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  • 1.
    Blåsjö, Mona
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    An interview with Britt-Louise Gunnarsson: Parallel language use in academic and professional communication2011Other (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Blåsjö, Mona
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    From percentage to prediction: University students meeting a parallel language of visuals and numerals2011In: Ibérica, ISSN 1139-7241, E-ISSN 2340-2784, no 22, p. 123-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A less-frequently discussed parallel-linguistic issue is the parallel language of visuals and numerals: the diagrams, tables, models, mathematical signs and different symbols that students have to deal with in their reading and writing. Texts are multimodal, that is they are constructed with visual objects and different sign systems as well as writing. For new students, it can be difficult to grasp how visuals and numerals can have different meanings in different contexts, such as academic disciplines. For teachers, the disciplinary use of the visuals and numerals is often so ingrained that they may have difficulty seeing the problems that students face. Drawing on the theoretical framework of social semiotics and the neo-Vygotskian perspective, this article shows how new students of economics in Sweden encounter a multimodal academic literacy. The article also discusses some of the difficulties relating to this situation and arguesfor a raised awareness among teachers in order to scaffold students intoacademic, visual literacies.

  • 3.
    Bohman, Rickard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Tycker du om dem här?: En sociolingvistisk undersökning av högskolestudenters attityder till olika former av språkbruk2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 4.
    Chrystal, Judith-Ann
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Ekvall, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Skrivelyst og tekstkompetence - Hvad responssamtaler mellem 'svage' skribenter kan afsloere2012In: Skrivelyst i et specialpaedagogisk perspektiv / [ed] Sigrid Madsberg, Kristen Friis, Köpenhamn: Dansk psykologisk Forlag, 2012, p. 91-116Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Clyne, Michael
    et al.
    University of Melbourne.
    Norrby, Catrin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Address in pluricentric languages: The case of German and Swedish2011In: Línguas Pluricêntricas Pluricentric Languages: Variação Linguística e Dimensões Sociocognitivas Linguistic Variation and Sociocognitive Dimensions / [ed] Augusto Soares da Silva, Amadeu Torres, Miguel Gonçalves, Braga, Portugal: ALETHEIA – Associação Científica e Cultural , 2011, p. 147-160Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on address practices in German and Swedish, which bring out contrasts in address in the national varieties. It draws mainly on a large-scale project on address in a number of languages in Europe (Clyne, Norrby, Warren 2009). Data were collected in key localities of the national varieties in focus groups, interviews, chat groups and through participant observation. The results demonstrate that the dominant variation between address in the German and Austrian national varieties of German is the much greater use of titles in Austria and the much more widespread use of T in the workplace, both to superiors and at the same level of seniority. There is also variation within Germany, which highlights the issue of whether East and West German were separate national varieties during the division of Germany. In Sweden-Swedish, the V form was virtually abandoned in the 1960s and is now restricted to addressing especially very old and frail people in service encounters. In Finland Swedish, V is still employed in a way that has been abandoned in Sweden – expressing status and formality, reflecting conservatism and the influence of the Finnish language. This means that controversy as to whether V is exclusionary in Sweden is not relevant in Finland-Swedish. Our study of German and Swedish also demonstrates that knowledge of address in others’ varieties is largely stereotypical.

  • 6. Edlund, Ann-Catrine
    et al.
    Erson, Eva
    Milles, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Språk och kön2007Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Falk, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    The Interaction of Temporal and Modal Auxiliaries in Counterfactual Contexts in Swedish2010In: Tampa Papers in Linguistics, ISSN 2155-1022, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Hellberg, Staffan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Polysemy across image schemas: Swedish fram2007In: Studia Linguistica, ISSN 0039 3193, Vol. 61, no 1, p. 20–58-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been some reluctance among scholars to accept the possibility that the image schema structure for a polysemous word can vary from one subsense to another, one image schema dominating for one subsense and another for the other. The aim of this article is to demonstrate that this possibility does indeed exist. For the polysemous Swedish adverb or particle fram, it is shown that no less than four image schemas are primary in different subsenses, viz. the front-back schema, the centre-periphery schema, the source-path-goal schema, and the container schema. Furthermore, although these schemas also appear in backgrounded functions in other subsenses, thus securing the network, no single schema is present in all subsenses.

  • 9.
    Jansson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Bilingual practices in the process of initiating and resolving lexical problems in students' collaborative writing sessions2007In: International Journal of Bilingualism, ISSN 1367-0069, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 157-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study deals with the sequential organization of language choice and code-switching between Persian as a first language and Swedish as a second language in the process of initiating and resolving a problem of understanding and producing the correct version of a lexical item. The data consist of detailed transcripts of audio tapings of two bilingual students’ collaborative writing sessions within the frame of a one-year master’s program in computer science in a multilingual setting at a Swedish university. The students, both Persianspeaking, are advanced speakers of Swedish as a second language. For this article, four lexical language-related episodes, where code-switching between Persian and Swedish occurs, are analyzed. The analyzed excerpts in this article are drawn from a corpus of data consisting of language-related episodes identified and transcribed in  the audio tapings. We employ a conversation analysis (CA) approach for the analysis of bilingual interaction. This means that the meaning of the code-switching in the interaction is described in terms of both global (the conversational activity at large) and local interactional factors. In the analysis, a close step-by-step analysis of the turn-taking procedures demonstrates how the communicative meaning of the students’ bilingual behavior in a lexical episode is determined in its local production in the emerging conversational context and how it can be explicated as part of the following social actions: drawing attention to a problem, seeking alliance when a problem is made explicit and confirming intersubjective understanding when the problem is resolved.

  • 10.
    Johansson, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Nederländska avdelningen.
    Contrastief corpusonderzoek: Het Nederlandse werkwoord komen en het Zweedse werkwoord komma2008In: Taal aan den lijve: Het gebruik van corpora in taalkundig onderzoek en taalonderwijs, Academia Press, Gent , 2008, p. 7-28Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In mijn proefschrift over het Nederlandse werkwoord komen en het Zweedse werkwoord komma heb ik deze twee multifunctionele werkwoorden gecontrasteerd met behulp van twee corpora (Johansson 2006). Het INL 27 Miljoen Woorden Krantencorpus 1995 en de concordanties van Språkbanken (24,5 miljoen woorden uit krantenteksten, Press 1995, 1996 en 1997), Göteborgs universitet, werden als empirisch materiaal gebruikt bij het in kaart brengen van grammaticale betekenissen van de twee werkwoorden. In totaal werden 1490 zinnen met komen en 1518 zinnen met komma geanalyseerd en ingedeeld in drie categorieën: zelfstandig werkwoord, hulpwerkwoord en koppelwerkwoord. In het materiaal kwamen in het bijzonder twee interessante functies van komen en komma naar voren. Het Zweedse komma blijkt in zeer beperkte contexten als koppelwerkwoord te functioneren, bv. Han kom fri med målvakten ‘hij kwam vrij voor de keeper’, en het Nederlandse komen blijkt in beperkte contexten de rol van futuraal hulpwerkwoord te kunnen spelen, bv. Hier komen huizen te staan. Deze twee functies van de werkwoorden hebben gedeeltelijk de vorm van vaste verbindingen aangenomen. Het gebruik van corpora bleek dus een bron van verrassende informatie over de betekenissen van het Nederlandse komen en het Zweedse komma.

  • 11.
    Johansson, Annika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Nederländska.
    Wennerberg, Jeanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Språktrotters2008Book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Josephson, Olle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Bubbelbadkar och frihetsbegär2012In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 5 marsArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Josephson, Olle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Det gör ont när namn ska sättas2012In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 11 sept.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Josephson, Olle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Finlands svenska utvecklas nära vår2012In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 13 febr.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Josephson, Olle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Förgiftade små ord rymmer en hel världsbild2012In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no 4, p. 60-61Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Personliga pronomen är giftiga. Det har dagens fin­författare förstått, och undviker inledande han, hon och de.

  • 16.
    Josephson, Olle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Grötig danska inte värre än vårt tj-ljud2012In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 4 decArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Josephson, Olle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Identitetsfrossan drabbar allt fler2012In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no mars 26Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Josephson, Olle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    La communauté linguistique nordique: éléments de comparaison des politiques linguistiques dans les pays nordiques2012In: Nordiques, ISSN 1761-7677, no 24, p. 17-36Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Olle Josephson treats the uniqueness of the Nordic linguistic community and describes how history can help explaining the current situation. [...] Josephson goes on to analyze official linguistic policy documents in the specific Nordic countries, and studies how these declarations are put to work in everyday practice.

  • 19.
    Josephson, Olle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Moderna och klassiska klassröster lika skiftande2012In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no 3, p. 66-67Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Josephson, Olle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Nya s-fraser och moderatord2012In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 8 oktoberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Josephson, Olle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Pressade priser ger usel tolkning2012In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 14 majArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Josephson, Olle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Skriv fejs men undvik fejsrejp2012In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 6 novArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Josephson, Olle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Språkforskarens käraste raritet2012In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 2 aug.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Josephson, Olle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Striden om ord en fråga om makt2012In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 23 jan.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Josephson, Olle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Strindberg i fem steg, hu! 2012In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no 2, p. 64-65Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Josephson, Olle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Uttalsförändringar skapade den danska sluddermyten2012In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no 8, p. 26-27Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Josephson, Olle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Zlatanpojkar och slukarbarn skolas in i olika litteraturspråk2012In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no 5, p. 68-69Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Josephson, Olle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Åtta sätt att skriva kort och effektivt2012In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no 6, p. 48-49Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Junefelt, karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Equality and Academic Life: An analysis of a Swedish academic lunch table conversation2008In: Mathematics Technologies Education: The Gender Perspective / [ed] Anna Chronaki, Volos, Greece: Thessaly University Press , 2008, 1, p. 119-129Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Junefelt, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Mikhail Bakhtin - A missing link in hypothesis about children's linguistic and cognitive development.2008In: Perspectives and Limits of Dialogism in Mikhail Bakhtin.: Applications in Psychology, Education, Art and Culture. / [ed] Marios A. Pourkos, Crete, Greece: University of Crete , 2008, p. 197-213Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Junefelt, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Nordin, PiaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Proceedings from the Second International Interdisciplinary Conference on Perspectives and Limits of Dialogism in Mikhail Bakhtin, 3-5 June, 20092010Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    (Preface) This conference focused on the core of Bakhtin’s theory, which concerns dialogue and dialogicality. The conference themes reflected his notion that the “I” and the “self”, the “you” and the “other” are embedded in each other so that each affects the other and as a whole they create a centrifugal force around which communication and life circle. The choice of the two-faced Janus figure as the symbol of the conference reflects the inward and outward aspects of communication’s inherent dialogue and dialogicality. As an ancient Roman god of beginnings and doorways, of the rising and setting sun, looking in opposite directions, Janus has been associated with polarities, that is, seeing different and contrasting aspects and characteristics. As a metaphor it describes Bakhtin’s view on dialogues and dialogicality within or between “selves” and “others”. As a metaphorical symbol it captured the intent, purpose and outcome of the conference as reflected in this collection of papers.

  • 32.
    Krantz, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Barns tidiga läsutveckling: En studie av tidiga språkliga och kognitiva förmågor och senare läsutveckling2011Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this study is to analyze and describe the reading of a group of pupils in a preschool class and grade 1 and to search for links between preschool language and cognitive skills and early literacy development.

    A total of 49 pupils participated in the study and their literacy development was analyzed over two consecutive years in preschool class and grade 1, partly by teacher evaluations and partly by reading tests. In the autumn term of the preschool class the pupils’ phono­logical awareness, letter knowledge, impressive and expressive voca­bulary, short-term memory and syntactic skills were tested. The main aim was to examine how these skills predicted reading in preschool class and grade 1.

    Single correlation analyses revealed that phonological awareness, letter knowledge, short-term memory and syntactic skills were sig­nificantly related to literacy development, whereas these patterns of prediction were not found regarding verbal skills.

    When analyzing the unique contribution of every single predictor to explain variations in reading ability, phonological awareness gives a specific additional contribution to reading abili­ty in preschool class, whereas letter knowledge gives an addi­tion­al contribution both in preschool class and grade 1. These patterns of prediction were not found regarding more general verbal skills or memory.

     When prior reading ability is also taken into consideration, the prediction of the analyzed preschool skills declines and it is mainly the prior reading ability that is significantly related to literacy deve­lopment.

    This study indicates the importance of success in early literacy development. To make this possible for all students the teachers must be able to identify the developmental stage to build upon. An impor­tant conclusion is that reading education must rely on a solid theoreti­cal basis and the use of a diagnostic approach.

  • 33.
    Larsson, Ida
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Lyngfelt, Benjamin
    Institutionen för svenska språket, Göteborgs universitet.
    Tempus i svenskan2011In: Tid och tidsförhållanden i olika språk / [ed] Christiane Andersen, Antoaneta Granberg, Ingmar Söhrman, Göteborg: Acta Universitatis Gothoburgensis, 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Magnusson Petzell, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    OV and V-to-I in the history of Swedish2012In: Historical Linguistics 2009: Selected papers from the 19th International Conference on Historical Linguistics, Nijmegen, 10-15 August 2009 / [ed] Ans van Kemenade, Nynke de Haas, Amsterdam: John Benjamins , 2012, p. 211-230Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Magnusson Petzell, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Jóhannesson, KristinnInst. för svenska språket, Göteborgs universitet.Larsson, IdaInst. för svenska språket, Göteborgs universitet.Malmgren, Sven-GöranInst. för svenska språket, Göteborgs universitet.Rogström, LenaInst. för svenska språket, Göteborgs universitet.Sköldberg, EmmaInst. för svenska språket, Göteborgs universitet.
    Bo65: Festskrift till Bo Ralph2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Milles, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Partitur med karta.: En modell för transkription av skriftanvändning2007In: ASLA-information, Vol. 32, no 3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Norrby, Catrin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Nelson, Marie: Andraspråkstalare i arbete. En språkvetenskaplig studie av kommunikationen vid ett svenskt storföretag (2010). Rec. av Catrin Norrby2011In: Språk & Stil, ISSN 1101-1165, Vol. 21, p. 226-231Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Norrby, Catrin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Hajek, John
    School of Languages and Linguistics, The University of MElbourne.
    Language Policy in Practice: What Happens When Swedish IKEA and H&M Take ‘You’ On?2011In: University and Diversity in Language Policy: Global Perspectives / [ed] Norrby, Catrin and Hajek, John, Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters , 2011, p. 242-257Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the impact of language policies and their implementation in the corporate world in an increasingly globalised economy. More specifically, the article draws on examples from two large multinationals of Swedish origin: the furniture retailer  IKEA and the clothing company H&M. Both companies dictate linguistic behaviour, albeit to different extents, by promoting Swedish-style informal 'you' and related address practices, both internally among employees and externally in customer-related interactions, even in countries where such informality is not the traditional norm. The chapter documents how such practices are implemented and public reactions to them in a range of linguistic contexts and in different countries. It underlines the importance of who has the position of power in a particular situation and discusses the tension between global and local concerns in building a corporate identity.

  • 39.
    Norrby, Catrin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Hajek, JohnThe University of Melbourne.
    Uniformity and Diversity in Language Policy: Global Perspectives2011Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book brings together current research by leading international scholars on the often contentious nature of language policies and their practical outcomes in North America, Australia and Europe. It presents a range of perspectives from which to engage with a variety of pressing issues raised by multilingualism, multiculturalism, immigration, exclusion, and identity.

    A recurrent theme is that of tension and conflict: between uniformity and diversity, between official policies and real day-to-day life experiences, but also between policies in schools and the corporate world and their implementation.

    Several chapters present research about language policy issues that has previously not been fully or easily available to an English-language audience. Many of the chapters also provide up-to-date analyses of language policy issues in particular regions or countries, focusing on recent developments.

  • 40.
    Norrby, Catrin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Håkansson, Gisela
    Institutionen för lingvistik, Lunds universitet.
    Introduktion till sociolingvistik2010 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Introduktion till sociolingvistik är en introduktionsbok till ämnet sociolingvistik, även kallat språksociologi på svenska. Boken vänder sig i första hand till högskolestudenter och syftar till att ge en lättfattlig och övergripande introduktion till den sociolingvistiska forskningens huvudområden. Boken består av åtta huvudkapitel och ett kort avslutningskapitel. I kapitel 1 ges en historik över ämnets framväxt och utveckling. Kapitlet beskriver även sociolingvistikens metoder och presenterar grundläggande termer och begrepp. I de påföljande kapitlen behandlas regional och social variation, språk och kön, ungdomsspråk, språk och etnicitet, flerspråkiga samhällen samt tvärkulturell kommunikation. I slutet av boken finns ett register med centrala termer.

  • 41.
    Norrby, Catrin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Warren, Jane
    Address Practices and Social Relationships in European Languages2012In: Language and Linguistics Compass, ISSN 1749-818X, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 225-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Address practices – the way people use second-person pronouns, first names, last names and titles, and other terms to address one another – are fundamental to expressing social relationships. They reflect cultural values and can tell us a great deal about social structures and change. This article gives an overview of recent research on address practices, focusing on three European languages – French, German and Swedish. It follows theoretical developments in the study of address from the 1960s onwards, and examines how address practices have evolved in French, German and Swedish since the socio-political upheavals of that decade. It is argued that the notions of social distance and common ground are central to an understanding of address choice in these languages.

  • 42.
    Norrby, Catrin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Warren, Jane
    School of Languages and Linguistics, The University of Melbourne.
    Hajek, John
    School of Languages and Linguistics, The University of Melbourne.
    Business the IKEA way: How business regulates language in a globalised world2011In: The Linguist : journal of the Institute of Linguists, ISSN 0268-5965, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 14-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Regulating language use is not the sole domain of countries or states. Large private companies can also be involved in making language policy. One way they do this is through formal or informal guidelines on how staff use language with one another and with customers. This article focuses on one such multinational company, IKEA, and how its promotion of informal address practices on its local websites, can be viewed as a means of building a global company identity while at the same time negotiating diversity at the local level.

  • 43.
    Norrby, Catrin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Wide, Camilla
    Lindström, Jan
    Nilsson, Jenny
    Finland Swedish as a non-dominant variety of Swedish – extending the scope to pragmatic and interactional aspects.2012In: Non-Dominant Varieties of Pluricentric Languages. Getting the Picture: In Memory of Michael Clyne / [ed] Rudolf Muhr, In Collaboration with Catrin Norrby, Leo Kretzenbacher, Carla Amorós, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2012, p. 49-60Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter gives an overview of Finland Swedish as a non-dominant variety of Swedish. The first part outlines the status and position of Swedish in Finland and documents research on Finland Swedish. We present this body of work with reference to work on Finland-Swedish status- and corpus planning. While there is an impressive body of work on the phonological, lexical, morphological and syntactic characteristics of Finland Swedish, much less attention has been paid to the pragmatic and interactional aspects of Finland Swedish vis-à-vis Sweden Swedish. With the exception of a few studies on politeness strategies, address and greeting practices, no systematic investigation of communicative patterns in the two Swedish varieties has been undertaken. The second part presents our methodological framework for such an investigation, and present preliminary results from a pilot study on openings in institutional telephone conversations in the respective national variety. These results suggest that there are systematic differences which warrant further investigation.

  • 44.
    Persson, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Dialektnivellering i Färs härad2010In: Svenska landsmål och svenskt folkliv, ISSN 0347-1837, no 336Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article it is discussed whether the phonological changes involved in dialect levelling occur in a certain order. To explore the issue, the author has analysed the pronunciation of four generations of a family in southern Skåne. The variables studied have been divided into two groups. In the first, the difference between standard Swedish and traditional dialect is at a phonemic level, as for example in the word pairs ett/itt 'one and ut/ud 'out'. In the second group, the difference is instead at the phonetic level: front or back r, and long vowels realised as monophthongs or diphthongs.

    The study suggests that phonemic adaption (which is complete in the youngest generation) precedes phonetic adaption (which has only just begun in the data examined).

  • 45.
    Riad, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Culminativity, stress and tone accent in Central Swedish2012In: Lingua, ISSN 0024-3841, E-ISSN 1872-6135, Vol. 122, no 13, p. 1352-1379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish stress and tone accent exhibits an interesting mixture of properties. I argue that the stress system is arranged in a largely morphological fashion, with clear similarities to dominance systems of Japanese, Basque and Greek, where there is a distinction between accented and unaccented stems, and where prefixes and, in particular, suffixes influence stress/accent placement. A major difference is that none of the lexical specifications for stress in Swedish is pre- or post-accenting, but rather post- and pretonic. Thus, no stress is assigned by affixes, but affixes impose adjacency conditions on stress placement in stems, or else the structure is either inhibited, or becomes noticeably marked. Beside the morphological specifications of stress information, there is a phonological default stress assignment, similar to what we find in Greek. The phonological default of Swedish applies blindly when prosodic specification is lacking at the right edge of prosodic words. An accentual default occurs also in Basque, but it applies at a phrasal level rather than at the word level. Beside stress, Swedish also exhibits a lexical tone ('accent 2', 'grave'), which occurs only in primary stressed syllables, and which (in the analysis assumed here) is mostly assigned from posttonic suffixes to an immediately preceding primary stress. So-called 'accent 1' (acute) is lexically unmarked, but both tonal contours signal prominence in a similar fashion, that is, in a way that is independent of the lexical distinction as such. Stress and tonal accent both instantiate culminativity. Building on the theory of projecting words and phrases (Ito and Mester, 2007), I argue that stress instantiates culminativity within the minimal prosodic word, and tonal accent instantiates culminativity in the maximal prosodic word.

  • 46.
    Riad, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Meter in poetry: a new theory (with a chapter on Southern Romance meters by Carlos Piera)/Nigel Fabb and Morris Halle (2008). Cambridge:Cambridge University Press. Pp. x+2972010In: Phonology, ISSN 0952-6757, E-ISSN 1469-8188, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 542-551Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Riad, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Retroflektering2010In: Bo 65: Festskrift till Bo Ralph / [ed] Jóhannesson, Kristinn, Larsson, Ida, Malmgren, Magnusson Petzell, Erik, Sven-Göran, Rogström, Lena, Sköldberg, Emma,, Göteborg: Meijerbergs institut för svensk etymologisk forskning , 2010, p. 214-227Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Riad, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Scandinavian accent typology2006In: STUF -- Sprachtypologie und Universalienforschung, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 36-55Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Riad, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Structures in Germanic Prosody: A diachronic study with special reference to the Nordic languages1992Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study provides a reconstruction of the development of the Germanic stress and syllabification system (as reflected in Gothic and Proto-Nordic) up to the completion of the quantity shift in Late Old Swedish. By means of current prosodic theory it is established that a domain of two moras wordinitially is present at all stages of development, in Gothic, Old English and Proto-Nordic as well as in Modem Swedish. It is argued that this domain is the linguistic instantiation of word minimality, referred to as the bimoraic condition. The bimoraic condition is interpreted over different prosodic categories - the prosodic word, the foot and finally the main-stress syllable - at different language stages. This development reflects the transition from a quantity system permitting light and overlong syllables to a system where the main-stress syllable is obligatorily heavy. Various prosodically conditioned changes and processes take place in the early Germanic dialects. New explanations are proposed for several of them in terms of prosodic theory. The vowel/glide alternation (Sievers’s law) in Gothic is derived from regular syllabification of the archiphonemes III and /U/. Syncope in Proto-Nordic (corresponding to high vowel deletion in Old English) is analysed as mora-deletion in metrically weak positions. Vowel shortening and nasal loss are also analyzed as mora-deletion following destressing under stress clash. The long-standing problem of delayed syncope (in Proto-Nordic) or absence of syncope (in Old English) in light stems is explained as a minimal word effect. The deletion rule in the so called second syncope period in Proto-Nordic is a case of vowel deletion (not mora-deletion). The patterning known as vowel balance is analyzed as the result of interaction between the general trend of reduction and the development of a particular balance prosody. In balance prosody one main-stress position (a unipositional foot) dominates two light syllables. This prosody is directly reflected as level stress on the surface. Rules that relate directly to the metrical configuration of balance are vowel strengthening (läsa > läså ’to read’), and vowel levelling (läså > låså). The latter rule is rendered as parametrized projection of features onto the stress unit, and the vowel patterns of vowel levelling are thereby given a principled description. Finally, the quantity shift in Old Swedish is discussed in detail. Balance - argued to be a Scandinavian innovation - is shown to be directly linked to the quantity shift. The loss of balance necessarily leads to the implementation of the quantity shift. Moreover, it is argued that the particular Central Scandinavian lengthening pattern involving both vowel and consonant lengthening (in roughly complementary contexts) is due to the (former) presence of balance. Finally, the theory predicts that the Modem Swedish quantity system emerging after the quantity shift depends on distinctive consonant quantity, rather than distinctive vowel quantity.

  • 50.
    Riad, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    The morphological status of accent 2 in North Germanic simplex forms2009In: Nordic Prosody: Proceedings of the Xth Conference, Helsinki 2008 / [ed] Martti Vainio, Reijo Aulanko, Olli Aaltonen, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang , 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
123 1 - 50 of 108
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