Change search
Refine search result
2345678 201 - 250 of 2285
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 201.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    PhD supervisor-supervision interactions in an English as a Lingua Franca (ELF) setting: genre features and ways of expressing disagreement2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 202.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Policies in the European Higher Education Arena2016In: Investigating English in Europe: Contexts and Agendas: English in Europe, Volume 6 / [ed] Andrew Linn, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2016, p. 145-152Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 203.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Pragmatic strategies in English as an academic lingua franca:  Ways of achieving communicative effectiveness2011In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 950-964Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper will report the findings of a study that has investigated spoken English as a lingua franca (ELF) usage in Swedish higher education. The material comprises digital recordings of lectures and student group-work sessions, all being naturally occurring, authentic high-stakes spoken exchange, i.e. from non-language-teaching contexts. The aim of the present paper, which constitutes a part of a larger study, has been to investigate the role pragmatic strategies play in the communicative effectiveness of English as a lingua franca. The paper will document types of pragmatic strategies as well as point to important differences between the two speech event types and the implications of these differences for English-medium education. The findings show that lecturers in ELF settings make less frequent use of pragmatic strategies than students who deploy these strategies frequently in group-work sessions. Earlier stages of the present study (Björkman, 2008a, Björkman, 2008b and Björkman, 2009) showed that despite frequent non-standardness in the morphosyntax level, there is little overt disturbance in student group-work, and it is highly likely that a variety of pragmatic strategies that students deploy prevents some disturbance. It is reasonable to assume that, in the absence of appropriate pragmatic strategies used often in lectures, there is an increased risk for covert disturbance

  • 204.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Questions in academic ELF interaction2012In: Journal of English as a Lingua Franca, ISSN 2191-9216, E-ISSN 2191-933X, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 93-119Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 205.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Review of David Deterding, Misunderstandings in English as a Lingua Franca. An Analysis of ELF Interactions in South-East Asia. 2015In: Journal of English as a Lingua Franca, ISSN 2191-9216, E-ISSN 2191-933X, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 385-389Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 206.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Review of Philippe Van Parijs Linguistic Justice for Europe and for the World2013In: International Studies in the Philosophy of Science, ISSN 0269-8595, E-ISSN 1469-9281, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 354-359Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 207.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    So You Think You Can ELF: English as a Lingua Franca as the Medium ofInstruction2010In: Hermes - Journal of Language and Communication Studies, ISSN 0904-1699, E-ISSN 1903-1785, Vol. 45, p. 77-99Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 208.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The grammar of English as a lingua franca2013In: The Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics / [ed] Chapelle, C., Oxford/UK: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 209.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The pragmatics of English as a lingua franca in the international university: Introduction2011In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 923-925Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 210.
    Björkstrand, Thomas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Ryttervik, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Tecken inom idrott2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 211.
    Björkstrand, Thomas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Wallin, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Bäckström, Joel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Jonsson, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Bergman, Brita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Gunnarsson, Magnus
    Svenskt teckenspråkslexikon2010Other (Other academic)
  • 212.
    Blanquet, Sarah Martine Dominique
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Puentes interculturales: Implicaciones de las creencias sobre la competencia intercultural de profesores en formación pertenecientes al máster MULTIELE2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Within the Erasmus Mundus program for Teaching and Learning Spanish in Multilingual and International Contexts (MULTIELE), pre-service teachers from different backgrounds participate in academic stays in several universities located in different countries and complete their internships in an external context. This research paper seeks to analyze the beliefs of seven pre-service teachers regarding intercultural competence, taking into account their life experiences and the master’s program. Through the qualitative study of seven semi-structured interviews, results show a lack of definition in the concept of intercultural competence and its teaching, a tight link between life experiences and the conception of this competence and a need for theoretical training during the master’s program regarding this topic. The discussion and conclusions offer some proposals based on these observations and suggest further research lines. 

  • 213.
    Blomqvist, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Vad uppmärksammar lärare i samtal om skrivbedömning? Svensklärares normer för beslut om summativ bedömning2018In: Nordisk tidskrift för allmän didaktik, ISSN 2002-1534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on a qualitative study of Swedish teachers’ summative assessments of students’ writing in upper secondary school. Based on teacher group discussions, the study describes and analyses teachers’ expressions of norms when assessing and grading students’ writing in the subject of Swedish. Data consist of audio- and video recordings from three focus group discussions, comprising a total of 17 teachers. Topic analysis (Linell, 2001) is the method used to identify expressions of assessment norms in these discussions. The analysis reveals that these teachers’ summative assessments of students’ writing express two competing norms: a non-compensatory and a compensatory norm. The non-compensatory norm is expressed through perceptions that all text qualities must correspond to the same criteria. This means that shortcomings in texts are crucial for teachers’ summative assessments. The text qualities that primarily determine these decisions are language style and text structure. Meanwhile, the compensatory norm is expressed through perceptions that in summative aspects such as students’ age and writing instructions as well as students’ writing development and the national test must be considered. These competing assessment norms have a substantial impact on theses teachers’ decisions on summative assessments. The teacher groups show significant variation in the basis for their decisions regarding summative assessment of students' writing.

  • 214.
    Blåsjö, Mona
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    An interview with Britt-Louise Gunnarsson: Parallel language use in academic and professional communication2011Other (Other academic)
  • 215.
    Blåsjö, Mona
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    From percentage to prediction: University students meeting a parallel language of visuals and numerals2011In: Ibérica, ISSN 1139-7241, E-ISSN 2340-2784, no 22, p. 123-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A less-frequently discussed parallel-linguistic issue is the parallel language of visuals and numerals: the diagrams, tables, models, mathematical signs and different symbols that students have to deal with in their reading and writing. Texts are multimodal, that is they are constructed with visual objects and different sign systems as well as writing. For new students, it can be difficult to grasp how visuals and numerals can have different meanings in different contexts, such as academic disciplines. For teachers, the disciplinary use of the visuals and numerals is often so ingrained that they may have difficulty seeing the problems that students face. Drawing on the theoretical framework of social semiotics and the neo-Vygotskian perspective, this article shows how new students of economics in Sweden encounter a multimodal academic literacy. The article also discusses some of the difficulties relating to this situation and arguesfor a raised awareness among teachers in order to scaffold students intoacademic, visual literacies.

  • 216.
    Blåsjö, Mona
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Byding, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Orden vi älskar med: Blädderordbok om kärleksrelationer2016Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Språk och ord spelar stor roll i kärleksrelationer. Hur sätter vi ord på lust och behov? Vad kallar vi varandra? Orden fångar känslorna och utvecklar dem. Det här är en ovanlig ordbok som sätter igång samtal mellan älskande och en dialog inom dig själv. Här finns fakta, funderingar och fina citat. Och inte minst intervjuer om psykologi, teater, transaktivism, nätdejting, hjärnforskning och språkforskning.

  • 217.
    Blåsjö, Mona
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Johansson, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism.
    Jonsson, Carla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Sannholm, Raphael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Fasta regler för fri kommunikation2017In: Nio-fem: tidskrift om arbetsliv & profession, ISSN 2001-9688, no 2, p. 20-23Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I dag jobbar många hemma eller på resande fot, och allt färre har ett fast skrivbord. Hur påverkar det förutsättningarna för kommunikationen? Hur ser kommunikationen ut jämfört med arbetsplatser där man fortfarande har eget skrivbord? I den här artikeln tar några språkvetenskapliga forskare från Stockholms universitet upp aktuella fynd från olika forskningsprojekt om kommunikation i arbetslivet.

  • 218.
    Blåsjö, Mona
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Jonsson, Carla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Mångfald, möten och mejl: En forskningsöversikt och tre fallstudier om arbetslivskommunikation2018Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I den här antologin beskrivs människor, redskap och situationer som många känner igen från dagens komplexa och rörliga arbetsliv:

    • En mellanchef vars arbetsdagar i hög grad styrs av de många möten som andra lagt in i hennes kalender.
    • En whiteboardtavla som kopplar samman olika delar av en verksamhet, och även kopplar möten till andra aktiviteter.
    • Flera samverkande organisationer som gör det svårt att skilja internkommunikation från annan kommunikation, och som både ökar behovet av kommunikation och försvårar den.

    Dessa skildras i tre uppsatser av Angie Gravett, Emma Legaard och Sofia Johansson. I en forskningsöversikt sammanfattar forskarna Mona Blåsjö och Carla Jonsson sociolingvistisk forskning om arbetslivskommunikation, med fokus på skrivbordsyrken. Översikten visar ur ett individperspektiv hur enskilda anställda förhåller sig till språk i sin vardag på arbetsplatsen, och ur ett organisatoriskt perspektiv diskuteras hur flera språk kan användas på en och samma arbetsplats. De studier som presenteras bygger på olika metoder (kvalitativa, kvantitativa, etnografiska osv.) och ger därigenom en bild av hur man kan gå tillväga för att analysera arbetslivskommunikation. Översikten fokuserar på tre teman: mångfald, dvs. olika aspekter av flerspråkighet på arbetsplatser, möten och annan muntlig kommunikation samt mejl eller snarare mejlande: textprocesser och digitala redskap i arbetslivet.

    Antologin är lämplig för studenter på grundnivå och forskarnivå, men kan även läsas av alla som är intresserade av hur moderna organisationer arbetar med sin kommunikation.

  • 219.
    Blåsjö, Mona
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Josephson, Olle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Möten i domäner: Uppsatsarbete i styrda strukturer2017In: Kampen om texten: Examensarbetet i lärarutbildningen / [ed] Per-Olof Erixon, Olle Josephson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017, p. 127-152Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 220.
    Blåsjö, Mona
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Josephson, Olle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Texter och genrenormer2017In: Kampen om texten: Examensarbetet i lärarutbildningen / [ed] Per-Olof Erixon, Olle Josephson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017, p. 189-209Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 221.
    Blåsjö, Mona
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Wittek, Line
    Skrivandet i professionsutbildningar: Forskningsöversikt och teoretiska utgångspunkter2017In: Kampen om texten: Examensarbetet i lärarutbildningen / [ed] Per-Olof Erixon, Olle Josephson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017, p. 31-51Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 222.
    Bock, Zannie
    et al.
    University of West Cape, South Africa.
    Dalwai, Nausheena
    University of West Cape, South Africa.
    Stroud, Christopher
    University of West Cape, South Africa.
    Cool mobilities: Youth style and mobile telephony in contemporary South Africa2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Considerable research on social media has documented the diversity and creativity inherent in many youth texting styles and instant messaging. However, little scholarship has explored the impact of changing technologies on texting styles, nor how the materiality of the phone is a stylistic resource in itself. This paper aims to address these gaps by exploring the role of phone, affordance, and application in the texting styles of young students over a five year period at a higher education institution in South Africa. Central to our account is a view of style as an ‘assemblage of design choices’ (Coupland 2007). We argue that our conception of style needs to be expanded to take into account  both the materiality of the phone as artefact, as well as users’ interpersonal affect and subjectivity. We use our analysis to make the argument that the changing technologies and their associated affordances provide new resources for styling identity among our participants, and that what shapes the selection and combination of both linguistic features of texting as well as choice of mobile technologies is a fluid and complex interplay of factors, driven by the participant’s changing identities and ideologies as well as an appreciation of what is symbolically valued and socially ‘cool’.

  • 223.
    Bogren, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Swedish Students’ Perceptions of and Attitudes toward Stereotypical Gender Images in Speech2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The research conducted within the linguistic subdiscipline of language and gender was carried out as early as in the 1970’s, when Lakoff (1975) identified nine main traits for female language. Based on Lakoff’s research, this project investigates Swedish students’ attitudes to and perceptions of gender stereotypes in speech. The aim of this study is to examine the attitudes and perceptions of the participants and to investigate if there has been a change in the way a speaker interprets a speech act in comparison to the 1970’s. A survey was carried out in order to be able to identify and elicit the attitudes and perceptions of stereotypical gender speech of the participants. The survey was based on the traits that Lakoff (1975) found to be typical for female speech. The survey consisted of a first part where the participant had to identify the gender of the speaker and a second part where the participants were asked about typical gender stereotypes in speech acts. The main finding was that Swedish students have a negative attitude toward filing individuals in categories based on their gender. In addition, it was found that the participants have unconscious prejudices toward both men and women based on learnt gender patterns. In conclusion, this study has shown the pattern that there has been an attitude change toward gender stereotypes since the 1970’s. However, it revealed that the students in Sweden participating in the study have a tendency to unconsciously apply gender stereotypes when interpreting a speech act. 

  • 224.
    Bohm Fiederling, Inga-Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    English in Swedish product packages: An exploratory study of how English is used in product packages sold in the dairy section in Swedish retail2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the use of English in the texts of product packages sold in Swedish retail. This includes looking at the proportion of English of the packages of four brands God Morgon, Froosh, Oatly and Wellness, as well as exploring what moves are most likely to be in English and furthermore, what cultural values are conveyed by the texts. The most significant findings are that the proportion of English varies among both between and within the brands, depending on the specific niche the products have. Furthermore, in line with previous studies, English is mainly found in the attention-grabbing moves such as headlines and leads, whereas Swedish is more frequent in the copy which serves a more explanatory and detailing function. This is true except for the texts of the brand Oatly, with the main copy also in English. The cultural values conveyed by the texts, finally, both support previous findings, but it may be suggested that some of the values, such as nature and morality, have just recently begun to be associated to English.

  • 225.
    Bohman, Rickard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Tycker du om dem här?: En sociolingvistisk undersökning av högskolestudenters attityder till olika former av språkbruk2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 226.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Introduction to Asian sociolinguistics2001In: Language and Society in Hong Kong, The Open University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong , 2001, p. 1-35Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 227.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Language and hybridization: Pidgin tales from the China coast2000In: Interventions, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 35-52Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 228.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Aylward, LouiseLevine, Paul
    Language and Society in Hong Kong2001Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 229.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Bacon-Shone, John
    University of Hong Kong.
    Bilingualism and multilingualism in the HKSAR: language surveys and Hong Kong’s changing linguistic profile2008In: Language and society in Hong Kong / [ed] Kinglsey Bolton, Han Yang, Hong Kong: Open University of Hong Kong Press , 2008, p. 25-51Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 230.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Bauer, Robert
    The Hong Kong speech community2001In: Language and Society in Hong Kong, The Open University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong , 2001, p. 1-38Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 231.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Chen, Katherine
    The sociolinguistics of Chinese in Hong Kong2001In: Language and Society in Hong Kong, The Open University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong , 2001, p. 1-40Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 232.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Chen, Katherine
    Varieties of language2001In: Language and Society in Hong Kong, The Open University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong , 2001, p. 1-29Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 233.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. City University Hong Kong, People's Republic of China.
    Graddol, David
    English in Contemporary China2012In: English Today, ISSN 0266-0784, E-ISSN 1474-0567, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 3-9Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    According to a 2010 China Dailyarticle, the number of English learners in China is now around 400 million, approximately one third of China's population (see also Wei and Su, this issue). The importance of English in the state education system has been supplemented by the rapid growth of privately-run language schools and training institutes across the country in recent years. The same article quoted a comment by Ms Xiao Yan, the public relations manager of the Wall Street English language school chain, who gave her explanation for the current popularity of English in the following terms:

    More and more importance has been given to English after China carried out the policy of reform and opening up to the outside world in the late 1970s. And accompanying China's rise on the world stage in recent years are growing connections of commerce and culture with other countries, especially those developed English-speaking countries […] The entire Chinese society attaches high importance to the English study as sometimes it even plays a vital role for a person who plans to pursue further education and seek a better career. There is no doubt that people who have a good command of English are more competitive than their peers. (China Daily, 2010a)

  • 234.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Hutton, Christopher
    Linguistics and orientalism2000Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 235.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Hutton, Christopher
    Media mythologies: The case of triad language2001In: Knowledge and Discourse, Longman, London , 2001, p. 147-63Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 236.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Hutton, Christopher
    Orientalism, linguistics and postcolonial studies2000In: Interventions, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 237.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Hutton, Christopher
    Triad Societies: Western Accounts of the History, Sociology, and Linguistics of Chinese Secret Societies2000Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 238.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Hutton, Christopher
    Western writings on Chinese secret societies and 'triads'2000In: Triad Societies: Western Accounts of the History, Sociology, and Linguistics of Chinese Secret Societies, Routledge, London , 2000, p. ix-xxChapter in book (Other academic)
  • 239.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Jernudd, Björn
    Language management and planning in Hong Kong2001In: Language and Society in Hong Kong, The Open University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong , 2001, p. 1-41Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 240.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Kwok, Helen
    Sociolinguistics today: international perspectives2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This collection of essays developed out of a conference held in Hong Kong in 1988. The aim was to provide a forum for an exchange of views between academics working within the field of sociolinguistics, in particular between those working in the West and those working in the East. Sociolinguistics Today has taken this aim a step further to produce an overview of contemporary research into sociolinguistics worldwide. The book contains articles by acknowledged leaders in the study of language and society, and the presence of sociolinguists working in Asia provides a new and exciting challenge to the hitherto western-dominated field. The comprehensive study of Asian sociolinguistics is unique and engages with the non-Asian contributions to great effect. The range of contributors reinforces the international emphasis of the book.

  • 241.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Luke, K. K.
    Language and Society in Hong Kong: The Social Survey of Languages in the 1980s2000Book (Other academic)
  • 242.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    Meierkord, Christiane
    English in contemporary Sweden: Perceptions, policies, and narrated practices2013In: Journal of Sociolinguistics, ISSN 1360-6441, E-ISSN 1467-9841, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 93-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper compares trends in Sweden's language planning and language policies, and particularly the rationale underlying recent government legislation, to actual language use at the grass roots' of society, in order to investigate the extent to which academic and official rationales are confirmed by observed language practices. The passing of the Swedish Language Act of 2009 followed debates in academia and the media which not infrequently characterised English as a major threat to the survival of Swedish. However, despite the strong belief in the utility of English widely held in Sweden, the Swedish language is the preferred language of Swedes as well as immigrants in most domains. These results reveal a contradiction between the arguments put forward by a number of academics, educators and journalists concerning the threat' of English, and the language practices of ordinary folk in their daily lives.

  • 243. Bono, Mayumi
    et al.
    Efthimiou, EleniFotinea, Stavroula-EvitaHanke, ThomasHochgesang, JulieKristoffersen, JetteMesch, JohannaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.Osugi, Yutaka
    8th Workshop on the Representation and Processing of Sign Languages: Involving the Language Community: Proceedings2018Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 244. Borg, Erik
    et al.
    Edquist, Gertrud
    Reinholdson, Anna-Clara
    Risberg, Arne
    McAllister, Bob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Speech and language development in a population of Swedish hearing-impaired pre-school-children, a cross-sectional study2007In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 71, no 7, p. 1061-1077Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: There is little information on speech and language development in preschool children with mild, moderate or severe hearing impairment. The primary aim of the study is to establish a reference material for clinical use covering various aspects of speech and language functions and to relate test values to pure tone audiograms and parents' judgement of their children's hearing and language abilities. Methods: Nine speech and language tests were applied or modified, both classical tests and newly developed tests. Ninety-seven children with normal hearing and 156 with hearing impairment were tested. Hearing was 80 dB HL PTA or better in the best ear. Swedish was their strongest language. None had any additional diagnosed major handicaps. The children were 4-6 years of age. The material was divided into 10 categories of hearing impairment, 5 conductive and 5 sensorineural: unilateral; bilateral 0-20; 21-40; 41-60; 61-80 dB HL PTA. The tests, selected on the basis of a three component language model, are phoneme discrimination; rhyme matching; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT-III, word perception); Test for Reception of Grammar (TROG, grammar perception); prosodic phrase focus; rhyme construction; Word Finding Vocabulary Test (word production); Action Picture Test (grammar production); oral motor test. Results: Only categories with sensorineural toss showed significant differences from normal. Word production showed the most marked delay for 21-40 dB HL: 5 and 6 years p < 0.01; for 41-60 dB: 4 years p < 0.01 and 6 years p < 0.01 and 61-80 dB: 5 years p < 0.05. Phoneme discrimination 21-40 dB HL: 6 years p < 0.05; 41-60 dB: 4 years p < 0.01; 61-80 dB: 4 years p < 0.001, 5 years p < 0.001. Rhyme matching: no significant difference as compared to normal data. Word perception: sensorineural 41-60 dB HL: 6 years p < 0.05; 61-80 dB: 4 years p < 0.05; 5 years p < 0.01. Grammar perception: sensorineural 41-60 dB HL: 6 years p < 0.05; 61-80 dB: 5 years p < 0.05. Prosodic phrase focus: 41-60 dB HL: 5 years p < 0.01. Rhyme construction: 41-60 dB HL: 4 years p < 0.05. Grammar production: 61-80 dB HL: 5 years p < 0.01. Oral motor function: no differences. The Word production test showed a 1.5-2 years delay for sensorineural impairment 41-80 dB HL through 4-6 years of age. There were no differences between hearing-impaired boys and girls. Extended data for the screening test [E. Borg, A. Risberg, B. McAllister, B.M. Undemar, G. Edquist, A.C. Reinholdsson, et at., Language development in hearing-impaired children. Establishment of a reference material for a ""Language test for hearing-impaired children"", Int. J. Pediatr. Otorhinolaryngot. 65 (2002) 15-26] are presented. Conclusions: Reference values for expected speech and language development are presented that cover nearly 60% of the studied population. The effect of the peripheral hearing impairment is compensated for in many children with hearing impairment up to 60 dB HL. Above that degree of impairment, language delay is more pronounced, probably due to a toss of acuity. The importance of central cognitive functions, speech reading and signing for compensation of peripheral limitations is pointed out.

  • 245. Borin, Lars
    et al.
    Brandt, Martha D.
    Edlund, Jens
    Lindh, Jonas
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Svenska språket i den digitala tidsåldern2012Book (Refereed)
  • 246.
    Borking, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Donaldson på Hellsingska: en komparativ fallstudie: Julia Donaldsons engelska bilderböcker i svensk översättning av Lennart Hellsing2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This master’s thesis looks at the translation of Julia Donaldson’s English picture books into Swedish by the Swedish children’s author Lennart Hellsing. The main aim of the study is to determine whether the translation of the original (source) texts involves the transference of Hellsing’s writing style into the translated (target) texts. Earlier research, carried out by Kåreland (2002), is employed in order to pinpoint Hellsing’s distinctive style as a writer. The style variables apparent in Hellsing’s own writing were thereby identified and these are applied to the analysed target texts in this case study. The theoretical framework is based on descriptive translation studies (DTS) and the use of Toury’s model (1995) for reconstructing translational norms allows the source texts (ST) and target texts (TT) to be put into a sociocultural context. By working within this framework a descriptive analysis is used to describe and compare the ST and TT and the concept of translation as a practice governed by certain translational norms at a certain moment in time and within a certain culture is applied. The findings show that Hellsing’s style as a writer can also be detected in his translations of Donaldson’s picture books. The results of this case study also indicate that the translation of these texts can be considered to be a target culture oriented practice.  

  • 247.
    Bornhöft, Malin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Demokratiskt klarspråk: Demokratidiskursen i förarbetena till språklagens 11 paragraf2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här uppsatsen analyserar demokratidiskursen i de parlamentariska dokument som från och med 2002 ledde fram till språklagens stiftande 2009. Den gör detta utifrån teorifälten kritisk diskursanalys och systemisk-funktionell grammatik. 

    Materialet består av utdrag ur de parlamentariska dokumenten. Utdragen består av de tillfällen då vissa nyckelord knutna till demokrati används gällande området klarspråk. Metoderna ringar tillsammans in hur demokratidiskursen realiseras. De analytiska kategorierna är intertextualitet, rekontextualisering, auktorisering, värderingar, presuppositioner och satsrelationer. 

    Resultatet visar att demokratidiskursens roll är att verka legitimerande genom att ge tyngd och auktoritet åt klarspråksidealet. Den framställs vara något självklart gott som läsaren ska acceptera och den är så abstrakt att den inte hamnar i fokus. Demokrati framställs som på en skala där det svenska samhället kan bli mer demokratiskt. 

  • 248.
    Bouveng, Anne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Awareness of English varieties among Swedish secondary school pupils2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay reports on a study concerning awareness of English varieties among Swedish secondary school pupils. The aim is to find out whether Swedish secondary school pupils are aware of the differences between English varieties as regards pronunciation, spelling and vocabulary. In addition, the study aims at finding out whether pupils believe in preferences in their environment for any particular variety and what might be influencing their own preferences of English varieties.

     

    The study is questionnaire-based and the respondents are all pupils in two 8th grade classes in Stockholm. The pupils seem to believe that they are aware of the differences between varieties, although only a little more than half of the respondents claim that this includes differences in vocabulary. High recognition is claimed for Indian, Scottish and Australian English.

     

    As to preferences, British and American English dominate. Possible influences may be English textbooks claimed by the pupils to prefer mainly British English. Even English teachers are believed to have preferences mainly for British English but also American English. To the extent that friends are believed to have a preference, it is for American English. Less strong influences seem to come from the Internet, parents and school. The pupils seem to be exposed to English varieties to some extent, but apparently receive little explicit teaching which could increase awareness of English varieties.

  • 249.
    Bovin, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Occupational titles and supposed gender-neutrality: A corpus-based diachronic study on gender-neutral occupational titles in American English2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionally, some occupational titles have been explicitly marked for the gender of the group dominating the occupation. For example, in male-dominated occupations, titles often end with -man. However, since the second-wave feminist movement, several of the previously gender-biased titles have been supplemented by new, gender-neutral titles. Previous research has shown a discrepancy between researchers regarding the implications of these new titles. Some argue that the gender-neutral titles are only used for female referents, whereas others claim that gender-neutral titles, especially for male- dominated occupations, tend to still presuppose maleness. In the present paper, a corpus-based study is conducted on a few selected occupational titles. The aim is to investigate whether the gender-neutral alternatives have increased in usage over time, and whether the gender-biased ones have decreased. In addition, the study aims at examining whether the gender-neutral forms tend to be used primarily for women or men. The present study is corpus-based, examining the particular terms in the TIME Magazine Corpus. The results of the study show that there has been an increase of the gender-neutral forms since their introduction to English, and that they are primarily used when there is no explicit gender referencing. Proposed explanations for these results are that it may depend on the type of work involved in the selected occupations, as well as them being male-dominated. Furthermore, the results indicate that the gender- neutral terms are opted for when gender is either unknown or irrelevant for the context. 

  • 250.
    Bowin, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Effekten av talarformanten och F0's styrka på otränade röstbedömare2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Speech and voice is governed by complicated processes, where a variety of different functions are used in its production and perception. Speech and voice differs in many ways from the objective measurable acoustic speech signal. The intensity of the fundamental frequency, F0, and what is called the speaker formant are two parameters that affect how voice is perceived. The purpose of the study was to investigate if the varied intensity of F0 and with or without speaker formant affect what stimuli untrained voice assessors like the most. To do so, a synthetic /a/ was created, formed by formant frequencies for Swedish vowels (Fant, 1959), varied with with or without speaker formant, and seven different intensities of the fundamental frequency, creating a total of 14 stimuli. Twelve women and eight men were asked to listen to and grade the stimuli, from the /a/ that was liked the most to the one that was liked the least. The expectations of the study were confirmed, the variation of the intensity of F0 and with or without speaker formant, did affect which stimuli the listeners preferred, and also confirmed that men and women preferred different stimuli. The two /a/’s with the weakest and the /a/ with the strongest intensity of F0, were least liked. The four /a/s with varying intensity of F0 in between, were liked approximately the same. If men and women ratings were studied separately from one another, the result differed. Women preferred stimuli with speaker formant more than the ones without, whereas men more appreciated stimuli with strong intensity of F0. If the study was the be retested and the results would be confirmed, further tests would be of interest to do, to investigate if the differences of preferences affect how speech is perceived and interpreted. 

2345678 201 - 250 of 2285
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf