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  • 1.
    Agbetsoamedo, Yvonne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics. University of Ghana, Ghana.
    Di Garbo, Francesca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Sɛlɛɛ2015In: Edinburgh handbook of evaluative morphology / [ed] Nicola Grandi, Livia Kortvelyessy, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2015, p. 487-495Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Agbetsoamedo, Yvonne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics. University of Ghana, Ghana.
    Di Garbo, Francesca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Unravelling temperature terms in Sɛlɛɛ2015In: The linguistics of temperature / [ed] Maria Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2015, p. 107-127Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the encoding of temperature in Sɛlɛɛ, a Niger-Congo language of the Kwa group, spoken in Ghana. The lexicon of temperature in Sɛlɛɛ consists of six central and two non-central temperature terms, distributed among the word classes of nouns, adjectives and verbs. The grammatical constructions associated with temperature evaluation vary according to the word-class status of each temperature term and its contexts of use. The distribution of the different grammatical constructions according to different types of temperature evaluation is discussed in the paper. Metaphorical uses of temperature-related terms are also discussed in the context of neighbouring and highly related languages. Finally, special patterns of temperature evaluation in connection with water are surveyed.

  • 3. Bakker, Peter
    et al.
    Daval-Markussen, Aymeric
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Plag, Ingo
    Creoles are typologically distinct from non-creoles2013In: Creole languages and linguistic typology / [ed] Parth Bhatt, Tonjes Veenstra, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2013, p. 9-45Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Bergqvist, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Intersubjectification revisited: a cross-categorical perspective2016In: Epistemic modality, evidentiality, and beyond / [ed] Zlatka Guentcheva, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper offers three illustrations of how the process of “intersubjectification” (Traugott & Dasher 2002) can be observed in the development of time deictics, person markers and sentence-type markers to encode aspects of the speaker’s assumptions concerning the addressee’s epistemic access to an event. First-hand data from Lakandon Maya (Yukatekan, Mexico), Kogi, and Ika (Arwako-Chibchan, Colombia) is discussed in order to offer a potentially more nuanced view of intersubjectification in language. While suggested in previous accounts of intersubjectification, the paper argues that this process of language change only involves categories and expressions defineable as “shifters” (Jespersen 1922), i.e. expressions that at the same time refer to aspects of the speech situation and the proposition.

  • 5.
    Bergqvist, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The role of sentence type in Ika (Arwako) egophoric marking2017In: Egophoricity / [ed] Simeon Floyd, Elisabeth Norcliffe, Lila San Roque, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2017, p. 347-374Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter focuses on the role of sentence type and subject person in accounting for egophoric marking in Ika, an Arwako-Chibchan language spoken in northern Colombia. Egophoric marking in Ika is only found in declarative clauses for which the speaker either assumes the role of epistemic authority, or where the speaker shares this role with the addressee. Interrogatives are treated as non-egophoric with all subject persons, as they do not encode the speaker’s assumptions about possible answers. This restriction, together with ones that pertain to predicate type and temporal frame of reference, point to epistemic/observational access as an important parameter in a system where public acts and personal attributes involving the speaker and/or the addressee are the only ones available for egophoric marking. As a complement to models of dialogical stance-taking (e.g. Du Bois 2007), the notion of “complex epistemic perspective” (see Bergqvist 2016) is introduced to identify which perspective configurations allow for egophoric marking.

  • 6.
    Brosig, Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Aspect and epistemic notions in the present tense system of Khalkha Mongolian2015In: Acta Linguistica Petropolitana: Transactions of the Institute for Linguistic Studies / [ed] N. N. Kazansky, St. Petersburg: Rossijskaja akademija nauk / Russian Academy of Sciences, 2015, Vol. XI, no 3, p. 46-127Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, I will dicuss positive present tense forms in spoken Khalkha Mongolian. Khalkha is analyzed to have five non-finite aspect markers, the Progressive, Continuative, Habitual, Perfect, and Prospective. They mainly combine with the three suffixes ‑n, ‑aa and ‑dag. On its own, ‑n expresses an instantiated potential or neutral future and ‑aa combines epistemic possibility and resultativity. In combination with aspect markers, though, they express the evidential value of direct vs. indirect perception. As the resultant state of a perfect can be perceived directly, the division runs between direct sensual perception of the event and an event inferred from direct sensual perception vs. events that are concluded from assumptions, hearsay, and previous perception. The suffix ‑dag expresses habitual and generic semantics. It is most commonly used on its own, but can also take other aspect markers into its scope, e.g. expressing a habitually ongoing event. Next to its main use, it is even used to refer to mono-occasional events that diverge from what the speaker perceives as the normal course of events. In addition, absolute-final and other uses of the participle ‑h and final uses of the converb ‑aad are discussed.

  • 7.
    Brosig, Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Factual vs. evidential? The past tense forms of spoken Khalkha Mongolian 2015In: Empirical Approaches to Evidentiality / [ed] Ad Foolen, Helen de Hoop, Gijs Mulder, John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The basic past tense suffixes in spoken Khalkha are ‑sɑ̆ŋ, -ɮɑ, -tʃe and the peripheral -w. The basic opposition is between established knowledge (‑sɑ̆ŋ) and non-established (mostly new) knowledge, which is then further differentiated into firsthand (-ɮɑ) and non-firsthand sources (‑tʃe). This adds the factor “time of acquisition” to “source of information.” However, vivid recollection and deferred realization allow for using ‑ɮɑ and -tʃe, respectively. Additionally, -ɮɑ is used to establish a fictive scenario in discourse. In the corpus, past ‑sɑ̆ŋ is thrice as frequent as past -ɮɑ and -tʃe combined and due to its opposition to the latter seems to acquire a connotation of factual, reliable information. In declaratives, ‑w accounts for just 0.7% of past tense uses. It is used for events that surprised the speaker in the past. In questions, -tʃe is used to ask the hearer to give an answer based on inference. In self-directed discourse, -ɮɑ is used by a speaker who tries to remember something she once knew, irrespective of whether this knowledge was acquired as firsthand knowledge or not.

    All past markers have future uses. For an event for which the speaker has sensory or internal evidence (including when the speaker refers to her own intentions), -ɮɑ is fairly common. Clues as to whether a future or past interpretation hold are mostly syntactical, but stative aktionsart or the presence of the boundary-actualizing marker -tʃʰ- restrict the interpretation to the past. ‑ɮɑ can be used in questions about the future in which case the speaker seems to motivate her question on the basis of a presumption based on firsthand evidence. The morphological form of -ɮɑ in such contexts is different from the form used in past questions. ‑tʃe can be used when a future event is inferred, and ‑sɑ̆ŋ marks it as inevitable. Both are exceedingly rare in future contexts, so that they presumably only work in a salient future context. Future ‑w expresses preventive warnings.

  • 8.
    Brosig, Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Temperature terms in Khalkha Mongolian2015In: The Linguistics of Temperature / [ed] Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2015, p. 570-593Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides an overview of the linguistic properties of temperature terms in Khalkha Mongolian. It begins with a general overview of the temperature vocabulary, which is most elaborated in relation to coldness. It then considers in closer detail the application of these terms to tactile, ambient and personal-feeling temperature domains, and the terms' metaphoric extensions. The paper continues by investigating different ways of expressing degrees of temperature adjectives within a morphological system of intensification and attenuation. Finally, the syntax of temperature terms is discussed.

  • 9.
    Brosig, Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The tense-aspect system of Khorchin Mongolian2014In: On diversity and complexity of languages spoken in Europe and North and Central Asia / [ed] Pirkko Suihkonen, Lindsay J. Whaley, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2014, p. 1-66Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Khorchin, a Mongolian dialect spoken in eastern Inner Mongolia, has a tense-aspect system slightly simpler than Middle Mongol and considerably simpler than Central Mongolian dialects (Khalkha, Chakhar). While it can express the time stability of ongoing events with many nuances, present habitual and generic events are not distinguished. The existence of a present perfect category is doubtful, but in any case it doesn’t extend to the past as participle-copula-combinations are impossible. Evidentiality was lost in the central verbal system, but a non-obligatory quotative/hearsay marker exists. This article is an attempt to fit these phenomena into a coherent system of tense, aspect and related notions and to explore some of its diachronic implications.

  • 10.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Grammatical resources and linguistic complexity: Sirionó as a language without NP coordination2008In: Language Complexity: Typology, contact, change, John Benjamins, Amsterdam/Philadelphia , 2008Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The paper discusses the relationship between cross-linguistic differences in grammatical resources and linguistic complexity. It is claimed that Sirionó (Tupí-Guaraní) lacks syntactic coordination as in English John and Mary are asleep. Instead, Sirionó employs a number of different strategies – the ‘with’ strategy, the list strategy, and the ‘also’ strategy – to make up for this. It is argued that one or more of these strategies may serve as a diachronic source of syntactic coordination. The development of syntactic coordination in a language exemplifies condensation processes in grammaticalization and increases complexity in the sense that a certain type of complex syntactic structure is introduced, and makes it possible to express in one syntactic unit what previously needed two or more.

  • 11.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Grammaticalization and Linguistic Complexity2011In: The Oxford handbook of grammaticalization / [ed] Narrog, Heiko and Heine, Bernd, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Gösta Bruce2011In: Kungl. Vitterhets historie och antikvitets akademiens årsbok, Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien , 2011, p. 85-93Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Increases in complexity as a result of language contact2009In: Convergence and Divergence in Language Contact Situations / [ed] Kurt Braunmüller, Juliane House, Amsterdam: Benjamins , 2009, p. 41-52Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Kvantitativ språktypologi2015In: Kungl. Vetenskapssamhällets i Uppsala årsbok 40/2013-14 / [ed] Lars-Gunnar Larsson, Uppsala: Kungliga Vetenskapssamhället , 2015, p. 71-81Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Polysynthesis and Complexity2017In: The Oxford Handbook of Polysynthesis / [ed] Michael Fortescue, Marianne Mithun, Nicholas Evans, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017, p. 19-29Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The notion of polysynthesis has been linked up with that of complexity from the very start. A discussion of the relationship between these two concepts is thus highly motivated, also in view of the recent increased interest in questions relating to complexity among linguists. The chapter discusses different ways of understanding and measuring complexity and how these can be applied to polysynthetic languages. Other topics treated in the chapter are how complexity develops over time in polysynthetic languages, the question of to what extent the notions of maturation and non-linearity as defined in Dahl (2004) are relevant to the synchrony and diachrony of polysynthesis, and how the complexity of constructions in polysynthetic languages compares to functionally equivalent constructions elsewhere.

  • 16.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Remarks on rarity2011In: Expecting the unexpected: exceptions in grammar / [ed] Simon, Horst J. and Wiese, Heike, Berlin; New York: Mouton de Gruyter, 2011, p. 433-436Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Sirionó2014In: Lenguas de Bolivia: Oriente / [ed] Mily Crevels, Pieter Muysken, La Paz: Plural Editores, 2014, p. 99-133Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Språkets uppkomst2014In: En samtidig världshistoria / [ed] Maria Sjöberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2014, 1, p. 111-123Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Tense, aspect, mood, and evidentiality, linguistics of2015In: International encyclopedia of the social & behavioral sciences / [ed] James D. Wright, Oxford: Elsevier, 2015, 2 uppl., p. 210-213Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Tense-aspect-mood-evidentiality (TAME) and the Organization of Human Memory2013In: Time and TAME in language / [ed] Karina Veronica Molsing; Ana Maria Tramunt Ibaños, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013, p. 22-53Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The degenerate dative in Southern Norrbothnian2008In: Case and grammatical relations: studies in honor of Bernard Comrie / [ed] Greville G. Corbett, Michael Noonan, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2008, p. 105-126Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The “minor language” perspective2015In: Major versus Minor? Languages and Literatures in a Globalized World / [ed] Theo D’haen, Iannis Goerlandt, Roger D. Sell, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2015, p. 15-24Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The perfect map: Investigating the cross-linguistic distribution of TAME categories in a parallel corpus2014In: Aggregating Dialectology, Typology, and Register Analysis: Linguistic Variation in Text and Speech / [ed] Szmrecsanyi, B.; Walchli, B., Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2014, p. 268-289Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The work presented in this paper can be seen as a continuation of my earlier attempts at using quantitative methods to compare tense-aspect categories across languages using translation questionnaire data using a different kind of data - a parallel corpus of Bible translations. Here I report on a comparison of the distribution of grams labeled perfect in traditional descriptions. The results confirm earlier claims that these grams do share a core of prototypical uses and also an anti-prototype, that is, a set of uses that are left untouched until the final end of the grammaticalization process by which perfects expand into general pasts. In the grey zone between the prototype and the anti-prototype, versions in one and the same language tend to show great variation. But it is also possible to identify specific areas of cross-linguistic variation even among the more conservative perfect grams.

  • 24.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Towards an ecological semantics of tense and aspect2007In: L'aspect dans les langues les théories: similitudes et différences / [ed] Daniele Monticelli, Anu Treikelder, Tartu: Université de Tartu, Centre d'études francophones Robert Schuman , 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Typology of negation2010In: The Expression of Negation / [ed] Laurence R. Horn, Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Dahl, Östen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Gillam, J. Christopher
    Savannah River Archaeological Research Program.
    Anderson, David G.
    University of Tennessee.
    Iriarte, José
    University of Exeter.
    Copé, Silvia M.
    Linguistic Diversity Zones and Cartographic Modeling: GIS as a Method for Understanding the Prehistory of Lowland South America2011In: Ethnicity in ancient Amazonia: Reconstructing past identities from archaeology, linguistics, and ethnohistory / [ed] Hornborg, Alf; Hill, Jonathan David, Boulder, Colo: University Press of Colorado , 2011, p. 211-224Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Dahl, Östen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Kinship in grammar2001In: Dimensions of possession / [ed] Irène Baron, Michael Herslund, Finn Sørensen, Philadelphia, Pa.: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2001, p. 201-225Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Di Garbo, Francesca
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Agbetsoamedo, Yvonne
    Non-canonical gender in African languages: A typological survey of interactions between gender and number, and between gender and evaluative morphology2018In: Non-Canonical Gender Systems / [ed] Sebastian Fedden, Jenny Aung, Greville G. Corbett, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018, p. 176-210Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29. Ender, Andrea
    et al.
    Leemann, Adrian
    Wälchli, Bernhard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Introduction2012In: Methods in Contemporary Linguistics / [ed] Andrea Ender, Adrian Leemann, Bernhard Wälchli, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2012, p. 1-17Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30. Ender, Andrea
    et al.
    Wälchli, Bernhard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The making of a festschrift, is it a ritual?2012In: Methods in Contemporary Linguistics / [ed] Ender, Andrea & Leemann, Adrian & Wälchli, Bernhard, De Gruyter Mouton , 2012, p. 143-167Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Språkprojektet i Farsta/Fagersjö1998In: Samverkan för barn och ungdom: en antologi om konsten att bedriva projekt / [ed] Ulf Hammare, Stockholm: Resursförvaltningen skola och socialtjänst, Forsknings- och utvecklingsenheten , 1998, p. 72-97Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Activation of L1 and L2 during production in L3: A comparison of two case studies2009In: Processes in third language acquisition / [ed] Björn Hammarberg, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press , 2009, p. 101-126Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Bakgrundsspråkens interaktion vid tredjespråksinlärning1998In: Nordiske sprog som andetsprog / [ed] Möller, Janus & Quist, Pia & Holmen, Anne & Jörgensen, J.N., Köbenhavn: Danmarks Laererhöjskole , 1998, p. 41-59Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Examining the processability theory: The case of adjective agreement in L2 Swedish1996In: Eurosla 6: A selection of papers / [ed] Eric Kellerman, Bert Weltens, Theo Bongaerts, Amsterdam: VU Uitgeverij / ANéLA & The European Second Language Association , 1996, p. 75-88Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Flerspråkighet och tredjespråksinlärning: Några grundbegrepp2016In: Tredjespråksinlärning / [ed] Camilla Bardel, Ylva Falk, Christina Lindqvist, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2016, p. 33-58Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Tredjespråksinlärning har under 2000-talet snabbt vuxit fram som ett aktuellt forskningsområde i takt med att man har uppmärksammat hur vanlig flerspråkighet är och vilken betydelse en två- eller flerspråkig bakgrund har vid inlärning av ytterligare språk. En-, två- och flerspråkighet definieras här som kunskap i ett, två respektive tre eller flera språk på någon signifikant färdighetsnivå. Två- eller flerspråkiga personers inlärning av ytterligare språk betecknas som tredjespråksinlärning. Det här kapitlet ger en översikt av centrala begrepp och rön inom detta område. Till de aspekter som ska utvecklas i kapitlet hör följande.

    Människans naturliga flerspråkighet. Människan är av naturen potentiellt flerspråkig, och flera fakta talar för att flerspråkighet är den normala formen av språkkompetens hos vuxna.

    Flerspråkighet i dagens samhälle. Två- eller flerspråkighet anses vara vanligare i världen än ren enspråkighet. Det främjas av en kombination av faktorer och tilltar i det moderna globala kommunikationssamhället. Tredjespråksinlärning sker både spontant i vardagslivet och genom undervisning. Exempel på tredjespråksinlärare i skolan är elever som läser fler än ett främmande språk och tvåspråkiga elever ur språkliga minoriteter.

    Första-, andra- och tredjespråk (L1, L2, L3) som kognitiva begrepp. Begreppen L1 och L2 baseras på den grundläggande skillnaden mellan infött och icke-infött språk, där åldersfaktorn är central. Skilda kognitiva utgångslägen gäller för tillägnande av ett L1, ett första L2 och ytterligare språk, med konsekvenser för L3-inlärning. Definitionen av begreppet L3 är ett problem som genomlyses här.

    Den flerspråkiga kompetensen och talprocessen. En persons kompetens i olika språk bildar en samverkande helhet, inte separata språkkompetenser. I talsituationer kan även andra språk än det valda (s.k. bakgrundsspråk) aktiveras i olika grad, vilket styrs av flera faktorer. I modeller av talprocessen söker man förstå hur yttrandeförloppet sker hos flerspråkiga, hur talaren kontrollerar sitt språkval och hur associationer mellan element i olika språk uppstår. Faktorer i talsituationen kan också leda talaren att hantera sitt språkval genom att anamma olika språkmodus (language modes): en en-, två- eller flerspråkig samtalsstil.

    Tvärspråkligt inflytande. Vad är det som betingar att ett visst bakgrundsspråk, snarare än ett annat, aktiveras i den flerspråkiges talproduktion och orsakar transfer? Flera faktorer har undersökts, såsom färdighetsnivån i språket, aktualitet i användning, typologisk likhet samt L2-status, dvs egenskapen att vara ett L2 för talaren.

    Nyttan av tidigare språkkunskap. Forskning utvisar att tidigare språkkunskap utgör en tillgång vid inlärning av ett nytt språk. Positiva effekter har konstaterats på den språkfärdighet som uppnås, på språklig medvetenhet och på användningen av strategier i språkinlärningen. Pedagogiska aspekter av detta handlar om hur man i språkundervisning kan ta tillvara L3-inlärares tidigare språkliga erfarenheter och ta hänsyn till L3-inlärningens särskilda möjligheter.

  • 36.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Learnability and learner strategies in second language syntax and phonology1985In: Modelling and assessing second language acquisition / [ed] Kenneth Hyltenstam, Manfred Pienemann, Clevedon: Multilingual Matters, 1985, p. 153-175Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Problems in defining the concepts of L1, L2 and L32014In: Teaching and learning in multilingual contexts: Sociolinguistic and educational perspectives / [ed] Agnieszka Otwinowska, Gessica De Angelis, Bristol: Multilingual Matters , 2014, p. 3-18Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Roles of L1 and L2 in L3 production and acquisition2001In: Cross-Linguistic Influence in Third Language Acquisition: Psycholinguistic Perspectives, Multilingual Matters, Clevedon , 2001, p. 21-41Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Teoretiska ramar för andraspråksforskning2013In: Svenska som andraspråk: i forskning, undervisning och samhälle / [ed] Hyltenstam, Kenneth & Lindberg, Inger, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2013, 2, p. 27-84Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Teoretiska ramar för andraspråksforskning2004In: Svenska som andraspråk: i forskning, undervisning och samhälle, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2004, p. 25-78Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The course of development in second language phonology acquisition: A natural path or strategic choice?1993In: Progression & regression in language: Sociocultural, neuropsychological & linguistic perspectives / [ed] Kenneth Hyltenstam, Åke Viberg, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993, p. 439-462Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The factor 'perceived crosslinguistic similarity' in third language production: How does it work?2009In: Processes in Third Language Acquisition / [ed] Björn Hammarberg, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press , 2009, 1, p. 127-153Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The learner's word acquisition attempts in conversation1998In: Perspectives on foreign and second language pedagogy: Esays presented to Kirsten Haastrup on the occasion of her sixtieth birthday / [ed] Albrechtsen, Dorte & Henriksen, Birgit & Mees, Inger M. & Poulsen, Erik, Odense: Odense Universitetsforlag, 1998, p. 177-190Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The learner's word acquisition attempts in conversation2009In: Processes in third language acquisition / [ed] Björn Hammarberg, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press , 2009, 1, p. 86-100Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Third language acquisition2013In: The Routledge Encyclopedia of Second Language Acquisition / [ed] Peter Robinson, London: Routledge, 2013, p. 644-648Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Utbildning av lärare i svenska som främmande språk1981In: Språkmöte: Svenska som främmande språk, Hemspråk, Tolkning / [ed] Kenneth Hyltenstam, Lund: LiberLäromedel , 1981, p. 96-117Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Über die deutsche Deutung des schwedischen Gravis-Akzents1972In: Germanistische Beiträge: Gert Mellbourn zum 60. Geburtstag am 21.5.1972 dargebracht von Kollegen und Schülern des Deutschen Instituts der Universität Stockholm / [ed] Lillebill Grähs, Anders Marell, Stockholm: Stockholms universitet, Tyska institutionen , 1972, p. 87-98Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Hammarberg, Britta
    Karolinska institutet.
    Articulatory re-setting in the articulation of new languages1993In: Studies presented to Claes-Christian Elert on the occasion of his seventieth birthday: Studies presented to Claes-Christian Elert on the occasion of his seventieth birthday / [ed] Eva Strangert , Mattias Heldner, Peter Czigler, Umeå: University of Umeå, Department of Phonetics , 1993, p. 61-67Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Hammarberg, Britta
    Karolinska institutet, Stockholm.
    Re-setting the basis of articulation in the acquisition of new languages: A third language case study2009In: Processes in Third Language Acquisition / [ed] Björn Hammarberg, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press , 2009, 1, p. 74-85Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Hammarberg, Britta
    Re-setting the basis of articulation in the acquisition of new languages: A third-language case study2005In: Introductory Readings in L3, Stauffenburg Verlag, Tübingen , 2005, p. 11-18Chapter in book (Other academic)
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