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  • 101.
    Azbel Schmidt, Morena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Ordlista för tolkar: Svenska - albanska2011 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 102.
    Azbel Schmidt, Morena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Ordlista för tolkar: Svenska - kurdiska2011 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 103.
    Bakker, Peter
    et al.
    Research Centre for Grammar and Language Use, Aarhus University .
    Daval-Markussen, Aymeric
    Research Centre for Grammar and Language Use, Aarhus University.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Plag, Ingo
    Universität Siegen.
    Creoles are typologically distinct from non-creoles2011In: Journal of Pidgin and Creole languages ( Print), ISSN 0920-9034, E-ISSN 1569-9870, Vol. 26, no 1, 5-42 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In creolist circles, there has been a long-standing debate whether creoles differ structurally from non-creole languages and thus would form a special class of languages with specific typological properties. This debate about the typological status of creole languages has severely suffered from a lack of systematic empirical study. This paper presents for the first time a number of large-scale empirical investigations of the status of creole languages as a typological class on the basis of different and well-balanced samples of creole and non-creole languages. Using statistical modeling (multiple regression) and recently developed computational tools of quantitative typology (phylogenetic trees and networks), this paper provides robust evidence that creoles indeed form a structurally distinguishable subgroup within the world's languages. The findings thus seriously challenge approaches that hold that creole languages are structurally indistinguishable from non-creole languages.

  • 104. Bakker, Peter
    et al.
    Daval-Markussen, Aymeric
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Plag, Ingo
    Creoles are typologically distinct from non-creoles2013In: Creole languages and linguistic typology / [ed] Parth Bhatt, Tonjes Veenstra, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2013, 9-45 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 105. Barddal, Johanna
    et al.
    Smitherman, Thomas
    Bjarnadottir, Valgerdur
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German.
    Danesi, Serena
    Jenset, Gard B.
    McGillivray, Barbara
    Reconstructing constructional semantics: The dative subject construction in Old Norse-Icelandic, Latin, Ancient Greek, Old Russian and Old Lithuanian2012In: Studies in Language, ISSN 0378-4177, E-ISSN 1569-9978, Vol. 36, no 3, 511-547 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the historical linguistic community is well aware, reconstructing semantics is a notoriously difficult undertaking. Such reconstruction has so far mostly been carried out on lexical items, like words and morphemes, and has not been conducted for larger and more complex linguistic units, which intuitively seems to be a more intricate task, especially given the lack of methodological criteria and guidelines within the field. This follows directly from the fact that most current theoretical frameworks are not construction-based, that is, they do not assume that constructions are form-meaning correspondences. In order to meet this challenge, we present an attempt at reconstructing constructional semantics, and more precisely the semantics of the Dative Subject Construction for an earlier stage of Indo-European. For this purpose we employ lexical semantic verb classes in combination with the semantic map model (Bar partial derivative dal 2007, Bar partial derivative dal, Kristoffersen & Sveen 2011), showing how incredibly stable semantic fields may remain across long time spans, and how reconstructing such semantic fields may be accomplished

  • 106.
    Bardel, Camilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages.
    La connaissance d’une langue étrangère romane favorise-t-elle l’acquisition d’une autre langue romane?: influences translinguistiques dans la syntaxe d’une L32006In: AILE : Acquisition et interaction en langue étrangère, ISSN 1243-969X, Vol. 24, 149-179 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper considers cross-linguistic influence from previously acquired second languages (L2) into L3 syntax. The object under study is the acquisition of the pre-verbal placement of sentence negation in Italian L3. Data was collected from a group of 16 year-old learners of Italian in a Swedish high school; all were native speakers of Swedish, a language with post-verbal negation in the main clause. One third of the learners only had knowledge of Germanic background languages (Swedish L1, English and German L2), while the other two thirds had studied French or Spanish, instead of German. Since negation is positioned differently in all the previously acquired non-native languages (English, German, French and Spanish), and Spanish is the only of these languages that precisely reflects the pre-verbal placement of negation in the TL, sentence negation offers an interesting opportunity to test the role of the different L2s in relation to the typology factor. The results point at positive transfer from Spanish L2 into Italian L3: the group that had studied Spanish produced only pre-verbal negation, while the students who only had experience of Germanic languages (Swedish, English and German) before learning Italian, produced mainly post-verbal negation together with non thematic verbs. Post-verbal negation was also found among students that had studied French, however to a lesser extent than among those who only had experience of Germanic languages.

  • 107.
    Bardel, Camilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages. Italienska avdelningen.
    Falk, Ylva
    Recension av Extra, G. & Gorter, D. (eds), The other languages of Europe: demographic, sociolinguistic and educational perspectives2004In: International Journal of Multilingualism, ISSN 1479-0718, Vol. 1, no 11, 71-73 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 108.
    Bardel, Camilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Falk, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    The L2 status factor and the declarative/procedural distinction2012In: Third language acquisition in adulthood / [ed] Cabrelli Amaro, Jennifer, Flynn, Suzanne & Rothman, Jason, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2012, 61-78 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 109.
    Bardel, Camilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages.
    Falk, Ylva
    The role of the second language in third language acquisition: the case of Germanic syntax2007In: Second Language Research, ISSN 0267-6583, Vol. 23, no 4, 459-484 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study of the placement of sentence negation in third language acquisition (L3), we argue that there is a qualitative difference between the acquisition of a true second language (L2) and the subsequent acquisition of an L3. Although there is considerable evidence for L2 influence on vocabulary acquisition in L3, not all researchers believe that such influence generalizes to morphosyntactic aspects of the grammar. For example, Håkansson et al. (2002) introduce the Developmentally Moderated Transfer Hypothesis (DMTH), which incorporates transfer in Processability Theory (PT). They argue against syntactic transfer from L2 to L3. The present study presents counter-evidence to this hypothesis from two groups of learners with different L1s and L2s acquiring Swedish or Dutch as L3. The evidence clearly indicates that syntactic structures are more easily transferred from L2 than from L1 in the initial state of L3 acquisition. The two groups behave significantly differently as to the placement of negation, a difference that can be attributed to the L2 knowledge of the learners in interaction with the typological relationship between the L2 and the L3.

  • 110.
    Bardel, Camilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Gudmundson, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages.
    Lindqvist, Christina
    Aspects of lexical sophistication in advanced learners' oral production vocabulary acquisition and use in l2 french and italian2012In: Studies in Second Language Acquisition, ISSN 0272-2631, E-ISSN 1470-1545, Vol. 34, no 2, 269-290 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on the design and use of a profiler for lexical sophistication (i.e., use of advanced vocabulary), which was created to assess the lexical richness of intermediate and advanced Swedish second language (L2) learners' French and Italian. It discusses how teachers' judgments (TJs) of word difficulty can contribute to the methodology for lexical profiling and compares two methods, one purely frequency based and one modified on the basis of TJs of word difficulty. It has been suggested elsewhere that factors other than frequency play an important role in vocabulary acquisition. Here it is argued that cognates and thematic vocabulary related to teaching materials, although infrequent in target language (TL) corpora, should not necessarily be considered advanced and that analyses of learners' lexical sophistication would benefit from integrating these aspects. In this study, the frequency-based method normally used in lexical profiling was modified by recategorizing some low-frequency words considered easy by many teachers. On the basis of the TJs, a basic vocabulary, which consisted mainly of high-frequency words but also of cognates and thematic words, was defined, which was based on the fact that teachers judged certain low-frequency cognates and thematic words as relatively easy. Using the modified method, learners' lexical profiles were found to be more homogeneous within groups of learners at specific proficiency levels. The superiority of the new method over the purely frequency-based one was shown when comparing effect sizes. It is argued that this method gives a more correct picture of advanced L2 lexical profiles.

  • 111.
    Bardel, Camilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages.
    Lindqvist, ChristinaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages.
    Approaches to third language acquisition2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 112.
    Bardel, Camilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Lindqvist, ChristinaUppsala University.Laufer, BatiaUniversity of Haifa.
    L2 vocabulary acquisition, knowledge and use: New perspectives on assessment and corpus analysis.2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book is intended for researchers and students in the field of second language (L2) acquisition. As its title suggests, the book discusses L2 vocabulary acquisition, knowledge and use, and examines them from the perspectives of assessment and corpus analysis. The chapters also address some additional central research issues: the role of word frequency in the input, the difference between single words and multi-word units, and the distinction between vocabulary of oral and written language. The first three chapters of the book present critical reviews of different aspects of vocabulary acquisition. The other four chapters contain empirical studies that relate to the central themes of the book. The data in the studies draw on a variety of source and target languages: English, French, Italian, Swedish, Hebrew and Japanese. The book offers some new insights into the field of vocabulary and suggests avenues of research.

  • 113.
    Bardel, Camilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages.
    Nystedt, JaneStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages.
    Progetto Dizionario Italiano-Svedese: Atti del Primo Colloquio,Stoccolma 10-12 febbraio 20052006Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    How much vocabulary does a second language learner need? How many words do native speakers know? How many words are needed to do the things that a language user needs to do? And – the question that justifies the text of this presentation – What is a dictionary? Che cos’è un vocabolario?, to echo the title used by Bruno Migliorini in 1951, and which is one of the main questions of the 1st Colloquium on the ”Progetto dizionario italiano-svedese”, held at Stockholm University on February 10-12, 2005. The colloquium was sponsored by the Henrik Granholm Foundation and by the Italian Foreign Ministry through the Italian Institute of Culture in Stockholm, and we are deeply grateful for their support. The opening ceremony was presided over by the Vice Chancellor of our University, the Rettore Magnifico Kåre Bremer, the Italian Ambassador Giulio Vinci Gigliucci and the Director of the Italian Institute, Cultural Counsellor Giuseppe Manica.

    The program included the main themes we outlined for this colloquium issues concerning vocabularies, dictionaries and the acquisition of Italian as an L2. We thank our speakers for providing us with their texts, which have been published in a two-fold format, as a printed version and on the web-site of the project: www.fraita.su.se/lexikonprojektet.

  • 114.
    Bardel, Camilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Sánchez, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    The L2 status factor hypothesis revisited: The role of metalinguistic knowledge, working memory, attention and noticing in third language learning2017In: L3 Syntactic Transfer: Models, New Developments and Implications / [ed] Tanja Angelovska, Angela Hahn, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2017, 85-101 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter provides a nuanced view of the L2 status factor model, emphasizing explicit metalinguistic knowledge as the key factor governing transfer, together with individual differences in working memory and the operations associated with it. We argue that individual differences regarding the degree of explicit metalinguistic knowledge attained either in L1 or in L2 and differences when it comes to working memory, attention and noticing should be taken in consideration when accounting for transfer from previously acquired or learned languages in L3 learning.

  • 115.
    Barra Oliveros, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies.
    La oferta en la correspondencia comercial : Actos y actividades de cortesía en español y en sueco2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [es]

    En esta monografía se analiza contractivamente el uso de la cortesía en una selección de Cartas Comerciales de Oferta (CCO) en español y sueco. Se trata de identificar las similitudes y diferencias en el modo de realizar Actos de Cortesía (AC) y en cómo éstos se distribuyen y aplican en el proceso de redacción de un texto de oferta. Partimos del concepto de acto de habla y de actividades de imagen para clasificar la producción de cortesía lingüística. Se ha incorporado un breve marco teórico que nos entrega datos básicos sobre los estudios y teorías en el ámbito de la cortesía desde el punto de vista pragmático. Basados en un número específico de cartas comerciales de oferta (diez en español y diez en sueco)  hemos analizado, en encabezamientos, cuerpos centrales y cierres, los procedimientos o estrategias empleados y a partir de allí hemos clasificado los actos de cortesía lingüística que se han producido. Defendemos la hipótesis de que los actos de cortesía son expresiones centrales en la composición de este tipo de texto y que su presencia posibilita la presentación y venta del producto. Las diferencias entre las cartas suecas y las españolas dan indicios de estilos comunicativos propios, donde lo más característico sería la orientación relativa hacia lo temático en el caso sueco y hacia lo personal, en el español. Los resultados muestran también que al comparar las cartas hispanas con las suecas se ponen de manifiestos similitudes y diferencias tanto en la cantidad como en la frecuencia, en lo referente a las fórmulas de tratamiento y también  en cuanto a la estrategia general de oferta. Por otra parte nuestro trabajo nos ha permitido distinguir entre distintos tipos de cortesía que se agrupan dependiendo de los objetivos de quien produce el texto.

  • 116.
    Bartkowiak, Paulina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finish, Dutch and German.
    Język polonijny w Szwecji: Przeskok kodowy w rozmowach na temat pracy2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 117.
    Bartning, Inge
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The functions of a high-frequency collocation in native and learner discourse: the case of French c’est and Swedish det är2007In: International Review of Applied Linguistics, Vol. 45, no 1, 1-43 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 118.
    Bartning, Inge
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages.
    Lundell, Fanny Forsberg
    Hancock, Victorine
    On the role of linguistic contextual factors for morphosyntactic stabilization in high level l2 french2012In: Studies in Second Language Acquisition, ISSN 0272-2631, E-ISSN 1470-1545, Vol. 34, no 2, 243-267 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to offer contextual linguistic explanations for morphosyntactic deviances (MSDs) in high-level second language (L2) French (30 nonnative speakers vs. 10 native speakers). It is hypothesized that the distribution of formulaic sequences (FSs) and the complexity of information structure will influence the occurrence of MSDs. The study reports that MSDs rarely occur within FSs, and if they do, they occur within sequences containing open slots for creative rule application. The rhematic part of the utterance attracts more MSDs due to the fact that this part is more syntactically complex than the preamble (the thematic part). An additional explanation is the mean length of the rhematic part, which is longer than the preamble and implies a higher processing load. A final explanation of MSD occurrence in the rheme is linked to the distribution of FSs in the information structure. The results are discussed in relation to the ongoing debate on the constructs of complexity, accuracy, and fluency-a promising area of study.

  • 119.
    Bell, Linda
    et al.
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Gustafson, Joakim
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Heldner, Mattias
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Prosodic adaptation in human-computer interaction2003In: Proceedings ICPhS 2003, Barcelona, Spain: ISCA , 2003, 2453-2456 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    State-of-the-art speech recognizers are trained on predominantly normal speech and have difficulties handling either exceedingly slow and hyperarticulated or fast and sloppy speech. Explicitly instructing users on how to speak, however, can make the human–computer interaction stilted and unnatural. If it is possible to affect users’ speaking rate while maintaining the naturalness of the dialogue, this could prove useful in the development of future human–computer interfaces. Users could thus be subtly influenced to adapt their speech to better match the current capabilities of the system, so that errors can be reduced and the overall quality of the human–computer interaction is improved. At the same time, speakers are allowed to express themselves freely and naturally. In this article, we investigate whether people adapt their speech as they interact with an animated character in a simulated spoken dialogue system. A user experiment involving 16 subjects was performed to examine whether people who speak with a simulated dialogue system adapt their speaking rate to that of the system. The experiment confirmed that the users adapted to the speaking rate of the system, and no subjects afterwards seemed to be aware they had been affected in this way. Another finding was that speakers varied their speaking rate substantially in the course of the dialogue. In particular, problematic sequences where subjects had to repeat or rephrase the same utterance several times elicited slower speech.

  • 120. ben-Aaron, Diana
    et al.
    Larjavaara, Meri
    Miestamo, Matti
    Allmän språkvetenskap /General linguistics Helsingfors universitet.
    Raukko, Jarno
    Field guide to mailing lists2000In: Pragmatics, Ideology and Contacts Bulletin, Vol. 5, 50-56 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 121.
    Benediktsdottir, Ásdis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Analysing a Harvest Moon: On the translation of role language in Bokujō Monogatari: Hajimari no Daichi for the Nintendo 3DS2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis seeks to introduce the concept of role language in translation in the context of video game localisation. There is very little written on the subject of role language in translation from Japanese to English, and none which pertains to role language in video games. There is also a seeming deficiency of reliable literature regarding the product of translation in video game localisation, analysing what was done and what effects it may have had on the finished product. By analysing the particular role language profiles of selected characters from Bokujō Monogatari: Hajimari no Daichi for the Nintendo 3DS, this thesis hopes to serve as a stepping stone towards a new area of video game localisation.

    Eight non-playable characters, four male and four female, were analysed to create their respective role language profiles. Four scenarios were chosen for each character: the first and last heart event, the love confession and the married life sequence. The translations of each of these scenarios were analysed, along with how the respective characters were linguistically portrayed.

    The study found that although many characters were found to retain most of their original linguistic profiling in translation, there were instances where misconception of the source text could have been a factor. The translations where this rather than a different linguistic profile altered the character’s perception, the translations were often ST-oriented. In translations where the characterisation had been unaltered, predominantly it seemed the result of a critical distance from the ST and willingness on the translator’s part to take creative liberties.

    Role language is an integral feature of Japanese popular fiction, and it would seem that the fictional realms of video games are no exception. Although this thesis has studied only a limited sample, it would not be entirely out of line to draw the initial conclusion that to take a step back from the source material and instead focus on conveying a perception of a character rather than follow the written script, seems to result in a character portrayal in the target text similar to that in the source text.

  • 122.
    Benson, Carol
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Centre for Teaching and Learning.
    Heugh, Kathleen
    Bogale, Berhanu
    Yohannes, Mekonnen Alemu Gebre
    Multilingual Education in Ethiopian Primary Schools2012In: Multilingual Education and Sustainable Diversity Work: From Periphery to Center / [ed] Tove Skutnabb-Kangas, Kathleen Heugh, London: Taylor & Francis, 2012, 32-61 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 123.
    Benson, Carol
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Centre for Teaching and Learning.
    Kosonen, Kimmo
    A Critical Comparison of Language-In-Education Policy and Practice in Four Southeast Asian Countries and Ethiopia2012In: Multilingual Education and Sustainable Diversity Work: From Periphery to Center / [ed] Tove Skutnabb-Kangas, Kathleen Heugh, London: Taylor & Francis, 2012, 111-137 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 124.
    Berger, Alexandra
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Hedström Lindenhäll, Rosanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Heldner, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Karlsson, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Nyberg Pergament, Sarah
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Vojnovic, Ivan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Voices after midnight: How a night out affects voice quality2014In: Proceedings from FONETIK 2014: Stockholm, June 9-11, 2014 / [ed] Mattias Heldner, Stockholm: Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University , 2014, 1-4 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to investigate how different parameters of the voice (jitter, shimmer, LTAS and mean pitch) are affected by a late night out. Three recordings were made: one early evening before the night out, one after midnight, and one on the next day. Each recording consisted of a one minute reading and prolonged vowels. Five students took part in the experiment. Results varied among the participants, but some patterns were noticeable in all parameters. A trend towards increased mean pitch during the second recording was observed among four of the subjects. Somewhat unexpectedly, jitter and shimmer decreased between the first and second recordings and increased in the third one. Due to the lack of ethical testing, only a small number of participants were included. A larger sample is suggested for future research in order to generalize results.

  • 125. Berggren, Max
    et al.
    Karlgren, Jussi
    Östling, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Inferring the location of authors from words in their texts2015In: Proceedings of the 20th Nordic Conference of Computational Linguistics: NODALIDA 2015 / [ed] Beáta Megyesi, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, ACL Anthology , 2015, 211-218 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the purposes of computational dialectology or other geographically bound text analysis tasks, texts must be annotated with their or their authors' location. Many texts are locatable but most have no ex- plicit annotation of place. This paper describes a series of experiments to determine how positionally annotated microblog posts can be used to learn location indicating words which then can be used to locate blog texts and their authors. A Gaussian distribution is used to model the locational qualities of words. We introduce the notion of placeness to describe how locational words are.

    We find that modelling word distributions to account for several locations and thus several Gaussian distributions per word, defining a filter which picks out words with high placeness based on their local distributional context, and aggregating locational information in a centroid for each text gives the most useful results. The results are applied to data in the Swedish language.

  • 126.
    Berglund, Jonny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    A Construction Grammar Approach to the Phrase2009Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay adopts a construction grammar approach to the linguistic pattern why don’t you. It argues that the pattern can have two different senses: an interrogative sense and a suggestive sense. Further it argues that the suggestive sense is a construction similar to the definition of a construction described by construction grammar theory.

    In other words, the linguistic pattern why don’t you can have a specific underlying semantics that cannot be reached by an examination of its formal pattern.

  • 127.
    Bergman, Brita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Barns tidiga teckenspråksutveckling: med illustrationer av Lena Johansmide2012Report (Other academic)
  • 128.
    Bergman, Brita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. Avd. för teckenspråk.
    Det svenska teckenspråket - ett språk i fyra dimensioner2007In: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademiens Årsbok 2007, 2007, 39-52 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 129.
    Bergman, Brita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    On Motivated Signs in the Swedish Sign Language.1978In: Studia Linguistica, ISSN 0039-3193, E-ISSN 1467-9582, Vol. XXXII, no I-II, 9-17 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 130.
    Bergman, Brita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Signed Swedish1979Book (Other academic)
  • 131.
    Bergman, Brita
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Björkstrand, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Teckentranskription2015Report (Other academic)
  • 132.
    Bergman, Brita
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Engberg-Pedersen, Elisabeth
    Institut for nordiske studier og sprogvidenskab, Københavns universitet.
    Transmission of sign languages in the Nordic countries2010In: Sign languages / [ed] Brentari, Diane, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press , 2010, 74-94 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 133.
    Bergman, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies.
    La distinción entre préstamo y cambio de código en un discurso electrónico2009Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [es]

    En el presente estudio se pretende investigar la posibilidad de distinguir los préstamos de los elementos de cambio de código en un discurso electrónico entre jovenes bilingües de sueco-español, a través de un modelo de frecuencia elaborado por Myers-Scotton. También la posible co-existencia de las palabras analizadas en ambas lenguas será averiguada. El material bajo estudio consiste en conversaciones entre bilingües jóvenes de sueco/español en el foro facebook. En dichas conversaciones la alternancia entre las dos lenguas es muy frecuente, con el uso de cambio de código y préstamos. La hipotesis consiste en la convicción de que sí será posible encontrar préstamos a través de la aplicación del modelo, dado que el discurso electrónico probablemente no se distinguirá tanto de un discurso oral o escrito. Además, creemos que los préstamos encontrados con alta probabilidad serán co-existentes con las palabras en la lengua original. El análisis muestra que existe una cantidad de préstamos en el discurso investigado, y además que son co-existentes en todos los casos estudiados menos uno. El estudio también da indicios de que el modelo no es completamente fiable; el límite mínimo de frecuencia debería ser aumentado.

  • 134.
    Bergqvist, Henrik
    SOAS, University of London, London, UK.
    Agent Focus in Yukatek and Lakandon Maya2015In: Proceedings of the thirty-third annual Meeting of the Berkeley Linguistics Society / [ed] Zhenya Antić, Charles B. Chang, Clare S. Sandy, Maziar Toosarvandani, Berkeley, California: eLanguage , 2015, Vol. 33, 28-38 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 135.
    Bergqvist, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Complex epistemic perspective in Kogi (Arwako)2016In: International Journal of American Linguistics, ISSN 0020-7071, E-ISSN 1545-7001, Vol. 82, no 1, 1-34 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper analyzes a form of epistemic marking in Kogi (Arwako-Chibchan) that positions information between the speech-participants from the perspective of the speaker. This form of epistemic marking is tentatively labeled “complex epistemic perspective” and is found with five prefixes that attach to the auxiliary verb. Relevant meaning contrasts are between speaker-perspective and addressee-perspective forms, which may in turn be separated into symmetric and asymmetric forms that signal shared and exclusive knowledge access. The meaning dimension of knowledge access is also subject to a private/public distinction that parallels the notion of “territory of information” (Kamio 1997; Heritage 2012) where information may belong more to one of the speech participants than the other. The analyzed forms thus share a core function in specifying two simultaneous perspectives as part of the referential ground (e.g. Hanks 1990; 2009). The paper builds on first-hand data collected in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta region of northern Colombia and offers the first comprehensive analysis of epistemic marking in the language.

  • 136.
    Bergqvist, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Epistemic marking and multiple perspective: an introduction2015In: Language Typology and Universals, ISSN 1867-8319, E-ISSN 2196-7148, Vol. 68, no 2, 123-141 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses forms of epistemic marking that instantiate multiple perspective constructions (see Evans 2005). Such forms express the speaker’s and the addressee’s simultaneous epistemic perspectives from the point of view of the speaker, crucially relying on the assumptions of the speaker with regard to the addressee’s knowledge. The analysis of forms considers established semanto-pragmatic concepts, such as semantic scope, mitigation strategies and communicative intention (as marked by sentence-type) in the exploration of forms. In addition, the notion of knowledge asymmetry is discussed alongside the concepts of epistemic status and stance as tools for a semantic analysis of investigated forms

  • 137.
    Bergqvist, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Epistemic marking in Ika (Arwako)2012In: Studies in Language, ISSN 0378-4177, E-ISSN 1569-9978, Vol. 36, no 1, 154-181 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper describes epistemic marking in Ika (Arwako-Chibchan, Colombia) and proposes an analysis in terms of a typologically unusual pattern called conjunct/disjunct, which has been attested for a small number of Asian and South American languages. Canonically, conjunct occurs with first person subjects in statements and with second person in questions, as opposed to any other combination of subject and sentence-type, which is disjunct. The pattern found in Ika both conforms to expectations and, at the same time, contributes to a more nuanced analysis of the functional motivations of the conjunct/disjunct pattern. In Ika, conjunct marking encodes the speaker's direct access to an event that involves either (or both) of the speech participants. In addition, conjunct/disjunct marking interacts predictably with a second set of epistemic markers that encode asymmetries in the epistemic authority of the speaker and the addressee. The analysis builds on first-hand data but remains tentative, awaiting further investigation.

  • 138.
    Bergqvist, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Intersubjectification revisited: a cross-categorical perspective2016In: Epistemic modality, evidentiality, and beyond / [ed] Zlatka Guentcheva, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper offers three illustrations of how the process of “intersubjectification” (Traugott & Dasher 2002) can be observed in the development of time deictics, person markers and sentence-type markers to encode aspects of the speaker’s assumptions concerning the addressee’s epistemic access to an event. First-hand data from Lakandon Maya (Yukatekan, Mexico), Kogi, and Ika (Arwako-Chibchan, Colombia) is discussed in order to offer a potentially more nuanced view of intersubjectification in language. While suggested in previous accounts of intersubjectification, the paper argues that this process of language change only involves categories and expressions defineable as “shifters” (Jespersen 1922), i.e. expressions that at the same time refer to aspects of the speech situation and the proposition.

  • 139.
    Bergqvist, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The role of 'perspective' in epistemic marking2017In: Lingua, ISSN 0024-3841, E-ISSN 1872-6135, Vol. 186, 5-20 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper focuses on inter-personal aspects of the context in the analysis of evidential and related epistemic marking systems. While evidentiality is defined by its capacity to qualify the speaker's indexical point of view in terms of information source, it is argued that other aspects of the context are important to analyze evidentiality both conceptually and grammatically. These distinct, analytical components concern the illocutionary status of a given marker and its scope properties. The importance of the hearer's point of view in pragmatics and semantics is well attested and constitutes a convincing argument for an increased emphasis on the perspective of the hearer/addressee in analyses of epistemic marking, such as evidentiality. The paper discusses available accounts of evidentials that attend to the perspective of the addressee and also introduces lesser-known epistemic marking systems that share a functional space with evidentiality.

  • 140.
    Bergqvist, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The role of sentence type in Ika (Arwako) egophoric marking2017In: Egophoricity / [ed] Simeon Floyd, Elisabeth Norcliffe, Lila San Roque, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2017, 347-374 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter focuses on the role of sentence type and subject person in accounting for egophoric marking in Ika, an Arwako-Chibchan language spoken in northern Colombia. Egophoric marking in Ika is only found in declarative clauses for which the speaker either assumes the role of epistemic authority, or where the speaker shares this role with the addressee. Interrogatives are treated as non-egophoric with all subject persons, as they do not encode the speaker’s assumptions about possible answers. This restriction, together with ones that pertain to predicate type and temporal frame of reference, point to epistemic/observational access as an important parameter in a system where public acts and personal attributes involving the speaker and/or the addressee are the only ones available for egophoric marking. As a complement to models of dialogical stance-taking (e.g. Du Bois 2007), the notion of “complex epistemic perspective” (see Bergqvist 2016) is introduced to identify which perspective configurations allow for egophoric marking.

  • 141.
    Bergqvist, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Kittilä, Seppo
    Person and Knowledge: Introduction2017In: Open Linguistics, ISSN 2300-9969, Vol. 3, no 1, 18-30 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relation between person and epistemicity has been a topic of investigation throughout the humanities, including linguistics, but has mostly been focused on how conceptualisations of these two notions overlap, or diverge. This paper reviews some of these conceptualisations, but also adds a finergrained picture of how they intersect in the world's languages. Purported categories such as egophoric marking and lesser known expressions such as non-selected arguments (i.e. ethical datives) are compared to evidentials and modals from a synchronic and diachronic perspective in order to explain how the roles of the speech-act participants as specific arguments relate to their respective function as epistemic authorities. The aim of the paper is to introduce separate contributions relating to such systems as they are found in various parts of the world.

  • 142.
    Bernal, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Actividades de imagen respecto al tema de la corrupción en una interacción entre Iglesias (Podemos) y Villalobos (PP)2016In: Roles situacionales, interculturalidad y multiculturalidad en encuentros en español / [ed] Domnita Dumitrescu, Diana Bravo, Buenos Aires: Editorial Dunken, 2016, 155-178 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [es]

    En este trabajo se aplican los conceptos de la Pragmática Sociocultural a una interacción entre dos políticos españoles (Celia Villalobos, del Partido Popular, y Pablo Iglesias, de Podemos) durante una jornada de puertas abiertas celebrada en el Congreso de los Diputados en 2015. En este discurso metaparlamentario, la autora trata la categoría conceptual de la imagen del rol en sus aspectos de afiliación (principalmente al propio grupo político) y autonomía, al realzar las cualidades propias como políticos. El análisis -con base en estudios anteriores propios- adopta tanto perspectivas macro como microdiscursivas (cf. Bernal, 2008, 2009 y 2010). Las conclusiones resaltan los efectos sociales de distintos tipos de actividades de imagen en un discurso público y contribuyen a ilustrar la idoneidad de las categorías aplicadas para establecer relaciones entre lo social y lo lingüístico.

  • 143.
    Beskow, Jonas
    et al.
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Carlson, Rolf
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Edlund, Jens
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Granström, Björn
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Heldner, Mattias
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Hjalmarsson, Anna
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Skantze, Gabriel
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Multimodal Interaction Control2009In: Computers in the Human Interaction Loop / [ed] Waibel, Alex and Stiefelhagen, Rainer, Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2009, 143-158 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 144.
    Beskow, Jonas
    et al.
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Edlund, Jens
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Gustafson, Joakim
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Heldner, Mattias
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Hjalmarsson, Anna
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    House, David
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Research focus: Interactional aspects of spoken face-to-face communication2010In: Proceedings from Fonetik 2010, Lund: Lund University , 2010, 7-10 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 145.
    Bigestans, Aina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Education in Languages and Language Development.
    Persson, Catarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Education in Languages and Language Development.
    Skeppstedt, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Education in Languages and Language Development.
    Den ämnesteoretiska kunskapsbasen för sfi‐läraruppdraget: - och om professionalitet, professionalisering och behovet av formell utbildning för sfi-lärare2007Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Många lärare, skolledare, studerande och förvaltningstjänstemän har genom åren tagit kontakt med Nationellt centrum för svenska som andraspråk för att få klarhet i vad som ska krävas för "behörighet" att undervisa i sfi.

    För att sfi‐lärare ska kunna få sina kunskaper validerade, måste det finnas en möjlighet att relatera den individuella kompetensen till en beskriven och fastställd kunskapsbas som är allmänt giltig för uppdraget att undervisa inom sfi.

    Avsaknaden av beskrivningar av sfi‐läraryrkets kunskapsbas har skapat en osäkerhet bland såväl tjänstemän som ska rekrytera lärare som bland enskilda individer som genom utbildning vill skaffa sig kvalifikationer som gör att de kan bedriva sfi‐undervisning. Denna osäkerhet förstärks genom att det saknas riktlinjer i frågan i såväl skollagen och andra gällande styrdokument som i annan skriven information från myndigheter inom skol‐området. Någon sådan information tillhandahålls inte heller av de lärosäten som erbjuder fristående kurser, eller inriktningar i lärarprogrammen inom området svenska som andraspråk.

    Det var bland annat mot denna bakgrund som Myndigheten för skolutveckling gav NC det uppdrag som enligt överenskommelsen har följande innehåll:

    1. att NC ska göra en analys och bedömning av vilka kunskaper och vilken kompetens inom ämnet svenska som andraspråk som kan anses nödvändiga för lärare som är verksamma inom sfi
    2. att analysen också är tänkt att utgöra ett underlag och stöd till lärosäten då validering av yrkesverksamma sfi‐lärares kompetens kan bli aktuell
    3. att analysen bland annat ska bygga på ett antal intervjuer med sfi‐studerande, sfi‐lärare, skolledare och företrädare för lärosäten, samt med representanter för Sveriges kommuner och landsting
    4. att jämförelse kan göras med liknande analyser av lärarkompetens i andraspråksundervisning för vuxna i övriga nordiska länder, och med den dokumentation av kompetensdiskussioner som förts med sfi‐lärare vid Myndigheten för skolutvecklings seminarier under våren 2007

    Uppdraget skulle genomföras under perioden juni till oktober 2007.

  • 146.
    Bijvoet, Ellen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Fraurud, Kari
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Rinkeby Swedish in the mind of the beholder. Studying listener perceptions of language variation in multilingual Stockholm.2010In: Multilingual Urban Scandinavia. New Linguistic Practices. / [ed] Quist, P. & Svendsen, B. A., Clevedon: Multilingual Matters , 2010, 170-188 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 147.
    Bijvoet, Ellen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Fraurud, Kari
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Studying high-level (L1-L2) development and use among young people in multilingual Stockholm: the role of perceptions of ambient sociolinguistic variation2012In: Studies in Second Language Acquisition, ISSN 0272-2631, E-ISSN 1470-1545, Vol. 34, no 2, 291-319 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article makes a case for studying the perceptions that young people have of the ways of speaking of both themselves and others on the supposition that constructions of ambient sociolinguistic variation have an impact on the language development and use of individual language users. Such a study is particularly relevant in multilingual contexts in which differences with regard to social as well as ethnic and linguistic background may generate significantly different perceptions. In a speaker evaluation study, Swedish speech stimuli from 12 young Stockholmers were evaluated by 343 listeners from different backgrounds. The results show that young people may divide and relate to the linguistic space of Stockholm in very different ways and that they vary in their degree of accuracy regarding linguistic self-perception.

  • 148.
    Bijvoet, Ellen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Fraurud, Kari
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Svenskan i dagens flerspråkiga storstadsmiljöer:: en explorativ studie av unga stockholmares perceptioner av variation och varieteter2008In: Nordand: nordisk tidsskrift for andrespråksforskning, ISSN 0809-9227, Vol. 3, no 2, 7-38 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 149. Bijvoet, Ellen
    et al.
    Fraurud, Kari
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    What's the target? A folk linguistic study of young Stockholmers' constructions of linguistic norm and variation2016In: Language Awareness, ISSN 0965-8416, E-ISSN 1747-7565, Vol. 25, no 1-2, 17-39 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To account for the full range of language use in contemporary multilingual urban contexts, the notion of target language (TL) needs to be reconsidered. In studies of second language acquisition and language variation, taking TL for granted implies that people agree on what constitutes 'good' language, or the standard norm. The TL of language learners and users is, however, more heterogeneous than is often assumed. To gain insight into what people are actually targeting in their language development and use, we need to study their perceptions of ambient sociolinguistic variation. In this folk linguistic listener study involving 343 upper secondary school students, a range of data types were analysed: attitude scales, variety labelling, and assessments of speakers' social and linguistic backgrounds. This article highlights some results pointing to a considerable divergence in the listeners' perceptions, in particular with regard to speech representing what is here characterised as migration-related social dialects. Several listeners labelled these samples as 'good' Swedish, possibly suggesting that they do not simply aim at or even relate to a TL identical with the dominating monolingual norm, but may instead have a less narrow view of the kind of Swedish they consider appropriate for use in more formal situations.

  • 150.
    Bjarnadottir, Valgerdur
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German.
    Dialectal and Diachronic Distribution of Case Variation in Lithuanian Pain Verb ConstructionIn: Baltic Linguistics, ISSN 2081-7533Article in journal (Refereed)
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