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  • 1.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    But first, let's think again!2018In: Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, ISSN 1366-7289, E-ISSN 1469-1841Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Alvarez López, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    The dialect of São João da Chapada: possible remains of a mining language in Minas Gerais, Brazil2018In: International Journal of the Sociology of Language, ISSN 0165-2516, E-ISSN 1613-3668Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on the analysis of a specific vocabulary, possibly the remains of a mining language spoken by descendants of Africans. It analyzes 149 lexical items that were registered in the 1920s in a rural region of Minas Gerais, near the city of Diamantina. Based on earlier historical and linguistic studies, as well as on dictionaries of relevant African languages, the lexical study aims to analyze 149 words and expressions in order to verify the etymologies, and determine whether they fit the demographic data available on the origins of the slave population in this area. The second aim is to analyze the distribution of the lexical items in different semantic domains and word classes and compare the observed tendencies, as well as other linguistic characteristics and social functions, with other mining languages and/or similar Afro-Brazilian and Afro-European varieties. The results indicate that Umbundu maintained a high status in the area, and that this variety was not limited to mining activities, but was probably used in everyday life as a secret code that was part of the strategies of resistance among slaves.

  • 3.
    Bergström, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    L'influence des méthodes didactiques sur la production orale en FLE: Comment les enseignants de français font parler les élèves2018Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

     

    Abstract

    The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of didactic methods on oral production in French as a foreign language. This is done by studying how three French teachers in Sweden use different didactic methods to encourage secondary school students to speak French. COLT observations and audio recordings were made at six occasions in three classes of sixth graders and three classes of ninth graders. The results show that the main didactic methods used to encourage students to speak were to ask questions, let students read aloud from textbooks and prepared presentations, let students repeat, and engage students in educational games. Asking questions is the most frequent method but produces a varied amount of oral production. Educational games engage most students and produces the most oral production. No pronounced difference was found between the use of didactic methods in sixth grade and ninth grade. The conclusion is that the choice of didactic method has an impact on oral production. Not only the method itself, but even more so in the way it is applied and adjusted to student’s level of knowledge. This might explain why the same didactic methods are used at different educational levels.

  • 4.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Morphosyntactic variation in spoken English as a lingua franca interactions: Revisiting linguistic variety2018In: Routledge Handbook of English as a Lingua Franca / [ed] Jennifer Jenkins, Will Baker, Martin Dewey, Abingdon: Routledge, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Blomqvist, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Vad uppmärksammar lärare i samtal om skrivbedömning? Svensklärares normer för beslut om summativ bedömning2018In: Nordisk tidskrift för allmän didaktik, ISSN 2002-1534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on a qualitative study of Swedish teachers’ summative assessments of students’ writing in upper secondary school. Based on teacher group discussions, the study describes and analyses teachers’ expressions of norms when assessing and grading students’ writing in the subject of Swedish. Data consist of audio- and video recordings from three focus group discussions, comprising a total of 17 teachers. Topic analysis (Linell, 2001) is the method used to identify expressions of assessment norms in these discussions. The analysis reveals that these teachers’ summative assessments of students’ writing express two competing norms: a non-compensatory and a compensatory norm. The non-compensatory norm is expressed through perceptions that all text qualities must correspond to the same criteria. This means that shortcomings in texts are crucial for teachers’ summative assessments. The text qualities that primarily determine these decisions are language style and text structure. Meanwhile, the compensatory norm is expressed through perceptions that in summative aspects such as students’ age and writing instructions as well as students’ writing development and the national test must be considered. These competing assessment norms have a substantial impact on theses teachers’ decisions on summative assessments. The teacher groups show significant variation in the basis for their decisions regarding summative assessment of students' writing.

  • 6.
    Börstell, Carl
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Jantunen, Tommi
    University of Jyväskylä.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Kimmelman, Vadim
    University of Amsterdam.
    Oomen, Marloes
    University of Amsterdam.
    de Lint, Vanja
    University of Amsterdam.
    Transitivity prominence within and across modalities2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The idea of transitivity as a scalar phenomenon is well known (e.g., Hopper & Thompson 1980; Tsunoda 1985; Haspelmath 2015). However, as with most areas of linguistic study, it has been almost exclusively studied with a focus on spoken languages. A rare exception to this is Kimmelman (2016), who investigates transitivity in Russian Sign Language (RSL) on the basis of corpus data. Kimmelman attempts to establish a transitivity prominence hierarchy of RSL verbs, and compares this ranking to the verb meanings found in the ValPal database (Hartmann, Haspelmath & Bradley 2013). He arrives at the conclusion that using the frequency of overt objects in corpus data is a successful measure of transitivity prominence, and that the prominence ranking of RSL verbs correlate with that found for spoken languages in Haspelmath (2015). In this paper, we expand on these intra- and cross-modal comparisons of transitivity prominence by introducing four other sign languages to the sample: Finnish Sign Language (FinSL), Swedish Sign Language (SSL), Sign Language to the Netherlands (NGT), and German Sign Language (DGS). FinSL and SSL are known to be historically related (cf. Bergman & Engberg-Pedersen 2010), while the other are not related, which allows us to look at both modality and relatedness effects in our sample. Of the 80 core verb meanings in the ValPal database, Kimmelman (2016) included the 25 most frequent verbs in his corpus. For our study, we have annotated all occurrences of these 25 verb meanings in a subset of the corpora of FinSL (2h 40min; 18,446 tokens), SSL (2h 5min; 16,724 tokens), NGT (≈80,000 tokens), and DGS (≈58,000 tokens). We annotate whether a verb occurs with an overt object as well as the type of object (direct, indirect, clausal, or a locative). Looking at the ValPal verb meanings with ≥5 sign tokens in all four new languages, we arrive at 12 verbs that are found in all five sign languages and the spoken languages (SpL) of the ValPal database – see Table 1. In Table 1, we see that there is a general agreement across languages – both signed and spoken – in how transitivity prominent a verb meaning is. Spearman’s rank correlation shows a significant (p<0.05) correlation between all possible pairs except SSL–SpL (p=0.091) and SSL– RSL (p=0.074), corroborating Kimmelman’s finding that there are patterns of transitivity prominence present across languages and modalities. It is interesting that SSL thus diverges from the other sign languages in this sample: this deserves further investigation. We also wanted to investigate the transitivity prominence as a property of individual languages. In order to do so, we took the individual languages of the ValPal database and measured each verb meaning in each language with regard to its transitivity prominence. This meant calculating how many of the verb forms associated with a specific verb meaning took a P argument. Note that this is quite different from calculating transitivity prominence based on corpus data: with corpora, we calculated the proportion of verbal tokens occurring with an overt object, and with the ValPal database, we calculated the proportion of transitive verb associated with a particular concept. We included the 12 verb meanings found across all languages (the five sign languages and 33 spoken languages). We then calculated mean distances across verb meanings and languages, and plotted this with multidimensional scaling in Figure 1. In the figure, we see that the five sign languages form a part of a cluster, suggesting either modality-based similarities, or similarities that come with the difference in data (corpus data rather than lexical data). On the other hand, sign languages as a group are not clearly opposed to spoken languages as a group, which implies that the corpus-based and lexical calculations of transitivity are comparable. Interestingly, FinSL and SSL are not more strongly associated than the other sign languages, which implies that their historical relatedness is not directly relevant to transitivity. In our presentation, we will present the results and the conclusions in more detail, as well as discuss the possibilities of using corpus data to establish valency patterns for languages in the signed modality.

    References Bergman, Brita & Elisabeth Engberg-Pedersen. 2010. Transmission of sign languages in the Nordic countries. In Diane Brentari (ed.), Sign languages: A Cambridge language survey, 74–94. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.Hartmann, Iren, Martin Haspelmath & Taylor Bradley (eds.). 2013. Valency Patterns Leipzig. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. http://valpal.info/. Haspelmath, Martin. 2015. Transitivity prominence. In Andrej Malchukov & Bernard Comrie (eds.), Valency classes in the world’s languages: Vol 1 - Introducing the framework, and case studies from Africa and Eurasia, 131–148. Boston, MA: De Gruyter Mouton. Hopper, Paul J. & Sandra A. Thompson. 1980. Transitivity in grammar and discourse. Language 56(2). 251–299. Kimmelman, Vadim. 2016. Transitivity in RSL: A corpus-based account. In Eleni Efthimiou, Stavroula-Evita Fotinea, Thomas Hanke, Julie Hochgesang, Jette Kristoffersen & Johanna Mesch (eds.), Proceedings of the 7th Workshop on the Representation and Processing of Sign Languages: Corpus Mining, 117–120. Paris: European Language Resources Association (ELRA). Tsunoda, Tasaku. 1985. Remarks on transitivity. Journal of Linguistics 21(2). 385. doi:10.1017/S0022226700010318.

  • 7.
    Di Garbo, Francesca
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Agbetsoamedo, Yvonne
    Non-canonical gender in African languages: A typological survey of interactions between gender and number, and between gender and evaluative morphology2018In: Non-Canonical Gender Systems / [ed] Sebastian Fedden, Jenny Aung, Greville G. Corbett, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018, p. 176-210Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Ek, Adam
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Wirén, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Östling, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Nilsson Björkenstam, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Grigonytė, Gintarė
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Gustafson Capková, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Identifying Speakers and Addressees in Dialogues Extracted from Literary Fiction2018In: 11th edition of the Language Resources and Evaluation Conference, European Language Resources Association, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes an approach to identifying speakers and addressees in dialogues extracted from literary fiction, along with a dataset annotated for speaker and addressee. The overall purpose of this is to provide annotation of dialogue interaction between characters in literary corpora in order to allow for enriched search facilities and construction of social networks from the corpora. To predict speakers and addressees in a dialogue, we use a sequence labeling approach applied to a given set of characters. We use features relating to the current dialogue, the preceding narrative, and the complete preceding context. The results indicate that even with a small amount of training data, it is possible to build a fairly accurate classifier for speaker and addressee identification across different authors, though the identification of addressees is the more difficult task.

  • 9.
    Ganuza, Natalia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hedman, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Modersmålsundervisning: möjligheter och utmaningar2018In: En god fortsättning: nyanländas fortsatta väg i skola och samhälle / [ed] Tore Otterup, Gilda Kästen-Ebeling, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 163-180Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    From shrieks to "Stupid poo": emotive language in a developmental perspective2018In: Text & Talk, ISSN 1860-7330, E-ISSN 1860-7349, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 137-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to highlight and describe the forms of verbal emotive utterances that appeared in a longitudinal corpus of 11 Swedish children interacting with parents, siblings and friends. The children were in the ages 0;9 to 5;10 and were recorded four to six times during a two-year period. The verbal emotive expressions of the material are divided into the categories Descriptive versus Accompanying utterances. Descriptive utterances are emotive mainly from semantic conventions, whereas Accompanying utterances are emotive due to prosodic and contextual traits. The categories are illustrated and related to conventions, language development and cognitive growth. By classifying and labeling verbal expressions as emotive in different ways, it is argued that we can gain a better understanding of how language is used when intertwined with emotions, but also that we access a way to compare and investigate emotive language in a more thorough manner.

  • 11.
    Graham, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Codeswitching from L1 to L2 in group work by teenagers: An investigation of codeswitching from Swedish to English in student group-work discussions by learners of English in 9th grade at a upper primary school in Sweden2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper was to perform an investigation into instances of codeswitching by Swedish teenagers from L1 Swedish to L2 English in student group-work discussions. The specific focus of the investigation were the instances of codeswitching which were performed as a demonstration of personal expression on the part of the speaker. It was the goal of this research to analyse such examples of codeswitching and attempt to create an understanding of the underlying mechanisms that drive this type of communication.  The study took place at an upper primary school in Sweden.  Data was collected through the recording of two group discussions. The group discussions were framed and recorded as part of an English language lesson in grade 9. Four student interviews were also performed. The results of the data analysis indicated that Swedish teenagers codeswitch from Swedish to English in group discussions quite frequently. The students expressed that they codeswitch to English in this manner as way of communicating with each other in a way that is generally agreed to be “cool” and “fun”. They also do this to display their own proficiency in the language. Proficiency in English is perceived to be a desirable attribute. The conclusion of the study is that codeswitching of this type is an important part of this group’s language use in terms of how the social relationships are expressed and maintained. A secondary result of this behaviour is that it appears to be a positive driver of oral English language skills.

  • 12.
    Guissemo, Manuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hip Hop Activism: Dynamic tension between global and local in Mozambique2018In: Journal of World Popular Music, ISSN 2052-4900, E-ISSN 2052-4919, Vol. 5, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Guissemo, Manuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Orders of (in)visibility: Colonial and postcolonial chronotopes in linguistic landscapes of memorization in Maputo2018In: Making Sense of People, Place and Linguistic Landscapes / [ed] Amiena Peck, Christopher Stroud, Quentin Williams, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Hallonsten Halling, Pernilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Adverbs: A typological study of a disputed category2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The notion adverb is often treated as encompassing leftover items in a class that shows little consistency both within and ​across languages. Adverbs are less frequent than other parts of speech cross-linguistically, they seldom inflect, and they are rarely used as a source for derivation to other categories.

    This dissertation focuses on adverbs that denote properties and that can be used as modifiers within predicating expressions. The adverbs in this group are roughly equivalent to the traditional manner adverbs (She walked slowly). In their role as modifiers, these adverbs are parallel to attributive adjectives, which also denote properties, and are modifiers in referring expressions (slow train). Adjectives often also occur in the predicative function (The train is slow). This study compares adverbs to attributive and predicative adjectives in a sample of 60 genealogically diverse languages from around the world. Simple adverbs are attested in the majority of these languages, including in some languages that do not have simple adjectives. The comparison with attributive and predicative adjectives is carried out at three levels of encoding: the root, the lexeme, and the construction. The analysis shows that a great majority of languages have the same root encoding for adverbs, attributive adjectives, and predicative adjectives. Many languages have a class of lexemes that are used in the functions of both adverbs and attributive adjectives, here called general modifiers. On the construction level, where constructions are analyzed in their entirety, important encoding similarities between adverbs and predicative adjectives are unraveled. In a few languages, adverbs and attributive adjectives are encoded by the same or similar constructions.

    The attested simple adverbs and general modifiers both fall into certain characteristic semantic types. For simple adverbs, a core type is SPEED, which is found among the adverbs of most sample languages. The types VALUE, CARE, and NOISE are also found among the simple adverbs of several languages. For general modifiers, VALUE appears as a core type. These semantic types are further attested in tendencies of adverb lexicalization and in adverbial affixation across languages. 

    This dissertation shows that adverbs constitute a cross-linguistically prototypical part of speech, although they differ in many ways from other categories. The basis for this class, just as for adjectives, is the presence of simple lexemes that tend to have similar semantics in unrelated and geographically distant languages. Adverbs are thus conceptually no less basic than adjectives.

  • 15.
    Holmström, Ingela
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Schönström, Krister
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Deaf lecturers’ translanguaging in a higher education setting. A multimodal multilingual perspective2018In: Applied Linguistics Review, ISSN 1868-6303, E-ISSN 1868-6311, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 90-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a few universities around the world courses are offered where the primary language of instruction is a national sign language. Many of these courses are given by bilingual/multilingual deaf lecturers, skilled in both national sign language(s) and spoken/written language(s). Research on such deaf-led practices in higher education are lacking, and this study will contribute to a greater understanding of these practices. Drawing on ethnographically created data from a higher education setting in Sweden, this case study examines the use of different languages and modalities by three deaf lecturers when teaching deaf and hearing (signing) students in theoretic subjects. The analysis is based on video-recordings of the deaf lecturers during classroom activities at a basic university level in which Swedish Sign Language (SSL) is used as the primary language. The results illustrate how these deaf lecturers creatively use diverse semiotic resources in several modes when teaching deaf and hearing (signing) students, which creates practices of translanguaging. This is illustrated by classroom activities in which the deaf lecturers use different language and modal varieties, including sign languages SSL and ASL as well as Swedish, and English, along with PowerPoint and whiteboard notes. The characteristics of these multimodal-multilingual resources and the usage of them will be closely presented in this article.

  • 16. Jon-And, Anna
    et al.
    Alvarez López, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    A Cupópia do Cafundó: uma análise morfossintática2018In: Revista de Estudos da Linguagem, ISSN 0104-0588, E-ISSN 2237-2083, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 73-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study analyzes the speech of the Afro-Brazilian rural community of Cafundó, located 150 km from São Paulo. Between 1978 and 1988, when the analyzed data were collected, the community had a population of 80 people, descendants of two former slaves, who were sisters and inherited the lands of their owner. In a book published in 1996, Carlos Vogt and Peter Fry (with the collaboration of Robert Slenes) argue that the variety denominated Cupópia presents structures of regional Portuguese, and that part of the vocabulary is of Bantu origin. The present paper focuses on morphosintactic aspects and discusses copulaomission, the use of copula instead of the possessive verb, unexpected word order in Portuguese, nouns without determinant in subject position, the use of definite articles in prepositional prepositional phrases functioning as adjectival locutions, as well as the variable agreement in the noun phrases and the agreement between the subject and the verb. The results indicate that the grammatical features of Cupopia do not fully coincide with those observed in the Portuguese spoken by the same individuals, but are shared with more restructured linguistic varieties than the ones spoken in rural areas of the interior of the State of São Paulo.

  • 17.
    Karlander, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Backjumps: writing, watching, erasing train graffiti2018In: Social Semiotics, ISSN 1035-0330, E-ISSN 1470-1219, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 41-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with mobile semiotics. First and foremost, it discusses mobility as a semiotic device. The analysis engages with backjumps, a genre of train graffiti that draws inventively on various forms of movement. The term backjump refers to any fairly elaborate graffiti piece painted on trains in traffic, notably during the trains’ extended stops at terminal stations. The examples focus on the Stockholm metro, where a rigorous anti-graffiti policy has been firmly in place: graffiti is quickly cleaned off trains and a range of strategies is implemented to keep graffiti writing under wraps. By slyly inserting graffiti into the metro system, the mobility-driven backjump practice allows graffiti writers to temporarily subvert this semiotic regime. Furthermore, the forms of semiotic mobility at play are not limited to the movement of the trains. As the present study shows, mobile backjumps are entangled in other patterns of mobility, which jointly underwrite a number of interlinked semiotic processes.

  • 18.
    Kaufhold, Kathrin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Creating translanguaging spaces in students’ academic writing practices2018In: Linguistics and Education, ISSN 0898-5898, E-ISSN 1873-1864, Vol. 45, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Postgraduates increasingly write in multilingual contexts. Studies have focused on developing bilingual expertise or harnessing expressions of writer identity. Yet, the role of students’ linguistic ideologies and their writing experiences has so far not been problematised. Based on Busch’s sociolinguistic model oflinguistic repertoire (2012), this paper investigates how students develop their academic writing across language codes and registers in the multilingual contexts of a Swedish university. The qualitative, longi-tudinal study presents data from two students including interviews based on the students’ written text relating to their master’s thesis. Findings show that students’ linguistic ideologies and their experiences can enable or restrict their capacity to draw on their varied repertoires. When enabled, students create translanguaging spaces for meaning making in collaboration with peers and institutional actors. I argue that the metaphor of translanguaging space can be fruitfully applied as a pedagogic tool.

  • 19.
    Kaufhold, Kathrin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Wirdenäs, Karolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Slutrapport: Att mediera information om vårdmöjligheter för nyanlända: Evaluering av SLL:s kommunikation 2015/162018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Under hösten 2015 och våren 2016 anlände många människor på flykt till Sverige. Runt omkring i landet uppstod då ett behov av att informera dem som kommit om deras förutsättningar, inte minst när det gällde hälso- och sjukvård. Stockholms läns landstings (SLL) reaktion på denna kommunikationsutmaning var bland annat att producera broschyrer och affischer med information för asylsökande.

    I vårt samarbetsprojekt har vi utvärderat informationssatsningen, och vi har sökt materialets informationsvägar, från landstinget till potentiella vårdtagare, via organisationerna och vårdinstitutionerna. Forskningsfrågorna är:

    -          Hur ges informationen, av vilka, till vilka och var?

    -          Vilka möjligheter och hinder har siktats?

    Vår studie är språkvetenskaplig och fokuserar samspel, samtal och kontexter där aktörer använder och tolkar vårdinformation.

    Något som vi ser som ett viktigt resultat från vår studie är att vi kan bidra till att synliggöra ett övergripande dilemma i samhället. Det finns en stor beredskap och en stark vilja att hjälpa och välkomna personer som är nya i Stockholm och Sverige. Det finns också god kunskap om hur man kan göra det. Samtidigt är viljan att upprätthålla och befästa gällande regelverk och system stark. Vi har sett hur dessa riktningar ofta hamnar på kollisonskurs med varandra och hur det verkligen försvårar både för den som vill hjälpa och den som behöver hjälp. SLL, och andra myndigheter och verksamheter, befinner sig tillsammans med den enskilde mitt i detta problem. I utformningen av framtida informationssatsningar kan man ha som mål att minska dilemmats konsekvenser i så stor utsträckning som det är möjligt.

  • 20.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Making and shaping participatory spaces: Resemiotisation and citizenship agency2018In: The Multilingual Citizen: Towards a Politics of Language for Agency and Change / [ed] Lisa Lim, Christopher Stroud, Lionel Wee, Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters, 2018, p. 263-288Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In South Africa, democratic consolidation involves not only building a new state but also new interfaces between state and society. In order to strengthen the agency of citizens at these interfaces, recent approaches to development stress the notion of ‘participatory citizenship’ which recasts citizenship as practised rather than given. The purpose of this paper is to explore the links between such practices of participatory citizenship and possibilities for literacy and language education in state adult learning centres. It draws on an impact study of a capacity building programme for educators of adults in the Northern Cape Province and uses interviews and document analysis to explore the ways in which meaning-making unfolded in new participatory spaces. It argues that such processes can be seen as  a form of ‘linguistic citizenship’ in which individuals and groups re-shaped the multilingual representational resources available to them to validate the authority of subaltern actors and mobilise collective agency. It uses the concept of resemiotisation (Iedema 1999) to investigate how the choice of different semiotic complexes enabled or constrained participation and to offer a set of principles for reconceptualising the provision of adult basic education.

     

  • 21.
    Liljegren, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Supporting and sustaining language vitality in northern Pakistan2018In: The Routledge Handbook of Language Revitalization / [ed] Leanne Hinton, Leena Huss, Gerald Roche, New York: Routledge, 2018, p. 427-437Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Northern Pakistan is linguistically and culturally very diverse. Nearly 30 languages—representing a wide span, numerically and vitality-wise—are spoken in this mountainous region, sharing ties with adjacent areas of neighboring countries. Although most of these languages have received little outside recognition, there have been few restrictions for those wanting to promote their languages. Therefore, a number of sustaining efforts have been made in recent years, exemplified throughout the chapter: collaborative fieldwork, the formation of language organizations, training in documentation, the development of orthographies, publications, the introduction of mother-tongue schools, and lobbying for the region’s languages. Evaluating some of those activities and their effectiveness in terms of language maintenance and revitalization, some key factors stand out: community ownership, institutional support, pooling of resources, and multi-community collaboration. The observations and subsequent analysis are informed by the author’s own long-term involvement in the development of the Forum for Language Initiatives.

  • 22.
    Marklund, Ellen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Schwarz, Iris-Corinna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Using rotated speech to approximate the acoustic mismatch negativity response to speech2018In: Brain and Language, ISSN 0093-934X, E-ISSN 1090-2155, Vol. 176, p. 26-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mismatch negativity (MMN) response is influenced by the magnitude of the acoustic difference between standard and deviant, and the response is typically larger to linguistically relevant changes than to linguistically irrelevant changes. Linguistically relevant changes between standard and deviant typically co-occur with differences between the two acoustic signals. It is therefore not straightforward to determine the contribution of each of those two factors to the MMN response. This study investigated whether spectrally rotated speech can be used to determine the impact of the acoustic difference on the MMN response to a combined linguistic and acoustic change between standard and deviant. Changes between rotated vowels elicited an MMN of comparable amplitude to the one elicited by a within-category vowel change, whereas the between-category vowel change resulted in an MMN amplitude of greater magnitude. A change between rotated vowels resulted in an MMN ampltude more similar to that of a within-vowel change than a complex tone change did. This suggests that the MMN amplitude reflecting the acoustic difference between two speech sounds can be well approximated by the MMN amplitude elicited in response to their rotated counterparts, in turn making it possible to estimate the part of the response specific to the linguistic difference.

  • 23. O'Rourke, Bernadette
    et al.
    Soler, Josep
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Darquennes, Jeroen
    New speakers and language policy2018In: The Oxford Handbook of Language Policy and Planning / [ed] James W. Tollefson, Miguel Pérez-Milans, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Palm, Clara
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Ganuza, Natalia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hedman, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Language use and investment among children and adolescents of Somali heritage in Sweden2018In: Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, ISSN 0143-4632, E-ISSN 1747-7557Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores language use and investment among Somali-speaking children and adolescents in Sweden, through group interviews and survey data. Our findings indicate that there are incentives to invest in Somali language learning considering the reported language use patterns and the expressed positive attitudes towards Somali mother tongue instruction. The Somali language was perceived to be ‘naturally’ linked to Somali identity and to being able to claim ‘Somaliness’, not only by the adolescents but also by the surroundings. Thus, advanced Somali language proficiency was perceived as necessary for being able to pass as ‘culturally authentic’ (Jaffe, A. [2012]. “Multilingual Citizenship and Minority Languages.” In The Routledge Handbook of Multilingualism, edited by M. Martin-Jones, A. Blackledge, and A. Creese, 83–99. London: Routledge). Furthermore, being perceived as unproficient in Somali or unable to transmit the language to future generations was experienced as guilt-provoking. Nevertheless, the adolescents articulated a compliance with the dominant linguistic order in Sweden, and their school’s assimilatory language rules (‘Swedish-only’). This compliance was associated with good manners and moral behaviour, thus reflecting the potentially harmful and pervasive nature of assimilatory language ideology and policy for individual students. The findings exemplify in many ways the struggles it entails to maintain and develop a minoritised language in a majority language context and the complex ‘ideological enterprise’ of language learning with its educational and ethical dilemmas.

  • 25.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Bakker, Peter
    Gretenkort, Tobias
    Dr. Crevaux’s Wayana-Carib Pidgin of the Guyanas: a grammatical sketch2018In: Amérindia : revue d'ethnolinguistique amérindienne, ISSN 0221-8852, Vol. 40, p. 169-220Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Bakker, Peter
    McWhorter, John H.
    Creoles and sociolinguistic complexity: Response to Ansaldo2018In: Language sciences (Oxford), ISSN 0388-0001, E-ISSN 1873-5746, Vol. 66, p. 226-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an earlier article in this journal, Umberto Ansaldo states that creoles are sociolinguistically the most complex of languages, equalled only by the situation in South India. In our article we show that this claim is not supported by facts about global multilingualism, creole societies, creole language structures and theories of language contact. The vast majority of the world’s population is multilingual: the average human speaks almost two languages. Nothing in the sociolinguistic situation of current creole societies is exceptional vis-à-vis situations of other minority languages. Yet, creoles differ structurally from the other languages of the world. That finding is supported by all empirical studies that include data on creoles and non-creoles, despite exceptionalists being accused of being inspired by ideology. The “feature pool theory” (cf. Mufwene 2001), analyzing creoles as simply language hybrids like a great many other languages, does not predict the relative analyticity of creole languages, since several equally analytic creoles and pidgins have come about from contact between morphologically rich languages. Crucially, adherents of this theory, including Ansaldo, have not responded to criticisms along these lines. Sudden language contact, as in situations of pidginization and creole genesis, leads to loss of irregularities and morphological paradigms. We argue that Ansaldo's claims are based on an insufficient familiarity with the relevant literature, as well as frequent misquotations.

  • 27.
    Premat, Christophe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Les usages du dégagisme dans la campagne présidentielle de Jean-Luc Mélenchon2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    If we define populism as a grid of reading that simplifies political questions, then we would be tempted to classify the simple anti-system positioning as an expression of this simplifying impulse (Wiles, 1969). The movement "La France insoumise" was created by the left-wing leader Jean-Luc Mélenchon on 10 February 2016 around a socialist and environmental program, “L'Avenir en commun”. The objective is both to impose an ideological vision of social relations and to prepare the future electoral deadlines. In the course of the presidential election campaign, Jean-Luc Mélenchon repeatedly referred to the idea of ​​a get lostism (dégagisme) which means that a large part of the representatives should be recalled or removed from duty as they betrayed the meaning of the mandate that people gave them. This contribution proposes to analyze the genealogy of this injunction which has been repeatedly taken up as a slogan. The chapter will be based on the critical discourse analysis that focuses on relations between social (Berger, Luckmann, 1991) reality and the conditions of emergence of the political discourse (Fairclough, 2015).

  • 28.
    Soler, Josep
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    El cas català des d’una perspectiva nord-europea: marcs ideològics i legislació lingüística2018In: El català, llengua mitjana d’Europa: Multilingüisme, globalització i sostenibilitat lingüística / [ed] Albert Bastardas i Boada, Emili Boix-Fuster, Rosa M. Torrens, Barcelona: Octaedro, 2018, p. 61-77Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Soler, Josep
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    University language policies in Estonia and Sweden: Exploring the interplay between English and national languages in higher education2018In: Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, ISSN 0143-4632, E-ISSN 1747-7557, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 29-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As universities seek to become more international, their need to engage with a wider range of languages, particularly English, seems more prominent. At the same time, universities are also regarded by many stakeholders as key institutions to preserve a given national language and culture. This apparent tension makes universities a fruitful ground to explore relevant issues of language policymaking. This paper analyses language policies in higher education in two northern European countries, Sweden and Estonia. Applying qualitative content analytical tools, we tackle the following questions: (1) what major themes emerge from the analysis of institutional language policy documents in Estonia and Sweden? and (2) how is English perceived in relation to other languages? Our analysis shows that, despite their different historical and sociopolitical trajectories, universities in the two countries tend to adopt similar stances vis-à-vis their language policy developments. There also exist, however, different nuances in approaching the language question, which we interpret as being the result of the particular cultural backgrounds of each country.

  • 30.
    Soler, Josep
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Vihman, Virve-Anneli
    Language ideology and language planning in Estonian higher education: nationalising and globalising discourses2018In: Current Issues in Language Planning, ISSN 1466-4208, E-ISSN 1747-7506, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 22-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, interest in the study of language policy issues in the context of universities has grown considerably. One reason for this is the coexistence of two apparently contradictory discourses, centring around nationalising and globalising orientations. Universities are seen by many as the key institutions for safeguarding the sustainability of national languages, while in order to operate on a global scale, an increasing use of foreign languages (particularly English) is necessary in those same institutions. In our paper, we explore the tensions and ambiguities provoked by this scenario in the context of Estonian higher education (HE), focusing on the University of Tartu. More specifically, we look at how different stakeholders orient themselves towards the language question at the university: university officials, members of the university (staff and students), and members of society outside the university. Using discourse analytical tools, we map the ideological constructs with which these different stakeholders take a stance towards the two dominating discourses. In our analysis, we show that these different groups re-create and shape both the nationalising and the globalising discourses currently present in the field of HE by strategically mobilising a set of semiotic resources available to them.

  • 31.
    Wallin, Lars
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Annoteringskonventioner för teckenspråkstexter: Version 7 (januari 2018)2018Other (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Wälchli, Bernhard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The rise of gender in Nalca (Mek, Tanah Papua): The drift towards the canonical gender attractor2018In: Non-canonical gender systems / [ed] Sebastian Fedden, Jenny Audring, Greville G. Corbett, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018, p. 68-99Chapter in book (Refereed)
1 - 32 of 32
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