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  • 1.
    Agbetsoamedo, Yvonne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics. University of Ghana.
    Noun classes in Sɛlɛɛ2014In: Journal of West African Languages, ISSN 0022-5401, Vol. XLI, no 1, p. 95-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the noun class system of Sl, a Na-Togo, Kwa (Niger-Congo) language spoken in the Volta Region of Ghana. As shown in this paper, Sl hasa noun class system with an equal number of singular and plural classes that are paired inirregular ways. The singular-plural pairs are referred to as genders. Nouns normally agreewith certain modifiers within the noun phrase. The agreement targets are determiners,numerals, interrogative pronouns and some adjectives. Outside the noun phrase, nounclasses may be indexed on the verb to signal long distance anaphora, a strategy thatspeakers rarely use. The paper provides a detailed account of possible semantic andcultural motivations for the assignment of nouns to a particular gender and/or class.

  • 2.
    Agbetsoamedo, Yvonne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics. University of Ghana.
    Standard negation in SɛlɛɛIn: Afrika und Übersee, ISSN 0002-0427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses standard negation in Sɛlɛɛ. Sɛlɛɛ is a Ghana-Togo Mountain (GTM) Language of the Kwa group of the Niger Congo family. Standard negation is the negation of declarative verbal clauses. Different strategies are used in Sɛlɛɛ to negate declarative verbal main clauses depending on the tense and aspect category of the verb. The basic negation strategy used in standard negation is tonal alternation, with or without other negation markers. The other strategies are the use of portmanteau morphemes, affixes and vowel lengthening. Interestingly, in one and the same tense paradigm, different persons can select different negation strategies. There is syncretism among the 1st person singular forms of the negative recent past, the negative habitual and the negative perfect.

  • 3.
    Agbetsoamedo, Yvonne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics. University of Ghana, Ghana.
    The tense and aspect system of Sɛlɛɛ: A preliminary analysis2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 4. Agbetsoamedo, Yvonne
    et al.
    Ameka, Felix
    Atintono, Samuel
    Koptjevskaja Tamm, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Temperature terms in the Ghanaian languages in a typological perspective2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This talk deals with the conceptualisation of temperature in some of the Ghanaian languages as reflected in their systems of central temperature terms, such as hot, cold, to freeze, etc. We will discuss these systems in the light of a large-scale cross-linguistic collaborative project, involving 35 researchers (including the present authors) and covering more than 50 genetically, areally and typologically diverse languages (Koptjevskaja-Tamm ed. 2015). The key questions addressed here are how the different languages carve up the temperature domain by means of their linguistic expressions, and how the temperature expressions are used outside of the temperature domain. Languages cut up the temperature domain among their expressions according to three main dimensions: TEMPERATURE VALUES (e.g., warming vs. cooling temperatures, or excessive heat vs. pleasant warmth), FRAMES OF TEMPERATURE EVALUATION (TACTILE, The stones are cold; AMBIENT, It is cold here; and PERSONAL-FEELING, I am cold), and ENTITIES whose “temperature” is evaluated.  Although the temperature systems are often internally heterogeneous, we may still talk about the main temperature value distinctions for the whole system. The Ghanaian languages favour the cross-linguistically preferred two-value systems, with water often described by a more elaborated system. An interesting issue concerns conventionalisation and frequency of expressions with a primary meaning outside of the temperature domain, for temperature uses. For instance, the conventionalised expressions for talking about ‘warm/hot’ in Ewe involve sources of heat (‘fire’) and bodily exuviae (‘sweat’). The Ghanaian languages often manifest numerous extended uses of their temperature terms. However, strikingly, none of them conforms to one of the most widely quoted conceptual metaphors, “affection is warmth” (Lakoff & Johnson 1999:50), which is also true for many other languages in (West) Africa and otherwise.

  • 5.
    Agbetsoamedo, Yvonne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics. University of Ghana, Ghana.
    Di Garbo, Francesca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Sɛlɛɛ2015In: Edinburgh handbook of evaluative morphology / [ed] Nicola Grandi, Livia Kortvelyessy, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2015, p. 487-495Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Agbetsoamedo, Yvonne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics. University of Ghana, Ghana.
    Di Garbo, Francesca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Unravelling temperature terms in Sɛlɛɛ2015In: The linguistics of temperature / [ed] Maria Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2015, p. 107-127Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the encoding of temperature in Sɛlɛɛ, a Niger-Congo language of the Kwa group, spoken in Ghana. The lexicon of temperature in Sɛlɛɛ consists of six central and two non-central temperature terms, distributed among the word classes of nouns, adjectives and verbs. The grammatical constructions associated with temperature evaluation vary according to the word-class status of each temperature term and its contexts of use. The distribution of the different grammatical constructions according to different types of temperature evaluation is discussed in the paper. Metaphorical uses of temperature-related terms are also discussed in the context of neighbouring and highly related languages. Finally, special patterns of temperature evaluation in connection with water are surveyed.

  • 7. Ahlgren, Inger
    et al.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Älgkalven Roð i Älvdalen. Recension över Björn Rehnströms barnböcker på älvdalska1999In: Mora Tidning, Vol. 1999-07-07Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Alvarez López, Laura
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Português vernáculo brasileiro e a hipótese da semi-crioulização2003In: Revista da ABRALIN Associação Brasileira de Lingüística, ISSN 1678-1805, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 111-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the possible semi-creole status of Brazilian Vernacular Portuguese and questions some of the literature on semi-creoles in general. It presents some differences between Brazilian Vernacular Portuguese and creole languages and makes a revision of the semi-creoles. Finally, it proposes new delimitations for the semi-creole concept.

  • 9.
    Bakker, Peter
    et al.
    Research Centre for Grammar and Language Use, Aarhus University .
    Daval-Markussen, Aymeric
    Research Centre for Grammar and Language Use, Aarhus University.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Plag, Ingo
    Universität Siegen.
    Creoles are typologically distinct from non-creoles2011In: Journal of Pidgin and Creole languages ( Print), ISSN 0920-9034, E-ISSN 1569-9870, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 5-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In creolist circles, there has been a long-standing debate whether creoles differ structurally from non-creole languages and thus would form a special class of languages with specific typological properties. This debate about the typological status of creole languages has severely suffered from a lack of systematic empirical study. This paper presents for the first time a number of large-scale empirical investigations of the status of creole languages as a typological class on the basis of different and well-balanced samples of creole and non-creole languages. Using statistical modeling (multiple regression) and recently developed computational tools of quantitative typology (phylogenetic trees and networks), this paper provides robust evidence that creoles indeed form a structurally distinguishable subgroup within the world's languages. The findings thus seriously challenge approaches that hold that creole languages are structurally indistinguishable from non-creole languages.

  • 10. Bakker, Peter
    et al.
    Daval-Markussen, Aymeric
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Plag, Ingo
    Creoles are typologically distinct from non-creoles2013In: Creole languages and linguistic typology / [ed] Parth Bhatt, Tonjes Veenstra, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2013, p. 9-45Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Bartning, Inge
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The functions of a high-frequency collocation in native and learner discourse: the case of French c’est and Swedish det är2007In: International Review of Applied Linguistics, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 1-43Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12. Berggren, Max
    et al.
    Karlgren, Jussi
    Östling, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Inferring the location of authors from words in their texts2015In: Proceedings of the 20th Nordic Conference of Computational Linguistics: NODALIDA 2015 / [ed] Beáta Megyesi, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, ACL Anthology , 2015, p. 211-218Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the purposes of computational dialectology or other geographically bound text analysis tasks, texts must be annotated with their or their authors' location. Many texts are locatable but most have no ex- plicit annotation of place. This paper describes a series of experiments to determine how positionally annotated microblog posts can be used to learn location indicating words which then can be used to locate blog texts and their authors. A Gaussian distribution is used to model the locational qualities of words. We introduce the notion of placeness to describe how locational words are.

    We find that modelling word distributions to account for several locations and thus several Gaussian distributions per word, defining a filter which picks out words with high placeness based on their local distributional context, and aggregating locational information in a centroid for each text gives the most useful results. The results are applied to data in the Swedish language.

  • 13.
    Bergqvist, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Complex epistemic perspective in Kogi (Arwako)2016In: International Journal of American Linguistics, ISSN 0020-7071, E-ISSN 1545-7001, Vol. 82, no 1, p. 1-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper analyzes a form of epistemic marking in Kogi (Arwako-Chibchan) that positions information between the speech-participants from the perspective of the speaker. This form of epistemic marking is tentatively labeled “complex epistemic perspective” and is found with five prefixes that attach to the auxiliary verb. Relevant meaning contrasts are between speaker-perspective and addressee-perspective forms, which may in turn be separated into symmetric and asymmetric forms that signal shared and exclusive knowledge access. The meaning dimension of knowledge access is also subject to a private/public distinction that parallels the notion of “territory of information” (Kamio 1997; Heritage 2012) where information may belong more to one of the speech participants than the other. The analyzed forms thus share a core function in specifying two simultaneous perspectives as part of the referential ground (e.g. Hanks 1990; 2009). The paper builds on first-hand data collected in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta region of northern Colombia and offers the first comprehensive analysis of epistemic marking in the language.

  • 14.
    Bergqvist, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Evidentiality as stance: Event types and Speaker roles2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper argues for a view of evidentials as a type of shifter and outlines a theory of reference for evidentials that separates the configuration of the ground from the relational axis, as well as the alignment between ground and figure. The paper also evaluates a proposal by Kockelman (2004) that draws on Jakobson’s notion of “event type” and Goffman’s “speaker roles” to suggest an existing analogy between “commitment events” for modals and “source events” for evidentials. The scope properties of ‘factual’ forms in both systems notably constitute a formal difference between (epistemic) modality and evidentiality that cannot be accounted for solely by the referential properties of evidentials.

  • 15.
    Bergqvist, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Intersubjectification revisited: a cross-categorical perspective2016In: Epistemic modality, evidentiality, and beyond / [ed] Zlatka Guentcheva, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper offers three illustrations of how the process of “intersubjectification” (Traugott & Dasher 2002) can be observed in the development of time deictics, person markers and sentence-type markers to encode aspects of the speaker’s assumptions concerning the addressee’s epistemic access to an event. First-hand data from Lakandon Maya (Yukatekan, Mexico), Kogi, and Ika (Arwako-Chibchan, Colombia) is discussed in order to offer a potentially more nuanced view of intersubjectification in language. While suggested in previous accounts of intersubjectification, the paper argues that this process of language change only involves categories and expressions defineable as “shifters” (Jespersen 1922), i.e. expressions that at the same time refer to aspects of the speech situation and the proposition.

  • 16.
    Bergqvist, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The role of sentence type in Ika (Arwako) egophoric marking2017In: Egophoricity / [ed] Simeon Floyd, Elisabeth Norcliffe, Lila San Roque, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2017, p. 347-374Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter focuses on the role of sentence type and subject person in accounting for egophoric marking in Ika, an Arwako-Chibchan language spoken in northern Colombia. Egophoric marking in Ika is only found in declarative clauses for which the speaker either assumes the role of epistemic authority, or where the speaker shares this role with the addressee. Interrogatives are treated as non-egophoric with all subject persons, as they do not encode the speaker’s assumptions about possible answers. This restriction, together with ones that pertain to predicate type and temporal frame of reference, point to epistemic/observational access as an important parameter in a system where public acts and personal attributes involving the speaker and/or the addressee are the only ones available for egophoric marking. As a complement to models of dialogical stance-taking (e.g. Du Bois 2007), the notion of “complex epistemic perspective” (see Bergqvist 2016) is introduced to identify which perspective configurations allow for egophoric marking.

  • 17.
    Bergqvist, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Knuchel, Dominique
    Complexity in Egophoric Marking: From Agents to Attitude Holders2017In: Open Linguistics, ISSN 2300-9969, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 359-377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper considers attested variation found in egophoric marking systems in order to discuss the role of such variation for the defining features of egophoric marking viz. a speech-act participant's epistemic authority subject to his/her involvement in an event. Austin Hale's (1980) pioneering description of egophoric marking in Kathmandu Newar (called conjunct/disjunct by Hale) has largely shaped our conception of what such systems look like, but in recent years, research on comparable systems has revealed that egophoric marking systems vary with respect to every purportedly defining feature of such systems. The one remaining variable that appears constant is the epistemic authority of the speech-act participants. When attempting to analyze and compare egophoric marking, one should consider all relevant cross-linguistic variation in order to determine what features are defeasible, and which ones are not. In this paper we explore the range of participant-roles that can be associated with egophoric marking focusing on secondary egophoric markers that map onto undergoers, affected participants, and the attitudes of the speech-act participants. It will become clear that these less prototypical instances of egophoric marking bridge such systems to a seemingly unrelated grammatical constructions, known as ethical datives.

  • 18. Borin, Lars
    et al.
    Brandt, Martha D.
    Edlund, Jens
    Lindh, Jonas
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Svenska språket i den digitala tidsåldern2012Book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Brosig, Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    BINNICK, Robert. 2012. The past tenses of the Mongolian verb. Brill.2013In: Linguistics, ISSN 0024-3949, E-ISSN 1613-396X, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 235-241Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Brosig, Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Factual vs. evidential? The past tense forms of spoken Khalkha Mongolian 2015In: Empirical Approaches to Evidentiality / [ed] Ad Foolen, Helen de Hoop, Gijs Mulder, John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The basic past tense suffixes in spoken Khalkha are ‑sɑ̆ŋ, -ɮɑ, -tʃe and the peripheral -w. The basic opposition is between established knowledge (‑sɑ̆ŋ) and non-established (mostly new) knowledge, which is then further differentiated into firsthand (-ɮɑ) and non-firsthand sources (‑tʃe). This adds the factor “time of acquisition” to “source of information.” However, vivid recollection and deferred realization allow for using ‑ɮɑ and -tʃe, respectively. Additionally, -ɮɑ is used to establish a fictive scenario in discourse. In the corpus, past ‑sɑ̆ŋ is thrice as frequent as past -ɮɑ and -tʃe combined and due to its opposition to the latter seems to acquire a connotation of factual, reliable information. In declaratives, ‑w accounts for just 0.7% of past tense uses. It is used for events that surprised the speaker in the past. In questions, -tʃe is used to ask the hearer to give an answer based on inference. In self-directed discourse, -ɮɑ is used by a speaker who tries to remember something she once knew, irrespective of whether this knowledge was acquired as firsthand knowledge or not.

    All past markers have future uses. For an event for which the speaker has sensory or internal evidence (including when the speaker refers to her own intentions), -ɮɑ is fairly common. Clues as to whether a future or past interpretation hold are mostly syntactical, but stative aktionsart or the presence of the boundary-actualizing marker -tʃʰ- restrict the interpretation to the past. ‑ɮɑ can be used in questions about the future in which case the speaker seems to motivate her question on the basis of a presumption based on firsthand evidence. The morphological form of -ɮɑ in such contexts is different from the form used in past questions. ‑tʃe can be used when a future event is inferred, and ‑sɑ̆ŋ marks it as inevitable. Both are exceedingly rare in future contexts, so that they presumably only work in a salient future context. Future ‑w expresses preventive warnings.

  • 21.
    Brosig, Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Linguistic bibliography for the year 20112012Other (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Brosig, Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Temperature terms in Khalkha Mongolian2015In: The Linguistics of Temperature / [ed] Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2015, p. 570-593Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides an overview of the linguistic properties of temperature terms in Khalkha Mongolian. It begins with a general overview of the temperature vocabulary, which is most elaborated in relation to coldness. It then considers in closer detail the application of these terms to tactile, ambient and personal-feeling temperature domains, and the terms' metaphoric extensions. The paper continues by investigating different ways of expressing degrees of temperature adjectives within a morphological system of intensification and attenuation. Finally, the syntax of temperature terms is discussed.

  • 23.
    Brosig, Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The aspect-evidentiality system of Middle Mongol2014In: Ural-Altaic studies, ISSN 2079-1003, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 7-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper contains an analysis of aspect, tense and evidentiality in Middle Mongol. This language has a fairly complex aspectual system, consisting of mostly periphrastic constructions built up from converbal, participial and final suffixes, and two different stative copula verbs. These express progressivity, habituality, genericity, perfectivity, perfect and resultativity on the present and past tense level. Present progressivity and resultativity can both be expressed by two different constructions that differ by their aspectual scope and/or actional properties. The three past tense suffixes mark factual, firsthand and secondhand information. This evidential trichotomy is restricted to the perfective aspect, while all other aspectual past tense markers only receive firsthand or secondhand marking. No aspectual distinctions seem to be made in the future, though both the future participle and the resultative participle can form contrafactual constructions.

  • 24.
    Brosig, Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The tense-aspect system of Khorchin Mongolian2014In: On diversity and complexity of languages spoken in Europe and North and Central Asia / [ed] Pirkko Suihkonen, Lindsay J. Whaley, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2014, p. 1-66Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Khorchin, a Mongolian dialect spoken in eastern Inner Mongolia, has a tense-aspect system slightly simpler than Middle Mongol and considerably simpler than Central Mongolian dialects (Khalkha, Chakhar). While it can express the time stability of ongoing events with many nuances, present habitual and generic events are not distinguished. The existence of a present perfect category is doubtful, but in any case it doesn’t extend to the past as participle-copula-combinations are impossible. Evidentiality was lost in the central verbal system, but a non-obligatory quotative/hearsay marker exists. This article is an attempt to fit these phenomena into a coherent system of tense, aspect and related notions and to explore some of its diachronic implications.

  • 25.
    Börstell, Carl
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Hörberg, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Östling, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Distribution and duration of signs and parts of speech in Swedish Sign Language2016In: Sign Language and Linguistics, ISSN 1387-9316, E-ISSN 1569-996X, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 143-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we investigate frequency and duration of signs and parts of speech in Swedish Sign Language (SSL) using the SSL Corpus. The duration of signs is correlated with frequency, with high-frequency items having shorter duration than low-frequency items. Similarly, function words (e.g. pronouns) have shorter duration than content words (e.g. nouns). In compounds, forms annotated as reduced display shorter duration. Fingerspelling duration correlates with word length of corresponding Swedish words, and frequency and word length play a role in the lexicalization of fingerspellings. The sign distribution in the SSL Corpus shows a great deal of cross-linguistic similarity with other sign languages in terms of which signs appear as high-frequency items, and which categories of signs are distributed across text types (e.g. conversation vs. narrative). We find a correlation between an increase in age and longer mean sign duration, but see no significant difference in sign duration between genders.

  • 26.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    An exercise in a posteriori language sampling2008In: Sprachtypologie und Universalienforschung, ISSN 1867-8319, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 208-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A central methodological issue in language typology is sampling – how to choose a representative set of languages for a typological investigation. Most proposed typological sampling methods are a priori in the sense that they are based on assumed, rather than observed, effects of biasing factors – such as genealogical and areal proximity.The advent of the World Atlas of Language Structures (WALS) creates for the first time a chance to attempt a posteriori sampling. The basic idea is to create a sample by

    removing from the set of available languages one member of each pair of languages whose typological distance – as defined in terms of the features in WALS – does not reach a predefined threshold. In

    this way, a sample of 101 languages was chosen from an initial set of the 222 languages that are best represented in WALS.The number of languages from different macroareas in this sample can be taken as an indication of the internal diversity of the area in question.Two issues are discussed in some detail: (i) the high diversity of the indigenous languages of the Americas and the tendency for these to be underrepresented by previous sampling methods; (ii) the extreme areal convergence of Mainland South East Asian languages. It is concluded that areal factors cannot be neglected in typological sampling, and that it must be questioned whether the creation of elaborate sampling algorithms makes sense.

  • 27.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Frithiof Rundgren2007In: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademiens Årsbok, ISSN 0083-6796, p. 31-36Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    From questionnaires to parallel corpora in typology2007In: Sprachtypologie und Universalienforschung, ISSN 0942-2919, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 172-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This rather programmatic paper discusses the use of parallel corpora in the typological study of grammatical categories. In the author’s earlier work, tense-aspect categories were studied by means of a translational questionnaire, and “cross-linguistic gram-types” were identified through their distribution in the questionnaire. It is proposed that a similar methodology could be applied to multilingual parallel corpora. The possibility of identifying grammatical markers by word-alignment methods is demonstrated with examples from Bible texts.

  • 29.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Grammatical resources and linguistic complexity: Sirionó as a language without NP coordination2008In: Language Complexity: Typology, contact, change, John Benjamins, Amsterdam/Philadelphia , 2008Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The paper discusses the relationship between cross-linguistic differences in grammatical resources and linguistic complexity. It is claimed that Sirionó (Tupí-Guaraní) lacks syntactic coordination as in English John and Mary are asleep. Instead, Sirionó employs a number of different strategies – the ‘with’ strategy, the list strategy, and the ‘also’ strategy – to make up for this. It is argued that one or more of these strategies may serve as a diachronic source of syntactic coordination. The development of syntactic coordination in a language exemplifies condensation processes in grammaticalization and increases complexity in the sense that a certain type of complex syntactic structure is introduced, and makes it possible to express in one syntactic unit what previously needed two or more.

  • 30.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Grammaticalization and Linguistic Complexity2011In: The Oxford handbook of grammaticalization / [ed] Narrog, Heiko and Heine, Bernd, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Grammaticalization in the North: Noun Phrase Morphosyntax in Scandinavian Vernacaulars2010Book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Grammaticalization in the North: Noun phrase morphosyntax in Scandinavian vernaculars2015Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book looks at some phenomena within the grammar of the noun phrase in a group of traditional North Germanic varieties mainly spoken in Sweden and Finland, usually seen as Swedish dialects, although the differences between them and Standard Swedish are often larger than between the latter and the other standard Mainland Scandinavian languages. In addition to being conservative in many respects – e.g. in preserving nominal cases and subject-verb agreement – these varieties also display many innovative features. These include extended uses of definite articles, incorporation of attributive adjectives, and a variety of possessive constructions. Although considerable attention has been given to these phenomena in earlier literature, this book is the first to put them in the perspective of typology and grammaticalization processes. It also looks for a plausible account of the historical origin of the changes involved, arguing that many of them spread from central Sweden, where they were later reverted due to the influence from prestige varieties coming from southern Scandinavia.

  • 33.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Grammatikens grundfärg är som zebrans2008In: Språktidningen, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 44-47Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 34.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Gregory Stump & Raphael A. Finkel, Morphological Typology: From Word to Paradigm, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 20132014In: Nordic Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0332-5865, E-ISSN 1502-4717, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 126-132Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Gösta Bruce2011In: Kungl. Vitterhets historie och antikvitets akademiens årsbok, Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien , 2011, p. 85-93Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    How telicity creates time2013In: Journal of Slavic Linguistics, ISSN 1068-2090, E-ISSN 1543-0391, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 45-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most treatments of temporal semantics start out from the conception of time as a line stretching from the past into the future, which is then populated with eventualities or situations. This paper explores how time can be seen as emerging from the construction of representations of reality in which the basic building blocks are static—i.e., timeless—representations, which are connected to each other by events that are transitions between them and that create an ordering which can be understood as temporal. This connects to von Wright’s “logic of change” and the “hybrid semantics” suggested by Herweg and Löbner. In this context, telicity is seen as the capacity of events, or of the predicates that express them, to “create time” in the sense of defining a before and an after. The basic elements of the model are global states, which are timeless taken in isolation but are connected by transition events, which transform one global state into another and thereby define the temporal relationships between them. Transition events, corresponding to Vendlerian achievements, represent simple changes which are then the basis for all other constructs in the model, most notably delimited states, Vendlerian activities (atelic dynamic eventualities), and accomplishments (telic non-punctual eventualities), but also time points and intervals. Transition events are further instrumental in constructing narrative structures and are responsible for narrative progression.

  • 37.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Hur exotiskt är finska?2008In: Verkko-Virittäjä, no 4/2008Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Increases in complexity as a result of language contact2009In: Convergence and Divergence in Language Contact Situations / [ed] Kurt Braunmüller, Juliane House, Amsterdam: Benjamins , 2009, p. 41-52Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Kuinka eksoottinen kieli suomi on?2008In: Virittäjä, Vol. 4/2008, p. 545-559Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Kvantitativ språktypologi2015In: Kungl. Vetenskapssamhällets i Uppsala årsbok 40/2013-14 / [ed] Lars-Gunnar Larsson, Uppsala: Kungliga Vetenskapssamhället , 2015, p. 71-81Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 41.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Polysynthesis and Complexity2017In: The Oxford Handbook of Polysynthesis / [ed] Michael Fortescue, Marianne Mithun, Nicholas Evans, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017, p. 19-29Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The notion of polysynthesis has been linked up with that of complexity from the very start. A discussion of the relationship between these two concepts is thus highly motivated, also in view of the recent increased interest in questions relating to complexity among linguists. The chapter discusses different ways of understanding and measuring complexity and how these can be applied to polysynthetic languages. Other topics treated in the chapter are how complexity develops over time in polysynthetic languages, the question of to what extent the notions of maturation and non-linearity as defined in Dahl (2004) are relevant to the synchrony and diachrony of polysynthesis, and how the complexity of constructions in polysynthetic languages compares to functionally equivalent constructions elsewhere.

  • 42.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Remarks on rarity2011In: Expecting the unexpected: exceptions in grammar / [ed] Simon, Horst J. and Wiese, Heike, Berlin; New York: Mouton de Gruyter, 2011, p. 433-436Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Review of Allen, Cynthia: Genitives in early English2010In: Diachronica, ISSN 0176-4225, E-ISSN 1569-9714, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 489-496Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Review of John A. Hawkins, Efficiency and Complexity in Grammars2007In: Studies in Language, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 485-497Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Review of Kurzon, Dennis and Adler, Silvia (eds.), Adpositions: Pragmatic, semantic and syntactic perspectives2010In: Language, ISSN 0097-8507, E-ISSN 1535-0665, Vol. 86, no 2, p. 448-450Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Review of Peter Trudgill, Investigations in sociohistorical linguistics: Stories of colonisation and contact2012In: Language in Society, ISSN 0047-4045, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 393-396Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Sirionó2014In: Lenguas de Bolivia: Oriente / [ed] Mily Crevels, Pieter Muysken, La Paz: Plural Editores, 2014, p. 99-133Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Språket och människan2011 (ed. 1. uppl.)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 49.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Språkets uppkomst2014In: En samtidig världshistoria / [ed] Maria Sjöberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2014, 1, p. 111-123Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 50.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Tense, aspect, mood, and evidentiality, linguistics of2015In: International encyclopedia of the social & behavioral sciences / [ed] James D. Wright, Oxford: Elsevier, 2015, 2 uppl., p. 210-213Chapter in book (Other academic)
1234567 1 - 50 of 422
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