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  • 1.
    Aare, Kätlin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Respiratory patterns and turn-taking in spontaneous Estonian: Inhalation amplitude in multiparty conversations2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores the relationship between inhalation amplitude and turn-taking in spontaneous multiparty conversations held in Estonian. Respiratory activity is recorded with Respiratory Inductance Plethysmography. The main focus is on how inhalation amplitude varies between the inhalations produced directly before turn onset compared to the following inhalations within the same speaking turn. The results indicate a significant difference in amplitude, realised mainly by an increase in inhalation end lung volume values. One of the possible functions of this pattern is to signal an intention of taking the conversational turn. Another could be a phrasing or grouping function connected to lower inhalation amplitudes within turns.

  • 2.
    Aare, Kätlin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Włodarczak, Marcin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Heldner, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Backchannels and breathing2014In: Proceedings from FONETIK 2014: Stockholm, June 9-11, 2014 / [ed] Mattias Heldner, Stockholm: Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University , 2014, p. 47-52Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigated the timing of backchannel onsets within speaker’s own and dialogue partner’s breathing cycle in two spontaneous conversations in Estonian. Results indicate that backchannels are mainly produced near the beginning, but also in the second half of the speaker’s exhalation phase. A similar tendency was observed in short non-backchannel utterances, indicating that timing of backchannels might be determined by their duration rather than their pragmatic function. By contrast, longer non-backchannel utterances were initiated almost exclusively right at the beginning of the exhalation. As expected, backchannels in the conversation partner’s breathing cycle occurred predominantly towards the end of the exhalation or at the beginning of the inhalation. 

  • 3.
    Aare, Kätlin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Włodarczak, Marcin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Heldner, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Inhalation amplitude and turn-taking in spontaneous Estonian conversations2015In: Proceedings from Fonetik 2015 Lund, June 8-10, 2015 / [ed] Malin Svensson Lundmark, Gilbert Ambrazaitis, Joost van de Weijer, Lund: Lund University , 2015, p. 1-5Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the relationship between inhalation amplitude and turn management in four approximately 20 minute long spontaneous multiparty conversations in Estonian. The main focus of interest is whether inhalation amplitude is greater before turn onset than in the following inhalations within the same speaking turn. The results show that inhalations directly before turn onset are greater in amplitude than those later in the turn. The difference seems to be realized by ending the inhalation at a greater lung volume value, whereas the initial lung volume before inhalation onset remains roughly the same across a single turn. The findings suggest that the increased inhalation amplitude could function as a cue for claiming the conversational floor.

  • 4.
    Afsun, Donya
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Forsman, Erika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Halvarsson, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Jonsson, Emma
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Malmgren, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Neves, Juliana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Marklund, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Effects of a film-based parental intervention on vocabulary development in toddlers aged 18-21 months2011In: Proceedings from Fonetik 2011: Speech, Music and Hearing; Quarterly Progress and Status Report, Stockholm, 2011, p. 105-108Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    SPRINT is a language intervention project aimed to study the outcome of a parental home training program on children’s language development and future reading and writing skills. This study, which derives data from the SPRINT project, intended to examine the possible effects of a parental-based film intervention. It was conducted on toddlers aged 18-21 months from the Stockholm area with at least one parent who has Swedish as a first language. Parents of 78 children participated in the study and filled in 3 SECDI-w&s questionnaires rating their children's productive vocabulary. Children were randomized to either the intervention or the control group. Results indicated that the interventiongroup demonstrated significantly higher scores over time, F (2,78) = 5,192, p < .007. In the light of previous research it is concluded that this intervention contributes to an increase in productive vocabulary. However, the scores of the intervention group did not exceed the average range for Swedish children in the same age span. Furthermore the possible impact of parental education and thepresence of siblings on productive vocabulary was discussed.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Ida
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Gauding, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Graca, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Holm, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Öhlin, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Marklund, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Ericsson, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Productive vocabulary size development in children aged 18-24 months - gender differences2011In: Proceedings from Fonetik 2011: Speech, Music and Hearing; Quarterly Progress and Status Report, Stockholm, 2011, p. 109-112Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies have shown slight differences in language skills between genders, favouring females. In order to investigate gender differences in speech production for Swedish children, the productive vocabulary size of 295 children, aged 18-24 months, was measured by the validated instrument SECDI-2. The size of the productive vocabulary was found to grow rapidly during this age. Significant gender differences were found at 21 and 24 months, but not at 18 months. The girls’ mean scores were higher.

  • 6.
    Berger, Alexandra
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Hedström Lindenhäll, Rosanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Heldner, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Karlsson, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Nyberg Pergament, Sarah
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Vojnovic, Ivan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Voices after midnight: How a night out affects voice quality2014In: Proceedings from FONETIK 2014: Stockholm, June 9-11, 2014 / [ed] Mattias Heldner, Stockholm: Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University , 2014, p. 1-4Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to investigate how different parameters of the voice (jitter, shimmer, LTAS and mean pitch) are affected by a late night out. Three recordings were made: one early evening before the night out, one after midnight, and one on the next day. Each recording consisted of a one minute reading and prolonged vowels. Five students took part in the experiment. Results varied among the participants, but some patterns were noticeable in all parameters. A trend towards increased mean pitch during the second recording was observed among four of the subjects. Somewhat unexpectedly, jitter and shimmer decreased between the first and second recordings and increased in the third one. Due to the lack of ethical testing, only a small number of participants were included. A larger sample is suggested for future research in order to generalize results.

  • 7.
    Bjerva, Johannes
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Marklund, Ellen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Engdahl, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Anticipatory Looking in Infants and Adults2011In: Proceedings of EyeTrackBehavior 2011, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Infant language acquisition research faces the challenge of dealing with subjects who are unable to provide spoken answers to research questions. To obtain comprehensible data from such subjects eye tracking is a suitable research tool, as the infants’ gaze can be interpreted as behavioural responses. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the amount of training necessary for participants to learn an audio-visual contingency and present anticipatory looking behaviour in response to an auditory stimulus. Infants (n=22) and adults (n=16) were presented with training sequences, every fourth of which was followed by a test sequence. Training sequences contained implicit audio-visual contingencies consisting of a syllable (/da/ or /ga/) followed by an image appearing on the left/right side of the screen. Test sequences were identical to training sequences except that no image appeared. The latency in time to first fixation towards the non-target area during test sequences was used as a measurement of whether the participants had grasped the contingency. Infants were found to present anticipatory looking behaviour after 24 training trials. Adults were found to present anticipatory looking behaviour after 28-36 training trials. In future research a more interactive experiment design will be employed in order to individualise the amount of training, which will increase the time span available for testing.

  • 8.
    Bjerva, Johannes
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Marklund, Ellen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Engdahl, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Tengstrand, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Preceding non-linguistic stimuli affect categorisation of Swedish plosives2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Speech perception is highly context-dependent. Sounds preceding speech stimuli affect how listeners categorise the stimuli, regardless of whether the context consists of speech or non-speech. This effect is acoustically contrastive; a preceding context with high-frequency acoustic energy tends to skew categorisation towards speech sounds possessing lower-frequency acoustic energy and vice versa (Mann, 1980; Holt, Lotto, Kluender, 2000; Holt, 2005). Partially replicating Holt's study from 2005, the present study investigates the effect of non-linguistic contexts in different frequency bands on speech categorisation. Adult participants (n=15) were exposed to Swedish syllables from a speech continuum ranging from /da/ to /ga/ varying in the onset frequencies of the second and third formants in equal steps. Contexts preceding the speech stimuli consisted of sequences of sine tones distributed in different frequency bands: high, mid and low. Participants were asked to categorise the syllables as /da/ or /ga/. As hypothesised, high frequency contexts shift the category boundary towards /da/, while lower frequency contexts shift the boundary towards /ga/, compared to the mid frequency context.

  • 9.
    Bjerva, Johannes
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Marklund, Ellen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Training in Anticipatory Looking Experiments with Adult Participants2011In: Proceedings of the 17th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences / [ed] Wai-Sum Lee & Eric Zee, 2011, p. 316-319Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The amount of training necessary to trigger anticipatory looking was investigated in adults (n=16) using a simple testing paradigm, in order to create a baseline for studies on infants’ language acquisition. Participants were presented with training containing implicit associations between two syllables (/da/ and /ga/) and visual events displayed on different areas on the screen. The training series were periodically interrupted by test trials where a syllable was presented but no visual event was displayed. Significantly altered looking behaviour, as measured by participants’ first gaze fixation latency towards the Non-target area (where the visual event should not be expected), was found after 28-36 training trials.

  • 10.
    Bjursäter, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    A Study of Simultaneous-masking and Pulsation-threshold Patterns of a Steady-state Synthetic Vowel: A Preliminary Report2006In: Working Papers 52 (2006): Proceedings from FONETIK 2006, Lund, June 7-9, 2006 / [ed] Ambrazaitis, G. & Schötz, S., Lund: Lund University, Centre for Languages and Literature , 2006, p. 13-16Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study will be a remake in part of Tyler & Lindblom "Preliminary study of simultaneous masking and pulsation-threshold patterns of vowels" (1982), with the use of today's technology. A steady-state vowel as masker and pure tones as signals will be presented using simultaneous-masking (SM) and pulsation-threshold (PT) procedures in an adjustment method to collect the vowel masking pattern. Vowel intensity is changed in three steps of 15 dB. For SM, each 15 dB change is expected to result in about a 10-13-dB change in signal thresholds. For PT, the change in signal thresholds with vowel intensity is expected to be about 3-4 dB. These results would correspond with the results from the Tyler & Lindblom study. Depending on technology outcome, further experiments can be made, involving representations of dynamic stimuli like CV-transitions and diphthongs.

  • 11.
    Bjursäter, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Effekten av fonologisk träning enligt Bornholmsmodellen på elevers språkliga medvetenhet i årskurs 12001Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna rapport är en del av en longitudinell studie av psykolingvistisk ålder och språklig medvetenhet hos elever i årskurs 1 på två olika skolor i Vallentuna kommun. I studien har material från de tre senaste projektåren bearbetats. Syftet med undersökningen var att undersöka huruvida fonologisk träning enligt den s.k. Bornholmsmodellen under elevernas tid i 6-årsklass återspeglar sig i ökad språklig medvetenhet och högre psykolingvistisk ålder i årskurs 1. Vidare undersöktes om den fonologiska träningen kan ha påverkat barnens arbetsminne. Två typer av test användes: UMESOL för kartläggning av fonologisk medvetenhet och ITPA, ett standardiserat test av psykolingvistiska färdigheter. Resultaten visar att det finns ett klart samband mellan fonologisk träning enligt Bornholmsmodellen i förskolan och elevernas språkliga medvetenhet i grundskolan. Vidare visar resultaten att även om minnesträningen i Bornholmsmodellen inte direkt påverkat resultaten vid ITPA, så finns det ett starkt samband mellan minnestestet i ITPA och elevernas prestation vid UMESOL.

  • 12.
    Bjursäter, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Effekten av fonologisk träning enligt Bornholmsmodellen på elevers tidiga läs- och skrivinlärning i årskurser 1 och 22002Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    I en longitudinell studie har elever i årskurs 1 och 2 på två olika skolor i Vallentuna kommun undersökts under tre på varandra följande projektår. Huvudsyftet med denna studie var att undersöka huruvida träning i fonologisk medvetenhet enligt den s.k. Bornholmsmodellen under elevernas tid i sexårsklass påverkar deras läs- och skrivinlärning. Tre typer av test användes, under årskurs 1 administrerades UMESOL för kartläggning av fonologisk medvetenhet och ITPA, för kartläggning av psykolingvistiska färdigheter. Under årskurs 2 kartlades elevernas läs- och skrivutveckling med UMESOL, ”läsning och skrivning”. I kontrast med tidigare forskningsresultat som pekade på en fördelaktig användning av Bornholmsmodellen under elevernas förskoleklassår, visade resultaten i denna studie inte på entydiga långsiktiga effekter för de elever som tränats fonologiskt enligt Bornholmsmodellen. Istället verkade den avgörande faktorn för elevernas läs- och skrivutveckling vara skoltillhörighet och pedagogisk ledning under dessa första skolår.

  • 13.
    Bjursäter, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lingvistiska och interaktiva aspekter på barn-vuxen kommunikation ur ett patologiskt perspektiv2005In: Konferensrapport från Tionde Nordiska Barnspråkssymposiet, Gävle 2005, Gävle: Högskolan i Gävle , 2005, p. 32-38Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Som en del av pågående forskning vid fonetiklaboratoriet, SU, utförs månatligen inspelningar med syfte att studera interaktionen i en mor-barndyad, där barnet har ett medfött produktions- och perceptionshandikapp. En pojke, född med Hemifacial Mikrosomia, vilket innebär partiellt försämrad hörsel, undersöks under åldrarna 8-30 månader. Syndromet inbegriper bl a avsaknad av vänster ytteröra, kind- och okben. Barnet har sondmatats via näsan upp till ca 8 månaders ålder. Studien är inriktad på pojkens språkliga och kommunikativa utveckling och på föräldrarnas samspel med honom. För att undersöka hur representationer av barnets tidiga ord kan utvecklas hos ett handikappat barn görs dels analyser av barnets vokalisationer, joller och tal och dels analyser av moderns lingvistiska struktur, timing och turtagning, repetitioner och strategi att anpassa sig till barnets uppmärksamhetsfokus. Audio- och videoinspelningar används för att samla in data på förälder-barn interaktionen och barnets vokalisationer. Eyetracking mäter barnets ögonrörelser vid presentation av audiovisuella stimuli. SECDI formulär används regelbundet för att undersöka utvecklingen av barnets lexikala produktion. Preliminära analyser tyder på generella ökade interaktiva åtgärder från föräldrarna. För att underlätta kommunikation och språklig utveckling har föräldrarna bl a introducerat tecken som stöd (TSS).

  • 14.
    Bjursäter, Ulla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Koponen, Eeva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Sundberg, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Klintfors, Eeva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Assessing the significance of Tallal's transform2002In: TMH-QPSR 44: Proceedings Fonetik 2002, 141-144, Stockholm, Sweden, 2002, p. 141-144Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The perceptual significance of enhancing amplitude contrasts at the onset of formant transitions in CV-syllables and of reducing the “speaking” tempo was studied with a group of normally developing school children. Natural and synthetic speech stimuli were used in the perception experiments. A total of 83 children, second and third graders, were tested on their ability to discriminate between CV syllables presented in pairs. The results indicate that the children’s discrimination performance resisted acoustic manipulations of both the natural and synthetic stimuli. Neither spectral nor timing manipulations rendered significant differencesin discrimination results.

  • 15.
    Bjursäter, Ulla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Influence of pre-school phonological training on early reading and writing abilities2003In: 15th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences (ICPhS) 2003, 2003, p. 2846-2848Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports a study of the possible impact of pre-school phonological training on first and second graders' reading and writing abilities. Two public schools in the Stockholm metropolitan area were selected. The children were divided in two groups, depending on whether or not they had participated in a phonological training program in their last pre-school year. The children's linguistic and literacy development was followed during their first two school years. Psycholinguistic profiles (ITPA) were obtained for all the first grade children, along with an assessment of their phonological awareness. In the second grade, the children were reassessed to map their reading and writing abilities. Although the results suggested an initial advantage in general linguistic awareness for the children enrolled in the phonological training program, that advantage seems to be quickly overshadowed by social and personal factors such as continuity in the pedagogical leadership and attended school.

  • 16.
    Bjursäter, Ulla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Sundberg, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    On Linguistic and Interactive Aspects of Infant-Adult Communication in a Pathological Perspective2005In: Proceedings, FONETIK 2005 / [ed] Eriksson, A & Lindh, J., Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, Institutionen för lingvistik , 2005, p. 55-58Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a preliminary report of a study of some linguistic and interactive aspects available in an adult-child dyad where the child is partially hearing impaired, during the ages 8 - 20 months. The investigation involves a male child, born with Hemifacial Microsomia. Audio and video recordings are used to collect data on child vocalization and parent-child interaction. Eye-tracking is used to measure eye movements when presented with audio-visual stimuli. SECDI forms are applied to observe the development of the child's lexical production. Preliminary analyses indicate increased overall parental interactive behaviour. As babbling is somewhat delayed due to physical limitations, signed supported Swedish is used to facilitate communication and language development. Further collection and analysis of data is in progress in search of valuable information of the linguistic development from a pathological perspective of language acquisition.

  • 17.
    Bjursäter, Ulla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Sundberg, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Gustavsson, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Klintfors, Eeva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Marklund, Ellen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Potential relevance of general purpose mechanisms to the onset of language: Audio-visual integration of ambient language in pathological perspective2005In: ESF Research Conference on Brain Development and Cognition in Human Infants: From Action to Cognition, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Bowin, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Effekten av talarformanten och F0's styrka på otränade röstbedömare2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Speech and voice is governed by complicated processes, where a variety of different functions are used in its production and perception. Speech and voice differs in many ways from the objective measurable acoustic speech signal. The intensity of the fundamental frequency, F0, and what is called the speaker formant are two parameters that affect how voice is perceived. The purpose of the study was to investigate if the varied intensity of F0 and with or without speaker formant affect what stimuli untrained voice assessors like the most. To do so, a synthetic /a/ was created, formed by formant frequencies for Swedish vowels (Fant, 1959), varied with with or without speaker formant, and seven different intensities of the fundamental frequency, creating a total of 14 stimuli. Twelve women and eight men were asked to listen to and grade the stimuli, from the /a/ that was liked the most to the one that was liked the least. The expectations of the study were confirmed, the variation of the intensity of F0 and with or without speaker formant, did affect which stimuli the listeners preferred, and also confirmed that men and women preferred different stimuli. The two /a/’s with the weakest and the /a/ with the strongest intensity of F0, were least liked. The four /a/s with varying intensity of F0 in between, were liked approximately the same. If men and women ratings were studied separately from one another, the result differed. Women preferred stimuli with speaker formant more than the ones without, whereas men more appreciated stimuli with strong intensity of F0. If the study was the be retested and the results would be confirmed, further tests would be of interest to do, to investigate if the differences of preferences affect how speech is perceived and interpreted. 

  • 19.
    Branderud, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Traunmüller, HartmutStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Proceedings FONETIK 2004: The XVIIth Swedish Phonetics Conference, held at Stockholm University, May 26-28, 20042004Conference proceedings (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Branderud, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Traunmüller, HartmutStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Proceedings FONETIK 2009: The XXIIth Swedish Phonetics Conference, held at Stockholm University, June 10-12, 20092009Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Burnham, Denis
    et al.
    School of Psychology, University of NSW, Sydney, 2052, Australia.
    Francis, Elisabeth
    School of Psychology, University of NSW, Sydney, 2052, Australia.
    Webster, Di
    School of Psychology, University of NSW, Sydney, 2052, Australia.
    Luksaneeyanawin, Sudaporn
    School of Psychology, University of NSW, Sydney, 2052, Australia.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Attapaiboon, Chayada
    School of Psychology, University of NSW, Sydney, 2052, Australia.
    Facilitation or attenuation in the development of speech mode processing? Tone perception over linguistic contexts1996In: Sixth Australian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology, 1996, p. 587-592Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Burnham, Denis
    et al.
    University of Western Sydney, Australia.
    Kasisopa, Benjawan
    University of Western Sydney, Australia.
    Reid, Amanda
    University of Western Sydney, Australia.
    Luksaneeyanawin, Sudaporn
    Chulalongkorn University, Thailand.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Attina, Virginia
    University of Western Sydney, Australia.
    Rattanasone, Nan Xu
    Macquarie University, Australia.
    Schwarz, Iris-Corinna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Webster, Diane
    University of Western Sydney, Australia.
    Universality and language-specific experience in the perception of lexical tone and pitch2015In: Applied Psycholinguistics, ISSN 0142-7164, E-ISSN 1469-1817, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 1459-1491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two experiments focus on Thai tone perception by native speakers of tone languages (Thai, Cantonese, and Mandarin), a pitch–accent (Swedish), and a nontonal (English) language. In Experiment 1, there was better auditory-only and auditory–visual discrimination by tone and pitch–accent language speakers than by nontone language speakers. Conversely and counterintuitively, there was better visual-only discrimination by nontone language speakers than tone and pitch–accent language speakers. Nevertheless, visual augmentation of auditory tone perception in noise was evident for all five language groups. In Experiment 2, involving discrimination in three fundamental frequency equivalent auditory contexts, tone and pitch–accent language participants showed equivalent discrimination for normal Thai speech, filtered speech, and violin sounds. In contrast, nontone language listeners had significantly better discrimination for violin sounds than filtered speech and in turn speech. Together the results show that tone perception is determined by both auditory and visual information, by acoustic and linguistic contexts, and by universal and experiential factors.

  • 23.
    Carlsson, Stina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Cromnow, Karolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Egardt, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    En undersökning av sambandet mellan språklig och motorisk utveckling hos 8-16 månader gamla barn: En analys av föräldrars skattningar i testinstrumentet Swedish Early Communicative Development Inventory (SECDI)2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Föräldrar till barn i åldrarna 8-16 månader har i samband med en forskningsstudie vid Stockholms universitet skattat sina barns färdigheter och förmågor med hjälp av formuläret SECDI. För undersökning av motorisk och språkliga utveckling hos barn valdes barn i åldrarna 8, 10, 12, 14 och 16 månader ut. Barnens skattade språkliga förmågor jämfördes med deras skattade motoriska förmågor. Syftet med detta specialarbete är att utifrån föräldrarnas skattningar av sina barns färdigheter undersöka om det finns ett samband mellan motorisk och språklig färdighet hos små barn. Undersökningens resultat påvisar ett sådant samband. Summan av antal förstådda respektive sagda ord korrelerade starkt med summan av antal gester. En bakomliggande variabel tros vara barnens ålder vilket visar sig som en signifikant korrelation mellan barnens språkliga och motoriska utveckling samt ålder.

  • 24.
    Cortes, Elisabet Eir
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Mapping articulatory parameters on formant patterns: From articulations to acoustics non-stop2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The traditional way of estimating the formant frequencies from articulatory data presupposes knowledge of how the vocal tract cross-sectional area varies for a given articulatory shape (Fant 1960/1970). Accordingly, in order to derive the formant pattern of a given articulation, the three-dimensional shape of the vocal tract (VT) needs to be known. In the past cross-sectional areas have typically been derived by means of ‘d-to-A rules’ that use the mid-sagittal cross-distance d at each point along the VT to produce a corresponding cross-sectional area A. X-ray and MRI data have been used to calibrate such rules (Heinz & Stevens 1964, Sundberg et al. 1987, Ericsdotter 2005). Although this procedure has produced many useful results it is time consuming and laborious. It is speaker-specific. It presupposes access to information on the three-dimensional shape of the VT, which is not experimentally readily accessible. Such observations raise the question whether sufficiently accurate alternative approaches can be developed. Is it possible to go straight from articulatory data to formant frequencies without having to construct a cross-sectional area function? If such methods could be developed it would have many uses both in phonetics and practical applications.

    This paper reports an attempt to map the time variations of selected articulatory parameters from X-ray profiles directly on the formant tracks using multiple regression analysis. Preliminary results for F1 indicate that multiple regression analysis can indeed be useful for making such predictions. The prospects of extending the present analyses to other formants are discussed.

  • 25.
    Cortes, Elisabet Eir
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Gustavsson, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    From movements to sound Contributions to building the BB speech production system2006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In terms of anatomical geometry the infant Vocal Tract undergoes significant change during development. This research note reports an attempt to reconstruct an infant VT from adult data. Comparable landmarks were identified on the fixed structures of adult articulatory lateral profiles (obtained from X-ray images) and matching infant profiles (obtained from published data in the literature, Sobotta [Putz & Pabst 2001, and personal communication from author Prof. Dr. med. R. Pabst]. The x-coordinates of the infant landmarks could be accurately derived by a linear scaling of the adult data whereas the y-values required information on both the x- and the y-coordinates of the adult. These scaling rules were applied to about 400 adult articulatory profiles to derive a set of corresponding infant articulations. A Principal Components Analysis was performed on these shapes to compare the shapes of the infant and adult articulatory spaces. As expected from the scaling results the infant space is significantly compressed in relation to the adult space suggesting that the main articulatory degree of freedom for the child is jaw opening. This finding is in perfect agreement with published descriptions of the phonetics of early vocalizations. 

  • 26.
    Cortes, Elisabet Eir
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    From articulatory to acoustic parameters non-stop: Phonetics in the fast lane2008In: Proceedings FONETIK 2008Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports an attempt to map the time variations of selected articulatory parameters (from X-ray profiles) directly on the F1, F2 and F3 formant tracks using multiple regression analysis (MRA). The results indicate that MRA can indeed be useful for predicting formant frequencies. Since the results reported here are limited to preliminary observations of F1 only, further studies including F2 and F3 are needed to evaluate the method more definitively.

  • 27.
    Dahlby, Malin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Irmalm, Ludvig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Kytöharju, Satu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Wallander, Linnéa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Zachariassen, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Ericsson, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Marklund, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Parent-child interaction: Relationship between pause duration and infant vocabulary at 18 months2011In: Proceedings from Fonetik 2011: Speech, Music and Hearing; Quarterly Progress and Status Report, Stockholm, 2011, p. 101-104Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of child language development have shown that children from an early age are aware of turn-taking patterns in interaction. The aim of this study is to investigate if there is a relationship between turn-taking pauses in parent-child interaction and child vocabulary at 18 months of age. Analysis of pause duration is conducted on recordings from the SPRINT language intervention project and pause duration is found to correlate with child vocabulary size. Different possible reasons for this correlation are discussed.

  • 28.
    Dufberg, Mats
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Engstrand, OlleStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    PERILUS XVII: Experiments in Speech Processes1993Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Dufberg, Mats
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Engstrand, OlleStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    PERILUS XVIII: Experiments in Speech Processes, Published in June 19941994Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Dufberg, Mats
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lindblom, BjörnStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Perilus No. 19: Annual Report 1993/941994Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Edlund, Jens
    et al.
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Alexandersson, Simon
    Beskow, Jonas
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Gustavsson, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Heldner, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Hjalmarsson, Anna
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Marklund, Ellen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    3rd party observer gaze as a continuous measure of dialogue flow2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present an attempt at using 3rd party observer gaze to get a measure of how appropriate each segment in a dialogue is for a speaker change. The method is a step away from the current dependency of speaker turns or talkspurts towards a more general view of speaker changes. We show that 3rd party observers do indeed largely look at the same thing (the speaker), and how this can be captured and utilized to provide insights into human communication. In addition, the results also suggest that there might be differences in the distribution of 3rd party observer gaze depending on how information-rich an utterance is. 

  • 32.
    Edlund, Jens
    et al.
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Heldner, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Gustafson, Joakim
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    On the effect of the acoustic environment on the accuracy of perception of speaker orientation from auditory cues alone2012In: INTERSPEECH 2012: vol.2, Portland, USA: Curran Associates, Inc. , 2012, p. 1482-1485Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability of people, and of machines, to determine the position of a sound source in a room is well studied. The related ability to determine the orientation of a directed sound source, on the other hand, is not, but the few studies there are show people to be surprisingly skilled at it. This has bearing for studies of face-to- face interaction and of embodied spoken dialogue systems, as sound source orientation of a speaker is connected to the head pose of the speaker, which is meaningful in a number of ways. The feature most often implicated for detection of sound source orientation is the inter-aural level difference - a feature which it is assumed is more easily exploited in anechoic chambers than in everyday surroundings. We expand here on our previous studies and compare detection of speaker orientation within and outside of the anechoic chamber. Our results show that listeners find the task easier, rather than harder, in everyday surroundings, which suggests that inter-aural level differences is not the only feature at play. 

  • 33.
    Edlund, Jens
    et al.
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Heldner, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Gustafson, Joakim
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Who am I speaking at? Perceiving the head orientation of speakers from acoustic cues alone2012In: LREC Workshop on Multimodal Corpora for Machine Learning, Istanbul, Turkey: LREC , 2012Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability of people, and of machines, to determine the position of a sound source in a room is well studied. The related ability to determine the orientation of a directed sound source, on the other hand, is not, but the few studies there are show people to be surprisingly skilled at it. This has bearing for studies of face-to-face interaction and of embodied spoken dialogue systems, as sound source orientation of a speaker is connected to the head pose of the speaker, which is meaningful in a number of ways. We describe in passing some preliminary findings that led us onto this line of investigation, and in detail a study in which we extend an experiment design intended to measure perception of gaze direction to test instead for perception of sound source orientation. The results corroborate those of previous studies, and further show that people are very good at performing this skill outside of studio conditions as well. 

  • 34.
    Edlund, Jens
    et al.
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Heldner, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Włodarczak, Marcin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Catching wind of multiparty conversation2014In: Proceedings of Multimodal Corpora: Combining applied and basic research targets (MMC 2014) / [ed] Jens Edlund, Dirk Heylen, Patrizia Paggio, Reykjavik, Iceland: European Language Resources Association , 2014, p. 35-36Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper describes the design of a novel multimodal corpus of spontaneous multiparty conversations in Swedish. The corpus is collected with the primary goal of investigating the role of breathing and its perceptual cues for interactive control of interaction. Physiological correlates of breathing are captured by means of respiratory belts, which measure changes in cross sectional area of the rib cage and the abdomen. Additionally, auditory and visual correlates of breathing are recorded in parallel to the actual conversations. The corpus allows studying respiratory mechanisms underlying organisation of spontaneous conversation, especially in connection with turn management. As such, it is a valuable resource both for fundamental research and speech techonology applications.

  • 35.
    Engdahl, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Bjerva, Johannes
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Marklund, Ellen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Byström, Emil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Acoustic analysis of adults imitating infants: a cross-linguistic perspective2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates adult imitations of infant vocalizations in a cross-linguistic perspective. Japanese-learning and Swedish-learning infants were recorded at ages 16-21 and 78-79 weeks. Vowel-like utterances (n=210) were selected from the recordings and presented to Japanese (n=3) and Swedish (n=3) adults. The adults were asked to imitate what they heard, simulating a spontaneous feedback situation between caregiver and infant. Formant data (F1 and F2) was extracted from all utterances and validated by comparing original and formant re-synthesized utterances. The data was normalized for fundamental frequency and time, and the accumulated spectral difference was calculated between each infant utterance and each imitation of that utterance. The mean spectral difference was calculated and compared, grouped by native language of infant and adult, as well as age of the infant. Preliminary results show smaller spectral difference in the imitations of older infants compared to imitations of the younger group, regardless of infant and adult native language. This may be explained by the increasing stability and more speech-like quality of infants' vocalizations as they grow older (and thus have been exposed to their native language for a longer period of time), making their utterances easier for adults to imitate.

  • 36.
    Engstrand, Olle
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Dufberg, MatsStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.Kylander, CatharinaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    PERILUS X: December 1989, Experiments in Speech Processes1989Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Engstrand, Olle
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Dufberg, MatsStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.Stark, JohanStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    PERILUS IX: Februrai 1989, Experiments in Speech Pathology and Comprehension1989Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Engstrand, Olle
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Dufberg, MatsStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.Stark, JohanStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    PERILUS VIII: December 19881988Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Engstrand, Olle
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Helgasson, Petur
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The beginnings of a database for historical sound change2008In: Papers from the 21st Swedish Phonetics Conference, 2008, p. 101-104Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We report a preliminary version of a database from which examples of historical sound change can be retrieved and analyzed. To date, the database contains about 1,000 examples of regular sound changes from a variety of language families. As exemplified in the text, searches can be made based on IPA symbols, articulatory features, segmental or prosodic context, or type of change. The database is meant to provide an adequately large sample of areally and genetically balanced information on historical sound changes that tend to take place in the world’s languages. It is also meant as a research tool in the quest for diachronic explanations of genetic and areal biases in synchronic typology.

  • 40.
    Engstrand, Olle
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Kylander, CatharinaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    PERILUS XI: May 1990, Papers by Björn Lindblom et al.1990Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Engstrand, Olle
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Kylander, CatharinaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    PERILUS XIV: Papers from the symposium Current Phonetic Research Paradigma: Implications for Speech Motor Control, held in Stockholm, August 13-16, 19911991Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Engstrand, Olle
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Kylander, CatharinaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.Dufberg, MatsStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    PERILUS XII: Experiments in Speech Processes, Published in May 19911991Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Engstrand, Olle
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Kylander, CatharinaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.Dufberg, MatsStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    PERILUS XIII: Papers from the Fifth National Phonetics Conference held in Stockholm, May 29-31, 19911991Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Engstrand, Olle
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Traunmüller, HartmutStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    PERILUS V: Experiments in Speech Processes, Fall 1986 - Spring 19871987Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Eriksson, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Arantes, Pablo
    São Carlos Federal University, Brazil.
    Temporal stability of long-term measures of fundamental frequency2014In: / [ed] Campbell, Gibbon, and Hirst (eds), Dublin, Ireland, 2014, p. 1149-1152Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Eriksson, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Bertinetto, Pier Marco
    Heldner, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Nodari, Rosalba
    Lenoci, Giovanna
    The Acoustics of Lexical Stress in Italian as a Function of Stress Level and Speaking Style2016In: Proceedings Interspeech 2016, International Speech Communication Association, 2016, p. 1059-1063Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study is part of a series of studies, describing the acoustics of lexical stress in a way that should be applicable to any language. The present database of recordings includes Brazilian Portuguese, English, Estonian, German, French, Italian and Swedish. The acoustic parameters examined are F0-level, F0- variation, Duration, and Spectral Emphasis. Values for these parameters, computed for all vowels (a little over 24000 vowels for Italian), are the data upon which the analyses are based. All parameters are examined with respect to their correlation with Stress (primary, secondary, unstressed) and speaking Style (wordlist reading, phrase reading, spontaneous speech) and Sex of the speaker (female, male). For Italian Duration was found to be the dominant factor by a wide margin, in agreement with previous studies. Spectral Emphasis was the second most important factor. Spectral Emphasis has not been studied previously for Italian but intensity, a related parameter, has been shown to correlate with stress. F0-level was also significantly correlated but not to the same degree. Speaker Sex turned out as significant in many comparisons. The differences were, however, mainly a function of the degree to which a given parameter was used, not how it was used to signal lexical stress contrasts. 

  • 47.
    Eriksson, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Grabe, Esther
    Traunmüller, Hartmut
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Perception of syllable prominence by listeners with and without competence in the tested language2002In: Proceedings of the Speech Prosody 2002 Conference, 2002, p. 275-278Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    In an experiment reported previously, subjects rated perceived syllable prominence in a Swedish utterance produced by ten speakers at various levels of vocal effort. The analysis showed that about half of the variance could be accounted for by acoustic factors. Slightly more than half could be accounted for by linguistic factors. Here, we report two additional ex-periments. In the first, we attempted to eliminate the linguistic factors by repeating the Swedish listening experiment with English listeners who had no knowledge of Swedish. In the second, we investigated the prominence pattern Swedish sub-jects expect by presenting the utterance only in written form. The results from these subjects and from the Swedish listeners were very similar but for two of the syllables where the promi-nence pattern did not coincide with the expectations of the readers. Swedish and English listeners perceived the promi-nence of the syllables to be almost identical in most cases, but where there was a conflict between expected and produced prominence, the Swedish listeners appeared to be influenced by their expectations. There was also a difference in the weights the Swedish and English listeners attached to different acoustic cues in the listening experiments.

  • 48.
    Eriksson, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Heldner, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    The acoustics of word stress in English as a function of stress level and speaking style2015In: 16th Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association (INTERSPEECH 2015): Speech Beyond Speech Towards a Better Understanding of the Most Important Biosignal, 2015, p. 41-45Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study of lexical stress in English is part of a series of studies, the goal of which is to describe the acoustics of lexical stress for a number of typologically different languages. When fully developed the methodology should be applicable to any language. The database of recordings so far includes Brazilian Portuguese, English (U.K.), Estonian, German, French, Italian and Swedish. The acoustic parameters examined are f0-level, f0-variation, Duration, and Spectral Emphasis. Values for these parameters, computed for all vowels, are the data upon which the analyses are based. All parameters are tested with respect to their correlation with stress level (primary, secondary, unstressed) and speaking style (wordlist reading, phrase reading, spontaneous speech). For the English data, the most robust results concerning stress level are found for Duration and Spectral Emphasis. f0-level is also significantly correlated but not quite to the same degree. The acoustic effect of phonological secondary stress was significantly different from primary stress only for Duration. In the statistical tests, speaker sex turned out as significant in most cases. Detailed examination showed, however, that the difference was mainly in the degree to which a given parameter was used, not how it was used to signal lexical stress contrasts. 

  • 49.
    Forssén Renner, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Wlodarzcak, Marcin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    The surprised pupil: New perspectives in semantic processing research2016In: ISSBD 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the research on semantic processing and brain activity, the N400-paradigm has been long known to reflect a reaction to unexpected events, for instance the incongruence between visual and verbal information when subjects are presented with a picture and a mismatching word. In the present study, we investigate whether an N400-like reaction to unexpected events can be captured with pupillometry. While earlier research has firmly established a connection between changes in pupil diameter and arousal, the findings have not been so far extended to the domain of semantic processing. Consequently, we measured pupil size change in reaction to a match or a mismatch between a picture and an auditorily presented word. We presented 120 trials to ten native speakers of Swedish. In each trial a picture was displayed for six seconds, and 2.5 seconds into the trial the word was played through loudspeakers. The picture and the word were matching in half of the trials, and all stimuli were common high-frequency monosyllabic Swedish words. For the analysis, the baseline pupil size at the sound playback onset was compared against the maximum pupil size in the following time window of 3.5 seconds. The results show a statistically significant difference (t(746)=-2.8, p < 0.01) between the conditions. In line with the hypothesis, the pupil was observed to dilate more in the incongruent condition (on average by 0.03 mm). While the results are preliminary, they suggest that pupillometry could be a viable alternative to existing methods in the field of language processing, for instance across different ages and clinical groups. In the future, we intend to validate the results on a larger sample of participants as well as expand the analysis with a view to locating temporal regions of greatest differences between the conditions. In the future, we intend to validate the results on a larger sample of participants as well as expand the analysis with a functional analysis accounting for temporal changes in the data. This will allow locating temporal regions of greatest differences between the conditions.

  • 50.
    Franzén, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Vokalkvalitet och duration hos diftonger i benadiri och nordsomaliska2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Descriptions of the Somali dialects include a variation in vowel quality and duration, between southern Somali (Benadiri) and northern Somali. Native speakers of Somali confirm noted variations and describe a possessive ending eey in Benadiri, different from the northern Somali equivalent ay.

    This survey aimed to investigate if, and how, vowel quality and duration vary in the diphthong ay in southern Somali and northern Somali. This study was limited to measuring vowel quality and duration of the possessive ending -ay. Values of F1 and F2 in the initial phase of the diphthong, as well as the duration, were measured in pronunciations, which native speakers have labeled as northern or southern respectively.

    The measured differences in vowel quality were in line with the expectations. Mean values of F1 and F2 were lower/higher in all measuring groups for the pronunciations labeled as southern, than for those labeled as northern. It was noted, however, that the distance between the diphthongs in northern and southern Somali, was significantly larger in the word aabahay than in hooyaday. The reason for this should be investigated further, focusing on contextual differences. The expected difference in duration between the southern and northern pronunciations could not be found. 

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