 2011, p. 211-224Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Dahlby, Malin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Irmalm, Ludvig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Kytöharju, Satu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Wallander, Linnéa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Zachariassen, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Ericsson, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Marklund, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Parent-child interaction: Relationship between pause duration and infant vocabulary at 18 months2011In: Proceedings from Fonetik 2011: Speech, Music and Hearing; Quarterly Progress and Status Report, Stockholm, 2011, p. 101-104Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of child language development have shown that children from an early age are aware of turn-taking patterns in interaction. The aim of this study is to investigate if there is a relationship between turn-taking pauses in parent-child interaction and child vocabulary at 18 months of age. Analysis of pause duration is conducted on recordings from the SPRINT language intervention project and pause duration is found to correlate with child vocabulary size. Different possible reasons for this correlation are discussed.

  • 29.
    Eklund, Alexander
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies.
    La diferencia cultural entre Suecia y España con respecto a las organizaciones económicas: Los factores culturales que se deben tener en cuenta al establecer un negocio en España2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [es]

    El propósito de esta investigación es identificar los factores culturales de los suecos y los españoles, en su encuentro dentro de una organización, que pueden intervenir en el establecimiento económico en España. Estudios anteriores han identificado la problemática de los encuentros culturales dentro de las organizaciones, y postulan que en realidad existen diferencias culturales claras entre las naciones, que pueden conducir a un resultado económico negativo. Los participantes de la investigación ya están familiarizados con el concepto principal del estudio, la cultura organizacional, puesto que son estudiantes de negocios. Estos respondieron a una encuesta, llevada a cabo tanto en español como en sueco, que trata de medir las actitudes, y el promedio obtenido por la importancia que pone el encuestado en cada afirmación, entre un intervalo de uno hasta cinco, de los participantes. Según las respuestas de 67 participantes, podemos responder a la pregunta de investigación, es decir, que sí existen diferencias culturales entre los suecos y los españoles hoy en día. En este trabajo se sacan además conclusiones acerca de cuáles de éstas pueden impedir un establecimiento económico exitoso en España.

  • 30. Falk, Ylva
    et al.
    Bardel, Camilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Object pronouns in German L3 syntax: Evidence for the L2 status factor2011In: Second language research, ISSN 0267-6583, E-ISSN 1477-0326, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 59-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies on L3 lexicon, and recently also some on L3 syntax, have convincingly shown a qualitative difference between the acquisition of a true L2 and the subsequent acquisition of an L3. Some studies even indicate that L2 takes on a stronger role than L1 in the initial state of L3 syntax (e.g. Bardel and Falk, 2007; Rothman and Cabrelli Amaro, 2010). In this article we further investigate syntactic transfer from L1/L2 to L3 in learners at an intermediate level of proficiency in the target language. Data have been obtained from 44 learners of German as L3, testing the placement of object pronouns in both main and subordinate clauses in a grammaticality judgement/correction task (GJCT). The learners constitute two groups (both n = 22): One group has English as L1 and French as L2 and the other group has French as L1 and English as L2. This particular combination of background languages allows us to pinpoint the source of transfer, since object placement is pre-verbal in French and post-verbal in English, this being applied in both main and subordinate clauses. In target language (TL) German, however, the object placement varies between pre-verbal in the sub clause and post-verbal in the main clause. The two groups behave differently as to both acceptance and rejection of the test items (60 grammatical and ungrammatical main and sub clauses with object pronouns). This difference is significant and can be ascribed to their L2s, respectively. Our results thus show that the L2 transfers into the L3 even at an intermediate level, and on the basis of this we claim a strong role for the L2 status factor.

  • 31.
    Franker, Qarin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Litteracitet och visuella texter: Studier om lärare och kortutbildade deltagare i sfi2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis aims to contribute to the growing body of knowledge concerning the adult basic literacy education in the Nordic countries and broaden research on literacy from its traditional focus on verbal texts to include images and visual texts. The thesis comprises a research survey concerning adult literacy and two empirical, exploratory studies focusing on the use of visual texts in the basic Swedish language programme for adult immigrants, Svenskundervisning för invandrare (sfi).

    The first study presents international and Nordic research on literacy with a focus on current sociocultural, and critical perspectives. Together with the three concepts of mutual respect, meaningfulness and participation, an ‘expansive’ model for adult literacy instruction is also presented.

    The second study deals with the teachers´ views on appropriate visual materials for second language and literacy teaching. The results show an extensive but diversified usage of visual material but also that literacy teachers pay very close attention to participants´ sociocultural background in their image selection but tend to underestimate their cognitive ability. From a critical perspective the teachers´ statements can be regarded as part of a discursive practice in which they unintentionally contribute to a discourse construction of an identity of deficiency of the learners.

    The third study examines and compares, how adult second language learners interact with and understand a number of Swedish election posters. The analyses identify processes and variations in the learners´ interaction. The results show that the reconstructions of the visual texts are influenced by the participants´ linguistic, educational and cultural ‘repertoires’, as well as the posters´ graphic, visual and textual design. A certain level of linguistic proficiency as well as formal schooling and knowledge of the current discourse seem to be indispensable for making the intended interpretations.

  • 32.
    Franker, Qarin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Val, vägar, variation: Vuxna andraspråksinlärares interaktion med svenska valaffischer2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Posters, paths and patterns. Adult second language learners interact with Swedish election posters

    The study examines and compares, at group level, how adult second language learners interact with and understand a number of image based Swedish election posters. The analyses identify processes and variations in the learners´ interaction with the posters and expose patterns and structures as graphic ‘reading paths’ and ‘focus points’. The result shows that the reconstructions of the visual texts are influenced by the participants´ linguistic, educational and cultural resources, their ‘repertoires’, as well as the posters´ graphic design and visual and textual elements, ‘the model reader’. A certain level of linguistic proficiency as well as formal schooling and knowledge of the current discourse seem to be indispensable for making the intended interpretations. The design of election posters will need to change to enable the multicultural and second language perspective to be deliberately taken into account.

  • 33.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Att uttrycka känslor språkligt - hinder och möjligheter2011In: VAKKI Symposium XXX: Språk och känslor / [ed] Niina Nissilä,Nestori Siponkoski, Vasa: Vasa universitet , 2011, p. 10-28Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although language and emotion has received an increasing interest during the last decades we still lack a definition of what this language consist of. In the paper it is argued that one major reason for this state of affairs relates to the fact that language and emotion reside on different poles of the dichotomies body/mind, nature/culture, etc. Thus, researchers from different camps have addressed the issue from oppositional vantage points while at the same time attempting to answer the same questions. As an alternative this paper argues that to define emotive language we need to study the actual crossing point between language and emotion, i.e. the language used together with nonverbal and vocal expressions of emotion. Drawing on a video-recorded material of interaction between children and their parents, three categories of emotive language are illustrated: autonomous, accompanying and descriptive utterances. In the paper the internal relation between these categories is discussed as well as their position vis-á-vis prior research.

  • 34.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Children's development of facework practices - An emotional endeavor2011In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 43, no 13, p. 3099-3110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses the origin and development of facework practices in young children by focusing on two kinds of practices in child–parent interaction: (1) situations in which a child’s verbal and nonverbal emotive expressions indicate a need to save face; and (2) situations in which a child uses various strategies in order to save face. Through illustrations from a longitudinal material of child–adult interaction it is argued that emotive reactions constitute the base for face awareness in children. This awareness in time turns to child facework practices, a process aided and shaped by the interactional routines with parents. The central aim of the article is to highlight these two aspects of facework, one internal, emotional and related to face; the other external and interactional. As a second aim the article will enforce that the way we analyze interaction must be transparent in that it can be understood, reviewed and contested by others.

  • 35.
    Gudmundson, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages.
    Bardel, Camilla
    Lindqvist, Christina
    Lexical richness in the advanced learner’s oral production of French and Italian L22011In: International Review of Applied Linguistics in Language Teaching, ISSN 0019-042X, E-ISSN 1613-4141, Vol. 49, p. 221-240Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Heinat, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Review of Meaning and the Lexicon2011In: Linguist List, ISSN 1068-4875, no 22, article id 616Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 37.
    heinat, fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Swedish evaluative relative clauses2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    heinat, fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Klingvall, Eva
    Lund University.
    Manninen, Satu
    Lund University.
    Agreeing passives in Finnish2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    heinat, fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Klingvall, Eva
    Lund University.
    Manninen, Satu
    Lund University.
    How do things get done? On non-canonical passives in Finnish2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Heldner, Mattias
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Detection thresholds for gaps, overlaps and no-gap-no-overlaps2011In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, Vol. 130, no 1, p. 508-513Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detection thresholds for gaps and overlaps, that is acoustic and perceived silences and stretches of overlapping speech in speaker changes, were determined. Subliminal gaps and overlaps were cate- gorized as no-gap-no-overlaps. The established gap and overlap detection thresholds both corre- sponded to the duration of a long vowel, or about 120 ms. These detection thresholds are valuable for mapping the perceptual speaker change categories gaps, overlaps, and no-gap-no-overlaps into the acoustic domain. Furthermore, the detection thresholds allow generation and understanding of gaps, overlaps, and no-gap-no-overlaps in human-like spoken dialogue systems.

  • 41.
    Heldner, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Edlund, Jens
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Hjalmarsson, Anna
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Laskowski, Kornel
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Very short utterances and timing in turn-taking2011In: Proceedings Interspeech 2011, Florence, Italy: ISCA , 2011, p. 2837-2840Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Hengameh, Moadeli
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Attitudes and experiences in Parallel Languages at the department of History of Religion2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Attitudes and experiences in Parallel Languages at the department of History of Religion

    Hengameh Moadeli

     

    Abstract

    The purpose of this case study is to obtain deeper knowledge about students´ and teachers´ beliefs and attitudes towards the arrangement of using two languages for study at university level in one humanities field. This case study was conducted through semi-structured interviews with ten students and two teachers at the Department of History of Religion at Stockholm University.

    Our findings show that the majority of students perceive using two languages in one field as positive and that the (perceived) long-term benefits of being more proficient in English outweigh the immediate problems of more time-consuming reading. Both subject groups described using English as a medium in of education as a natural part of studying at a university and knowing academic English was perceived as a fundamental part of being a student. Although the teachers stated that the motivation behind using English textbooks was not to enhance the students’ language proficiency, most students believed that the advantage they could get from using English textbooks was to become more proficient in English or at least more familiar with academic English. One feature of this case study is to show the impact of having an inadequate knowledge of academic English which is rooted in insufficient training in the upper-secondary school system.

     

     

     

    Key words: Internationalization, attitudes and beliefs, Parallel languages, English textbooks, Department of History of Religion

  • 43.
    Hultgren, Annie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German, German.
    Die Sportpalastrede von Joseph Goebbels aus schwedischer Perspektive: Eine Rezeptionsstudie acht schwedischer Zeitungen2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 44.
    Janson, Tore
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Bengt Sigurd2011In: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitetsakademiens Årsbok 2011, Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, 2011, p. 79-84Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 45.
    Jansson, Mari
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies.
    El bilingüismo y la elección lingüística en la Comunidad Valenciana: ¿Cuáles son los factores que influyen en la elección de lengua?2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [es]

    El presente estudio tiene como objetivo estudiar cuáles son los factores que influyen en la elección de hablar el castellano y el valenciano que son las dos lenguas oficiales de la Comunidad Valenciana, por personas bilingües en una zona rural en esta comunidad. Pretendemos dilucidar si el proceso del castellanismo durante los siglos pasados influye en la elección de lengua cuando los hablantes están en la ciudad, donde el valenciano tiene un estatus menor que en la zona rural. Nos centramos en tres factores: el nivel hablado del castellano y el valenciano, la frecuencia del uso del valenciano y la actitud hacia el uso del valenciano. Partimos de la premisa de que el estatus del valenciano en el pueblo es más alto que en la ciudad. Defendemos las hipótesis de que los informantes que cambian del valenciano al castellano en la ciudad tienen un nivel más bajo de valenciano y el idioma que hablan con más frecuencia es el castellano y que las personas con un nivel alto de valenciano hablado y cuyo idioma hablado con más frecuencia es el valenciano no cambian del valenciano al castellano ni en el pueblo ni en la ciudad. Además creemos que la mayoría de los hablantes tiene una actitud positiva hacia el uso del valenciano y que el estatus que el valenciano tiene en la ciudad afecta la elección en favor del castellano. Para comprobar estas hipótesis hemos utilizado dos encuestas que han sido rellenadas por 67 informantes digitalmente por la red, una con situaciones en el pueblo y la otra con situaciones en la ciudad, en las cuales se prueba la percepción de los hablantes sobre su propia competencia de los dos idiomas. Los resultados comprueban que hay una actitud muy positiva hacia el uso del valenciano, tanto en el pueblo como en la ciudad, y que este factor actitudinal es el que más influye a la hora de elegir una u otra lengua en la ciudad. También se ha visto que se expresa la identidad a través del idioma y por ello la lengua de preferencia es el valenciano tanto en el pueblo como en la ciudad por parte de nuestros informantes residentes en esta zona rural donde el  valenciano es la lengua más usada.

  • 46.
    Kenntoft Hof, Matilda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    L2 learners’ perceptions of accents: A study of the attitudes of Swedish 2nd language learners of English to standard and non-standard English accents2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to find out what attitudes non-native speakers of English have towards standard and non-standard varieties of British English and how these attitudes correlate with the attitudes of native speakers. This study is restricted to Swedish L2 learners of English taking the courses English 5 and English B in a Swedish Upper Secondary School and it is compared to studies done in the UK. The study shows that there are correlations between the accent attitudes of L2 learners of English and the accent attitudes of native speakers of British English, and reflects over and discusses why these correlations occur and what may have affected them.

  • 47.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Linguistic typology and language contact2011In: The Oxford Handbook of Linguistic Typology / [ed] Jae Jung Song, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011, p. 568-590Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Krantz, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Barns tidiga läsutveckling: En studie av tidiga språkliga och kognitiva förmågor och senare läsutveckling2011Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this study is to analyze and describe the reading of a group of pupils in a preschool class and grade 1 and to search for links between preschool language and cognitive skills and early literacy development.

    A total of 49 pupils participated in the study and their literacy development was analyzed over two consecutive years in preschool class and grade 1, partly by teacher evaluations and partly by reading tests. In the autumn term of the preschool class the pupils’ phono­logical awareness, letter knowledge, impressive and expressive voca­bulary, short-term memory and syntactic skills were tested. The main aim was to examine how these skills predicted reading in preschool class and grade 1.

    Single correlation analyses revealed that phonological awareness, letter knowledge, short-term memory and syntactic skills were sig­nificantly related to literacy development, whereas these patterns of prediction were not found regarding verbal skills.

    When analyzing the unique contribution of every single predictor to explain variations in reading ability, phonological awareness gives a specific additional contribution to reading abili­ty in preschool class, whereas letter knowledge gives an addi­tion­al contribution both in preschool class and grade 1. These patterns of prediction were not found regarding more general verbal skills or memory.

     When prior reading ability is also taken into consideration, the prediction of the analyzed preschool skills declines and it is mainly the prior reading ability that is significantly related to literacy deve­lopment.

    This study indicates the importance of success in early literacy development. To make this possible for all students the teachers must be able to identify the developmental stage to build upon. An impor­tant conclusion is that reading education must rely on a solid theoreti­cal basis and the use of a diagnostic approach.

  • 49.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    An ecological model of early phonological development2011In: International Child Phonology Conference / [ed] Marilyn Vihman and Tamar Keren-Portnoy, York, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A model ofphonological development will be presented. The model is outlined within thetentative framework of ETLA, an Ecological Theory of Language Acquisition beingproposed by Stockholm University’s research group for early languageacquisition. It expands Lindblom’s pioneering work on emergent phonology byintroducing explicit ecological and interactional components in the process ofphonological development. In this context the infant’s early discovery of thelinguistic referential function is directly triggered by recurrent co-occurrencesof utterances and affordances of the ecological setting within which the infantinteracts with speakers of the ambient language. The model assumes no initiallinguistic knowledge. Its only underlying assumption is that recurrentco-occurrences of sensory information from different modalities are extremelysignificant, given that the probability of randomly drawing similar co-occurrencesof sensory representations from the huge multisensory space is vanishingly low.Departing from these general and non-linguistic assumptions, the model suggeststhat phonological structure of the ambient language can be inferred fromsituated IDS in the infant’s ecological setting. The model uses a hierarchicalprocess that initially singles out large chunks of utterances with potentialreferential function. By further recursive splitting of the initial referentialchunks into recurrent sub-chunks, the model incrementally converges towards theambient language’s phonological structure.

    Thepresentation will try to demonstrate how the model can generate plausibleemergent phonological representations when applied to actual IDS and relevantecological settings for the adult-infant interaction. It will also be shown howthe inclusion of general aerodynamic and articulatory constraints further refinesthe realism of the phonological development predicted by the model.

    Researchsupported by grants from The Bank of Sweden Tercentenary Foundation (MILLE,K2003:0867), EU-NEST (CONTACT, project n. 5010), Knut and Alice WallenbergFoundation, (KAW 2005.0115) and Stockholm University.

  • 50.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Både arv och miljö spelar roll när barn lär sig tala2011In: Tvärsnitt, ISSN 0348-7997, no 2, p. 14-17Article, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Trots skillnader i ljudrepertoar och grammatiska regler delar världens alla naturliga språk samma kombinatoriska principer. Det gäller även teckenspråk, fast där är principerna anpassade till visuella element. Hur har då människan uppfunnit dessa principer och varför verkar människobarnet ha så lätt att lära sig modersmålet? Svaren på dessa frågor bygger traditionellt på uppfattningar om att språket antingen är medfött eller inlärt. Men arv och miljö framhävs ofta som skarpare motpoler än de kanske är. Studier visar att barns språk utvecklas i ett samspel mellan genetiska förutsättningar och språklig miljö.

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