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  • 1.
    Ahlgren, Katrin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    "Språket – en biljett till frihet": narrativ identitet i en migrationskontext2016In: Nordand: nordisk tidsskrift for andrespråksforskning, ISSN 0809-9227, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 143-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article highlights and discusses a young woman’s experience of language use and language development. The woman’s story, which spans a period of fifteen years, starts with her escape from Afghanistan and illustrates her socialisation into Swedish society. The analysis is based on Paul Ricœur’s theoretical framework that is grounded in hermeneutic and phenomenological traditions. Ricœur tries to capture our experiencesof being the same person though we are constantly changing, making his thoughts onstorytelling and identity creation interesting to apply to the experiences of migration. Drawing on the concept of narrative identity, the article points to how narration connects time, how it expresses ethical dimensions and how the woman, little by little, develops an increasingly transnational and inclusive identity. The value of studying new arrivals in a longitudinal perspective also becomes clear as the analysis includes crucial turning points in terms of attitudes and strategies in relation to second language use.

  • 2.
    Axelsson, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Att resonera som en samhällsvetare – exemplet historia2017Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Varje ämne har sitt sätt att formulera sin kunskap och dessa specifika uttryckssätt behöver våra elever bliuppmärksammade på. I detta avsnitt kommer samhällsvetenskap att illustreras av ämnet historia och syftet är att beskriva det språk elever behöver för att kunna resonera som en historiker.

  • 3.
    Axelsson, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Att uttrycka sig som en naturvetare2017Other (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Axelsson, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Litteracitetsutveckling i olika åldrar och ämnen2017Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Ett övergripande mål för alla elever i grundskolan är att utveckla litteracitet i varje skolämne, det vill sägaatt tala, läsa, skriva och använda multimodalitet kopplat till stoffet i varje ämne (jfr det vidgade textbegreppet). Syftet med denna artikel är att visahur eleverskunskapsutveckling gynnas av att de under alla årskurser får undervisning ihur texter och multimodala uttryck ska läsas, förstås och skrivas i olika ämnen.

  • 5.
    Axelsson, Monica
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Juvonen, Päivi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Inledning: Nyanlända barn och ungdomar i de nordiska länderna2016In: Nordand: nordisk tidsskrift for andrespråksforskning, ISSN 0809-9227, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 5-12Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Axelsson, Monica
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Juvonen, PäiviStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Nyanlända barn och ungdomar i de nordiska länderna2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Bardel, Camilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Falk, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    The L2 status factor and the declarative/procedural distinction2012In: Third language acquisition in adulthood / [ed] Cabrelli Amaro, Jennifer, Flynn, Suzanne & Rothman, Jason, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2012, p. 61-78Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Bardel, Camilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Gudmundson, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages.
    Lindqvist, Christina
    Aspects of lexical sophistication in advanced learners' oral production vocabulary acquisition and use in l2 french and italian2012In: Studies in Second Language Acquisition, ISSN 0272-2631, E-ISSN 1470-1545, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 269-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on the design and use of a profiler for lexical sophistication (i.e., use of advanced vocabulary), which was created to assess the lexical richness of intermediate and advanced Swedish second language (L2) learners' French and Italian. It discusses how teachers' judgments (TJs) of word difficulty can contribute to the methodology for lexical profiling and compares two methods, one purely frequency based and one modified on the basis of TJs of word difficulty. It has been suggested elsewhere that factors other than frequency play an important role in vocabulary acquisition. Here it is argued that cognates and thematic vocabulary related to teaching materials, although infrequent in target language (TL) corpora, should not necessarily be considered advanced and that analyses of learners' lexical sophistication would benefit from integrating these aspects. In this study, the frequency-based method normally used in lexical profiling was modified by recategorizing some low-frequency words considered easy by many teachers. On the basis of the TJs, a basic vocabulary, which consisted mainly of high-frequency words but also of cognates and thematic words, was defined, which was based on the fact that teachers judged certain low-frequency cognates and thematic words as relatively easy. Using the modified method, learners' lexical profiles were found to be more homogeneous within groups of learners at specific proficiency levels. The superiority of the new method over the purely frequency-based one was shown when comparing effect sizes. It is argued that this method gives a more correct picture of advanced L2 lexical profiles.

  • 9.
    Bardel, Camilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Sánchez, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    The L2 status factor hypothesis revisited: The role of metalinguistic knowledge, working memory, attention and noticing in third language learning2017In: L3 Syntactic Transfer: Models, New Developments and Implications / [ed] Tanja Angelovska, Angela Hahn, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2017, p. 85-101Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter provides a nuanced view of the L2 status factor model, emphasizing explicit metalinguistic knowledge as the key factor governing transfer, together with individual differences in working memory and the operations associated with it. We argue that individual differences regarding the degree of explicit metalinguistic knowledge attained either in L1 or in L2 and differences when it comes to working memory, attention and noticing should be taken in consideration when accounting for transfer from previously acquired or learned languages in L3 learning.

  • 10.
    Blomqvist, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Vad uppmärksammar lärare i samtal om skrivbedömning? Svensklärares normer för beslut om summativ bedömning2018In: Nordisk tidskrift för allmän didaktik, ISSN 2002-1534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on a qualitative study of Swedish teachers’ summative assessments of students’ writing in upper secondary school. Based on teacher group discussions, the study describes and analyses teachers’ expressions of norms when assessing and grading students’ writing in the subject of Swedish. Data consist of audio- and video recordings from three focus group discussions, comprising a total of 17 teachers. Topic analysis (Linell, 2001) is the method used to identify expressions of assessment norms in these discussions. The analysis reveals that these teachers’ summative assessments of students’ writing express two competing norms: a non-compensatory and a compensatory norm. The non-compensatory norm is expressed through perceptions that all text qualities must correspond to the same criteria. This means that shortcomings in texts are crucial for teachers’ summative assessments. The text qualities that primarily determine these decisions are language style and text structure. Meanwhile, the compensatory norm is expressed through perceptions that in summative aspects such as students’ age and writing instructions as well as students’ writing development and the national test must be considered. These competing assessment norms have a substantial impact on theses teachers’ decisions on summative assessments. The teacher groups show significant variation in the basis for their decisions regarding summative assessment of students' writing.

  • 11.
    Cunningham, Una
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Growing up with Two Languages: A Practical Guide for the Bilingual Family2011 (ed. 3)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Cunningham, Una
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    How much linguistics do language teachers need?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The amount of linguistics required or available as part of an undergraduate degree with a major in a foreign language degree has varied through time and from country to country. Currently in New Zealand it is possible to graduate with a double major in in European or Asian languages without ever having come closer to linguistics than a grammar or pronunciation course. Language graduates may not have studied much in the way of linguistics during their degree study. This means that if they choose to enter initial secondary teacher education, they may be quite linguistically naive, despite years of language study.

     

    Current thinking on language education is that the combination of meaningful spoken and written input in the target language, and the possibility of meaningful interaction in the target language are enough to allow students to acquire communicative competence in the target language. However, all but the most radical believe that most learners will be helped by also learning about the target language – in effect learning something of the pragmatics, syntax, morphology, phonology and phonetics of the target language. Communicative competence is the goal for language education, and this paper examines the role of implicit and explicit linguistic knowledge and linguistic teaching in the learning and teaching of languages and the disconnect between language graduates’ linguistic understanding and language education.

  • 13.
    Cunningham, Una
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Teachability and Learnability of English Pronunciation Features for Vietnamese-Speaking Learners2013In: Teaching and Researching English Accents in Native and Non-native Speakers / [ed] E. Waniek-Klimczak & L. R. Shockey, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, p. 3-14Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anyone who has tried to learn a language with a very different sound system will understand the challenges faced by speakers of a language as different as Vietnamese who are attempting to learn to speak English in a way that is intelligible to non-speakers of Vietnamese. Many learners have very limited opportunity to hear model pronunciations other than their teacher’s, and no opportunity at all to speak in English outside the classroom. Vietnamese-accented English is characterised by a number of features which ride roughshod over English morphosyntax, resulting in speech that is extremely difficult to reconstruct for the non-Vietnamese-speaking listener. Some of these features appear to be more difficult to learn to avoid than others. Phonotactic constraints in L1 appear to be persistent even in L2, and L1 phonological rules will, apparently, often apply in L2 unless they are blocked in some way. Perception of salient (to native listeners) target pronunciations is often lacking, and learners may not be aware that their pronunciation is not intelligible. Despite years of language study, many learners are unable to produce some native speaker targets. Vietnamese learners typically exhibit a set of characteristic pronunciation features in English, and the aim of this study is to see which of these are susceptible to remediation through explicit teaching. This explicit teaching is compared with a less direct, less interactive kind of teaching, involving drawing native and native-like pronunciation of problematic features of English pronunciation to the learners’ attention. The results of this study can then be interpreted in terms of teachability and learnability, which do not always go hand in hand. If we understand what kinds of phonetic features are teachable and how learnability varies for different features, we can target those features where there is a good return for effort spent, resulting in efficient teaching.

  • 14. Falk, Ylva
    et al.
    Bardel, Camilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Object pronouns in German L3 syntax: Evidence for the L2 status factor2011In: Second language research, ISSN 0267-6583, E-ISSN 1477-0326, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 59-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies on L3 lexicon, and recently also some on L3 syntax, have convincingly shown a qualitative difference between the acquisition of a true L2 and the subsequent acquisition of an L3. Some studies even indicate that L2 takes on a stronger role than L1 in the initial state of L3 syntax (e.g. Bardel and Falk, 2007; Rothman and Cabrelli Amaro, 2010). In this article we further investigate syntactic transfer from L1/L2 to L3 in learners at an intermediate level of proficiency in the target language. Data have been obtained from 44 learners of German as L3, testing the placement of object pronouns in both main and subordinate clauses in a grammaticality judgement/correction task (GJCT). The learners constitute two groups (both n = 22): One group has English as L1 and French as L2 and the other group has French as L1 and English as L2. This particular combination of background languages allows us to pinpoint the source of transfer, since object placement is pre-verbal in French and post-verbal in English, this being applied in both main and subordinate clauses. In target language (TL) German, however, the object placement varies between pre-verbal in the sub clause and post-verbal in the main clause. The two groups behave differently as to both acceptance and rejection of the test items (60 grammatical and ungrammatical main and sub clauses with object pronouns). This difference is significant and can be ascribed to their L2s, respectively. Our results thus show that the L2 transfers into the L3 even at an intermediate level, and on the basis of this we claim a strong role for the L2 status factor.

  • 15.
    Franker, Qarin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Litteracitet och visuella texter: Studier om lärare och kortutbildade deltagare i sfi2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis aims to contribute to the growing body of knowledge concerning the adult basic literacy education in the Nordic countries and broaden research on literacy from its traditional focus on verbal texts to include images and visual texts. The thesis comprises a research survey concerning adult literacy and two empirical, exploratory studies focusing on the use of visual texts in the basic Swedish language programme for adult immigrants, Svenskundervisning för invandrare (sfi).

    The first study presents international and Nordic research on literacy with a focus on current sociocultural, and critical perspectives. Together with the three concepts of mutual respect, meaningfulness and participation, an ‘expansive’ model for adult literacy instruction is also presented.

    The second study deals with the teachers´ views on appropriate visual materials for second language and literacy teaching. The results show an extensive but diversified usage of visual material but also that literacy teachers pay very close attention to participants´ sociocultural background in their image selection but tend to underestimate their cognitive ability. From a critical perspective the teachers´ statements can be regarded as part of a discursive practice in which they unintentionally contribute to a discourse construction of an identity of deficiency of the learners.

    The third study examines and compares, how adult second language learners interact with and understand a number of Swedish election posters. The analyses identify processes and variations in the learners´ interaction. The results show that the reconstructions of the visual texts are influenced by the participants´ linguistic, educational and cultural ‘repertoires’, as well as the posters´ graphic, visual and textual design. A certain level of linguistic proficiency as well as formal schooling and knowledge of the current discourse seem to be indispensable for making the intended interpretations.

  • 16.
    Franker, Qarin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Val, vägar, variation: Vuxna andraspråksinlärares interaktion med svenska valaffischer2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Posters, paths and patterns. Adult second language learners interact with Swedish election posters

    The study examines and compares, at group level, how adult second language learners interact with and understand a number of image based Swedish election posters. The analyses identify processes and variations in the learners´ interaction with the posters and expose patterns and structures as graphic ‘reading paths’ and ‘focus points’. The result shows that the reconstructions of the visual texts are influenced by the participants´ linguistic, educational and cultural resources, their ‘repertoires’, as well as the posters´ graphic design and visual and textual elements, ‘the model reader’. A certain level of linguistic proficiency as well as formal schooling and knowledge of the current discourse seem to be indispensable for making the intended interpretations. The design of election posters will need to change to enable the multicultural and second language perspective to be deliberately taken into account.

  • 17.
    Ganuza, Natalia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hedman, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Ideology vs. practice: Is there a space for pedagogical translanguaging in mother tongue instruction?2017In: New Perspectives on Translanguaging and Education / [ed] BethAnne Paulsrud, Jenny Rosén, Boglárka Straszer, Åsa Wedin, Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 2017, p. 208-226Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Ganuza, Natalia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hedman, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Modersmålsundervisning: möjligheter och utmaningar2018In: En god fortsättning: nyanländas fortsatta väg i skola och samhälle / [ed] Tore Otterup, Gilda Kästen-Ebeling, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 163-180Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Ganuza, Natalia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hedman, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    The Impact of Mother Tongue Instruction on the Development of Biliteracy: Evidence from Somali-Swedish Bilinguals2017In: Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0142-6001, E-ISSN 1477-450XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates if participation in mother tongue instruction (henceforth MTI) impacts the biliteracy proficiency of young bilinguals, drawing on examples from Somali–Swedish bilinguals and Somali MTI in a Swedish school context. In the study, biliteracy was operationalized as reading proficiency and vocabulary knowledge in two languages, which was tested with measures of word decoding, reading comprehension, and vocabulary breadth and depth. The study was designed to allow for cross-sectional, longitudinal, and cross-linguistic analyses of data. Overall, the results showed that participation in MTI contributed positively to participants’ results on Somali reading comprehension, beyond the influence of chronological age, age of arrival, and reported home language and literacy use. Furthermore, higher results in Somali were associated with higher results on the same measures in Swedish, in particular for the reading measures. In sum, the results indicate that MTI has an impact on some aspects of literacy proficiency in the mother tongue, despite the restricted time allocated for it (<1 h/week). They also indicate that MTI, albeit indirectly, may benefit the stated proficiencies in the language of schooling.

  • 20.
    Gudmundson, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Alvarez López, LauraStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.Bardel, CamillaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Romance Languages: Multilingualism and Language Acquisition2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume contains a collection of papers that deal with Romance linguistics from two broad perspectives: multilingualism and language acquisition. Some of the contributions investigate these phenomena in the light of language contact, language attitudes and code switching in multilingual societies or multilingual families. Others focus on the acquisition of rhythmic patterns, intonation or even emotions in a second language. Many of the contributions present themes related to oral production or speech. The book in itself is multilingual and includes papers written in Italian, Portuguese, Spanish and English.

  • 21.
    Haslam, Mara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    The importance of aspirated initial stops in English as a lingua franca2016In: Proceedings of the 7th Pronunciation in Second Language Learning and Teaching Conference / [ed] John Levis, Huong Le, Ivana Lucic, Evan Simpson, Sonca Vo, 2016, p. 66-75Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A significant proportion of the population of the world is made up of users of English as a Lingua Franca (ELF). Jenkins (2000) published the Lingua Franca Core (LFC), a syllabus for ELF pronunciation, including the claim that the fortis/lenis distinction must be preserved on English stop consonants for successful ELF intelligibility. The present study evaluates the relationship between Voice Onset Time (VOT) and how the sounds are perceived by ELF listeners. 101 tokens produced during ELF interaction which contained the stops /b/, /p/, /d/, /t/, /g/, or /k/ were played for 9 Swedish listeners, who could indicate that they heard either the word or its minimal-pair counterpart, e.g. bees or peas. The relationship between VOT and perceived stop was analyzed, with the expectation that longer VOTs would be associated with fortis consonants and shorter VOTs would be associated with lenis consonants. Results followed the predicted pattern for /d/ and /g/ but not for /t/ and /k/. In addition, the pattern observed for /p/ and /b/ is the reverse of the pattern found for the other consonants. These results suggest that further research into the LFC’s claim about the fortis/lenis distinction and other LFC claims are warranted.

  • 22. Holmberg, Per
    et al.
    Grahn, Inga-Lill
    Magnusson, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Systemisk-funktionell lingvistik. Att analysera språkets betydelsepotential2014In: Folkmålsstudier, ISSN 0356-1771, Vol. 52, p. 9-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the theory of Systemic functional linguistics (SFL), first developed by Michael Halliday, and exemplifies how the theory can be applied in empirical analysisof text and talk. It shows how SFL is centered on the idea that language functions in social meaning making, and how this idea is theoretically elaborated in terms of stratification, metafunctional diversity, systemic choices and registers. The article includes a theoretical description of these four central notions, followed by a presentation of two empirical studies. Both studies explore lexicogrammatical and semantic choices within the ideational metafunction, though in different registers.The first study is an analysis of the use of grammatical metaphor in text written by monolingual and multilingual upper secondary school students. Grammatical metaphor is the realization of meaning in atypical, or incongruent, ways. In the study, grammatical metaphor is a developmental trait, allowing students to express specialized meanings through new combinations between semantics and lexicogrammar.In the second analysis SFL is applied on talk in interaction and combined with activity analysis. The study explores the successive instantiation of the meaning potentialof language in a certain context, namely when participants talk about thinkingin radio phone-in counseling conversations. An analysis within the ideational metafunctioncombined with the notion of communicative projects describes how, in this specific case, the participants’ lexicogrammatical choices between a verb and a nominalform contributes in a critical way to a successful outcome of the ongoing counseling activity.

  • 23.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Österberg, Rakel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Foreign language provision at secondary level in Sweden2010In: Sociolinguistica: Internationales Jahrbuch fuer Europaeische Soziolinguistik, ISSN 0933-1883, E-ISSN 1865-939X, Vol. 24, p. 85-100Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Juvonen, Päivi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Articles, definite and indefinite2006In: Encyclopedia of language & linguistics. [Vol. 1], [A-Bil] / [ed] Editor-in-chief Keith Brown; co-ordinating editors Anne H. Anderson, Laurie Bauer, Margie Berns, Graeme Hirst, Jim Miller, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2006, 2. uppl., p. 484-487Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Juvonen, Päivi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Complexity and simplicity in minimal lexica: the lexicon of Chinook Jargon2008In: Language complexity: typology, contact, change / [ed] Matti Miestamo, Kaius Sinnemäki, Fred Karlsson, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2008, p. 321-340Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I examine the ways the minimal lexicon of a pidgin language, Chinook Jargon, gains maximal efficiency when put into use in a contemporary fictional text. The paper first describes the lexicon used from a structural point of view. It then examines the use of multifunctional lexical items in comparison to English. The results of these studies show, that 1) there is no bound morphology (neither derivational nor inflectional) in the variety studied and, 2) there is much more multifunctionality in the pidgin text than in the English texts. Finally, it is argued that the results show that the lexicon studied can indeed be described as simple and efficient.

  • 26.
    Juvonen, Päivi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Making do with minimal lexica: Light verb constructions with make/do in pidgin lexica2016In: The Lexical Typology of Semantic Shifts / [ed] Päivi Juvonen, Maria Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Mouton de Gruyter, 2016, p. 223-248Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most characteristic features of pidgin languages is the small size of their lexica. Normally, a pidgin makes do with less than 2000 common lexical items. How can one make do with so few words? The present study focuses on how pidgin lexica may allow for a systematic expansion of their minimal lexica by using a light verb meaning ‘make’ or ‘do’, or both, and investigates the polysemy that arises as a result of semantic shifts in 32 mostly unrelated pidgin varieties. The main results of the semantic analysis show that 1) two thirds of the analysed varieties make use of the light verb construction studied and, 2) those that make use of it are distributed all over the world, represent different combinations of languages in contact, favour effect metonymies and context metonymies over other types of semantic shifts and, use the construction to different degrees. These results are discussed mainly in terms of grammaticalization: in some of the languages the light verb make/do is argued to have become a verbaliser, in others, the constructions (if attested) are best described as conventionalised idiomatic expressions, i.e. verb idioms.

  • 27.
    Juvonen, Päivi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Nyanländ i den svenska skolan - om mottagning, utbildning och forskning2016In: Nordand: nordisk tidsskrift for andrespråksforskning, ISSN 0809-9227, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 93-114Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Juvonen, Päivi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Om bestämdhetsmarkering i svenska och finska: Har finskan en bestämd artikel?2000In: Denna - den här - den där: om demonstrativer i tvärspråklig belysning : en minnesskrift till Elsie Wijk-Andersson / [ed] Ulla Melander Marttala, Uppsala: ASLA , 2000, p. 57-92Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Juvonen, Päivi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    On the pragmatics of indefinite determiners in spoken Finnish2005In: Minimal reference: the use of pronouns in Finnish and Estonian discourse / [ed] Ritva Laury, Helsinki: Finnish Literature Society, 2005, p. 190-211Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Juvonen, Päivi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Så lika men ändå så olika. Om kanssa, kans och kaa i talad finska.2013In: Keelemees Raag Raimo 60. / [ed] Tiina Söderman, Tallinn: Eesti Keele Sihtasutus , 2013, p. 33-49Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Juvonen, Päivi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, MariaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    The Lexical Typology of Semantic Shifts2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The volume focuses on semantic shifts and motivation patterns in the lexicon. Its key feature is its lexico-typological orientation, i.e. a heavy emphasis on systematic cross-linguistic comparison. The book presents current theoretical and methodological trends in the study of semantic shifts and motivational patters based on an abundance of empirical findings across genetically, areally and typologically diverse languages.

  • 32.
    Juvonen, Päivi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Nikunlassi, Ahti
    Temperature adjectives in Finnish2015In: The Linguistics of Temperature / [ed] Maria Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2015, p. 491-536Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides a descriptive and theoretical account of Finnish temperature adjectives as a system consisting of a three-term core and a supplementary set. The former are unrestricted with respect to a number of grammatical and semantic parameters proposed in cross-linguistic and typological studies, whereas the latter have restricted availability in temperature subdomains or express additional semantic distinctions. In metaphorical uses of the adjectives, the base of semantic extensions is argued to be the culturally grounded emotional charge of positive or negative evaluation that gives rise to thermal preferences of different kinds of emotions. Metaphorical extensions not only involve changes in the argument structure of a term, but also significant increase in the use of syntactic frames with abstract situational semantics.

  • 33.
    Juvonen, Päivi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Viberg, Åke
    Tvåspråkighet i skolan: Användandet av konnektorer och lexikala val på finska och svenska - en tillbakablick2013In: Profession, politik och passion: Inger Lindberg som andraspråksforskare - en vänbok / [ed] Monica Axelsson, Marie Carlson, Qarin Franker, Karin Sandvall, Göteborg: Institutionen för svenska språket, Göteborgs universitet , 2013, p. 89-120Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Lindberg, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Fostering multilingualism in Swedish schools – intentions and realities2011In: Young Urban Swedish: Variation and change in multilingual settings / [ed] Roger Källström and Inger Lindberg, Gothenburg: Department of Swedish Language, University of Gothenburg , 2011, p. 149-172Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The continuous cast of ethnic and linguistic diversity in negative terms in Swedish schools reveals systematic mismatches between intended policies and everyday classroom practices. In this article, failures in terms of the implementation of language education policy are attributed to languagepolicies not being sufficiently attuned to the sociolinguistic realities in multilingual contexts and at the same time disregarding issues of power and identity. With reference to findings in critical, ethnographic research, it is suggested that strategic essentialism at a general policy level as well as linguicism as a manifestation of prevailing deficit ideologies at an institutional and individual level of practice may contribute to an unresolved tension between the official policy and local educational practices. It is concluded that a number of challenges remain to be addressed before the vision of equal access to linguistic resources in Swedish schools can be realized.

  • 35.
    Lindberg, Inger
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Sandwall, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education. Nationellt centrum för svenska som andraspråk.
    Conflicting Agendas in Swedish Adult Second Language Education2017In: Entangled discourses: Sout-North Orders of Visibility / [ed] Caroline Kerfoot, Kenneth Hyltenstam, New York: Routledge, 2017, p. 119-136Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 36. Lindqvist, Christina
    et al.
    Bardel, Camilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Exploring the Impact of the Proficiency and Typology Factors: Two Cases of Multilingual Learners' L3 Learning2014In: Essential Topics in Applied Linguistics and Multilingualism: Studies in Honor of David Singleton / [ed] Pawlak, M.; Aronin, L., Cham: Springer International Publishing AG , 2014, p. 253-266Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines lexical crosslinguistic influence (CLI) from L1 and L2 in two cases of L3 learning. It focuses on the role of the proficiency level of the background languages and of typological proximity in the activation of the background languages in L3 oral production. Earlier research has shown that both these factors play a role for CLI. Here we aim at further understanding the role of these factors, and how they are related to the proficiency level of the L3. The first case, which will be summarized briefly and used as a point of comparison in this chapter, concerns a Swedish learner of Italian L3, with English, French and Spanish as L2s (Bardel and Lindqvist 2007). The results showed that low-proficiency Spanish L2 was the background language that was most used in the beginning of the acquisition process of Italian, especially in code-switches of function words. High-proficiency French L2 was also used but in a different way, mostly in word construction attempts. Both the proficiency and the typology factor played a role, but their impact varied at different stages of development in the L3. The second case concerns a bilingual Swedish/Italian L1 speaker learning Spanish L3, with English and French as L2s. The data was gathered following the same procedure as in the first study, and consist of three recordings of interviews and retellings. The results indicate that the proficiency and typology factors are decisive for CLI here too, but in slightly different ways as compared to the first case. Italian L1 is used for both code-switches and word construction attempts, suggesting that a high-proficiency language may well be activated for both purposes, if it is similar enough to the target language. These results show that further investigation of both factors is necessary for our understanding of their interplay.

  • 37.
    Lubińska, Dorota
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Inte utan grammatik2016In: Lisetten, ISSN 1101-5128, no 3/4Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38.
    Magnusson, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Grammatical metaphor in Swedish monolingual and multilingual upper secondary school students' writing2013In: Functions of language, ISSN 0929-998X, E-ISSN 1569-9765, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 250-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This partly longitudinal study applies the theoretical framework of Systemic Functional Linguistics to second language writing to investigate the use of grammatical metaphor (GM; non-congruent realizations of meaning, e. g. nominalizations) in 365 texts written by Swedish mono- and multilingual students in grades 9 and 11. According to the analysis, older students and monolingual students make greater use of GM than younger students and multilingual students. Multilingual students with early and late ages of onset use GM more than multilingual students with onset ages between these two extremes. A relation was found between the occurrence of GM and the use of the potential functions of GM, e. g. expansion of the nominal phrase, which was used more frequently in texts with a higher GM density, contributing to the construction of specialized, educational knowledge. The occurrence of GM was compared to the occurrence of L2 deviations in a subcorpus. These results are interpreted in relation to the Interdependence Hypothesis formulated by Cummins (1979).

  • 39.
    Nilsson, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Target Langauge in the Primary Classroom: Teachers' beliefs and practices2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In spite of a monolingual norm in foreign language teaching during the last decades studies throughout the world show that teachers’ target language use varies significantly. This study sets out to examine to what extent the target language (TL) is used with young language learners and how this use correlates to teachers’ beliefs about foreign language teaching and first language (L1) inclusion. Moreover the paper discusses functions for L1 use and strategies used by teachers to support comprehension in the TL. Lesson observations and qualitative interviews were performed with four Swedish primary school class teachers. Despite the prevailing idea of exclusive TL use three of the four teachers do not subscribe to this approach and find L1 inclusion necessary. An emerging theme is the impact of teachers’ beliefs and how these are shaped by personal experience and/or education. L1 is legitimized in order to support comprehension and prevent pupils’ frustration. To varying degrees the L1 is used, mostly to facilitate learning but also for classroom management. The data suggests that teachers are well aware of their language use although they lack awareness and professional language to describe and be articulate about strategies they employ.

  • 40.
    Olofsson, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Symposium 2012: lärarollen i svenska som andraspråk2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Antologin innehåller 14 artiklar som på olika sätt speglar lärarrollen i svenska som andraspråk och de frågor som man möter som lärare i dagens mångspråkiga skola.

  • 41.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Rosén, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education. Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Translanguaging and Education: New perspectives from the field2017In: AAAL, Portland 2017: ON-SITE PROGRAM, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The colloquium “Translanguaging and Education: New perspectives from the field” is comprised of recent research that is included in the forthcoming volume with the same name (Multilingual Matters). While studies of translanguaging in bilingual, immersion, heritage, and minority education have become more widespread in recent years, much of the current research centers on contexts in which one of the languages is English and the others are minority or heritage languages. This colloquium, however, contributes to an understanding of diversity in European schools, in which languages other than English are in focus. We include three of the eleven empirical studies in the volume from diverse European school settings (France, Belgium, and Sweden), allowing for an exploration of multilingual educational issues of today.

     

    With an aim to stimulate an active discussion on the notion of translanguaging as applied in current educational research, the emphasis will be on the possibilities the concept offers as both a theoretical lens for educational research and as a pedagogy in the classroom, as seen in the three papers. The first paper presents a study of how a French pre-school teacher creates safe spaces through translanguaging with emergent bilingual learners in a multilingual classroom of three- and four-year-old children. The second paper offers comparative case studies from two diverse elementary school classrooms in Belgium, with an investigation into how translanguaging practices may provide pedagogical scaffolding for learning. The third paper presents a comparative study of language practices in Swedish mother tongue instruction (state-funded teaching of minority languages) and the ideologies expressed by the mother tongue teachers, offering a discussion of pedagogical translanguaging. To conclude the colloquium, we will open the floor for a discussion of the applicability of the concept of translanguaging in educational research in diverse settings. 

  • 42.
    Philipsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Svenskans morfologi och syntax i ett andraspråksperspektiv2013In: Svenska som andraspråk: i forskning, undervisning och samhälle / [ed] Kenneth Hyltenstam och Inger Lindberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 2, p. 121-150Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Reath Warren, Anne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Developing multilingual literacies in Sweden and Australia: Opportunities and challenges in mother tongue instruction and multilingual study guidance in Sweden and community language education in Australia2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis aims to learn about opportunities for and challenges to the development of multilingual literacies in three forms of education in Sweden and Australia that teach or draw on immigrant languages.  In Sweden mother tongue instruction and multilingual study guidance are in focus and in Australia, a community language school. Taking an ecological approach to the research sites, the thesis investigates how language ideologies, organization of the form of education and language practices impact on the development of multilingual literacies. A range of linguistic ethnographic data including 75 lesson observations, 48 interviews, field notes and photographs has been analyzed against the theoretical backdrop of the continua of biliteracy (Hornberger, 1989; Hornberger & Skilton-Sylvester, 2000), heteroglossia (Bakhtin, 1981) and emerging theories of translanguaging (García & Li, 2014) to investigate the questions. The thesis ties together the results of four interlocking case studies investigating the above-mentioned forms of education.

    Study I analyses the syllabus for mother tongue instruction in Sweden and finds that while aligning with the overall values of the curriculum for the compulsory school, a hidden curriculum constrains implementation. In Study II, multilingual practices during multilingual study guidance in Sweden are analysed, and demonstrate how translanguaging helps recently arrived students reach the learning goals of subjects in the Swedish curriculum. In study III, systematic analysis of indexicals reveals contrasting language narratives about language and language development in and around a Vietnamese community language school in Australia. Study IV focuses on mother tongue instruction in Sweden and through analysis of audio-recordings of lessons, interviews and field notes, finds three dimensions of linguistic diversity infuse the subject. 

    Opportunities for the development of multilingual literacies are created when there is equal access to spaces for developing literacies in different immigrant languages, within which language ideologies that recognize and build on the heteroglossic diversity of students’ linguistic repertoires dynamically inform the organization of education and classroom practices. Challenges are created when monoglossic ideologies restrict access to or ignore linguistic diversity and when there is a lack of dynamic engagement with implementation and organization. Basing organization, and classroom strategies around the linguistic reality of the students and the genres they need, benefits the development of multilingual literacies in both settings and can help students become resourceful language users (Pennycook, 2012b, 2014).

  • 44.
    Reath Warren, Anne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Heteroglossia in mother tongue instruction in Sweden and the development of multilingual literaciesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses connections between linguistic diversity in mother tongue instruction (MTI) in Sweden and the learning aims of the subject. Linguistic ethnographic data collected over 12 months in 13 schools were thematically analyzed into three heteroglossic categories which were then interpreted through the continua of biliteracy to investigate what relationships could be traced between linguistic diversity in MTI, heteroglossia and the development of multilingual literacies in the setting. Results show that MTI policies and planning respond to linguistic heterogeneity in the context. Heteroglossic discursive practices and diverse linguistic repertoires are reported on and observed in the MT classrooms. While heteroglossia is viewed as a resource for learning in some situations, in others it is regarded as an obstacle.  These results contribute to discussions on organizational and pedagogical approaches that work with rather than against heteroglossia, to enhance learning in MTI and potentially other forms of multilingual education. 

  • 45.
    Roberts, Leah
    et al.
    Max Planck Institute of Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Lindqvist, ChristinaInst för moderna språk, Uppsala universitet.Bardel, CamillaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.Abrahamsson, NiclasStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    EUROSLA Yearbook 12 (2012)2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Rosén, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    New speakers in a multilingual Sweden: Policy in practice2017In: 11th ISB: 2017 International Symposium on Bilingualism, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is a multilingual country: in 2014, 23.8% of students in compulsory schools spoke languages in addition to Swedish. Over 160,000 individuals applied for asylum in Sweden in 2015 many of them children aged 7-16 with the right to education during the asylum-seeking process (Swedish Migration Agency, 2016). While Sweden has educational policies and programs in place to meet the needs of multilingual students, the exceptional numbers of recent arrivals has been a challenge to the educational system. In view of the changing linguistic landscape in educational settings, the aim of this colloquium is to critically analyze how new speakers in a range of educational contexts in Sweden are constructed in policy and practice.

    To frame the four studies, the colloquium begins with a presentation of language and education in the Swedish context. Following this, the first paper examines compulsory school teacher education, specifically researching how teachers are prepared to meet increasingly diverse student populations. The study considers the perspectives of teacher educators and pre-service teachers in order to understand the ideological and implementational spaces afforded multilingualism in teacher training policies. The second paper explores tensions between conceptualizations and regulations framing languages as "mother tongues" and approaches to teaching Kurdish through the subject of mother tongue instruction to children in lower secondary school. The findings contribute to understandings of the new and traditional speaker dichotomy—a relevant issue in research on heritage or multilingual language education in all contexts. The third paper focuses on other new speakers in a Swedish primary school, namely language minority students enrolled in an English-Swedish bilingual program. As new speakers of both languages of instruction, these students may encounter particular challenges with academic content learning. However, results reveal how students resist language separation policies and legitimize their own language practices in the classroom. Finally, the fourth paper moves the focus to literacy education for adult immigrants. The study utilizes a critical sociocultural perspective on literacy and language learning to investigate how the “illiterate learner” is constructed in Swedish adult education policy and how the conceptualization is subsequently related to understandings of these new speakers as the Other. With our presentations ranging from primary school to adult education, we expand the view of the new speaker, by exploring categorizations and conceptualizations of new speakers and their language practices in Sweden. 

    To conclude, the discussant will consider the themes presented by the four papers, focusing on the ways these empirical studies shed light on the range of issues surrounding new speakers in the Swedish context. This conceptual discussion will be briefly compared to similar challenges and possibilities in other contexts before we open the floor for a dialogue amongst the participating audience and the presenting speakers.

  • 47.
    Sandberg, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Cognition and communication in multilingual education: case studies from content and language integrated learning in the Swedish upper secondary school2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Sánchez, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Against ‘Canonical Word Order’: Evidence of basic word order transfer at the initial stage of LnA2011In: Newcastle Working Papers in Linguistics, ISSN 2041-1057, Vol. 17, p. 220-236Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Sánchez, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    An inquiry into the role of L3 proficiency on crosslinguistic influence in third language acquisition2014In: Odisea. Revista de Estudios Ingleses, ISSN 1578-3820, Vol. 15, p. 169-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the rise of multilingualism, studies have proliferated that investigate the interaction of the different languages. The study presented here sets out to examine the role that proficiency plays on the occurrence of a specific interaction, namely interlanguage transfer from a prior non–native language (L2 German) upon another non–native language (L3 English) at the level of syntax in Spanish/ Catalan bilinguals. Data were collected from 80 learners of L3 English who were at different proficiency levels (as indicated by a 30-item cloze test), while data for the analysis of transfer was elicited using a story telling task. Statistical tests revealed significant differences across proficiency levels, i.e. low and pre–intermediate (p= .032), low and intermediate levels (p= .000), and pre–intermediate and intermediate levels (p= .018).

  • 50.
    Sánchez, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    An insight into the relationship between proficiency and crosslinguistic influence in third language acquisition2014Conference paper (Other academic)
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