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  • 1. van der Auwera, Johan
    et al.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Dočekal, Mojmír
    Typologie negace2017In: Nový encyklopedický slovník češtiny online / [ed] Petr Karlík, Marek Nekula, Jana Pleskalová, Prague: Nakladatelství Lidové noviny , 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Applying the Negative Existential Cycle on the Uralic Language Family2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Digitiziting legacy data for linguistic GIS-applications. Presentation at the Language Mapping2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Lexicalization of Negative Senses: A Crosslinguistic Study2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Negation in existential and non-verbal predications: Publicly available database on a map server2015Report (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Negation in non-verbal and existential predications: a holistic typology2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Negative existentials: a cross linguistic study2013In: Rivista di Linguistica = Italian Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 1120-2726, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 107-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to provide a cross-linguistic outline of the negation strategies in existential predications like ‘There are no mice in the basement’. It is found that there is a strong cross-linguistic tendency to use a special negation strategy in these predications. Furthermore, the special negators, labelled here ‘negative existentials’, show a number of similarities in terms of their semantics, morphosyntax, use and diachronic origin. In light of this, it is suggested that they represent a linguistic construction of its own, and in fact, a separate conceptual domain.

  • 8.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Non-verbal and existential negators: a cross-linguistic and a historical-comparative study2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Not-yet expressions in the languages of the world: a special negator or a separate gram type?2015In: ALT 2015, 11th Conference of the Association for Linguistic Typology: Abstract Booklet, 2015, p. 136-137Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many languages there is a special negation strategy to indicate that an action has not been accomplished or that a state has not been attained. For instance, in Indonesian, verbal predications are negated by the particle tiada (or tidak), cf (1a). Nominal predications, are negated by the particle bukan, cf. (1c). When the speaker intends to communicate that an action has not been carried out yet, cf. (1b), or a particular state has not been reached yet, cf. (1d), the word belum ‘not yet’ is used in verbal and in nominal predications. The perfect marker sudahcannot be combined with belum or tidak, cf. Sneddon (1996: 202). Expressions like belum are typically dubbed in grammars as special negators that differ from the standard negator (SN). They are sporadically mentioned in the comparative literature on negation cf. (Payne 1985, Miestamo 2005).Van der Auwera (1998) analyzes ‘not yet’ expressions in the languages of Europe as continuative negatives and suggests the label nondum for them; it is adopted here too. However, a systematic cross-linguistic study of their distribution does not yet exist. My goals with this work are to obtain a better understanding about their cross-linguistic frequency as well as about their functions and status in the grammar and lexicon of their respective languages. In my sample of 100 unrelated languages, nondum expressions occur in most areas of the world, but are notably absent in Europe in the form of single, bound or semi-bound, grammaticalized negative temporal markers. My sources are grammars and parallel texts. The available data allow for the following generalizations: (i) Nondum expressions can be encoded as affixes cf. (2) and (3) or as particles, cf (1b, 1d); (ii) they can be either univerbations between SN and another word or completely unsegmentable morphemes. (iii) They typically indicate the non-occurrence of an expected action or state but also an anticipation about its imminent realization. Thus they appear to belong to both the temporal and the negative domain; however, as Contini-Morava (1989: 138), notes the negation they indicate is of limited duration. Their cross-linguistic frequency together with their functional similarities in a number of unrelated languages are evidence that nondum expressions should be considered a separate gram. Furthermore, gaining a better knowledge about them also contributes to a deeper understanding of the semantic-pragmatic asymmetry between the tense-aspect systems of the affirmative and the negative domain.

  • 10.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    'Not-yet'-expressions in the languages of the world: special negative adverbs or a separate gram type?2015In: ALT 2015: 11th Conference of the Association for Linguistic Typology: Abstract Booklet, 2015, p. 136-137Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many languages there is a special negation strategy to indicate that an action has not been accomplished or that a state has not been attained. For instance, in Indonesian, verbal predications are negated by the particle tiada (or tidak), cf (1a). Nominal predications, are negated by the particle bukan, cf. (1c). When the speaker intends to communicate that an action has not been carried out yet, cf. (1b), or a particular state has not been reached yet, cf. (1d), the word belum ‘not yet’ is used in verbal and in nominal predications. The perfect marker sudahcannot be combined with belum or tidak, cf. Sneddon (1996: 202). Expressions like belum are typically dubbed in grammars as special negators that differ from the standard negator (SN). They are sporadically mentioned in the comparative literature on negation cf. (Payne 1985, Miestamo 2005).Van der Auwera (1998) analyzes ‘not yet’ expressions in the languages of Europe as continuative negatives and suggests the label nondum for them; it is adopted here too. However, a systematic cross-linguistic study of their distribution does not yet exist. My goals with this work are to obtain a better understanding about their cross-linguistic frequency as well as about their functions and status in the grammar and lexicon of their respective languages. In my sample of 100 unrelated languages, nondum expressions occur in most areas of the world, but are notably absent in Europe in the form of single, bound or semi-bound, grammaticalized negative temporal markers. My sources are grammars and parallel texts. The available data allow for the following generalizations: (i) Nondum expressions can be encoded as affixes cf. (2) and (3) or as particles, cf (1b, 1d); (ii) they can be either univerbations between SN and another word or completely unsegmentable morphemes. (iii) They typically indicate the non-occurrence of an expected action or state but also an anticipation about its imminent realization. Thus they appear to belong to both the temporal and the negative domain; however, as Contini-Morava (1989: 138), notes the negation they indicate is of limited duration. Their cross-linguistic frequency together with their functional similarities in a number of unrelated languages are evidence that nondum expressions should be considered a separate gram. Furthermore, gaining a better knowledge about them also contributes to a deeper understanding of the semantic-pragmatic asymmetry between the tense-aspect systems of the affirmative and the negative domain.

  • 11.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    'Not-yet'-expressions in the languages of the world: special negators or a separate cross-linguistic category2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Random SamplesIn: WSK Dictionary on Theories and Methods in Linguistics.Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Sampling ProceduresIn: WSK Dictionary on Theories and Methods in LinguisticsArticle, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Standard and Special Negators in the Slavonic Languages: Synchrony and Diachrony2010In: Diachronic Syntax of the Slavonic Languages / [ed] Hansen, Björn and Jasmina Grkovic-Major, Vienna: Wiener Slawistischen Almanach , 2010, p. 197-210Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Standard and Special Negators in the Uralic Languages2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Standard and Special Negators: their evolution and interaction2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Suppletion2013In: Oxford Bibliographies, Oxford University Press, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Suppletion in Verb Paradigms2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The Negative Existential Cycle Revisited2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The Negative Existential Cycle Revisited2014In: Linguistics, ISSN 2072-8379, Vol. 52, no 6, p. 1327-1389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on crosslinguistic data and the postulation of six language types, the Negative Existential Cycle was proposed by Croft (1991) as a way of modeling the evolution of standard negation markers from existential negators. The current investigation tests this model by applying it to two language families, Slavonic and Polynesian, checking which cycle types are instantiated in these families and outlining pathways of transition between different types. In Slavonic, we observe one type without variation and two types with internal variation. All cycle types are instantiated in Polynesian, which is correlated with characteristics specific to this family. Three pathways are outlined for the partial or complete transfer of negative existentials into the verbal domain. The first is contingent on negative existentials being used in specific constructions and the direct inheritance or expansion of use of these constructions; the second involves negative existentials being used as emphatic negators external to the proposition and their subsequent reanalysis as clause internal negators without any additional pragmatic content. The third pathway, observed in Polynesian only, is through subordination processes leading to the re-interpretation of negative existentials as general markers of negation. Additionally, a time dimension needs to be added when modeling this cycle, as its completion, i.e., the negative existential turning into a full-fledged marker of standard negation, appears to take longer than 2,000 years.

  • 21.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The Negative Existential Cycle through the lens of comparative data2016In: The Linguistic Cycle Continued, Amsterdam/New York: John Benjamins Publishing Co. , 2016, p. 139-187Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Towards a typology of negation of non-verbal and existential sentences2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Typology of negation in existential sentences2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Bond, Oliver
    SOAS.
    Sampling Isolates2011Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 24 of 24
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