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  • 2101.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Lexicalization of Negative Senses: A Crosslinguistic Study2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2102.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Negation in existential and non-verbal predications: Publicly available database on a map server2015Report (Other academic)
  • 2103.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Negation in non-verbal and existential predications: a holistic typology2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2104.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Negative existentials: a cross linguistic study2013In: Rivista di Linguistica = Italian Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 1120-2726, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 107-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to provide a cross-linguistic outline of the negation strategies in existential predications like ‘There are no mice in the basement’. It is found that there is a strong cross-linguistic tendency to use a special negation strategy in these predications. Furthermore, the special negators, labelled here ‘negative existentials’, show a number of similarities in terms of their semantics, morphosyntax, use and diachronic origin. In light of this, it is suggested that they represent a linguistic construction of its own, and in fact, a separate conceptual domain.

  • 2105.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Non-verbal and existential negators: a cross-linguistic and a historical-comparative study2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2106.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Not-yet expressions in the languages of the world: a special negator or a separate gram type?2015In: ALT 2015, 11th Conference of the Association for Linguistic Typology: Abstract Booklet, 2015, p. 136-137Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many languages there is a special negation strategy to indicate that an action has not been accomplished or that a state has not been attained. For instance, in Indonesian, verbal predications are negated by the particle tiada (or tidak), cf (1a). Nominal predications, are negated by the particle bukan, cf. (1c). When the speaker intends to communicate that an action has not been carried out yet, cf. (1b), or a particular state has not been reached yet, cf. (1d), the word belum ‘not yet’ is used in verbal and in nominal predications. The perfect marker sudahcannot be combined with belum or tidak, cf. Sneddon (1996: 202). Expressions like belum are typically dubbed in grammars as special negators that differ from the standard negator (SN). They are sporadically mentioned in the comparative literature on negation cf. (Payne 1985, Miestamo 2005).Van der Auwera (1998) analyzes ‘not yet’ expressions in the languages of Europe as continuative negatives and suggests the label nondum for them; it is adopted here too. However, a systematic cross-linguistic study of their distribution does not yet exist. My goals with this work are to obtain a better understanding about their cross-linguistic frequency as well as about their functions and status in the grammar and lexicon of their respective languages. In my sample of 100 unrelated languages, nondum expressions occur in most areas of the world, but are notably absent in Europe in the form of single, bound or semi-bound, grammaticalized negative temporal markers. My sources are grammars and parallel texts. The available data allow for the following generalizations: (i) Nondum expressions can be encoded as affixes cf. (2) and (3) or as particles, cf (1b, 1d); (ii) they can be either univerbations between SN and another word or completely unsegmentable morphemes. (iii) They typically indicate the non-occurrence of an expected action or state but also an anticipation about its imminent realization. Thus they appear to belong to both the temporal and the negative domain; however, as Contini-Morava (1989: 138), notes the negation they indicate is of limited duration. Their cross-linguistic frequency together with their functional similarities in a number of unrelated languages are evidence that nondum expressions should be considered a separate gram. Furthermore, gaining a better knowledge about them also contributes to a deeper understanding of the semantic-pragmatic asymmetry between the tense-aspect systems of the affirmative and the negative domain.

  • 2107.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    'Not-yet'-expressions in the languages of the world: special negative adverbs or a separate gram type?2015In: ALT 2015: 11th Conference of the Association for Linguistic Typology: Abstract Booklet, 2015, p. 136-137Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many languages there is a special negation strategy to indicate that an action has not been accomplished or that a state has not been attained. For instance, in Indonesian, verbal predications are negated by the particle tiada (or tidak), cf (1a). Nominal predications, are negated by the particle bukan, cf. (1c). When the speaker intends to communicate that an action has not been carried out yet, cf. (1b), or a particular state has not been reached yet, cf. (1d), the word belum ‘not yet’ is used in verbal and in nominal predications. The perfect marker sudahcannot be combined with belum or tidak, cf. Sneddon (1996: 202). Expressions like belum are typically dubbed in grammars as special negators that differ from the standard negator (SN). They are sporadically mentioned in the comparative literature on negation cf. (Payne 1985, Miestamo 2005).Van der Auwera (1998) analyzes ‘not yet’ expressions in the languages of Europe as continuative negatives and suggests the label nondum for them; it is adopted here too. However, a systematic cross-linguistic study of their distribution does not yet exist. My goals with this work are to obtain a better understanding about their cross-linguistic frequency as well as about their functions and status in the grammar and lexicon of their respective languages. In my sample of 100 unrelated languages, nondum expressions occur in most areas of the world, but are notably absent in Europe in the form of single, bound or semi-bound, grammaticalized negative temporal markers. My sources are grammars and parallel texts. The available data allow for the following generalizations: (i) Nondum expressions can be encoded as affixes cf. (2) and (3) or as particles, cf (1b, 1d); (ii) they can be either univerbations between SN and another word or completely unsegmentable morphemes. (iii) They typically indicate the non-occurrence of an expected action or state but also an anticipation about its imminent realization. Thus they appear to belong to both the temporal and the negative domain; however, as Contini-Morava (1989: 138), notes the negation they indicate is of limited duration. Their cross-linguistic frequency together with their functional similarities in a number of unrelated languages are evidence that nondum expressions should be considered a separate gram. Furthermore, gaining a better knowledge about them also contributes to a deeper understanding of the semantic-pragmatic asymmetry between the tense-aspect systems of the affirmative and the negative domain.

  • 2108.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    'Not-yet'-expressions in the languages of the world: special negators or a separate cross-linguistic category2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2109.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Random SamplesIn: WSK Dictionary on Theories and Methods in Linguistics.Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 2110.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Sampling ProceduresIn: WSK Dictionary on Theories and Methods in LinguisticsArticle, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 2111.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Standard and Special Negators in the Slavonic Languages: Synchrony and Diachrony2010In: Diachronic Syntax of the Slavonic Languages / [ed] Hansen, Björn and Jasmina Grkovic-Major, Vienna: Wiener Slawistischen Almanach , 2010, p. 197-210Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2112.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Standard and Special Negators in the Uralic Languages2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2113.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Standard and Special Negators: their evolution and interaction2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2114.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Suppletion2013In: Oxford Bibliographies, Oxford University Press, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2115.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Suppletion in Verb Paradigms2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 2116. Veselinova, Ljuba
    Suppletion in verb paradigms: bits and pieces of a puzzle2003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 2117.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. Allmän språkvetenskap.
    Suppletion in verb paradigms: Bits and pieces of a puzzle2006Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This book examines stem change in verb paradigms, as in English go 'go.PRESENT' vs. went 'go.PAST', a phenomenon referred to as suppletion in current linguistic theory. The work is based on a broad sample of 193 languages, and examines this long neglected phenomenon from a typological perspective. In addition to identifying types of suppletion which occur cross-linguistically, the study brings to light areal patterns of the occurrence of suppletive forms in verb paradigms. Several hypotheses as regards the diachronic development of suppletive forms are presented as well. The author also seeks to explore the methodological issues of evaluating the frequency of linguistic features in large language samples by introducing a method of weighting languages according to their genetic relatedness. All figures obtained in this way are compared to the proportions yielded by more familiar counting methods, and the results and implications of the different procedures are compared and discussed throughout.

  • 2118.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The Negative Existential Cycle Revisited2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2119.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The Negative Existential Cycle Revisited2014In: Linguistics, ISSN 2072-8379, Vol. 52, no 6, p. 1327-1389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on crosslinguistic data and the postulation of six language types, the Negative Existential Cycle was proposed by Croft (1991) as a way of modeling the evolution of standard negation markers from existential negators. The current investigation tests this model by applying it to two language families, Slavonic and Polynesian, checking which cycle types are instantiated in these families and outlining pathways of transition between different types. In Slavonic, we observe one type without variation and two types with internal variation. All cycle types are instantiated in Polynesian, which is correlated with characteristics specific to this family. Three pathways are outlined for the partial or complete transfer of negative existentials into the verbal domain. The first is contingent on negative existentials being used in specific constructions and the direct inheritance or expansion of use of these constructions; the second involves negative existentials being used as emphatic negators external to the proposition and their subsequent reanalysis as clause internal negators without any additional pragmatic content. The third pathway, observed in Polynesian only, is through subordination processes leading to the re-interpretation of negative existentials as general markers of negation. Additionally, a time dimension needs to be added when modeling this cycle, as its completion, i.e., the negative existential turning into a full-fledged marker of standard negation, appears to take longer than 2,000 years.

  • 2120.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The Negative Existential Cycle through the lens of comparative data2016In: The Linguistic Cycle Continued, Amsterdam/New York: John Benjamins Publishing Co. , 2016, p. 139-187Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2121.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Towards a typology of negation of non-verbal and existential sentences2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2122.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Typology of negation in existential sentences2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2123.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Bond, Oliver
    SOAS.
    Sampling Isolates2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2124.
    Veselinova, Ljuba N.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Special Negators in the Uralic Languages: Synchrony, Diachrony and Interaction with Standard Negation2015In: Negation in Uralic Languages / [ed] Matti Miestamo, Anne Tamm, Beáta Wagner-Nagy, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2015, p. 547-600Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study covers data from 26 Uralic languages and has both a synchronic and a diachronic orientation. The synchronic part includes a detailed description of the negation strategies in sentences such as (i) Mary is not a nurse and (ii) There are no wild cats. The negators used in such clauses are referred to as special negators because they often differ from standard negation. Their formal and semantic features are discussed but they are also viewed in a broader typological setting. As regards diachrony, the origin of the special negators is traced and the Negative Existential Cycle (Croft 1991) is tested on the Uralic data. Some modifications of the model are suggested as a result of this application.

  • 2125.
    Veselinova, Ljuba Nikolova
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Booza, J. C.
    Studying the Multilingual City: a GIS-based approach2009In: Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, ISSN 0143-4632, E-ISSN 1747-7557, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 145-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Work in two distinct disciplines, urban geography and sociolinguistics, readily points out the multiethnic and multilingual character of metropolitan areas. However, there is still demand for studies which establish the language structure of modern cities. For the purposes of this pilot study, we focus on the Detroit Metropolitan Area (DMA), Michigan. Geographical Information Systems (GIS) technology together with census data were used to arrive at an adequate description of the spatial distribution of languages currently spoken in Detroit and its immediate surroundings. Data from the 2000 US Census are entered into a GIS system and presented visually with a subsequent analysis of the emerging spatial patterns. Due to limitations of the data, we had to restrict the mapping to languages used at home. The study suggests one possible model for the initial stages of mapping the multilingual city; moreover, the data analysed here provide the infrastructure necessary for further research on phenomena such as language shift and language death as well as other aspects of a dynamic multilingual situation.

  • 2126.
    Vesterinen, Rainer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Estruturas causativas no Português: Um estudo sobre a relação entre o modo conjuntivo e os conceitos de subjetificação e domínio2013In: Revista Portuguesa de Humanidades, ISSN 0874-0321, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 97-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies carried out within a cognitive-functional perspective of linguistic analysisdistinguish a relation between the structural properties of complements of causationverbs and the kind of causation they designate. The present paper follows this lineof investigation. However, the focus of the analysis is put on the relation between thesubjunctive mood and the concepts of subjectification and dominion in causativestructures. The hypothesis put forward is that the relation between the Portuguesecausation verbs fazer and deixar, on the one hand, and the subjunctive complement, onthe other, can be can be explained in terms of subjectification, i.e. a diminished degreeof subject control. Accordingly, it is argued that the subjunctive mood designates anevent that is located outside the conceptualizer’s dominion.

  • 2127.
    Vesterinen, Rainer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Extending the dominion of effective control: Its applicability to mood choice in Spanish and Portuguese2014In: Cognitive Linguistics, ISSN 0936-5907, E-ISSN 1613-3641, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 583-616Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the model of Cognitive Grammar, the concept of dominion is fundamental to the analysis of the conceptualizer’s attitude toward an event or a proposition. However, the concept has, first and foremost, been understood in epistemic terms, whereas there has been less concern with the conceptualizer’s efforts to influence and manipulate the course of events in the world. This being so, the present paper shows that the conceptualizer’s dominion of effective control is relevant in a number of linguistic contexts. The analysis provides evidence for this particular feature in factive contexts, deontic contexts, contexts of volition and causation, and in adverbial clauses of purpose, manner and condition. The analysis further shows that the conceptualizer’s dominion of effective control is capable of providing a conceptually grounded explanation for the occurrence of the Spanish and the Portuguese subjunctive mood in these grammatical contexts.

  • 2128.
    Vesterinen, Rainer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Factividade e modo verbal2014In: Revue Romane, ISSN 0035-3906, E-ISSN 1600-0811, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 52-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The traditional way of explaining the subjunctive mood in Portuguese is utterly related to the distinction made between reality and non-reality. That is, while the indicative mood has been explained in terms of reality, the subjunctive has been the mood of non-reality. Although this explanation covers many occurrences of the subjunctive mood, it is also recognized that it fails to explain the use of the subjunctive mood in factive contexts. This being so, the present study aims at explaining the variation between the indicative and subjunctive mood in factive contexts from a Cognitive Grammar perspective. The hypothesis put forward is that the mood variation can be explained in terms of dominion and control. Thus, it is claimed that the subjunctive mood in factive contexts can be explained by a reduced degree of active control, this being consistent with an event that is located outside the conceptualizer’s dominion of effective control. On the other hand, the indicative mood occurs in contexts of epistemic control that are located inside the conceptualizer’s epistemic dominion. An additional analysis of the subjunctive mood in other grammatical contexts corroborates the initial claim.

  • 2129.
    Vesterinen, Rainer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics, Institute of Latin American Studies.
    Iconicity, Subjectification and Dominion in Portuguese concessive clauses: Conceptual Differences between Concessive Clauses Introduced by Apesar de and Embora2012In: Compendium of Cognitive Linguistics Research: Volume 1 / [ed] Thomas Fuyin Li, New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2012, p. 169-192Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper analyses Portuguese concessive constructions introduced by apesar de (‘in weight of’) and embora (from Old Portuguese em boa hora, ‘in good time’). From the standpoint of Cognitive Grammar, it is argued that the constructions display a prime example of iconicity. Thus, it is shown that iconic principles such as linear ordering, formal complexity and formal distance explain the reason why the apesar de construction prototypically designates a more direct concessive relation, while the embora construction designates a more complex relation to the main clause. Further, it is claimed that the complex relation between the embora construction and the main clause represents a prime example of subjectification. Finally, the analysis shows that the subjunctive mood in the embora construction is related to the notion of dominion.

  • 2130.
    Vesterinen, Rainer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies.
    Impersonals with ser ('to be') and the dominion of effective control2014In: Language sciences (Oxford), ISSN 0388-0001, E-ISSN 1873-5746, Vol. 41, p. 143-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper analyses the semantic meaning of the subjunctive mood in complements of deontic and evaluative impersonal expressions. From the perspective of Cognitive Grammar, it is argued that the meaning of the subjunctive mood is to designate events that are located outside the conceptualizer’s dominion, whereas the impersonal expression puts focus on the relevant dominion, i.e. the dominion of effective control. Thus, the analysis shows that there is a conceptual relation between the conceptual content of the impersonal expression, on the one hand, and occurrence of the subjunctive mood, on the other hand. An additional analysis concerns the occurrence and the meaning of the inflected infinitive in contexts that imply a low degree of effective control.

  • 2131.
    Vesterinen, Rainer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Instructions or dominion?: The meaning of the Spanish subjunctive mood2013In: Pragmatics & Cognition, ISSN 0929-0907, E-ISSN 1569-9943, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 359-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a highly interesting study, Dam and Dam-Jensen (2010) put forward the idea that the indicative and the subjunctive mood in Spanish complementizer phrases can be explained by the instructions they convey. The indicative instructs the addressee to locate the situation created by the verb relative to the situation of utterance, whereas the subjunctive instructs the addressee not to locate the situation described by the verb relative to the situation of utterance. Although this explanation is most appealing, the present paper argues that it also may create explanatory problems. Thus, it is claimed that the notion of dominion can explain the semantic meaning of the Spanish subjunctive mood. This verbal mood designates events that are located outside the conceptualizer’s dominion, either in terms of epistemic control or in terms of effective control.

  • 2132.
    Vesterinen, Rainer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Mood choice in complements of Spanish comprender and Portuguese compreender (‘understand’) – distribution and meaning2017In: Languages in Contrast: International Journal for Contrastive Linguistics, ISSN 1387-6759, E-ISSN 1569-9897, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 279-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper analyzes the occurrence of indicative and subjunctive complements of the verbs comprender (Spanish) and compreender (Portuguese) in European Spanish and European Portuguese. A quantitative analysis based on 400 occurrences of the complements randomly selected from the newspaper genre shows that the indicative mood occurs more frequently than the subjunctive mood in both languages, although the subjunctive mood is more frequent in the Portuguese corpus than in the Spanish one. The analysis also shows that the occurrence of the subjunctive complement is highly restricted to contexts in which the subject of the main clause verb is either 1st person or 3rd person singular. From the theoretical perspective of Cognitive Grammar, the mood alternation is explained by the concept of dominion, i.e. the indicative complement designates an event that is located within the conceptualizer’s epistemic dominion, whereas the subjunctive complement designates an event that is located outside the conceptualizer’s dominion of effective control.

  • 2133.
    Vesterinen, Rainer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies.
    O modo verbal em expressões impessoais com o verbo ser2012In: Revue Romane, ISSN 0035-3906, E-ISSN 1600-0811, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 76-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The subjunctive mood has frequently been explained in terms of unreality, presupposition, non-assertion and the distinction between new and old information. Although these explanations offer a partial account of the semantics of this mood, it is shown that many occurrences of the subjunctive mood remain unexplained. This being so, the present paper aims at explaining the indicative and subjunctive mood in impersonal expressions with the verb ser from a Cognitive Grammar perspective of linguistic analysis. The analysis shows that the variation between the indicative and subjunctive mood in this grammatical context can be explained in terms of dominion and control. An extension of the analysis further shows that it may account for the occurrence of the subjunctive mood in other grammatical contexts.

  • 2134.
    Vesterinen, Rainer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    The Portuguese Future Subjunctive: A Dominion Analysis2017In: Review of Cognitive Linguistics, ISSN 1877-9751, E-ISSN 1877-976X, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 58-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the analysis of the Portuguese future subjunctive mood would contribute to a greater understanding of the general meaning of the subjunctive mood, this verb form has received considerably little attention compared to the other subjunctive forms, namely, the past and present subjunctives. The aim of the present paper is to fill this gap. Using the theoretical perspective of Cognitive Grammar, it will be shown that the Portuguese future subjunctive shares many characteristic features with other tenses of the subjunctive mood. In particular, the analysis shows that the Portuguese future subjunctive can be explained by the concept of dominion. Thus, the present paper provides a conceptually grounded and unified explanation for the meaning of the Portuguese subjunctive mood.

  • 2135.
    Vikner, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Accent preference - stereotypes or individual?: Swedish university students' attitudes towards British and American varieties of English.2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the attitudes of Swedish university students towards the British and the American variety of English. Many studies have shown that perceptions of the varieties are changing as a result of increasing exposure of the language. The present study analyses responses from a questionnaire on speech samples of the two varieties and compares them to a similar study made ten years ago, to investigate possible differences over time and between respondents. The data shows a more positive attitude towards the American variety in general, although female respondents are more prone to conform to the results of previous studies and favour the British variety in aspects of prestige and status. The data also show that this method of research is very sensitive to individual characteristics of the speakers used in the investigation and stresses the difficulties in receiving a reliable general result.

  • 2136.
    Vikström, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    “[E]en strict offensive och defensive alliance” and “the danger this King and the 2 Queens were in”: News Reporting in Early Modern Swedish and English Diplomatic Correspondence2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The study of early cross-linguistic diplomatic epistolography was first introduced in Brownlees' (2012) comparative study of Italian and English personal newsletters. Given the field’s young age and the strong need for both further research and the retrieving of new, untranscribed and unanalysed data, the present study set out to help move this field forward by examining, at both a textual superstructure and semantic macrostructural level, two sets of unchartered diplomatic newsletters which representatives at foreign courts despatched back to their respective home countries. The first set of original manuscripts comprises periodical newsletters which Baron Christer Bonde, the Swedish ambassador-extraordinary to England, wrote to Charles X, King of Sweden, between 1655-6, whereas the second set consists of letters sent in 1680 by John Robinson, England’s chargé d’affaires in Sweden, to Sir Leoline Jenkins, Secretary of State for the Northern Department of England. The analysis has shown that whereas the textual superstructures of the two diplomats’ correspondences remain similarly robust, the instantiating semantic macrostructures display not only stylistic and compositional, but also narrative, variation.

  • 2137.
    Vikström, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Tudor and Stuart England and the Significance of Adjectives: A Corpus Analysis of Adjectival Modification, Gender Perspectives and Mutual Information Regarding Titles of Social Rank Used in Tudor and Stuart England2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study has been to investigate how titles of social rank used in Tudor and Stuart England are modified by attributive adjectives in pre-adjacent position and the implications that become possible to observe. Using the Corpus of Early English Correspondence Sampler (CEECS) the present work set out to examine adjectival modification, gender perspectives and MI (Mutual Information) scores in order to gain a deeper understanding of how and why titles were modified in certain ways. The titles under scrutiny are Lord, Lady, Sir, Dame, Madam, Master and Mistress and these have been analysed following theories and frameworks pertaining to the scientific discipline of sociohistorical linguistics.

       The findings of the present study suggest that male titles were modified more frequently than, and differently from, female titles. The adjectives used as pre-modifiers, in turn, stem from different semantic domains which reveals differences in attitudes from the language producers towards the referents and in what traits are described regarding the holders of the titles. Additionally, a type/token ratio investigation reveals that the language producers were keener on using a more varied vocabulary when modifying female titles and less so when modifying male titles. The male terms proved to be used more formulaically than the female terms, as well. Lastly, an analysis of MI scores concludes that the most frequent collocations are not necessarily the most relevant ones.

       A discussion regarding similarities and differences to other studies is carried out, as well, which, further, is accompanied by suggestions for future research. 

  • 2138.
    Virta, Erkki
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities.
    Tvåspråkighet, tänkande och identitet: studier av finska barn i Sverige och Finland1994Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 2139.
    Visnjar, Mojca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Negotiating Identity: A sociolinguistic analysis of adult English speaking immigrants in Sweden2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Due to increased transnational migration and globalisation, English has come to have a high status in Sweden, and is used in daily communication. The purpose of this research is to investigate how immigrants with English as their first language, negotiate their identity in Sweden, how they construct the need to (not) speak Swedish, and, finally, how their linguistic trajectories inform us about their linguistic ideologies and reported practices. Identity, constantly performed on the border between the self and the other, is greatly dependent on the language. Recent research in the field has focused mainly on immigrants moving to English speaking countries, while migrants with English as their first language have been somewhat neglected. This study investigates identity negotiation based on linguistic repertoire, Spracherleben, and linguistic ideologies, based on data collected through interviews. The results indicate that the fact that all informants prefer to, and mostly do use English, has a meaning beyond the language. It is namely in the language choice itself that the participants negotiate and demonstrate their identity. Language, therefore, is not the main issue the informants find problematic. Instead, it is the sense of alienation and the inability to convey their message in the way they feel would best represent who they are. 

  • 2140.
    Vogel, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism.
    Adjective2013In: Wörterbücher zur Sprach- und Kommunikationswissenschaft online: cognitive grammar / [ed] Susanne Niemeier, Constanze Juchem-Grundmann, Doris Schönefeld, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2013, , p. 5Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2141.
    Vogel, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Classifier2013In: Wörterbücher zur Sprach- und Kommunikationswissenschaft (WSK) Online: Cognitive grammar / [ed] Susanne Niemeier, Constanze Juchem-Grundmann, Doris Schönefeld, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2142.
    Vogel, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Comparison2013In: Wörterbücher zur Sprach- und Kommunikationswissenschaft / [ed] Christoph Demmerling et al., de Gruyter , 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2143.
    Vogel, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism.
    Det fördomsfulla språket2001In: Språkbitar / [ed] Jane Nystedt, Stockholm: svenska förlaget , 2001Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2144.
    Vogel, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Going towards the unknown: Expressions for dying in European languages2009In: Studies in language and cognition, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing , 2009, p. 200-208Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper investigates expressions for dying in five European languages with an onomasiological approach. The data was collected from questionnaires, dictionaries, web resources and literature, both fiction and non-fiction. The results indicate that expressions for dying show great similarities across the languages. Expressions involve verbs with high agentivity. A location (where one will be after death) is often specified. Expressions often make use of trivial tasks, such as “put down the receiver”. Further, death is associated with lack of breath and to sleep. Here, the study supports earlier research. Finally, a seemingly paradoxical way of relating death to both cold and heat is explained by discussing specific conceptualizations, separating the body from the location of the body.

  • 2145.
    Vogel, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Gradability2013In: Wörterbücher zur Sprach- und Kommunikationswissenschaft (WSK) Online: Cognitive Grammar / [ed] Susanne Niemeier, Constanze Juchem-Grundmann, Doris Schönefeld, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2146.
    Vogel, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism.
    Laddade ord2011In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2147.
    Vogel, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism.
    Laddade ord2010In: Populär kommunikation, ISSN 1402-2567Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2148.
    Vogel, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Participle2013In: Wörterbücher zur Sprach- und Kommunikationswissenschaft (WSK) Online: Cognitive grammar / [ed] Susanne Niemeier, Constanze Juchem-Grundmann, Doris Schönefeld, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2149.
    Vogel, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Superlative2013In: Wörterbücher zur Sprach- und Kommunikationswissenschaft (WSK) Online: Cognitive grammar / [ed] Susanne Niemeier, Constanze Juchem-Grundmann, Doris Schönefeld, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2150.
    Vogel, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Tranströmer visar världen på nytt2014In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no 11Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
40414243444546 2101 - 2150 of 2285
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