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  • 1.
    Aare, Kätlin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lippus, Pärtel
    University of Tartu.
    Włodarczak, Marcin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Heldner, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Creak in the respiratory cycle2018In: Proceedings of Interspeech 2018, Hyderabad, India: The International Speech Communication Association (ISCA), 2018, p. 1408-1412-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Creakiness is a well-known turn-taking cue and has been observed to systematically accompany phrase and turn ends in several languages. In Estonian, creaky voice is frequently used by all speakers without any obvious evidence for its systematic use as a turn-taking cue. Rather, it signals a lack of prominence and is favored by lengthening and later timing in phrases. In this paper, we analyze the occurrence of creak with respect to properties of the respiratory cycle. We show that creak is more likely to accompany longer exhalations. Furthermore, the results suggest there is little difference in lung volume values regardless of the presence of creak, indicating that creaky voice might be employed to preserve air over the course of longer utterances. We discuss the results in connection to processes of speech planning in spontaneous speech.

  • 2.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    But first, let's think again!2018In: Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, ISSN 1366-7289, E-ISSN 1469-1841, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 906-907Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On the basis of their review of studies, Mayberry and Kluender (2017) propose that the human language learning ability becomes severely compromised if it is not developed in tandem with brain development in early childhood, but that it functions more or less flawlessly, even in adulthood, if language acquisition had at one time proceeded according to the maturational timetable. Mayberry and Kluender therefore suggest that the critical period hypothesis (CPH) for language is unambiguously tied to the timing of L1 acquisition, but that its relevance to L2 acquisition is less clear, the implication being that the well-documented AoA effects in the SLA literature are due to non-maturational (i.e., psychological, experiential, cross-linguistic, etc.) causes.

  • 3.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Age effects on language acquisition, retention and loss. Key hypotheses and findings2018In: High-Level Language Proficiency in Second Language and Multilingual Contexts / [ed] Kenneth Hyltenstam, Inge Bartning, Lars Fant, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018, p. 16-49Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    af Klintberg, Juli
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Akademiskt svenskt teckenspråk: En undersökning av akademiska kännetecken2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose is to investigate the characteristics that may be considered in academic Swedish Sign Language and which in turn will help a larger number of students produce their essays in academic Swedish Sign Language. Recorded material from lectures, made by four deaf graduates and from the Sign Language corpus, where two deaf academics were also involved, and some randomly chosen in-formants, were investigated. The results from the academic Swedish Sign Language were compared to the characteristics that identify with the academic American Sign Language. There need to be more knowledge and research on this subject.

  • 5.
    Aktürk Drake, Memet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Vrije Universiteit Brussel.
    Hur bra har den svenska integrationskontexten varit på att främja balanserad tvåspråkighet?2018In: Nordand: nordisk tidsskrift for andrespråksforskning, ISSN 0809-9227, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 107-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates how good the Swedish integration context has been at promoting balanced bilingualism among adult children of Turkish immigrants. Balanced bilingualism has been one of the goals of Sweden’s multicultural language policy. An extensive comparison with corresponding groups in Rotterdam and Berlin is also presented. The data come from 430 participants in the project The Integration of the European Second Generation, of whom 133 resided in Stockholm. Balanced bilingualism is defined on the basis of the participants’ self-assessed speaking and writing skills in Turkish and their respective second languages. The results show that only a minority of the second-generation Turks were balanced bilinguals in Stockholm, which constituted the lowest rate among the cities. At the same time, the Stockholm group displayed the highest skill levels in the second language among the three cities. The analysis points out that the inclusive multi-ethnic context in Stockholm had a positive effect on second-language skills, while the Turkish group’s relatively small size and concentration coupled with the deficient implementation of mother-tongue instruction had a negative effect on Turkish skills. The other cities’ more segregated and enclavelike integration contexts seem instead to better promote Turkish skills and thereby to lead to a higher occurrence of balanced bilingualism. 

  • 6.
    Alrup, Malin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    ”Välj vego”: En argumentations- och legitimeringsanalytisk studie av Djurens Rätts webbtexter.2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna uppsats undersöks språkliga strategier i tre webbtexter från den ideella organisationen Djurens Rätt. Djurens Rätt måste i sina texter möta kommunikativa utmaningar i form av en diversifierad målgrupp och att fylla olika syften, eller funktioner, i texterna. Dessa funktioner innebär dels att försöka väcka intresse hos mottagaren för innehållet i texterna och dels att försöka påverka mottagarens attityder till en djurvänlig livsstil. För att undersöka olika strategier använder jag mig av argumentationsanalys och legitimeringsanalys.

     

    Undersökningen visar på olika fynd, bland annat att Djurens Rätt i sina webbtexter arbetar mycket med auktoriteter, konsekvenser och exempel, men att de däremot inte arbetar med berättelser, explicita teser eller analogier. Dessa strategier verkar för att beroende av ämnet i den aktuella texten väcka mottagarens intresse eller påverka dennes attityder. Användningen av argument och legitimeringar beror på flera faktorer: ämnet, den tänkta målgruppen och den tänkta funktionen i den specifika texten. Djurens Rätt verkar även arbeta mycket med kunskap och förmedlingen av denna. Genom språket legitimeras denna kunskap, och att följa en vegansk kost.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Läsning på olika nivåer: Läsguidesfrågornas påverkan på elevers läsförståelse och lässtrategier2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Ett vanligt sätt att arbeta med läsförståelse i skolan är att låta elever läsa en lärobokstext och svara på frågor om texten. I denna uppsats undersöker jag hur sådana läsguidesfrågor som ska fungera som stöd för läsförståelsen kan påverka elevernas läsförståelse och lässtrategier. Detta undersöker jag genom ett test där en högstadieklass får läsa en lärobokstext i historia från det digitala läromedlet Clio Online. Hälften av klassen får i samband med läsningen svara på textkontrollerande läsguidesfrågor, medan andra hälften får svara på inferensfrågor. Därefter får alla elever svara på enkätfrågor om textens svårighetsgrad och sina strategival under uppgiften samt kontrollfrågor som testar deras läsförståelse.

    Resultatet visar att eleverna som besvarar inferensfrågor ägnar längre tid åt uppgiften att läsa texten och besvara frågorna. Dessa elever visar en starkare metakognitiv medvetenhet, genom att färre av dessa elever överskattar sin egen förståelse av texten. Denna elevgrupp får också ett bättre totalresultat på kontrollfrågorna som testar deras läsförståelse. Detta indikerar att inferensfrågorna tycks styra eleverna till en djupare läsning och en bättre läsförståelse.

    Samtidigt får dock eleverna som besvarar textkontrollerande läsguidesfrågor ett bättre resultat på den kontrollfråga som efterfrågar en helhetsförståelse av texten. Fler i denna grupp anger dessutom som lässtrategi att de läste igenom hela texten snarare än att leta efter svaren i texten, vilket bör leda till en djupare läsning. Detta resultat verkar till viss del orsakas av att några av eleverna som får inferensfrågor tycks sakna antingen motivation eller förmåga att besvara dessa, och därmed inte blir hjälpta av dem i sin läsning. Resultatet kan också förklaras med att läsguidesfrågorna eleverna får vid ett tillfälle inte är det enda som påverkar deras läsning, utan de påverkas också av andra faktorer såsom motivation eller en vana vid vissa lässtrategier. Även elever som får frågor som leder dem mot en ytlig läsning kan alltså läsa på en djupare nivå, och tvärtom.

    Denna undersöknings begränsade omfattning gör att det inte går att dra några säkra slutsatser utifrån resultatet. Den försiktiga slutsats som kan dras är att för svåra inferensfrågor för eleven inte tycks hjälpa läsförståelsen, medan inferensfrågor på en lagom nivå tycks kunna leda till en djupare läsförståelse än textkontrollerande frågor.

  • 8.
    Andersson, Stina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Swedish toddlers’ use of turn-final gaze in dyadic child-parent interaction2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Turn-final gaze at the interlocutor has been suggested to fill different functions in conversation: being monitoring, regulatory or response-seeking. 16 Swedish toddlers use of turn-final gaze in dyadic interaction with their parents was investigated at the ages 1;0, 1;6, 2;0, 2;6 and 3;0. The turn-final gaze behaviour was investigated for correlations to child age and language level. Additionally, child turn-final gaze in turn-final questions, in turns longer than 5 seconds and in different interaction contexts was examined.Results showed that the use of active turn final gaze increased over ages 1;0-2;0. No correlations between child use of turn-final gaze and child language level could be found. In turn-final questions, 93% of the turn-final gaze was active, i.e. was not present at the start of the turn. Turn-final gaze was used both during conversation and object-oriented interaction at all ages.A monitoring-response-seeking function of turn-final gaze was proposed to be used by the toddlers as a means to get the parent’s encouragement and approval of the child’s interactive language use. Additionally, the importance of choosing a suitable measure type of turn-final gaze while investigating small children was stressed.

  • 9.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Myths about bilingual learning in family life settings: Leoold’s child language biographies and contemporary children’s play practices2018In: Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, ISSN 2210-6561, E-ISSN 2210-657XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In four volumes, Werner Leopold documented his first child's acquisition of German and English (e.g. 1939; 1949). In this article I problematize contemporary myths about bilingualism that partly date back to Leopold's pioneering work and his theorizing about the one-language/one- person method of language development. Notably, this method worked for his first-born, but not for his second child, whose very existence has often not been noted. A dyadic bias – privileging the study of one parent/one child – has led to a neglect of the role of siblings and peers. Moreover, a cognitive bias has led to an under-analysis of the role of play in language acquisition. On the basis of work on play practices and activity settings, this paper addresses these biases, highlighting the role of social demands and play communities for multilingual development. Several explanations are presented for why Leopold's second child did not speak German. In foregrounding the social situation of development and the role of play, this paper advocates more holistic approaches, including the study of hybrid improvisations in everyday practices.

  • 10.
    Assadi, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Bäste Den det vederbör: En studie av artighet i skriftliga klagomål till en svensk myndighet2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna undersökning analyseras hur artighetsstrategier och ansiktshot realiseras med Brown & Levinsons artighetsteori som grund. Materialet består av sextio skriftliga klagomål som Stockholms stads trafikkontor tagit emot mellan åren 1977 och 2017. De har skickats in via brev, mejl, mobilapplikationen Tyck till samt Stockholms stads webbplats. Syftet är att se vilka strategier som används för att uttrycka ansiktshot, men också för att kringgå dem. Resultatet visar att det förekommit olika tendenser vad gäller hur skribenterna uttrycker både artighetsstrategier och ansiktshot. Det tidiga materialet präglas av fler modala verb som signalerar lägre förpliktelse samt passiva verb och nominaliseringar för att utelämna mottagaren. Över tid ökar förekomsten av kritik och fler skribenter både ifrågasätter och nedvärderar trafikkontorets arbete. Mot slutet av mätperioden blir meddelandena dock opersonligare med färre aktörer och värderingar. 

  • 11. Bakker, Peter
    et al.
    Gretenkort, Tobias
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Dr. Crevaux’s Wayana-Carib Pidgin of the Guyanas: a grammatical sketch2018In: Amérindia: revue d'ethnolinguistique amérindienne, ISSN 0221-8852, Vol. 40, p. 169-217Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Balkstam, Eira
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Fonologisk utveckling i det svenska teckenspråket hos hörande andraspråksinlärare: Identifiering av aspekter, tecken och en- och tvåhandstecken2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the phonological development of hearing L2 learners has been investigated with regard to their ability to identify a sign's aspect structure, both partially and as a whole, and one- vs. two-handed signs. The results were compared to a control group of deaf first language speakers of Swedish sign language. There has previously been a limited number of studies focusing on the identification of signs. For this reason, a task that required no previous knowledge of Swedish Sign Language or linguistics was created for this study. The study is based on data from a quantitative and longitudinal investigation. In the identification of aspects, it is shown that place of articulation was the easiest to identify for both groups, followed by articulator, and lastly articulation, which was the most difficult to identify correctly. The L2 group performed better and could identify a higher number of correct lexical signs than the L1 group. However, both groups scored low results. A possible reason for this is that the test template is not explicit enough about articulation as a aspect. When identifying one- and two-handed signs, it is shown that one-handed signs are easier to identify than two-handed signs, across both groups. This corroborates previous research that shows that two-handed signs are phonologically and cognitively more complex than one-handed signs. Further research with a larger number of participants is encouraged in order to investigate other potentially influencing factors.

  • 13.
    Bardel, Camilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Gudmundson, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Developing Lexical Complexity in Oral Production: Limitations and Possibilities of the Advanced L2 Learner2018In: High-level language proficiency in second language and multilingual contexts / [ed] Kenneth Hyltenstam, Inge Bartning, Lars Fant, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018, p. 120-145Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Bark, Josefin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Adversativa och deskriptiva betydelserelationer i svenskt teckenspråk2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines how adversative and descriptive semantic relations is marked in sentences and how signs and non-manual signals are used to mark these important relations in Swedish Sign Language. Different areas of this study are highlighted because they are significant and may influence how we select sign and non-manual signals in sentences of sign language: sign space, non-manual signals and word sequence that can vary. It is shown that both sign and non-manual signals that mark the two semantic relationships depend on the context of the sign language text. When one uses markers for semantic relations, the signs are being used in its basics forms. There can also be phonological variants of one sign. Clear markers with the non-manual signals for meaning relationships are eye gaze, raised or furrowed eyebrows, and eyes that are widened or squinting. Placement of signs in the space can be regarded as a marker.

  • 15.
    Becker, Christine
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German.
    "Sie und ihre Familie waren keine Nazis" - Faktuales Erzählen im Landeskundeunterricht2018In: Deutsch als Fremdsprache und Kulturwissenschaft - Zugänge zu sozialen Wirklichkeiten / [ed] Simone Schiedermair, München: IUDICIUM Verlag GmbH, 2018, p. 277-291Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Bergqvist, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Evidentiality as stance: Event types and Speaker roles2018In: Evidence for Evidentiality / [ed] Ad Foolen; Helen de Hoop; Gijs Mulder, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2018, p. 19-43Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper argues for a view of evidentials as a type of shifter and outlines a theory of reference for evidentials that separates the configuration of the ground from the relational axis, as well as the alignment between ground and figure. The paper also evaluates a proposal by Kockelman (2004) that draws on Jakobson’s notion of “event type” and Goffman’s “speaker roles” to suggest an existing analogy between “commitment events” for modals and “source events” for evidentials. The scope properties of ‘factual’ forms in both systems notably constitute a formal difference between (epistemic) modality and evidentiality that cannot be accounted for solely by the referential properties of evidentials.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-01-01 10:14
  • 17.
    Bergqvist, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Intersubjectification revisited: a cross-categorical perspective2018In: Epistemic Modalities and Evidentiality in Cross-Linguistic Perspective / [ed] Zlatka Guentcheva, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2018, p. 319-345Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article offers three illustrations of how the process of “intersubjectification” (Traugott & Dasher 2002) can be observed in the development of time deictics, person markers and sentence-type markers to encode aspects of the speaker’s assumptions concerning the addressee’s epistemic access to an event. First-hand data from Lakandon Maya (Yukatekan, Mexico), Kogi, and Ika (Arwako-Chibchan, Colombia) is discussed in order to offer a potentially more nuanced view of intersubjectification in language. While suggested in previous accounts of intersubjectification, the article argues that this process of language change only involves categories and expressions definable as “shifters” (Jespersen 1922), i.e. expressions that at the same time refer to aspects of the speech situation and the proposition.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-01-01 10:59
  • 18.
    Bergqvist, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The role of sentence type in Ika (Arwako) egophoric marking2018In: Egophoricity / [ed] Simeon Floyd, Elisabeth Norcliffe, Lila San Roque, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2018, p. 347-374Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter focuses on the role of sentence type and subject person in accounting for egophoric marking in Ika, an Arwako-Chibchan language spoken in northern Colombia. Egophoric marking in Ika is only found in declarative clauses for which the speaker either assumes the role of epistemic authority, or where the speaker shares this role with the addressee. Interrogatives are treated as non-egophoric with all subject persons, as they do not encode the speaker’s assumptions about possible answers. This restriction, together with ones that pertain to predicate type and temporal frame of reference, point to epistemic/observational access as an important parameter in a system where public acts and personal attributes involving the speaker and/or the addressee are the only ones available for egophoric marking. As a complement to models of dialogical stance-taking (e.g. Du Bois 2007), the notion of “complex epistemic perspective” (see Bergqvist 2016) is introduced to identify which perspective configurations allow for egophoric marking.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-01-01 10:24
  • 19.
    Bergström, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    L'influence des méthodes didactiques sur la production orale en FLE: Comment les enseignants de français font parler les élèves2018Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

     

    Abstract

    The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of didactic methods on oral production in French as a foreign language. This is done by studying how three French teachers in Sweden use different didactic methods to encourage secondary school students to speak French. COLT observations and audio recordings were made at six occasions in three classes of sixth graders and three classes of ninth graders. The results show that the main didactic methods used to encourage students to speak were to ask questions, let students read aloud from textbooks and prepared presentations, let students repeat, and engage students in educational games. Asking questions is the most frequent method but produces a varied amount of oral production. Educational games engage most students and produces the most oral production. No pronounced difference was found between the use of didactic methods in sixth grade and ninth grade. The conclusion is that the choice of didactic method has an impact on oral production. Not only the method itself, but even more so in the way it is applied and adjusted to student’s level of knowledge. This might explain why the same didactic methods are used at different educational levels.

  • 20. Bijvoet, Ellen
    et al.
    Fraurud, Kari
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    What’s the target? A folk linguistic study of young Stockholmers’ constructions of linguistic norm and variation2018In: High-Level Language Proficiency in Second Language and Multilingual Contexts / [ed] Hyltenstam, Kenneth, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018, p. 196-225Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Morphosyntactic variation in spoken English as a lingua franca interactions: Revisiting linguistic variety2018In: Routledge Handbook of English as a Lingua Franca / [ed] Jennifer Jenkins, Will Baker, Martin Dewey, Abingdon: Routledge, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Blomqvist, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Vad uppmärksammar lärare i samtal om skrivbedömning? Svensklärares normer för beslut om summativ bedömning2018In: Nordisk tidskrift för allmän didaktik, ISSN 2002-1534, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 34-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on a qualitative study of Swedish teachers’ summative assessments of students’ writing in upper secondary school. Based on teacher group discussions, the study describes and analyses teachers’ expressions of norms when assessing and grading students’ writing in the subject of Swedish. Data consist of audio- and video recordings from three focus group discussions, comprising a total of 17 teachers. Topic analysis (Linell, 2001) is the method used to identify expressions of assessment norms in these discussions. The analysis reveals that these teachers’ summative assessments of students’ writing express two competing norms: a non-compensatory and a compensatory norm. The non-compensatory norm is expressed through perceptions that all text qualities must correspond to the same criteria. This means that shortcomings in texts are crucial for teachers’ summative assessments. The text qualities that primarily determine these decisions are language style and text structure. Meanwhile, the compensatory norm is expressed through perceptions that in summative aspects such as students’ age and writing instructions as well as students’ writing development and the national test must be considered. These competing assessment norms have a substantial impact on theses teachers’ decisions on summative assessments. The teacher groups show significant variation in the basis for their decisions regarding summative assessment of students' writing.

  • 23.
    Blåsjö, Mona
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Christensson, Johan
    University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Questions as literacy practice and boundary object in a teacher education setting2018In: Linguistics and Education, ISSN 0898-5898, E-ISSN 1873-1864, Vol. 48, p. 85-95Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Blåsjö, Mona
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Jonsson, Carla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Mångfald, möten och mejl: En forskningsöversikt och tre fallstudier om arbetslivskommunikation2018Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I den här antologin beskrivs människor, redskap och situationer som många känner igen från dagens komplexa och rörliga arbetsliv:

    • En mellanchef vars arbetsdagar i hög grad styrs av de många möten som andra lagt in i hennes kalender.
    • En whiteboardtavla som kopplar samman olika delar av en verksamhet, och även kopplar möten till andra aktiviteter.
    • Flera samverkande organisationer som gör det svårt att skilja internkommunikation från annan kommunikation, och som både ökar behovet av kommunikation och försvårar den.

    Dessa skildras i tre uppsatser av Angie Gravett, Emma Legaard och Sofia Johansson. I en forskningsöversikt sammanfattar forskarna Mona Blåsjö och Carla Jonsson sociolingvistisk forskning om arbetslivskommunikation, med fokus på skrivbordsyrken. Översikten visar ur ett individperspektiv hur enskilda anställda förhåller sig till språk i sin vardag på arbetsplatsen, och ur ett organisatoriskt perspektiv diskuteras hur flera språk kan användas på en och samma arbetsplats. De studier som presenteras bygger på olika metoder (kvalitativa, kvantitativa, etnografiska osv.) och ger därigenom en bild av hur man kan gå tillväga för att analysera arbetslivskommunikation. Översikten fokuserar på tre teman: mångfald, dvs. olika aspekter av flerspråkighet på arbetsplatser, möten och annan muntlig kommunikation samt mejl eller snarare mejlande: textprocesser och digitala redskap i arbetslivet.

    Antologin är lämplig för studenter på grundnivå och forskarnivå, men kan även läsas av alla som är intresserade av hur moderna organisationer arbetar med sin kommunikation.

  • 25. Bock, Zannie
    et al.
    Dalwai, Nausheena
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Cool mobilities: Youth style and mobile telephony in contemporary South Africa2018In: Multilingual Youth Practices in Computer Mediated Communication / [ed] Cecelia Cutler, Unn Røyneland, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2018, p. 51-67Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26. Bono, Mayumi
    et al.
    Efthimiou, EleniFotinea, Stavroula-EvitaHanke, ThomasHochgesang, JulieKristoffersen, JetteMesch, JohannaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.Osugi, Yutaka
    8th Workshop on the Representation and Processing of Sign Languages: Involving the Language Community: Proceedings2018Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Botsis, Hannah
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa.
    Subjectivity, Language and the Postcolonial: Beyond Bourdieu in South Africa2018Book (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Botsis, Hannah
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa.
    Bradbury, Jill
    Metaphorical sense-making: Visual-narrative language portraits of South African students2018In: Qualitative Research in Psychology, ISSN 1478-0887, E-ISSN 1478-0895, Vol. 15, no 2-3, p. 412-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reflects on a creative visual-narrative approach to understanding South African students' lived experiences of languages. Data were collected in two interviews: the first entailing a biographical history and the drawing of a linguistic portrait on a simple body outline and the second a narrative interview utilising the portrait generated in the first as a basis for talking about language and identity. Framing the research process in this creative visual mode shifts the focus of narrative talk, simultaneously grounding it in affective, embodied experience, and enabling a reflexive position from which to analyse the taken-for-granted role of language in the minutiae of everyday life. The theoretical lenses of identity and subjectivity are invigorated through these metaphorical representations, and new creative possibilities are released for analysing the role of language in mediating shifting power dynamics in post-apartheid and postcolonial South African life.

  • 29.
    Börstell, Carl
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Jantunen, Tommi
    University of Jyväskylä.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Kimmelman, Vadim
    University of Amsterdam.
    Oomen, Marloes
    University of Amsterdam.
    de Lint, Vanja
    University of Amsterdam.
    Transitivity prominence within and across modalities2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The idea of transitivity as a scalar phenomenon is well known (e.g., Hopper & Thompson 1980; Tsunoda 1985; Haspelmath 2015). However, as with most areas of linguistic study, it has been almost exclusively studied with a focus on spoken languages. A rare exception to this is Kimmelman (2016), who investigates transitivity in Russian Sign Language (RSL) on the basis of corpus data. Kimmelman attempts to establish a transitivity prominence hierarchy of RSL verbs, and compares this ranking to the verb meanings found in the ValPal database (Hartmann, Haspelmath & Bradley 2013). He arrives at the conclusion that using the frequency of overt objects in corpus data is a successful measure of transitivity prominence, and that the prominence ranking of RSL verbs correlate with that found for spoken languages in Haspelmath (2015). In this paper, we expand on these intra- and cross-modal comparisons of transitivity prominence by introducing four other sign languages to the sample: Finnish Sign Language (FinSL), Swedish Sign Language (SSL), Sign Language to the Netherlands (NGT), and German Sign Language (DGS). FinSL and SSL are known to be historically related (cf. Bergman & Engberg-Pedersen 2010), while the other are not related, which allows us to look at both modality and relatedness effects in our sample. Of the 80 core verb meanings in the ValPal database, Kimmelman (2016) included the 25 most frequent verbs in his corpus. For our study, we have annotated all occurrences of these 25 verb meanings in a subset of the corpora of FinSL (2h 40min; 18,446 tokens), SSL (2h 5min; 16,724 tokens), NGT (≈80,000 tokens), and DGS (≈58,000 tokens). We annotate whether a verb occurs with an overt object as well as the type of object (direct, indirect, clausal, or a locative). Looking at the ValPal verb meanings with ≥5 sign tokens in all four new languages, we arrive at 12 verbs that are found in all five sign languages and the spoken languages (SpL) of the ValPal database – see Table 1. In Table 1, we see that there is a general agreement across languages – both signed and spoken – in how transitivity prominent a verb meaning is. Spearman’s rank correlation shows a significant (p<0.05) correlation between all possible pairs except SSL–SpL (p=0.091) and SSL– RSL (p=0.074), corroborating Kimmelman’s finding that there are patterns of transitivity prominence present across languages and modalities. It is interesting that SSL thus diverges from the other sign languages in this sample: this deserves further investigation. We also wanted to investigate the transitivity prominence as a property of individual languages. In order to do so, we took the individual languages of the ValPal database and measured each verb meaning in each language with regard to its transitivity prominence. This meant calculating how many of the verb forms associated with a specific verb meaning took a P argument. Note that this is quite different from calculating transitivity prominence based on corpus data: with corpora, we calculated the proportion of verbal tokens occurring with an overt object, and with the ValPal database, we calculated the proportion of transitive verb associated with a particular concept. We included the 12 verb meanings found across all languages (the five sign languages and 33 spoken languages). We then calculated mean distances across verb meanings and languages, and plotted this with multidimensional scaling in Figure 1. In the figure, we see that the five sign languages form a part of a cluster, suggesting either modality-based similarities, or similarities that come with the difference in data (corpus data rather than lexical data). On the other hand, sign languages as a group are not clearly opposed to spoken languages as a group, which implies that the corpus-based and lexical calculations of transitivity are comparable. Interestingly, FinSL and SSL are not more strongly associated than the other sign languages, which implies that their historical relatedness is not directly relevant to transitivity. In our presentation, we will present the results and the conclusions in more detail, as well as discuss the possibilities of using corpus data to establish valency patterns for languages in the signed modality.

    References Bergman, Brita & Elisabeth Engberg-Pedersen. 2010. Transmission of sign languages in the Nordic countries. In Diane Brentari (ed.), Sign languages: A Cambridge language survey, 74–94. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.Hartmann, Iren, Martin Haspelmath & Taylor Bradley (eds.). 2013. Valency Patterns Leipzig. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. http://valpal.info/. Haspelmath, Martin. 2015. Transitivity prominence. In Andrej Malchukov & Bernard Comrie (eds.), Valency classes in the world’s languages: Vol 1 - Introducing the framework, and case studies from Africa and Eurasia, 131–148. Boston, MA: De Gruyter Mouton. Hopper, Paul J. & Sandra A. Thompson. 1980. Transitivity in grammar and discourse. Language 56(2). 251–299. Kimmelman, Vadim. 2016. Transitivity in RSL: A corpus-based account. In Eleni Efthimiou, Stavroula-Evita Fotinea, Thomas Hanke, Julie Hochgesang, Jette Kristoffersen & Johanna Mesch (eds.), Proceedings of the 7th Workshop on the Representation and Processing of Sign Languages: Corpus Mining, 117–120. Paris: European Language Resources Association (ELRA). Tsunoda, Tasaku. 1985. Remarks on transitivity. Journal of Linguistics 21(2). 385. doi:10.1017/S0022226700010318.

  • 30.
    Caliolo, Susanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages, French and Italian.
    Non skrattare!: Tipologie di errori nella produzione orale di bambini italo-svedesi2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [it]

    This thesis examines the different typologies of morphosyntactic and lexical errors committed in speaking by bilingual Swedish-Italian children, 7-9 years old, having Swedish as first dominant mother tongue and Italian as first weak mother tongue. Furthermore, this work tries to assess if performance or competence errors are committed. Stated by Green, the bilinguals’ languages are organized in separate subsystems that can be activated to different extents. For the speakers analyzed here, the frequency of use of Swedish implies their predilection for this language, whose ease of access causes a predominance of the Swedish language system over the Italian one. According to the Competition Model, by improving the knowledge of Italian, the subjects adopt the linguistic structures that they gradually acquire and the transfers from the dominant to the weak L1 gradually decrease. The collection of data has been carried out taking into account the theories defining code-switching, code-mixing and slips of the tongue. As expected, the results show that performance errors are prevalent in children with a good knowledge of Italian, especially in the morpho-lexical field (terms not occurring automatically during the production and often drawn from Swedish). On the other hand, competence errors prevail in children with a poor knowledge of Italian: having a very weak ability of normative control and being subject to a very strong interference and mixture with Swedish at every level, they often borrow terms or sentences not occurring in Italian from the dominant language.

  • 31.
    Colliander, Martha-Paula
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Hen: mer än ett ord på tre bokstäver: En korpusbaserad studie om distributionen av olika funktioner hos pronomenet hen i sociala medier 2012-20172018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is a corpus-based study, which aims to investigate both the distribution and function of the pronoun hen in social media platforms, during the time period 2012-2017. Since 2012, the year when a broad debate sparked regarding the use of hen, the pronoun has increasingly been incorporated into the Swedish language. By using the search-tool Korp, and the collection of texts provided by Språkbanken, 186 occurrences of hen have been analyzed. These occurrences were extracted from various social media corpora, specifically Bloggmix, Familjeliv, Flashback and Twittermix. The data were tagged into eight different categories: Könsöverskridande (Non-gender), Anonymising and Unknown-sex, Indefinite and generic, Meta, Nominalised, Non-human, Unclear and Other. The results show that the dominant function of hen are the anonymized- and unknown-hen, comprising up to 47% of all cases. Also, the second most prominent function is the Generic-hen, with a total of 28%. Finally, the function Meta-hen, covers about 13% of all occurrences. These result indicate that the pronoun is debated less in social media compared to results from previous studies where Meta-hen proved to be the dominant use in previous years (Ledin & Lyngfelt, 2013: 168). Instead it is more common to use hen in order to anonymize, for example, or when it is not possible to comment on the gender identity of a person when the sex is unknown, and that it is more common to generalize in different contexts instead. Moreover, it can be noted that the use of hen had increased on both Bloggmix and Familjeliv until 2016. Conversely, the data shows that its use on Flashback fluctuated over time, and showed a constant decline on Twittermix.

  • 32.
    Cortes, Elisabet Eir
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Włodarczak, Marcin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Simko, Juraj
    University of Helsinki.
    Articulatory Consequences of Vocal Effort Elicitation Method2018In: Proceedings of Interspeech 2018, Hyderabad, India: The International Speech Communication Association (ISCA), 2018, p. 1521-1525Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Articulatory features from two datasets, Slovak and Swedish, were compared to see whether different methods of eliciting loud speech (ambient noise vs. visually presented loudness target) result in different articulatory behavior. The features studied were temporal and kinematic characteristics of lip separation within the closing and opening gestures of bilabial consonants, and of the tongue body movement from /i/ to /a/ through a bilabial consonant. The results indicate larger hyper - articulation in the speech elicited with visually presented target. While individual articulatory strategies are evident, t he speaker groups agree on increasing the kinematic features consistently within each gesture in response to the increased vocal effort. Another concerted strategy is keeping the tongue response considerably smaller than that of the lips, presumably to preserve acoustic prerequisites necessary for the adequate vowel identity. While the method of visually presented loudness target elicits larger span of vocal effort, the two elicitation methods achieve comparable consistency per loudness conditions.

  • 33.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Grammaticalization in the languages of Europe2018In: The grammaticalization from a typological perspective / [ed] Heiko Narrog, Bernd Heine, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018, p. 79-96Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Dandache, Rayan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    English borrowings on South Korean TV: A study of how English borrowings are utilized in South Korean television programs2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    English has been utilized as a donor language for lexical borrowing of loanwords for a long time, by many different languages. One of those languages is Korean: and despite the importance of the English influence on the Korean language, few have researched what word class the loanwords within the language belong to and if the lexical borrowing goes through any changes. The purpose of the present study was to establish what type of lexical borrowings occur in Korean television programs and what processes the lexical borrowings go through before settling within the borrowing language and how these results would relate to studies in other languages. The results showed a strong tendency for English nouns to be borrowed regardless of the genres of the different programs analysed for this study. Loanwords was the most common borrowing type with 493 followed by loanshifts with 31. Loanblends were very uncommon with only 3 found, suggesting further research or a different approach. The results were also compatible with findings in other languages.

  • 35.
    Di Garbo, Francesca
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Agbetsoamedo, Yvonne
    Non-canonical gender in African languages: A typological survey of interactions between gender and number, and between gender and evaluative morphology2018In: Non-canonical gender systems / [ed] Sebastian Fedden, Jenny Audring, Greville G. Corbett, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018, p. 176-210Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 36. Ehrensberger-Dow, Maureen
    et al.
    Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Exploring the Situational Interface of Translation and Cognition2018Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The contributions of this volume explore the dynamics of the interface between the cognitive and situational levels in translation and interpreting. Until relatively recently, there has been an invisible line in translation and interpreting studies between cognitive research (e.g., into mental processes or attitudes) and sociological research (e.g., concerning organization, status, or institutions). However, rapid developments in translation and interpreting practices (professional, non-professional) have brought to the fore the need to rethink theoretical perspectives and to apply new research methods. The chapters in this volume aim to contribute to this discussion through conceptual and/or empirical research. Drawing on different theoretical and methodological frameworks, they offer insights into diverse translation and interpreting situations, in a number of different countries and cultures, and their consequences for individual and collective cognition. Originally published as special issue of Translation Spaces 5:1 (2016).

  • 37.
    Ek, Adam
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Wirén, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Östling, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Nilsson Björkenstam, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Grigonytė, Gintarė
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Gustafson Capková, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Identifying Speakers and Addressees in Dialogues Extracted from Literary Fiction2018In: 11th edition of the Language Resources and Evaluation Conference, European Language Resources Association, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes an approach to identifying speakers and addressees in dialogues extracted from literary fiction, along with a dataset annotated for speaker and addressee. The overall purpose of this is to provide annotation of dialogue interaction between characters in literary corpora in order to allow for enriched search facilities and construction of social networks from the corpora. To predict speakers and addressees in a dialogue, we use a sequence labeling approach applied to a given set of characters. We use features relating to the current dialogue, the preceding narrative, and the complete preceding context. The results indicate that even with a small amount of training data, it is possible to build a fairly accurate classifier for speaker and addressee identification across different authors, though the identification of addressees is the more difficult task.

  • 38.
    Ekman, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Automatisk extraktion av nyckelord ur ett kundforum2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Conversations in a customer forum span across different topics and the language is inconsistent. The text type do not meet the demands for automatic keyword extraction. This essay examines how keywords can be automatically extracted despite these difficulties. Focus in the study are three areas of keyword extraction. The first factor regards how the established keyword extraction method TF*IDF performs compared to four methods created with the unusual material in mind. The next factor deals with different ways to calculate word frequency. The third factor regards if the methods use only posts, only titles, or both in their extractions. Non-parametric tests were conducted to evaluate the extractions. A number of Friedman's tests shows the methods in some cases differ in their ability to identify relevant keywords. In post-hoc tests performed between the highest performing methods, one of the new methods perform significantly better than the other new methods but not better than TF*IDF. No difference was found between the use of different text types or ways to calculate word frequency. For future research reliability test of manually annotated keywords is recommended. A larger sample size should be used than in the current study and further suggestions are given to improve the results of keyword extractions.

  • 39.
    Eliaso Magnusson, Josefina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Språk, makt och "Den Andre": Erfarenheter av underordning och/eller "möjliggörande" i Sverige2018In: Paideia, ISSN 1904-9633, no 16, p. 46-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med denna studie är att visa hur språket och kroppen används som gränsmarkörer för att skapa och skilja ut det svenska genom vardaglig språkanvändning. Detta görs med hänvisning till idén om intersektionen av indexikaliteter av "Den Andre". Därmed bidrar artikeln till att göra utbildningsaktörer medvetna om hur olika maktrelationer vävs ihop och omformar olika koncept av svenska samt betydelsen av vad det innebär att kunna svenska. Studiens resultat kan användas för att nå ökad förståelse för språkets roll och de möjligheter och begränsningar som följer av ett visst sätt att tala.

  • 40.
    Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Ehrensberger-Dow, Maureen
    Cognitive space: exploring the situational interface2018In: Exploring the Situational Interface of Translation and Cognition / [ed] Maureen Ehrensberger-Dow, Birgitta Englund Dimitrova, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2018, p. 1-18Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Eriksson, Freya
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Gesture-speech combinations in child language: Form, function, and how they relate to language acquisition2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates children's production of gesture-speech combinations and how they relate to language acquisition. 16 children were observed at seven age points (0;9, 1;0, 1;3, 1;6, 1;9, 2;0 and 3;0), and their gesture-speech combinations were classified into the categories complementary, supplementary and discourse combinations. The results show that the production of gesture-speech combinations over time follows different patterns in children with high, average and low productive vocabulary. Furthermore, the amount of gesture-speech combinations produced at four age points predicted productive vocabulary at the age of 2;6, and the amount produced at the age of 1;6 predicted sentence complexity at 3;0. The use of complementary gesture-speech combinations at three age points was also linked to productive vocabulary. The age of onset of supplementary gesture-speech combinations predicted sentence complexity at 3;0, while the age of onset of discourse gesture-speech combinations predicted productive vocabulary at 2;6. The results support previous research suggesting that complementary and supplementary gesture-speech combinations play an important role in child language acquisition. Additionally, the results of the present study suggest that discourse gesture-speech combinations are also connected with language development.

  • 42.
    Frey, Vanessa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Outer Circle Englishes in the Expanding Circle Classroom: A Qualitative Study on Swedish Teachers’ Attitudes towards Singapore English Accents2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The English language has become more globalised, with different varieties and accents being used around the world. English is no longer merely Received Pronunciation (RP); it is equally as central in countries that belong to what is known as the ‘Outer Circle’ in the context of World Englishes and the Three Circles model (Kachru, 1992a). Citizens of these countries often speak multiple languages and some use English as their first language, although it does not always completely resemble the English used within the ‘Inner Circle’ (the United Kingdom, for example). One of these countries is Singapore, where English has become the official language and is also used as a lingua franca (ELF). While Standard Singapore English is used in formal settings, the local Singlish is more common in everyday situations and most Singaporeans can switch between the two depending on their surroundings (Melchers & Shaw, 2011). These accents are, however, not commonly recognised in Sweden, and less so in a teaching context. In the core content of the subject English 5 in Swedish upper secondary schools it is stated that teaching should incorporate “the spread of English and its position in the world” (Skolverket, 2011, p. 3). Nevertheless, the instructional focus tends to be on the culture and traditions of English-speaking countries instead of language use. Therefore, the present study will investigate teachers’ attitudes towards Outer Circle Englishes and, more specifically, Singapore English. The aim is to answer research questions regarding what attitudes English teachers in Swedish upper secondary schools have towards Outer Circle Englishes, attitude differences regarding teaching experience, and what these teachers can do to incorporate these Englishes in their teaching. The respondents include three experienced and three newly graduated English teachers who all teach in Swedish upper secondary schools. The study has a qualitative approach where the data was collected through semi-structured interviews. To examine Singapore English, the respondents also listened to two audio clips of Singapore English speakers and discussed these accents as well as their attitudes towards them. The results show that teachers from both groups need more knowledge regarding Outer Circle Englishes to acquire a more positive attitude towards these to, in turn, portray this positivity onto their students when discussing the English varieties that exist in the world. The study concludes by suggesting that Outer Circle Englishes need to be explicitly incorporated in the teacher education programme at university for these to be more accepted in the English classroom.

  • 43.
    Gabarró-López, Sílvia
    Université Saint-Louis-Bruxelles, Belgium; Université catholique de Louvain, Belgium.
    Discourse markers in French Belgian Sign Language (LSFB) and Catalan Sign Language (LSC): Buoys, PALM-UP and SAME2018In: Sign Language and Linguistics, ISSN 1387-9316, E-ISSN 1569-996X, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 153-162Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Ganuza, Natalia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hedman, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Modersmålsundervisning, läsförståelse och betyg – modersmålsundervisningens roll för elevers skolresultat2018In: Nordand: nordisk tidsskrift for andrespråksforskning, ISSN 0809-9227, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 4-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study explores the relationship between participation in mother tongue instruction (MTI), students’ reading comprehension, and their overall school results. The study expands on the results of an earlier study, which found that Somali–Swedish speaking students who had attended Somali MTI for several years, performed better on reading comprehension in Somali, than Somali–Swedish speaking students of the same ages, who had not taken Somali MTI (Ganuza & Hedman 2017a). The present study revisits the results of 36 participants in the earlier study, and explores the relationship between their scores on reading comprehension and their grades at the end of 6th or 7th grade; in MTI, Swedish as a second language, Mathematics, and overall grade points. Most importantly, the results show consistent positive correlations between participants’ reading comprehension in Somali and their school results. This correlation is also stronger and more comprehensive than the one found between their reading comprehension in Swedish and their school results. In the paper, we argue that these results indirectly point to a positive relationship between MTI and students’ school results, which, if confirmed by future studies, is quite remarkable considering the limited teaching time allotted to MTI and its’ marginalized position in the Swedish school system.

  • 45.
    Ganuza, Natalia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hedman, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Modersmålsundervisning: möjligheter och utmaningar2018In: En god fortsättning: nyanländas fortsatta väg i skola och samhälle / [ed] Tore Otterup, Gilda Kästen-Ebeling, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 163-180Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46. Gast, Volker
    et al.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The areal factor in lexical typology: Some evidence from lexical databases2018In: Aspects of linguistic variation / [ed] Daniël Van Olmen, Tanja Mortelmans, Frank Brisard, Walter de Gruyter, 2018, p. 43-82Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our study aims to explore how much information about areal patterns of colexification we can gain from lexical databases, such as CLICS and ASJP. We adopt a bottom-up (rather than hypothesis-driven) approach, identifying areal patterns in three steps: (i) determine spatial autocorrelations in the data, (ii) identify clusters as candidates for convergence areas and (iii) test the clusters resulting from the second step controlling for genealogical relatedness. Moreover, we identify a (genealogical) diversity index for each cluster. This approach yields promising results, which we regard as a proof of concept, but we also point out some drawbacks of the use of major lexical databases.

  • 47.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Conventions for annotation and transcription of the MINT-project: Modulating child language acquisition through parent-child interaction, MAW:2011.0072018Report (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    From shrieks to "Stupid poo": emotive language in a developmental perspective2018In: Text & Talk, ISSN 1860-7330, E-ISSN 1860-7349, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 137-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to highlight and describe the forms of verbal emotive utterances that appeared in a longitudinal corpus of 11 Swedish children interacting with parents, siblings and friends. The children were in the ages 0;9 to 5;10 and were recorded four to six times during a two-year period. The verbal emotive expressions of the material are divided into the categories Descriptive versus Accompanying utterances. Descriptive utterances are emotive mainly from semantic conventions, whereas Accompanying utterances are emotive due to prosodic and contextual traits. The categories are illustrated and related to conventions, language development and cognitive growth. By classifying and labeling verbal expressions as emotive in different ways, it is argued that we can gain a better understanding of how language is used when intertwined with emotions, but also that we access a way to compare and investigate emotive language in a more thorough manner.

  • 49.
    Gerholm, Tove
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Hörberg, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics.
    Tonér, Signe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Frankenberg, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Kjällander, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Palmer, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Lenz Taguchi, Hillevi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    A protocol for a three-arm cluster randomized controlled superiority trial investigating the effects of two pedagogical methodologies in Swedish preschool settings on language and communication, executive functions, auditive selective attention, socioemotional skills and early maths skills2018In: BMC Psychology, E-ISSN 2050-7283, Vol. 6, article id 29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    During the preschool years, children develop abilities and skills in areas crucial for later success in life. These abilities include language, executive functions, attention, and socioemotional skills. The pedagogical methods used in preschools hold the potential to enhance these abilities, but our knowledge of which pedagogical practices aid which abilities, and for which children, is limited. The aim of this paper is to describe an intervention study designed to evaluate and compare two pedagogical methodologies in terms of their effect on the above-mentioned skills in Swedish preschool children.

    Method

    The study is a randomized control trial (RCT) where two pedagogical methodologies were tested to evaluate how they enhanced children’s language, executive functions and attention, socioemotional skills, and early maths skills during an intensive 6-week intervention. Eighteen preschools including 28 units and 432 children were enrolled in a municipality close to Stockholm, Sweden. The children were between 4;0 and 6;0 years old and each preschool unit was randomly assigned to either of the interventions or to the control group. Background information on all children was collected via questionnaires completed by parents and preschools. Pre- and post-intervention testing consisted of a test battery including tests on language, executive functions, selective auditive attention, socioemotional skills and early maths skills. The interventions consisted of 6 weeks of intensive practice of either a socioemotional and material learning paradigm (SEMLA), for which group-based activities and interactional structures were the main focus, or an individual, digitally implemented attention and math training paradigm, which also included a set of self-regulation practices (DIL). All preschools were evaluated with the ECERS-3.

    Discussion

    If this intervention study shows evidence of a difference between group-based learning paradigms and individual training of specific skills in terms of enhancing children’s abilities in fundamental areas like language, executive functions and attention, socioemotional skills and early math, this will have big impact on the preschool agenda in the future. The potential for different pedagogical methodologies to have different impacts on children of different ages and with different backgrounds invites a wider discussion within the field of how to develop a preschool curriculum suited for all children.

  • 50.
    Gerholm, Tove
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Tonér, Signe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Ge tid till goda samtal2018In: Förskoletidningen, ISSN 0348-0364, Vol. 43, no 4Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Förskolan är viktig för barns språk- och kommunikations- utveckling, särskilt för dem som inte har optimala förutsättningar. Den som har lätt för kommunikation har en fördel i livet. Genom att stötta barns samtal kan pedagogerna stärka språk och kommunikation.

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