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  • 1.
    Alm-Arvius, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Universal and Language-specific Components of Metaphors: An analysis of the Swedish compounds folkhemmet, ‘the people’s home’, and klassresa, ‘class journey’2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation examines two lexicalised compounds in Swedish with at least basically metaphorical senses connected with the Swedish Social Democratic vision and attempted practical construction of a modern egalitarian welfare state: folkhemmet: ‘’the people’s home’ and klassresa: ‘class journey’.

    We are going to consider the experiential and conceptual grounding of the compounds folkhemmet and klassresa i) within a specific, Swedish cultural and ideological discourse complex as well as in relation to ii) a set of presumably universal meaning dimensions or functions, and iii) some embodied, also presumably universal image schemas.

  • 2.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    English as a lingua franca and the international university: Language policy rhetoric and ground reality2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Morphosyntactic Variation in Spoken English as a Lingua Franca (ELF): Revisiting linguistic variety2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is now well-known that in ELF settings, we have complex language contact situations with high linguistic heterogeneity. The linguistic diversity present in ELF settings naturally manifests itself in several areas, including variation in morphosyntactic use. While the conventional wisdom has been that non-standardness is associated with a speaker’s L1, ELF research has shown repeatedly that this variation is not (solely) due to speakers’ L1 backgrounds (e.g. author, 2013a and 2013b; Ranta, 2013), and that there are too many non-standard forms shared by a wide spectrum of L1s that may be considered commonalities. ELF research has revealed several processes of syntactic variation in ELF usage, such as reducing redundancy (e.g. ‘not marking the plural on the noun’, author 2013a), and creating extra explicitness (e.g. ‘unraised negation’ in author 2013a; see Schneider, 2012 for an overview of the processes of variation). When it comes to morphology, similar trends have been observed (author, 2013a), namely non-standard word forms with semantic transparency (e.g. discriminization, levelize), analytic comparatives (e.g. more narrow), and non-standard plurals (e.g. how many energy). The present paper focuses on morphosyntactic variation in 15 hours of naturally-occurring speech from a Swedish higher education setting and reports research conducted by the author (2013a, b and in preparation) where s/he approaches variation in ELF with reference to the World Englishes (WE) paradigm, Second Language Acquisition (SLA) and creole studies. Included in the discussion are other ELF studies on grammatical variation (e.g. Ranta, 2013). Following major studies that problematize variation and variability in ELF usage (e.g. Ferguson, 2009; Schneider, 2012; Seidlhofer, 2009), the present paper aims to offer new perspectives on the theoretical construct of ‘variety’. The paper also argues that WE and ELF paradigms have much to gain from each other (see Seidlhofer, 2009) while addressing the sociolinguistic realities of the world today.

  • 4.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    PhD supervisor and supervisee interactions as a spoken academic genre: Genre features, power issues and linguistic competence2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    PhD supervisor-supervision interactions in an English as a Lingua Franca (ELF) setting: genre features and ways of expressing disagreement2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Eriksson, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Grabe, Esther
    Traunmüller, Hartmut
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Perception of syllable prominence by listeners with and without competence in the tested language2002In: Proceedings of the Speech Prosody 2002 Conference, 2002, p. 275-278Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    In an experiment reported previously, subjects rated perceived syllable prominence in a Swedish utterance produced by ten speakers at various levels of vocal effort. The analysis showed that about half of the variance could be accounted for by acoustic factors. Slightly more than half could be accounted for by linguistic factors. Here, we report two additional ex-periments. In the first, we attempted to eliminate the linguistic factors by repeating the Swedish listening experiment with English listeners who had no knowledge of Swedish. In the second, we investigated the prominence pattern Swedish sub-jects expect by presenting the utterance only in written form. The results from these subjects and from the Swedish listeners were very similar but for two of the syllables where the promi-nence pattern did not coincide with the expectations of the readers. Swedish and English listeners perceived the promi-nence of the syllables to be almost identical in most cases, but where there was a conflict between expected and produced prominence, the Swedish listeners appeared to be influenced by their expectations. There was also a difference in the weights the Swedish and English listeners attached to different acoustic cues in the listening experiments.

  • 7.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Gestures and gestures in child language development2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The underlying question in most work on gestures is how the relation between gesture and speech should be understood. This is also the fundamental question in this presentation, where focus is on children’s gestures in relation to language development and socialization.

    Gesture studies on adult interaction tend to divide gestural movements into various kinds depending on their assumed relation to spoken language. The group of gestures which have received most attention in the scientific world is the so called “co-speech gestures”, i.e. hand- and arm movements that occur simultaneously with speech and that are integrated temporally and semantically with the verbal utterance (Kendon, 1981, 2004; McNeill, 1992, 2005).

    In child language studies, the term co-speech gestures is not used as frequently, although the gestures actually described tend to be within that domain, e.g. the deictic pointing gesture co-occurring with “there” (Tomasello et al.,2007; Rowe et al.,2008). Other child gestures receiving attention are the more pragmatically oriented “grab/reach gesture” or emblematic gestures like “nodding”, “waving goodbye”, etc. (e.g., Bates et al., 1975). Although humans remain children for quite some time the majority of child-gesture studies end when the children reach the vocabulary spurt (around the second birthday). A likely reason is that the questions posed relate to the transition from pre-language to language and the role played by gestural behavior in this developmental interval.

    The presentation builds on a study taking the child gestures one step further by allowing the gesture definition to be wider (including in this term movements of the whole body), and the age span studied to go beyond the first two years. The material is longitudinal and consists of child-child and child-adult interaction between the ages 1 to 6. There are 11 children in the study, belonging to five families and they were recorded in their homes regularly during 2 ½ years. The data (in all 22 h) where transcribed and annotated using the ELAN software. The annotations of gestural behavior were categorized according to age of the child, interactional partner (child/adult), setting, activity/semantic theme, and concurrent speech/vocalizations.

    In the presentation, main focus will be on two groups of gestural behavior in particular: co-speech gestures and co-activity speech. Whereas the former is an established term (se above), the latter is the term I have been using to describe speech-gesture combinations where the vocalizations seem to be redundant or at least second in priority, for example the utterances made while going through the motions of ritualized and mainly gestural play (e.g., “pat-a-cake”, “peek-a-boo”, “hide-and-seek”). The differences between these two classes of gestural behavior will be illustrated, described, and related to language development, cognitive growth, and socialization patterns. Ending the talk the fundamental question of speech-gesture relation will be addressed and a developmental path including the described gestural forms will be sketched out.

  • 8.
    Gerholm, Tove
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Pagmar, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The MINT-project: Modeling infant language acquisition from parent-child interction2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Grigonyté, Gintaré
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Kvist, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Velupillai, Sumithra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Wirén, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Spelling Variation of Latin and Greek words in Swedish Medical Text2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Hörberg, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Incremental syntactic prediction in the comprehension of Swedish2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Comprehenders need to incrementally integrate incoming input with previously processed material. Constraint-based and probabilistic theories of language understanding hold that comprehenders do this by drawing on implicit knowledge about the statistics of the language signal, as observed in their previous experience. I test this prediction against the processing of grammatical relations in Swedish transitive sentences, combining corpus-based modeling and a self-paced reading experiment.

    Grammatical relations are often assumed to express role-semantic (e.g., Actor and Undergoer) and discourse-related (such as topic and focus) functions that are encoded on the basis of a systematic interplay between morphosyntactic (e.g., case and word order), semantic / referential (e.g., animacy and definiteness) and verb semantic (e.g., volitionality and sentience) information. Constraint-based and probabilistic theories predict that these information types serve as cues in the process of assigning functions to the argument NPs during language comprehension. The weighting, interplay and availability of these cues vary across languages but do so in systematic ways. For example, languages with fixed word orders tend to have less morphological marking of grammatical relations than languages with less rigid word order restrictions. The morphological marking of grammatical relations is also in many languages restricted to NP arguments which are non-prototypical or marked in terms of semantic or referential properties, given their functions (overt case marking of objects is, e.g., restricted to personal pronouns in English and Swedish). I first assess how these factors affect constituent order (i.e. the order of grammatical relations) in a corpus of Swedish and then test whether comprehenders use the statistical information contained in these cues.

    Corpus study. The distribution of SVO and OVS orders conditional on semantic / referential (e.g., animacy and givenness), morphosyntactic (e.g., case) and verb semantic (e.g. volitionality) information was calculated on the basis of 16552 transitive sentences, extracted from a syntactically annotated corpus of Swedish. Three separate mixed logistic regression models were fit to derive the incremental predictions that a simulated comprehender with experience in Swedish would have after seeing the sentence up to and including the first NP (model 1), the verb (model 2), or the second NP (model 3). The regression models provide separate estimates of the objective probability of SVO vs. OVS word order at each point in the sentence. This information was used to design stimuli for a self-paced reading experiment to test whether comprehenders draw on this objectively present information in the input.

    Self-paced reading experiment. 45 participants read transitive sentences that varied with respect to word order (SVO vs. OVS), NP1 animacy (animate vs. inanimate) and verb class (volitional vs. experiencer).  By-region reading times were well-described by the region-by-region shifts in the probability of SVO vs. OVS word order, calculated as the relative entropy. For example, reading times in the NP2 region observed in locally ambiguous, object-initial sentences were mitigated when the animacy of NP1 and its interaction with the verb class bias towards an object-initial word order, as predicted by the constraint-based and probabilistic theories.

  • 11. Jantunen, Tommi
    et al.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Börstell, Carl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    GIVE or TAKE: Transitivity prominence of Finnish Sign Language and Swedish Sign Language verbs2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we apply methodology presented in Kimmelman (2016) and investigate the transitivityprominence of verbs in Finnish Sign Language (FinSL) and Swedish Sign Language (SSL). Specifically,we ask how similar or different FinSL and SSL verbs are in terms of their transitivity prominence,and how the transitivity prominence of FinSL and SSL verbs compares with that of verbs inother languages. The term transitivity prominence refers to the relative frequency with which a verboccurs with an object. Haspelmath (2015) has shown that in spoken languages, verbs form a rankedcontinuum between those that are highly transitivity prominent and those that occur with no objectat all. Recently, Kimmelman (2016) has argued that Haspelmath's ranking applies also to the verbsof Russian Sign Language (RSL).Our investigation is based on annotated corpus data comprising narratives, conversations andpresentations. For FinSL, we use material from 20 signers (2h 40min, 18446 sign tokens) and forSSL from 28 signers (1h 54min, 15186 sign tokens). From this data, we identified 18 verb lexemeswhich all have enough tokens and which are all comparable between languages. In FinSL, the totalnumber of verb tokens is 745 and in SSL the corresponding number is 579. All the verbs were annotatedfor overt direct and indirect objects and for overt clausal complements. The annotation workwas carried out by different annotators following common guidelines.Concerning the results, our data suggests that there are clear similarities in what verbs rankhighest (e.g. GIVE, TAKE) and what lowest (e.g. HAPPY, COLD) in terms of their transitivity prominencein FinSL and SSL. On the basis of Haspelmath (2015) and Kimmelman (2016), these are thesame verbs that are ranked highest and lowest also in spoken languages and in RSL (Table 1).However, the data also shows that certain verbs (e.g. SEARCH, TALK, PLAY) may differ considerablyin the position they occupy in the ranking. Although some of these differences can be assumed to betrue differences between languages, we suspect that some may, despite our best efforts, be traceableback to issues relating to the type of data as well as to the way the samples were formed and objectsannotated. In our presentation, we will present the results of our comparative study and discuss thedata and methodology-related issues in more detail.

  • 12. Johannessen, Janne Bondi
    et al.
    Larsson, Ida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Nominal agreement in attrition2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Jon-And, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Aguilar, Elliot
    Modelling contact-induced language change in Angolan Portuguese2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Jon-And, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Developing a pidgin corpus2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Jon-And, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Funcke, Alexander
    Word Length and word frequency in pidgins and creoles2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Jon-And, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Reite, Torun
    A direção da mudança linguística no português de Maputo: Dados diacrônicos de uma situação de contato2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Jon-And, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Högskolan Dalarna, Sverige.
    Álvarez López, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Helmer, Michelle
    Cardenas, Kirenia
    Concordância variável de número no português de Cabinda: efeitos de uso e aquisição2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Koptjevskaja Tamm, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Introducing the panel: what can be meant by areal semantics?2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the panel is to initiate a discussion on which lexico-semantic phenomena show parallells across the (West-)African languages and how these similarities may be described and accounted for – by universal tendencies, genetic relations among the languages, their contacts and/or their common extra-linguistic surrounding. Areal semantics (Ameka & Wilkins 1996, Koptjevskaja-Tamm & Liljegren forthc.), in its concern with the diffusion of semantic features across language boundaries in a geographical area, is a potentially vast field, spanning the convergence of individual lexemes, through the structuring of entire semantic domains to the organization of complete lexicons. It has a great potential for historical and areal linguistics, but is still awaiting systematic research. Lexical phenomena have a long standing record in research on language contact and linguistic areas. However, the recent developments in areal linguistics and areal typology have, with a few exceptions, mainly concerned grammatical phenomena. This is not at all surprising given the central place of this research in modern linguistics of all denominations, including typology, where the rapidly developing field of areal typology has encouraged and facilitated serious research on the relative role of universal, genetic and areal factors for many grammatical and phonetic phenomena. The two traditionally distinguished groups of contact phenomena in the lexicon are loanwords and calques, or semantic loans – the distinction paralleled by contact phenomena at other levels (‘replication of matter’ vs. ‘pattern replication’ in Matras and Sakel 2007, also Croft's 2000 distinction between ‘substance linguemes’ and ‘schematic linguemes’ and Heine and Kuteva's 2005 ‘polysemy copying’). Loanwords have been studied from a more systematic cross-linguistic perspective, where the core issue has been the varying borrowability of various words, seen as belonging to different parts of speech and/or coming from different semantic domains (cf. Haspelmath and Tadmor eds. 2009, Wohlgemuth 2009). The interesting research angles here, as elsewhere in research on contact phenomena and in (areal-)typological research (cf. Koptjevskaja-Tamm 2011) are possible outcomes of language contact in the realm of the lexicon, on the one hand, and a possibility of using lexical phenomena for reconstructing contact, on the other. But a lexical-typological contribution to areal linguistics has an even greater potential when it comes to pattern replication rather than to replication of matter. To give one example, Hayward (1991, 2000, also Treis 2010) points out many shared lexicalization patterns in the three Ethiopian languages Amharic (Semitic), Oromo (Cushitic) and Gamo (Omotic), which add to the cumulative evidence in favour of the Ethio-Erithrean linguistic area and fall into four categories: (i) shared semantic specializations, e.g. ‘die without ritual slaughter (of cattle)’;  (ii) shared polysemy, e.g. ‘draw water’ – ‘copy’; (iii) shared derivational pathways, e.g. ‘need’ = causative of ‘want’: (iv) shared ideophones and idioms, e.g., ‘I caught a cold’ expressed via ‘a cold caught me’. Matisoff (2004), Vanhove (ed. 2008), Zalizniak et al. (2012) and Urban (2012) give numerous examples of cross-linguistically recurrent patterns of polysemy (e.g., ‘eat’ –> ‘suffer’), some of which are clearly areally restricted and witness of language contact, whereas others rather reflect universal tendencies.

  • 19.
    Larsson, Ida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Perfects, perfectives and participles - pieces of a puzzle2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Larsson, Ida
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Johannessen, Janne Bondi
    Verb placement in Incomplete Acquisition2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Larsson, Ida
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Svenonius, Peter
    English and Scandinavian participles at the syntax-morphology interface2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Larsson, Ida
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Svenonius, Peter
    Phases and Categories in Passive and Perfect Participles2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Lindström, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Gender in Kuot, an East Papuan Isolate2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Lockwood, Hunter
    et al.
    Eastern Michigan University.
    Vejdemo, Susanne
    Eastern Michigan University.
    Talking about Temperature in Anishinaabemowin2010In: Proceedings from the Thirteenth Workshop on American Indigenous Languages, University College of Santa Barbara, 2010, p. 97-114Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25. Lockwood, Hunter
    et al.
    Vejdemo, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    There is no thermostat in the forest - the semantics and sociolinguistics of temperature in Ojibwe2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Mesch, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Wallin, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    From meaning to signs and back:Lexicography and the Swedish Sign Language Corpus2012In: Proceedings of the 5th Workshop on the Representation and Processing of Sign Languages: Interactions between Corpus and Lexicon., 2012, p. 123-126Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we will present the advantages of having a reference dictionary, and how having a corpus makes dictionary making easier and more effective. It also gives a new perspective on sign entries in the dictionary, for example, if a sign uses one or two hands, or which meaning “genuine signs” have, and it helps find a model for categorization of polysynthetic signs that is not found in the dictionary. Categorizing glosses in the corpus work has compelled us to revisit the dictionary to add signs from the corpus that are not already in the dictionary and to improve sign entries already in the dictionary based on insights that have been gained while working on the corpus.

  • 27.
    Miestamo, Matti
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Koponen, Eino
    Negation in Skolt Saami2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Simulating the genesis of Mauritian2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A simple computer simulation addresses some of the most basic issues in creole formation. Mauritius is chosen as the testing ground because of its uniquely well documented settlement history. The outcome of the simulation is compared to the actual product of the language contact situation, i. e. Mauritian Creole. The questions dealt with are the following: Were slaves trying to acquire the lexifier? How fast did the new language emerge? Did it develop from a pidgin? To what extent are the features of the creole drawn from the languages in contact?

  • 29.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Preparing teachers to meet linguistic diversity in the Swedish compulsory school2017In: 11th ISB: 2017 International Symposium on Bilingualism, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Swedish compulsory school today, at least 140 languages are spoken by students—a situation entailing both challenges and opportunities for teachers. This paper presents an investigation of how teachers are prepared to meet these students, who may be either newly arrived and fairly new speakers of Swedish or students born in Sweden with other languages at home. The focus is on how ideological and implementational spaces for supporting linguistic diversity in the classroom are created and accessed in pre-service teacher training. First, the national curriculum for the compulsory school as well as the education plans and syllabi of obligatory pre-service teacher training courses were analysed, with an aim to identity spaces for multilingualism in these educational policies. Second, a study of teacher educators and pre-service teachers from four national universities was conducted, with semi-structured interviews to elicit their perspectives and experiences. The results reveal a lack of explicit emphasis in the national curriculum on students as a diverse population, with ideological spaces for multilingualism only implicit. Likewise, teacher educators and pre-service teachers generally feel that preparation for how to support linguistic diversity in the mainstream classroom is deficient in teacher education and could be afforded greater attention. With a lack of clear directives in policy and a lack of focus in pre-service training, there are risks of inconsistent interpretation and implementation of practices supporting linguistic diversity in the compulsory school.

     

  • 30.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Rosén, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education. Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Translanguaging and Education: New perspectives from the field2017In: AAAL, Portland 2017: ON-SITE PROGRAM, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The colloquium “Translanguaging and Education: New perspectives from the field” is comprised of recent research that is included in the forthcoming volume with the same name (Multilingual Matters). While studies of translanguaging in bilingual, immersion, heritage, and minority education have become more widespread in recent years, much of the current research centers on contexts in which one of the languages is English and the others are minority or heritage languages. This colloquium, however, contributes to an understanding of diversity in European schools, in which languages other than English are in focus. We include three of the eleven empirical studies in the volume from diverse European school settings (France, Belgium, and Sweden), allowing for an exploration of multilingual educational issues of today.

     

    With an aim to stimulate an active discussion on the notion of translanguaging as applied in current educational research, the emphasis will be on the possibilities the concept offers as both a theoretical lens for educational research and as a pedagogy in the classroom, as seen in the three papers. The first paper presents a study of how a French pre-school teacher creates safe spaces through translanguaging with emergent bilingual learners in a multilingual classroom of three- and four-year-old children. The second paper offers comparative case studies from two diverse elementary school classrooms in Belgium, with an investigation into how translanguaging practices may provide pedagogical scaffolding for learning. The third paper presents a comparative study of language practices in Swedish mother tongue instruction (state-funded teaching of minority languages) and the ideologies expressed by the mother tongue teachers, offering a discussion of pedagogical translanguaging. To conclude the colloquium, we will open the floor for a discussion of the applicability of the concept of translanguaging in educational research in diverse settings. 

  • 31.
    Premat, Christophe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Le langage des mythes: analyse de la gouvernance mémorielle en France2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Rosén, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    New speakers in a multilingual Sweden: Policy in practice2017In: 11th ISB: 2017 International Symposium on Bilingualism, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is a multilingual country: in 2014, 23.8% of students in compulsory schools spoke languages in addition to Swedish. Over 160,000 individuals applied for asylum in Sweden in 2015 many of them children aged 7-16 with the right to education during the asylum-seeking process (Swedish Migration Agency, 2016). While Sweden has educational policies and programs in place to meet the needs of multilingual students, the exceptional numbers of recent arrivals has been a challenge to the educational system. In view of the changing linguistic landscape in educational settings, the aim of this colloquium is to critically analyze how new speakers in a range of educational contexts in Sweden are constructed in policy and practice.

    To frame the four studies, the colloquium begins with a presentation of language and education in the Swedish context. Following this, the first paper examines compulsory school teacher education, specifically researching how teachers are prepared to meet increasingly diverse student populations. The study considers the perspectives of teacher educators and pre-service teachers in order to understand the ideological and implementational spaces afforded multilingualism in teacher training policies. The second paper explores tensions between conceptualizations and regulations framing languages as "mother tongues" and approaches to teaching Kurdish through the subject of mother tongue instruction to children in lower secondary school. The findings contribute to understandings of the new and traditional speaker dichotomy—a relevant issue in research on heritage or multilingual language education in all contexts. The third paper focuses on other new speakers in a Swedish primary school, namely language minority students enrolled in an English-Swedish bilingual program. As new speakers of both languages of instruction, these students may encounter particular challenges with academic content learning. However, results reveal how students resist language separation policies and legitimize their own language practices in the classroom. Finally, the fourth paper moves the focus to literacy education for adult immigrants. The study utilizes a critical sociocultural perspective on literacy and language learning to investigate how the “illiterate learner” is constructed in Swedish adult education policy and how the conceptualization is subsequently related to understandings of these new speakers as the Other. With our presentations ranging from primary school to adult education, we expand the view of the new speaker, by exploring categorizations and conceptualizations of new speakers and their language practices in Sweden. 

    To conclude, the discussant will consider the themes presented by the four papers, focusing on the ways these empirical studies shed light on the range of issues surrounding new speakers in the Swedish context. This conceptual discussion will be briefly compared to similar challenges and possibilities in other contexts before we open the floor for a dialogue amongst the participating audience and the presenting speakers.

  • 33.
    Sandberg, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Cognition and communication in multilingual education: case studies from content and language integrated learning in the Swedish upper secondary school2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Schönström, Krister
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Swedish as a Second Language for the Deaf.
    Adaptation of a sign language test into Swedish Sign Language2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Schönström, Krister
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Swedish as a Second Language for the Deaf.
    Adaptation of sign language tests2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Sundkvist, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Pulmonic ingressive speech: Shetland Scots and Tohono O’odham compared2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Sundkvist, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Gao, Man
    Pulmonic ingressive speech in Orkney Scots2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Sundkvist, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Gao, Man
    Tracing syllable structure through time: Durational reflexes of complementary quantity in Shetland Scots2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Sánchez, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    An insight into the relationship between proficiency and crosslinguistic influence in third language acquisition2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Van Meerbergen, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages, Dutch.
    Dutch Picture Books in Swedish Translation: Towards a model for multimodal analysis2009In: Translation and the (Trans)formation of Identities.: Selected Papers of the CETRA Research Seminar in Translation Studies 2008. / [ed] De Crom, Dries, Leuven: CETRA , 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper considers the translation of picture books. It explores how multimodal analysis as proposed by Kress & Van Leeuwen (2006) can be integrated into a descriptive model for translation analysis as proposed by Toury (1995). As picture book texts combine both visual and verbal means of expression, a study of the two semiotic modes must be included in a translation analysis of these texts. Because translated picture books are printed in coproduction, visual text components of the source text are combined with new verbal components in the target text. It has been argued that the co-printing of picture books leads to an amalgamate market avoiding culture-specific elements in the images. This view however only takes into consideration the physical appearance of the images and thus ignores the semiotic content that these images get when placed within the context of a text. By using a multimodal analysis as part of a translation analysis not only the changing semiotic interplay between the verbal and the visual can be studied, it also allows the study of how the semiotic content of images changes when placed into a new textual and socio-cultural context.

  • 41.
    Vejdemo, Susanne
    Eastern Michigan University.
    How do semantic categories influence rates of cross-linguistic lexical change?2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42. Vejdemo, Susanne
    The changing nature of Swedish GIRLs -“ report on a corpus study on lexical change: Presentation at the Annual Meeting of the Michigan Linguistic Society2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Vejdemo, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    To Database Meaning: Building the Typological Database of Temperature Terms2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Vejdemo, Susanne
    et al.
    Eastern Michigan University.
    Wicks, Erica
    Eastern Michigan University.
    Yat Pinde Tat Brahmande’ Searching for a Proto-Indo-European basis for the humoral systems of Hippocrates and the Ayurveda through historical linguistics2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Lexicalization of Negative Senses: A Crosslinguistic Study2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Standard and Special Negators in the Uralic Languages2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Wallin, Lars
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Swedish sign language corpus2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Álvarez López, Laura
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Jon-And, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Language Attitudes in Contact Settings: data from speakers of Portuguese and Bantu languages in Cabinda, Angola2015Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 48 of 48
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