Change search
Refine search result
2345678 201 - 250 of 2171
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 201.
    Blåsjö, Mona
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Josephson, Olle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Möten i domäner: Uppsatsarbete i styrda strukturer2017In: Kampen om texten: Examensarbetet i lärarutbildningen / [ed] Per-Olof Erixon, Olle Josephson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017, 127-152 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 202.
    Blåsjö, Mona
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Josephson, Olle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Texter och genrenormer2017In: Kampen om texten: Examensarbetet i lärarutbildningen / [ed] Per-Olof Erixon, Olle Josephson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017, 189-209 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 203.
    Blåsjö, Mona
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Wittek, Line
    Skrivandet i professionsutbildningar: Forskningsöversikt och teoretiska utgångspunkter2017In: Kampen om texten: Examensarbetet i lärarutbildningen / [ed] Per-Olof Erixon, Olle Josephson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017, 31-51 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 204.
    Bock, Zannie
    et al.
    University of West Cape, South Africa.
    Dalwai, Nausheena
    University of West Cape, South Africa.
    Stroud, Christopher
    University of West Cape, South Africa.
    Cool mobilities: Youth style and mobile telephony in contemporary South Africa2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Considerable research on social media has documented the diversity and creativity inherent in many youth texting styles and instant messaging. However, little scholarship has explored the impact of changing technologies on texting styles, nor how the materiality of the phone is a stylistic resource in itself. This paper aims to address these gaps by exploring the role of phone, affordance, and application in the texting styles of young students over a five year period at a higher education institution in South Africa. Central to our account is a view of style as an ‘assemblage of design choices’ (Coupland 2007). We argue that our conception of style needs to be expanded to take into account  both the materiality of the phone as artefact, as well as users’ interpersonal affect and subjectivity. We use our analysis to make the argument that the changing technologies and their associated affordances provide new resources for styling identity among our participants, and that what shapes the selection and combination of both linguistic features of texting as well as choice of mobile technologies is a fluid and complex interplay of factors, driven by the participant’s changing identities and ideologies as well as an appreciation of what is symbolically valued and socially ‘cool’.

  • 205.
    Bogren, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Swedish Students’ Perceptions of and Attitudes toward Stereotypical Gender Images in Speech2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The research conducted within the linguistic subdiscipline of language and gender was carried out as early as in the 1970’s, when Lakoff (1975) identified nine main traits for female language. Based on Lakoff’s research, this project investigates Swedish students’ attitudes to and perceptions of gender stereotypes in speech. The aim of this study is to examine the attitudes and perceptions of the participants and to investigate if there has been a change in the way a speaker interprets a speech act in comparison to the 1970’s. A survey was carried out in order to be able to identify and elicit the attitudes and perceptions of stereotypical gender speech of the participants. The survey was based on the traits that Lakoff (1975) found to be typical for female speech. The survey consisted of a first part where the participant had to identify the gender of the speaker and a second part where the participants were asked about typical gender stereotypes in speech acts. The main finding was that Swedish students have a negative attitude toward filing individuals in categories based on their gender. In addition, it was found that the participants have unconscious prejudices toward both men and women based on learnt gender patterns. In conclusion, this study has shown the pattern that there has been an attitude change toward gender stereotypes since the 1970’s. However, it revealed that the students in Sweden participating in the study have a tendency to unconsciously apply gender stereotypes when interpreting a speech act. 

  • 206.
    Bohm Fiederling, Inga-Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    English in Swedish product packages: An exploratory study of how English is used in product packages sold in the dairy section in Swedish retail2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the use of English in the texts of product packages sold in Swedish retail. This includes looking at the proportion of English of the packages of four brands God Morgon, Froosh, Oatly and Wellness, as well as exploring what moves are most likely to be in English and furthermore, what cultural values are conveyed by the texts. The most significant findings are that the proportion of English varies among both between and within the brands, depending on the specific niche the products have. Furthermore, in line with previous studies, English is mainly found in the attention-grabbing moves such as headlines and leads, whereas Swedish is more frequent in the copy which serves a more explanatory and detailing function. This is true except for the texts of the brand Oatly, with the main copy also in English. The cultural values conveyed by the texts, finally, both support previous findings, but it may be suggested that some of the values, such as nature and morality, have just recently begun to be associated to English.

  • 207.
    Bohman, Rickard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Tycker du om dem här?: En sociolingvistisk undersökning av högskolestudenters attityder till olika former av språkbruk2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 208.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Introduction to Asian sociolinguistics2001In: Language and Society in Hong Kong, The Open University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong , 2001, 1-35 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 209.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Language and hybridization: Pidgin tales from the China coast2000In: Interventions, Vol. 2, no 1, 35-52 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 210.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Aylward, LouiseLevine, Paul
    Language and Society in Hong Kong2001Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 211.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Bacon-Shone, John
    University of Hong Kong.
    Bilingualism and multilingualism in the HKSAR: language surveys and Hong Kong’s changing linguistic profile2008In: Language and society in Hong Kong / [ed] Kinglsey Bolton, Han Yang, Hong Kong: Open University of Hong Kong Press , 2008, 25-51 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 212.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Bauer, Robert
    The Hong Kong speech community2001In: Language and Society in Hong Kong, The Open University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong , 2001, 1-38 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 213.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Chen, Katherine
    The sociolinguistics of Chinese in Hong Kong2001In: Language and Society in Hong Kong, The Open University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong , 2001, 1-40 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 214.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Chen, Katherine
    Varieties of language2001In: Language and Society in Hong Kong, The Open University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong , 2001, 1-29 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 215.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. City University Hong Kong, People's Republic of China.
    Graddol, David
    English in Contemporary China2012In: English Today, ISSN 0266-0784, E-ISSN 1474-0567, Vol. 28, no 3, 3-9 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    According to a 2010 China Dailyarticle, the number of English learners in China is now around 400 million, approximately one third of China's population (see also Wei and Su, this issue). The importance of English in the state education system has been supplemented by the rapid growth of privately-run language schools and training institutes across the country in recent years. The same article quoted a comment by Ms Xiao Yan, the public relations manager of the Wall Street English language school chain, who gave her explanation for the current popularity of English in the following terms:

    More and more importance has been given to English after China carried out the policy of reform and opening up to the outside world in the late 1970s. And accompanying China's rise on the world stage in recent years are growing connections of commerce and culture with other countries, especially those developed English-speaking countries […] The entire Chinese society attaches high importance to the English study as sometimes it even plays a vital role for a person who plans to pursue further education and seek a better career. There is no doubt that people who have a good command of English are more competitive than their peers. (China Daily, 2010a)

  • 216.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Hutton, Christopher
    Linguistics and orientalism2000Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 217.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Hutton, Christopher
    Media mythologies: The case of triad language2001In: Knowledge and Discourse, Longman, London , 2001, 147-63 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 218.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Hutton, Christopher
    Orientalism, linguistics and postcolonial studies2000In: Interventions, Vol. 2, no 1, 1-5 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 219.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Hutton, Christopher
    Triad Societies: Western Accounts of the History, Sociology, and Linguistics of Chinese Secret Societies2000Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 220.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Hutton, Christopher
    Western writings on Chinese secret societies and 'triads'2000In: Triad Societies: Western Accounts of the History, Sociology, and Linguistics of Chinese Secret Societies, Routledge, London , 2000, ix-xx p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 221.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Jernudd, Björn
    Language management and planning in Hong Kong2001In: Language and Society in Hong Kong, The Open University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong , 2001, 1-41 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 222.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Kwok, Helen
    Sociolinguistics today: international perspectives2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This collection of essays developed out of a conference held in Hong Kong in 1988. The aim was to provide a forum for an exchange of views between academics working within the field of sociolinguistics, in particular between those working in the West and those working in the East. Sociolinguistics Today has taken this aim a step further to produce an overview of contemporary research into sociolinguistics worldwide. The book contains articles by acknowledged leaders in the study of language and society, and the presence of sociolinguists working in Asia provides a new and exciting challenge to the hitherto western-dominated field. The comprehensive study of Asian sociolinguistics is unique and engages with the non-Asian contributions to great effect. The range of contributors reinforces the international emphasis of the book.

  • 223.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Luke, K. K.
    Language and Society in Hong Kong: The Social Survey of Languages in the 1980s2000Book (Other academic)
  • 224.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    Meierkord, Christiane
    English in contemporary Sweden: Perceptions, policies, and narrated practices2013In: Journal of Sociolinguistics, ISSN 1360-6441, E-ISSN 1467-9841, Vol. 17, no 1, 93-117 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper compares trends in Sweden's language planning and language policies, and particularly the rationale underlying recent government legislation, to actual language use at the grass roots' of society, in order to investigate the extent to which academic and official rationales are confirmed by observed language practices. The passing of the Swedish Language Act of 2009 followed debates in academia and the media which not infrequently characterised English as a major threat to the survival of Swedish. However, despite the strong belief in the utility of English widely held in Sweden, the Swedish language is the preferred language of Swedes as well as immigrants in most domains. These results reveal a contradiction between the arguments put forward by a number of academics, educators and journalists concerning the threat' of English, and the language practices of ordinary folk in their daily lives.

  • 225. Borg, Erik
    et al.
    Edquist, Gertrud
    Reinholdson, Anna-Clara
    Risberg, Arne
    McAllister, Bob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Speech and language development in a population of Swedish hearing-impaired pre-school-children, a cross-sectional study2007In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 71, no 7, 1061-1077 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: There is little information on speech and language development in preschool children with mild, moderate or severe hearing impairment. The primary aim of the study is to establish a reference material for clinical use covering various aspects of speech and language functions and to relate test values to pure tone audiograms and parents' judgement of their children's hearing and language abilities. Methods: Nine speech and language tests were applied or modified, both classical tests and newly developed tests. Ninety-seven children with normal hearing and 156 with hearing impairment were tested. Hearing was 80 dB HL PTA or better in the best ear. Swedish was their strongest language. None had any additional diagnosed major handicaps. The children were 4-6 years of age. The material was divided into 10 categories of hearing impairment, 5 conductive and 5 sensorineural: unilateral; bilateral 0-20; 21-40; 41-60; 61-80 dB HL PTA. The tests, selected on the basis of a three component language model, are phoneme discrimination; rhyme matching; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT-III, word perception); Test for Reception of Grammar (TROG, grammar perception); prosodic phrase focus; rhyme construction; Word Finding Vocabulary Test (word production); Action Picture Test (grammar production); oral motor test. Results: Only categories with sensorineural toss showed significant differences from normal. Word production showed the most marked delay for 21-40 dB HL: 5 and 6 years p < 0.01; for 41-60 dB: 4 years p < 0.01 and 6 years p < 0.01 and 61-80 dB: 5 years p < 0.05. Phoneme discrimination 21-40 dB HL: 6 years p < 0.05; 41-60 dB: 4 years p < 0.01; 61-80 dB: 4 years p < 0.001, 5 years p < 0.001. Rhyme matching: no significant difference as compared to normal data. Word perception: sensorineural 41-60 dB HL: 6 years p < 0.05; 61-80 dB: 4 years p < 0.05; 5 years p < 0.01. Grammar perception: sensorineural 41-60 dB HL: 6 years p < 0.05; 61-80 dB: 5 years p < 0.05. Prosodic phrase focus: 41-60 dB HL: 5 years p < 0.01. Rhyme construction: 41-60 dB HL: 4 years p < 0.05. Grammar production: 61-80 dB HL: 5 years p < 0.01. Oral motor function: no differences. The Word production test showed a 1.5-2 years delay for sensorineural impairment 41-80 dB HL through 4-6 years of age. There were no differences between hearing-impaired boys and girls. Extended data for the screening test [E. Borg, A. Risberg, B. McAllister, B.M. Undemar, G. Edquist, A.C. Reinholdsson, et at., Language development in hearing-impaired children. Establishment of a reference material for a ""Language test for hearing-impaired children"", Int. J. Pediatr. Otorhinolaryngot. 65 (2002) 15-26] are presented. Conclusions: Reference values for expected speech and language development are presented that cover nearly 60% of the studied population. The effect of the peripheral hearing impairment is compensated for in many children with hearing impairment up to 60 dB HL. Above that degree of impairment, language delay is more pronounced, probably due to a toss of acuity. The importance of central cognitive functions, speech reading and signing for compensation of peripheral limitations is pointed out.

  • 226. Borin, Lars
    et al.
    Brandt, Martha D.
    Edlund, Jens
    Lindh, Jonas
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Svenska språket i den digitala tidsåldern2012Book (Refereed)
  • 227.
    Borking, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Donaldson på Hellsingska: en komparativ fallstudie: Julia Donaldsons engelska bilderböcker i svensk översättning av Lennart Hellsing2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This master’s thesis looks at the translation of Julia Donaldson’s English picture books into Swedish by the Swedish children’s author Lennart Hellsing. The main aim of the study is to determine whether the translation of the original (source) texts involves the transference of Hellsing’s writing style into the translated (target) texts. Earlier research, carried out by Kåreland (2002), is employed in order to pinpoint Hellsing’s distinctive style as a writer. The style variables apparent in Hellsing’s own writing were thereby identified and these are applied to the analysed target texts in this case study. The theoretical framework is based on descriptive translation studies (DTS) and the use of Toury’s model (1995) for reconstructing translational norms allows the source texts (ST) and target texts (TT) to be put into a sociocultural context. By working within this framework a descriptive analysis is used to describe and compare the ST and TT and the concept of translation as a practice governed by certain translational norms at a certain moment in time and within a certain culture is applied. The findings show that Hellsing’s style as a writer can also be detected in his translations of Donaldson’s picture books. The results of this case study also indicate that the translation of these texts can be considered to be a target culture oriented practice.  

  • 228.
    Bornhöft, Malin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Demokratiskt klarspråk: Demokratidiskursen i förarbetena till språklagens 11 paragraf2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här uppsatsen analyserar demokratidiskursen i de parlamentariska dokument som från och med 2002 ledde fram till språklagens stiftande 2009. Den gör detta utifrån teorifälten kritisk diskursanalys och systemisk-funktionell grammatik. 

    Materialet består av utdrag ur de parlamentariska dokumenten. Utdragen består av de tillfällen då vissa nyckelord knutna till demokrati används gällande området klarspråk. Metoderna ringar tillsammans in hur demokratidiskursen realiseras. De analytiska kategorierna är intertextualitet, rekontextualisering, auktorisering, värderingar, presuppositioner och satsrelationer. 

    Resultatet visar att demokratidiskursens roll är att verka legitimerande genom att ge tyngd och auktoritet åt klarspråksidealet. Den framställs vara något självklart gott som läsaren ska acceptera och den är så abstrakt att den inte hamnar i fokus. Demokrati framställs som på en skala där det svenska samhället kan bli mer demokratiskt. 

  • 229.
    Bouveng, Anne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Awareness of English varieties among Swedish secondary school pupils2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay reports on a study concerning awareness of English varieties among Swedish secondary school pupils. The aim is to find out whether Swedish secondary school pupils are aware of the differences between English varieties as regards pronunciation, spelling and vocabulary. In addition, the study aims at finding out whether pupils believe in preferences in their environment for any particular variety and what might be influencing their own preferences of English varieties.

     

    The study is questionnaire-based and the respondents are all pupils in two 8th grade classes in Stockholm. The pupils seem to believe that they are aware of the differences between varieties, although only a little more than half of the respondents claim that this includes differences in vocabulary. High recognition is claimed for Indian, Scottish and Australian English.

     

    As to preferences, British and American English dominate. Possible influences may be English textbooks claimed by the pupils to prefer mainly British English. Even English teachers are believed to have preferences mainly for British English but also American English. To the extent that friends are believed to have a preference, it is for American English. Less strong influences seem to come from the Internet, parents and school. The pupils seem to be exposed to English varieties to some extent, but apparently receive little explicit teaching which could increase awareness of English varieties.

  • 230.
    Bovin, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Occupational titles and supposed gender-neutrality: A corpus-based diachronic study on gender-neutral occupational titles in American English2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionally, some occupational titles have been explicitly marked for the gender of the group dominating the occupation. For example, in male-dominated occupations, titles often end with -man. However, since the second-wave feminist movement, several of the previously gender-biased titles have been supplemented by new, gender-neutral titles. Previous research has shown a discrepancy between researchers regarding the implications of these new titles. Some argue that the gender-neutral titles are only used for female referents, whereas others claim that gender-neutral titles, especially for male- dominated occupations, tend to still presuppose maleness. In the present paper, a corpus-based study is conducted on a few selected occupational titles. The aim is to investigate whether the gender-neutral alternatives have increased in usage over time, and whether the gender-biased ones have decreased. In addition, the study aims at examining whether the gender-neutral forms tend to be used primarily for women or men. The present study is corpus-based, examining the particular terms in the TIME Magazine Corpus. The results of the study show that there has been an increase of the gender-neutral forms since their introduction to English, and that they are primarily used when there is no explicit gender referencing. Proposed explanations for these results are that it may depend on the type of work involved in the selected occupations, as well as them being male-dominated. Furthermore, the results indicate that the gender- neutral terms are opted for when gender is either unknown or irrelevant for the context. 

  • 231.
    Bowin, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Effekten av talarformanten och F0's styrka på otränade röstbedömare2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Speech and voice is governed by complicated processes, where a variety of different functions are used in its production and perception. Speech and voice differs in many ways from the objective measurable acoustic speech signal. The intensity of the fundamental frequency, F0, and what is called the speaker formant are two parameters that affect how voice is perceived. The purpose of the study was to investigate if the varied intensity of F0 and with or without speaker formant affect what stimuli untrained voice assessors like the most. To do so, a synthetic /a/ was created, formed by formant frequencies for Swedish vowels (Fant, 1959), varied with with or without speaker formant, and seven different intensities of the fundamental frequency, creating a total of 14 stimuli. Twelve women and eight men were asked to listen to and grade the stimuli, from the /a/ that was liked the most to the one that was liked the least. The expectations of the study were confirmed, the variation of the intensity of F0 and with or without speaker formant, did affect which stimuli the listeners preferred, and also confirmed that men and women preferred different stimuli. The two /a/’s with the weakest and the /a/ with the strongest intensity of F0, were least liked. The four /a/s with varying intensity of F0 in between, were liked approximately the same. If men and women ratings were studied separately from one another, the result differed. Women preferred stimuli with speaker formant more than the ones without, whereas men more appreciated stimuli with strong intensity of F0. If the study was the be retested and the results would be confirmed, further tests would be of interest to do, to investigate if the differences of preferences affect how speech is perceived and interpreted. 

  • 232.
    Boyd, Sally
    et al.
    Institutionen för filosofi, lingvistik och vetenskapsteori, Göteborgs universitet.
    Fraurud, Kari
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Challenging the homogeneity assumption in language variation analysis: Findings from a study of multilingual urban spaces2010In: Language and Space. An International Handbook of Linguistic Variation. : Volume 1: Theories and Methods. / [ed] Auer, Peter & Schmidt, Jürgen Erich, Berlin/New York: Mouton de Gruyter , 2010, 1, 686-706 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 233.
    Bramlett, Frank
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Linguistics and the Study of Comics2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Do Irish superheroes actually sound Irish? Why are Gary Larson's Far Side cartoons funny? How do political cartoonists in India, Turkey, and the US get their point across? What is the impact of English on comics written in other languages? These questions and many more are answered in this volume, which brings together the two fields of comics research and linguistics to produce groundbreaking scholarship. With an international cast of contributors, the book offers novel insights into the role of language in comics, graphic novels, and single-panel cartoons, analyzing the intersections between the visual and the verbal. Contributions examine the relationship between cognitive linguistics and visual elements as well as interrogate the controversial claim about the status of comics as a language. The book argues that comics tell us a great deal about the sociocultural realities of language, exploring what code switching, language contact, dialect, and linguistic variation can tell us about identity – from the imagined and stereotyped to the political and real.

  • 234.
    Branderud, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Traunmüller, HartmutStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Proceedings FONETIK 2004: The XVIIth Swedish Phonetics Conference, held at Stockholm University, May 26-28, 20042004Conference proceedings (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 235.
    Branderud, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Traunmüller, HartmutStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Proceedings FONETIK 2009: The XXIIth Swedish Phonetics Conference, held at Stockholm University, June 10-12, 20092009Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 236.
    Branderud, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. Fonetik.
    Traunmüller, HartmutStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. Fonetik.
    Proceedings of FONETIK 981998Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 237.
    Brandström, Felicia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Intertextuality as a politeness strategy: A qualitative study of the use and function of intertextuality in the television series Suits2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the use and function of intertextuality in the television series Suits, and examines the interplay between intertextuality and politeness. Intertextuality allows a text to incorporate other texts and to draw upon connotations that belong to those texts. Politeness theory offers a tool to analyse the pragmatic use of language in social interaction. Analysing occurrences of intertextuality from the first episode of the television series, the paper explores in what ways the fictional characters use intertextuality and for what purposes. It explores if, and how, intertextuality can be used as a politeness strategy. Findings suggest that intertextuality is used for three main purposes, and functions as characterisation and as a means to establish and/or maintain social relations. Detailed analyses of instances of intertextuality propose that intertextuality can be used as a politeness theory, but only in certain ways. The paper discusses these findings and offers a possible explanation for why intertextuality is only used in this restricted way.

  • 238.
    Brodin, Jane
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Kommunikativ kompetens - begrepp och definitioner2005Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 239.
    Brodin, Jane
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Non-verbal communication in children with severe disabilities2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The paper was presented at South West University "Neofit Rilsky", Blagoevgrad, Bulgaria, September 17-23, 2007.

    Target groups: Speech therapists, teachers, students

  • 240.
    Brosig, Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Aspect, evidentiality and tense in Mongolian: From Middle Mongol to Khalkha and Khorchin2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present thesis consists of an introduction and the following papers:

    • The aspect-evidentiality system of Middle Mongol. Ural-Altaic Studies, 13. (forthcoming)
    • The tense-aspect system of Khorchin Mongolian. In: Pirkko Suihkonen & Lindsay Whaley (eds.), Typology of Languages of Europe and Northern and Central Asia. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. (forthcoming)
    • Aspect and epistemic notions in the present tense system of Khalkha Mongolian. Acta Linguistica Petropolitana. (forthcoming)
    • Factual vs. evidential? - The past tense forms of spoken Khalkha Mongolian. In: Ad Foolen, Helen de Hoop, & Gijs Mulder (eds.), Empirical Approaches to Evidentiality. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. (under review)

    Its purpose is to give an account of tense, aspect and evidentiality in three Mongolian varieties: Middle Mongol (MM) as spoken in the Mongol Empire, Khalkha Mongolian as spoken in the Mongolian state, and Khorchin Mongolian as spoken in eastern Inner Mongolia, China. MM started out with a tripartite tense distinction and a medium-sized aspectual system. Its past evidential system was tripartite with suffixes for firsthand, non-firsthand and evidentially neutral information. In Khorchin, which developed under the influence of Mandarin and Manchu, evidentiality was lost, and tense was simplified into a past / non-past distinction, alongside with a discontinuous proximal future / past marker. The aspect system underwent some changes, but retained its complexity. Khalkha, which developed under the influence of Turkic and Tibetan, underwent some shared innovations with Khorchin, but retained participles as a multifunctional unit within finite predicates, so that its aspectual system grew more complex. The past evidentiality distinctions of MM were basically retained, but the introduction of present tense evidentiality brought a number of changes: the evidentially neutral value shifted to signaling assimilated knowledge, and discontinuous future uses were introduced for all past markers.

  • 241.
    Brosig, Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    bilee sul ügiin utga, hereglee (The meaning and function of the particle bilee in Khalkha Mongolian)2012In: Hel zohiol sudlal, Vol. 5, no 37, 10-18 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the meaning and use of the evidential particle bilee and its shortened derived form lee in Khalkha Mongolian are investigated. In indicatives, bilee is used to indicate one's own recollection. Simple past is formed together with the past inferential -j. Similarly, with a hortative mood bilee indicates the recollection of one's mental state. Both confirmation and surprise can be found as connotations, but the notion of surprise even appears to have grammaticalized into the more specific construction -na lee which either expresses surprise or is used to beg for attention. In questions, bilee can both express that one has witnessed, but cannot recall a given event, or an event that the addressee is presumed to remember. With the imperfective -dag, bilee can sometimes induce mono-occasional readings, but these are even possible with -dag alone or most commonly with -dag baijee.

  • 242.
    Brosig, Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    BINNICK, Robert. 2012. The past tenses of the Mongolian verb. Brill.2013In: Linguistics, ISSN 0024-3949, E-ISSN 1613-396X, Vol. 51, no 1, 235-241 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 243.
    Brosig, Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Linguistic bibliography for the year 20112012Other (Other academic)
  • 244.
    Brosig, Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Review of Mongolic Phonology and the Qinghai-Gansu Languages2012In: Linguist List, ISSN 1068-4875, no 23, 2868Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 245.
    Brylla, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German.
    "Sedan lärde jag mig svenska en gång till": Om tvärspråkligt inflytande i tyska inlärares svenska interimspråk2006In: Grenzgänger: Festschrift zum 65. Geburtstag von Jurij Kusmenko / [ed] Antje Hornscheidt, Kristina Kotcheva, Tomas Milosch, Michael Rießler, Berlin: Nordeuropa-Institut der Humboldt-Universität , 2006, 17-30 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 246.
    Burnham, Denis
    et al.
    School of Psychology, University of NSW, Sydney, 2052, Australia.
    Francis, Elisabeth
    School of Psychology, University of NSW, Sydney, 2052, Australia.
    Webster, Di
    School of Psychology, University of NSW, Sydney, 2052, Australia.
    Luksaneeyanawin, Sudaporn
    School of Psychology, University of NSW, Sydney, 2052, Australia.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Attapaiboon, Chayada
    School of Psychology, University of NSW, Sydney, 2052, Australia.
    Facilitation or attenuation in the development of speech mode processing? Tone perception over linguistic contexts1996In: Sixth Australian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology, 1996, 587-592 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 247.
    Burnham, Denis
    et al.
    University of Western Sydney, Australia.
    Kasisopa, Benjawan
    University of Western Sydney, Australia.
    Reid, Amanda
    University of Western Sydney, Australia.
    Luksaneeyanawin, Sudaporn
    Chulalongkorn University, Thailand.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Attina, Virginia
    University of Western Sydney, Australia.
    Rattanasone, Nan Xu
    Macquarie University, Australia.
    Schwarz, Iris-Corinna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Webster, Diane
    University of Western Sydney, Australia.
    Universality and language-specific experience in the perception of lexical tone and pitch2015In: Applied Psycholinguistics, ISSN 0142-7164, E-ISSN 1469-1817, Vol. 36, no 6, 1459-1491 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two experiments focus on Thai tone perception by native speakers of tone languages (Thai, Cantonese, and Mandarin), a pitch–accent (Swedish), and a nontonal (English) language. In Experiment 1, there was better auditory-only and auditory–visual discrimination by tone and pitch–accent language speakers than by nontone language speakers. Conversely and counterintuitively, there was better visual-only discrimination by nontone language speakers than tone and pitch–accent language speakers. Nevertheless, visual augmentation of auditory tone perception in noise was evident for all five language groups. In Experiment 2, involving discrimination in three fundamental frequency equivalent auditory contexts, tone and pitch–accent language participants showed equivalent discrimination for normal Thai speech, filtered speech, and violin sounds. In contrast, nontone language listeners had significantly better discrimination for violin sounds than filtered speech and in turn speech. Together the results show that tone perception is determined by both auditory and visual information, by acoustic and linguistic contexts, and by universal and experiential factors.

  • 248.
    Buschmeier, Hendrik
    et al.
    Bielefeld University, Germany.
    Malisz, Zofia
    Bielefeld University, Germany.
    Skubisz, Joanna
    Bielefeld University, Germany.
    Wlodarczak, Marcin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. Bielefeld University, Germany.
    Wachsmuth, Ipke
    Bielefleld University, Germany.
    Kopp, Stefan
    Bielefeld University, Germany.
    Wagner, Petra
    Bielefeld University, Germany.
    ALICO: A multimodal corpus for the study of active listening2014In: Proceedings of LREC 2014, 2014, 3638-3643 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Active Listening Corpus (ALICO) is a multimodal database of spontaneous dyadic conversations with diverse speech andgestural annotations of both dialogue partners. The annotations consist of short feedback expression transcription with correspondingcommunicative function interpretation as well as segmentation of interpausal units, words, rhythmic prominence intervals andvowel-to-vowel intervals. Additionally, ALICO contains head gesture annotation of both interlocutors. The corpus contributes to researchon spontaneous human–human interaction, on functional relations between modalities, and timing variability in dialogue. It also providesdata that differentiates between distracted and attentive listeners. We describe the main characteristics of the corpus and present the mostimportant results obtained from analyses in recent years.

  • 249. Byding, Katarina
    et al.
    Blåsjö, Mona
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Kärlek kräver mer än tusen ord2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 250.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Effects of age of L2 acquisition on L1 event conceptualization patterns2009In: Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, ISSN 1366-7289, E-ISSN 1469-1841, Vol. 12, no 3, 305-322 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the effects that the age of onset (AO) of second language (L2) acquisition exerts on the attrition of first language (L1) event conceptualization patterns. The subjects studied are L1 Spanish–L2 Swedish bilinguals living in Sweden. The specific research questions addressed in the study concern the role of AO in endpoint encoding and temporal perspectivation in goal-oriented motion events. In view of previous findings on age effects in attrition, it is hypothesized that deviations from Spanish monolingual patterns of conceptualization would be limited basically to subjects whose AO is below 12 years of age. The analyses show that subjects with AO > 12 converge with Spanish monolingual controls on both endpoint encoding and temporal perspectivation strategies, whereas deviations from the controls' performance are found exclusively in subjects with AO < 12. It is suggested, in view of these findings, that subjects with early AO are more dependent on advantageous socio-psychological circumstances such as L1 contact and use in order to fully acquire/maintain Spanish event conceptualization patterns, while L1 maintenance in subjects with late AO is less dependent on these factors. It is concluded that patterns of event conceptualization are affected by age in the same way as formal language skills.

2345678 201 - 250 of 2171
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf