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  • 1.
    Bakker, Peter
    et al.
    Research Centre for Grammar and Language Use, Aarhus University .
    Daval-Markussen, Aymeric
    Research Centre for Grammar and Language Use, Aarhus University.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Plag, Ingo
    Universität Siegen.
    Creoles are typologically distinct from non-creoles2011In: Journal of Pidgin and Creole languages ( Print), ISSN 0920-9034, E-ISSN 1569-9870, Vol. 26, no 1, 5-42 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In creolist circles, there has been a long-standing debate whether creoles differ structurally from non-creole languages and thus would form a special class of languages with specific typological properties. This debate about the typological status of creole languages has severely suffered from a lack of systematic empirical study. This paper presents for the first time a number of large-scale empirical investigations of the status of creole languages as a typological class on the basis of different and well-balanced samples of creole and non-creole languages. Using statistical modeling (multiple regression) and recently developed computational tools of quantitative typology (phylogenetic trees and networks), this paper provides robust evidence that creoles indeed form a structurally distinguishable subgroup within the world's languages. The findings thus seriously challenge approaches that hold that creole languages are structurally indistinguishable from non-creole languages.

  • 2. Bakker, Peter
    et al.
    Daval-Markussen, Aymeric
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Plag, Ingo
    Creoles are typologically distinct from non-creoles2013In: Creole languages and linguistic typology / [ed] Parth Bhatt, Tonjes Veenstra, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2013, 9-45 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3. Berggren, Max
    et al.
    Karlgren, Jussi
    Östling, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Inferring the location of authors from words in their texts2015In: Proceedings of the 20th Nordic Conference of Computational Linguistics: NODALIDA 2015 / [ed] Beáta Megyesi, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, ACL Anthology , 2015, 211-218 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the purposes of computational dialectology or other geographically bound text analysis tasks, texts must be annotated with their or their authors' location. Many texts are locatable but most have no ex- plicit annotation of place. This paper describes a series of experiments to determine how positionally annotated microblog posts can be used to learn location indicating words which then can be used to locate blog texts and their authors. A Gaussian distribution is used to model the locational qualities of words. We introduce the notion of placeness to describe how locational words are.

    We find that modelling word distributions to account for several locations and thus several Gaussian distributions per word, defining a filter which picks out words with high placeness based on their local distributional context, and aggregating locational information in a centroid for each text gives the most useful results. The results are applied to data in the Swedish language.

  • 4. Borin, Lars
    et al.
    Brandt, Martha D.
    Edlund, Jens
    Lindh, Jonas
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Svenska språket i den digitala tidsåldern2012Book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Dahl, Östen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Divan får se upp - nu kommer divalaterna!2010In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no aprilArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Engstrand, Olle
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Helgasson, Petur
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The beginnings of a database for historical sound change2008In: Papers from the 21st Swedish Phonetics Conference, 2008, 101-104 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We report a preliminary version of a database from which examples of historical sound change can be retrieved and analyzed. To date, the database contains about 1,000 examples of regular sound changes from a variety of language families. As exemplified in the text, searches can be made based on IPA symbols, articulatory features, segmental or prosodic context, or type of change. The database is meant to provide an adequately large sample of areally and genetically balanced information on historical sound changes that tend to take place in the world’s languages. It is also meant as a research tool in the quest for diachronic explanations of genetic and areal biases in synchronic typology.

  • 7.
    Jansson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Strimling, Pontus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Modeling the Evolution of Creoles2015In: Language Dynamics and Change, ISSN 2210-5824, E-ISSN 2210-5832, Vol. 5, no 1, 1-51 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Various theories have been proposed regarding the origin of creole languages. Describing a process where only the end result is documented involves several methodological difficulties. In this paper we try to address some of the issues by using a novel mathematical model together with detailed empirical data on the origin and structure of Mauritian Creole. Our main focus is on whether Mauritian Creole may have originated only from a mutual desire to communicate, without a target language or prestige bias. Our conclusions are affirmative. With a confirmation bias towards learning from successful communication, the model predicts Mauritian Creole better than any of the input languages, including the lexifier French, thus providing a compelling and specific hypothetical model of how creoles emerge. The results also show that it may be possible for a creole to develop quickly after first contact, and that it was created mostly from material found in the input languages, but without inheriting their morphology.

  • 8. Jansson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Strimling, Pontus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Modelling the evolution of creoles2012In: The Evolution of Language: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference (EVOLANG9) / [ed] Thomas C. Scott-Phillips et al., Singapore: World Scientific Publishing Company , 2012, 464-465 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Juvonen, Päivi
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Den flerspråkiga världen i siffror2003In: Låt mig ha kvar mitt språk: den tredje SUKKA-rapporten = Antakaa minun pitää kieleni: kolmas SUKKA-raportti / [ed] Raija Kangassalo, Ingmarie Mellenius, Umeå: Inst. för moderna språk, Umeå univérsitet , 2003, 11, 13-32 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10. Klein, Raymond M.
    et al.
    Christie, John
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Does multilingualism affect the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease?: A worldwide analysis by country2016In: SSM - Population Health, ISSN 2352-8273, Vol. 2, 463-467 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been suggested that the cognitive requirements associated with bi- and multilingual processing provide a form of mental exercise that, through increases in cognitive reserve and brain fitness, may delay the symptoms of cognitive failure associated with Alzheimer′s disease and other forms of dementia. We collected data on a country-by-country basis that might shed light on this suggestion. Using the best available evidence we could find, the somewhat mixed results we obtained provide tentative support for the protective benefits of multilingualism against cognitive decline. But more importantly, this study exposes a critical issue, which is the need for more comprehensive and more appropriate data on the subject.

  • 11. McWhorter, John
    et al.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Pas tout à fait du français: Une étude créole2002In: Études créoles, ISSN 0708-2398, Vol. 25, no 1, 179-231 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12. Melin, Lars
    et al.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Laddade ord: en bok om tankens makt över språket2016Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Access, prestige and losses in contact languages2013In: Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, ISSN 1366-7289, E-ISSN 1469-1841, Vol. 16, no 4, 746-747 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Agency in the Emergence of Creole Languages ed. by Nicholas Faraclas2014In: Journal of Historical Linguistics, ISSN 2210-2116, E-ISSN 2210-2124, Vol. 4, no 2, 293-300 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Brief Note on Valdman (2005)2006In: Studies in Second Language Acquisition, ISSN 0272-2631, E-ISSN 1470-1545, Vol. 28, no 3, 515-516 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Creolistics and the quest for creoleness: A reply to Claire Lefebvre2000In: Journal of Pidgin and Creole languages ( Print), ISSN 0920-9034, E-ISSN 1569-9870, Vol. 16, no 1, 147-151 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Cutting off the branch2002In: Pidgin and Creole Linguistics in the Twenty-First Century / [ed] Gilbert, Glenn, New York: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2002, 355-367 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Da África Para o Atlântico2012Book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Du duger bra2007In: Språkvård, no 1, 49- p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    (flera olika artiklar i detta verk)2007In: Nationalencyklopedien, 2007Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    (flera uppslag)2007In: Fråga experten / [ed] Lundquist, Sophia, Malmö: Nationalencyklopedin, 2007Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Handel och krig gynnar pidginisering2016In: Språkbruk, ISSN 0358-9293, no 3, 26-30 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    ”Hen”-kulturer är inte mer jämställda2012In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 2001-3868, no 16 marsArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    How European is Esperanto?: A typological study2010In: Language Problems and Language Planning, ISSN 0272-2690, E-ISSN 1569-9889, Vol. 34, no 1, 63-79 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The typological similarities between Esperanto and other languages have long been a matter of debate. Assuming that foreign-language structures are more easily acquired when they resemble those of the learner's native tongue, any candidate for a global lingua franca obviously ought to be as typologically neutral as possible. One common criticism of Esperanto is that it is 'too European,' and thus less accessible to speakers of non-European languages. In order to provide a more solid base for such discussions, this paper makes an attempt to quantify the Eurocentricity of Esperanto, employing the features catalogued in the World Atlas of Language Structures. It is concluded that Esperanto is indeed somewhat European in character, but considerably less so than the European languages themselves.

  • 25.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Här går gränsen!2012In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no oktoberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Här var det mångfald!2016In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no 3, 56-63 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    I rymden talas fler språk än man kan tro2015In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 27 december, 1 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Jos Suomi kuuluisi vielä Ruotsiin...2009In: Kieliviesti, ISSN 0280-350X, no 4, 13-18 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Känslosvall som bara en ny ordbok kan skapa2015In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 17 aprilArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 30.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Lagom finns bara i Sverige: och andra myter om språk2009 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Language Contact in the Arctic. Northern Pidgins and Contact Languages2000In: Journal of Pidgin and Creole languages ( Print), ISSN 0920-9034, E-ISSN 1569-9870, Vol. 15, no 1Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Nordisk och finländsk språkpolitik i ett globalt perspektiv2017In: Språk i Norden, E-ISSN 2246-1701, 82-93 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is an attempt to on the one hand offer a brief survey of national langauges policies of the world, and on the other hand to situate those of the Nordic countries in general, and Finland in particular, in this global context. The impressive (albeit not always sucessful) measures of Finnish authori-ties to uphold bilingualism are highlighted, and argued to have few parallels world-wide.

  • 33.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    När två (eller flera) språk blir ett2017In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no 4, 51-61 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 34.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    On the possibility of Afrogenesis in the case of French Creoles1999In: Creole genesis, attitudes and discourse, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 1999, 187-213 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Out of Africa: African influences in Atlantic creoles2000Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Papiamentu as one of the most complex languages in the world: A reply to Kouwenberg2012In: Journal of Pidgin and Creole languages ( Print), ISSN 0920-9034, E-ISSN 1569-9870, Vol. 27, no 1, 159-166 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    R [ʁ]2007In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no septemberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Reassessing the role of demographics in language restructuring2000In: Degrees of Restructuring in Creole Languages / [ed] Neumann-Holzschuh, Ingrid & Edgar Schneider, Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2000, 195-213 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Reduplication in the Atlantic creoles and other contact languages2003In: Twice as meaningful / [ed] Kouwenberg, Silvia, London: Battlebridge , 2003, 19-36 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Review of Bob Dixon & Alexandra Aikhenvald (eds.): Areal Diffusion and genetic inheritance2003In: Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0022-2267, E-ISSN 1469-7742, Vol. 39, 652-656 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Review of "Creolization of langauge and culture" by Robert Chaudenson2008In: Carrier Pidgin, Vol. 32, no 1, 24-26 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Review of John Holm: An introduction to Pidgins and Creoles2003In: Nieuwe West-Indische Gids, ISSN 0028-9930, Vol. 77, no 1-2, 193-196 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Review of Michel DeGraff (ed.): Language creation and language change2002In: Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0022-2267, E-ISSN 1469-7742, Vol. 38, 661-666 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    (seven entries)2004In: Encyclopedia of linguistics / [ed] Strazny, Philipp, New York: Fitzroy Dearborn , 2004Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    (several entries)Press.2009In: Atlas of strange maps / [ed] Jacobs, Frank (ed.), New York: Viking Studio Press , 2009Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Simulating the genesis of Mauritian2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A simple computer simulation addresses some of the most basic issues in creole formation. Mauritius is chosen as the testing ground because of its uniquely well documented settlement history. The outcome of the simulation is compared to the actual product of the language contact situation, i. e. Mauritian Creole. The questions dealt with are the following: Were slaves trying to acquire the lexifier? How fast did the new language emerge? Did it develop from a pidgin? To what extent are the features of the creole drawn from the languages in contact?

  • 47.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Språkekologi i siffror2003In: Låt mig ha kvar mitt språk/Antakaa minun pitää kieleni / [ed] Kangassalo, Raija & Ingmarie Mellenius, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2003, 13-32 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Språken som saknar pynt2007In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no decemberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 49.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Språksituationen i Sverige och Finland om inte 1809 hade varit2010In: Språkbruk, ISSN 0358-9293, no 1, 13-19 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 50.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Svenskan i Nya Sverige 1638–ca 1810: Fragment av en kortlivad dialekt2011In: Svenska landsmål och svenskt folkliv, ISSN 0347-1837, 77-104 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish in New Sweden, 1638–c. 1810. Fragments of a short-lived dialect

    Although the colony of New Sweden is fairly well documented, very little has been written about the linguistic situation there, and still less about the Swedish dialect that developed in the colony. Nonetheless, such a dialect was spoken by, at most, around 1,500 people between the middle of the 17th and the beginning of the 19th century. This article is an attempt to analyse the limited data available on the only truly indigenous Swedish dialect outside Europe.

    The Swedish of New Sweden probably deviated relatively little from the standard language of the time, although it seems to have had something of a Western Swedish flavour, as well as being influenced to some extent by the neighbouring languages of Dutch, English and Lenape. Both archaic and – for the period – modern features can be observed.

    Most documentation of the dialect is lexical in nature. The main source consists of the writings of Pehr Kalm, a disciple of Linnaeus, a fact reflected in the vocabulary recorded, which is made up largely of words from the plant and animal worlds. Certain conclusions can, however, be drawn regarding the morphology, syntax, phonology and pragmatics of the dialect.

12 1 - 50 of 65
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