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  • 1.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Morphosyntactic variation in spoken English as a lingua franca interactions: Revisiting linguistic variety2018In: Routledge Handbook of English as a Lingua Franca / [ed] Jennifer Jenkins, Will Baker, Martin Dewey, Abingdon: Routledge, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    De Ridder, Reglindis
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German, Dutch.
    O'Connel, Eithne
    Using Audiovisual Translation to Track Language Planning Developments: Flemish Public Broadcasting Subtitles from 1995 to 20122018In: Fast-Forwarding with Audiovisual Translation / [ed] Jorge Díaz Cintas, Kristijan Nikolić, Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 2018, 212-222 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter, describing interdisciplinary research, links audiovisual translation, lexicography and corpus linguistics with sociolinguistics, presenting a useful example of how audiovisual translation studies can make a contribution to the field of sociolinguistics. Given the ever-increasing presence of the audiovisual media, especially in the lives of the younger generation, it is important for sociolinguists to attend to what is happening to language in, and as a result of, this media. In the digital age, the impact of the published written word is weakened, not least because subtitles have become the most dominant written text type read in many smaller European language areas. It follows that the subtitled word may play a significant, if sometimes underestimated, language planning role. In the research presented here, the case study relates to subtitles in a small, pluricentric European language, namely Dutch. Using corpus linguistics techniques, it has been possible to track trends relating to the use of the Belgian variety of Dutch in interlingual subtitles in Flemish public broadcasting (VRT) fiction programmes. The transnational Dutch publishing industry’s established practice has been one of consistently avoiding Belgian Dutch features and this has had ramifications for Belgian authors and translators. Since 1998, VRT has changed its language policy and been officially committed to using more Belgian Dutch lexical variants. Therefore, this diachronic study seeks to establish whether, and if so, to what extent, VRT’s subtitled texts, between 1995 and 2012, have in practice included more marked Belgian Dutch lexical items, thus providing an important counterbalance to published Dutch texts and contributing to the development of a richer, more inclusive Dutch written standard. This research yields concrete new data and demonstrates how productive links can be forged between audiovisual translation (subtitling) and corpus linguistics, on the one hand, and sociolinguistics (language planning and minority media studies), on the other.

  • 3.
    Jon-And, Anna
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna.
    Alvarez López, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    A Cupópia do Cafundó: uma análise morfossintática2018In: Revista de Estudos da Linguagem, ISSN 0104-0588, E-ISSN 2237-2083, E-ISSN 223720183, Vol. 26, no 1, 73-101 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study analyzes the speech of the Afro-Brazilian rural community of Cafundó, located 150 km from São Paulo. Between 1978 and 1988, when the analyzed data were collected, the community had a population of 80 people, descendants of two former slaves, who were sisters and inherited the lands of their owner. In a book published in 1996, Carlos Vogt and Peter Fry (with the collaboration of Robert Slenes) argue that the variety denominated Cupópia presents structures of regional Portuguese, and that part of the vocabulary is of Bantu origin. The present paper focuses on morphosintactic aspects and discusses copulaomission, the use of copula instead of the possessive verb, unexpected word order in Portuguese, nouns without determinant in subject position, the use of definite articles in prepositional prepositional phrases functioning as adjectival locutions, as well as the variable agreement in the noun phrases and the agreement between the subject and the verb. The results indicate that the grammatical features of Cupopia do not fully coincide with those observed in the Portuguese spoken by the same individuals, but are shared with more restructured linguistic varieties than the ones spoken in rural areas of the interior of the State of São Paulo.

  • 4.
    Karlander, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Backjumps: writing, watching, erasing train graffiti2018In: Social Semiotics, ISSN 1035-0330, E-ISSN 1470-1219, Vol. 28, no 1, 41-59 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with mobile semiotics. First and foremost, it discusses mobility as a semiotic device. The analysis engages with backjumps, a genre of train graffiti that draws inventively on various forms of movement. The term backjump refers to any fairly elaborate graffiti piece painted on trains in traffic, notably during the trains’ extended stops at terminal stations. The examples focus on the Stockholm metro, where a rigorous anti-graffiti policy has been firmly in place: graffiti is quickly cleaned off trains and a range of strategies is implemented to keep graffiti writing under wraps. By slyly inserting graffiti into the metro system, the mobility-driven backjump practice allows graffiti writers to temporarily subvert this semiotic regime. Furthermore, the forms of semiotic mobility at play are not limited to the movement of the trains. As the present study shows, mobile backjumps are entangled in other patterns of mobility, which jointly underwrite a number of interlinked semiotic processes.

  • 5.
    Marklund, Ellen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Schwarz, Iris-Corinna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Using rotated speech to approximate the acoustic mismatch negativity response to speech2018In: Brain and Language, ISSN 0093-934X, E-ISSN 1090-2155, Vol. 176, 26-35 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mismatch negativity (MMN) response is influenced by the magnitude of the acoustic difference between standard and deviant, and the response is typically larger to linguistically relevant changes than to linguistically irrelevant changes. Linguistically relevant changes between standard and deviant typically co-occur with differences between the two acoustic signals. It is therefore not straightforward to determine the contribution of each of those two factors to the MMN response. This study investigated whether spectrally rotated speech can be used to determine the impact of the acoustic difference on the MMN response to a combined linguistic and acoustic change between standard and deviant. Changes between rotated vowels elicited an MMN of comparable amplitude to the one elicited by a within-category vowel change, whereas the between-category vowel change resulted in an MMN amplitude of greater magnitude. A change between rotated vowels resulted in an MMN ampltude more similar to that of a within-vowel change than a complex tone change did. This suggests that the MMN amplitude reflecting the acoustic difference between two speech sounds can be well approximated by the MMN amplitude elicited in response to their rotated counterparts, in turn making it possible to estimate the part of the response specific to the linguistic difference.

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