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  • 2151.
    Ädel, Annelie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Using corpora to teach academic writing: challenges for the direct approach2010In: Corpus-based approaches to English language teaching / [ed] Mari Carmen Campoy-Cubillo, Begoña Bellés-Fortuño and Maria Lluisa Gea-Valor, London and New York: Continuum , 2010Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2152.
    Ädel, Annelie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    "What uh the folks who did this survey found": expert attribution in spoken academic lectures2008In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1654-6970, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 83-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Academic writing has been said to display a tension between originality and humility to the community (Myers 1990; Berkenkotter & Huckin 1995; Hyland 1999). One of the fundamental ways in which this tension plays out is in references to previous research, or ‘attribution’. While recent research has emphasized the importance of attribution in academic writing—Hyland (1999), for example, found the average number of citations in research articles to be as high as 70 per 10,000 words—the role of attribution in spoken academic discourse is relatively uncharted territory. In this study of attribution in academic speech, transcripts of 30 large lectures from the Michigan Corpus of Academic Spoken English (MICASE; Simpson et al. 1999) were analysed, totalling 250,000 words. References to expert sources in the academic domain were analysed, specifically third person attribution (including third person pronouns, proper names, and a selection of nouns), as in “um and, Marx points out that those are the tools that the proletariat are gonna use”. The research questions were: To what degree dolecturers situate intertextually the knowledge and facts they are presenting? Do thedisciplinary differences found in written citation practices also occur in speech? Howvariable are the formal realizations of attribution in speech?Contrary to previous research findings (e.g. Biber 2006; Swales 2005), the studyshowed both that expert attribution is quite pervasive and that there is disciplinaryvariation in academic speech. The findings are compared to studies of attribution inacademic writing (e.g. Hyland 1999; Tadros 1993), with the goal of contributing tocurrent research on the commonalities that academic speech (lectures) exhibits withacademic writing on one hand, and non-academic speech on the other.

  • 2153.
    Ädel, Annelie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Garretson, Gregory
    Boston University.
    Who's speaking?: evidentiality in US newspapers during the 2004 presidential campaign2008In: Corpora and discourse: the challenges of different settings / [ed] Annelie Ädel, Randi Reppen, Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , 2008, p. 157-187Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2154.
    Ädel, Annelie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Mauranen, Anna
    English Department, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Metadiscourse: diverse and divided perspectives 2010In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1654-6970, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2155.
    Ädel, Annelie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Reppen, Randi
    Corpora and discourse: the challenges of different settings2008Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2156.
    Ådin, Hanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Goggle-Eyes: en främmandegörande barnboksöversättning utifrån Bermans negativa analysverktyg2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The present study is based on the translation of the first two chapters of Goggle-Eyes, a novel for young teenagers by the british author Anne Fine. The study examines the effects of a foreignizing translation strategy based on Antoine Berman’s negative analytics, concerning avoidance of the loss of sonorous and iconic terms and expressions and idioms. The analysis suggests that in many cases it is possible to keep sonorous and iconic terms in translation without creating a foreignizing effect that could make reading difficult for young readers. However, the keeping of expressions and idioms in many cases calls for clarification in order to create a target text that is understandable for the target group.

  • 2157. Åsman, Thea Palm
    et al.
    Pedersen, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    How Bert got into Ned's head: domestication in the translation of literature for young readers2013In: Perspectives: studies in translatology, ISSN 0907-676X, E-ISSN 1747-6623, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 143-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper was to discover to what extent the American translation of the Swedish children's novel Berts dagbok had been adapted to its audience as a result of the translator's initial norm. Previous research has found that while translators of children's literature traditionally mainly employ domesticating strategies, recent research has shown that current translations of canonized children's literature, and literature aimed at a slightly older demographic segment, have been more source-oriented. We therefore decided to investigate whether the translator's initial norm had been to domesticate the text, i.e. adapting any unfamiliar cultural context with regard to the new audience, American children and young teenagers. Through the analysis of coupled pairs it was concluded that the translator's initial norm was still to domesticate the text, and, as a result, a majority of the extracted examples had been replaced by something more familiar to the new audience, which consequently moved the story from Sweden to USA.

  • 2158.
    Öhrström, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    A preliminary study of audiovisual integration of roundedness in front vowels: limitation due to discrepancy in jaw depression2010In: Proceedings, FONETIK 2010, 2010, p. 125-128Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Audiovisual integration of vowel roundedness was investigated, as the discrepancy in jaw depression increased. The results show that the relative visual impact on perceived roundedness decreases at larger discrepancies. The results may suggest that this tendency would be stronger among acoustically presented [i] than [y]. To verify this, more research with talking heads may be required. The results confirm earlier findings that audiovisual integration doesn’t require unconsciousness among subjects about the dubbing procedure.

     

  • 2159.
    Öhrström, Niklas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Arppe, Heidi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Eklund, Linnéa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Eriksson, Sofie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Marcus, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Mathiassen, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Pettersson, Lina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Audiovisual integration in binaural, monaural and dichotic listening2011In: Proceedings, FONETIK 2011, 2011, p. 29-32Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Audiovisual speech perception was investigated in three different conditions: (i) binaurally, where the same sound was presented in both ears, (ii) monaurally, where the sound was presented in one ear randomly, and (iii) dichotically, where the subjects were asked to focus on what was heard in the right ear. The results showed visual influence to be lowered in random monaural presentation as well as in dichotic presentation. Low visual influence to dichotic presentation, as compared with binaural presentation, supports the notion of an attentional component in audiovisual speech processing. Low visual influence in the random monaural presentation may be due to increased attention to the auditory modality because of uncertainty.

  • 2160.
    Öhrström, Niklas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Bulukin Wilén, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Eklöf, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Gustafsson, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Visual discrimination between Swedish and Finnish among L2-learners of Swedish2009In: Proceedings, FONETIK 2009, 2009, p. 150-153Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of speech reading experiments were carried out to examine the ability to discriminate between Swedish and Finnish among L2 learners of Swedish and Spanish as their mother tongue. This group was compared with native speakers of Swedish and a group with no knowledge in Swedish or Finnish. The results showed tendencies, that familiarity with Swedish increased the discrimination ability between Swedish and Finnish.

  • 2161.
    Öhrström, Niklas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Traunmüller, Hartmut
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Acoustical prerequisites for visual hearing2006In: Working Papers 52, FONETIK 2006, 2006, p. 149-152Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The McGurk effect shows in an obvious manner that visual information from a speaker’s articulatory movements influences the auditory perception. The present study concerns the robustness of such speech specific audiovisual integration. What are the acoustical prerequisites for audiovisual integration to occur in speech perception? Auditory, visual and audiovisual syllables (phonated and whispered) were presented to 23 perceivers. In some of the stimuli, the auditory signal was exchanged for a schwa syllable, a dynamic source signal and a constant source signal. The results show that dynamic spectral information from a source signal suffice as auditory input for speech specific audiovisual integration to occur. The results also confirm that type (and absence) of lip rounding are strong visual cues.

  • 2162.
    Öhrström, Niklas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Traunmüller, Hartmut
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Audiovisual perception of Swedish vowels with and without conflicting cues2004In: Proceedings, FONETIK 2004, 2004, p. 40-43Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Auditory, visual and audiovisual syllables with and without conflicting vowel cues (/i y e ø /) presented to men and women showed (1) most to perceive roundedness by eye rather than by ear, (2) a mostly male minority to be less relying on vision, (3) presence of lip rounding to be noticed more easily than absence, and (4) all to perceive openness by ear rather than by eye.

  • 2163.
    Östberg, Urban
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    De indoeuropeiska språkens historia2008In: Språkbruk, ISSN 0358-9293, no 4Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2164.
    Östberg, Urban
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Ett träd med vida grenar2009In: Historielärarnas förenings årsskrift, ISSN 0439-2434, p. 151-153Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2165.
    Östberg, Urban
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Något tungläst men fängslande om indoeuropeiska språk2008In: Nya Wermlands-Tidningen, no 15/12Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2166.
    Östberg, urban
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Seglivade språkmyter2009In: Språkbruk, ISSN 0358-9293, no 1, p. 29-30Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2167.
    Östberg, Urban
    Stockholm University. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Snön faller rikligt i svenska språket2009In: Svenskläraren, ISSN 0346-2412, no 2, p. 33-34Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2168.
    Östberg, Urban
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Språkets rot sökes genom grenars studier2008In: Svenskläraren, ISSN 0346-2412, no 3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2169.
    Östling, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Stagger: A modern POS tagger for Swedish2012In: / [ed] Pierre Nugues, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2170.
    Östling, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Word order typology through multilingual word alignment2015In: The 53rd Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and the 7th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing of the Asian Federation of Natural Language Processing: Proceedings of the Conference, Volume 2: Short Papers, 2015, p. 205-211Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With massively parallel corpora of hundreds or thousands of translations of the same text, it is possible to automatically perform typological studies of language structure using very large language samples. We investigate the domain of wordorder using multilingual word alignment and high-precision annotation transfer in a corpus with 1144 translations in 986 languages of the New Testament. Results are encouraging, with 86% to 96% agreementbetween our method and the manually created WALS database for a range of different word order features. Beyond reproducing the categorical data in WALS and extending it to hundreds of other languages, we also provide quantitative data for therelative frequencies of different word orders, and show the usefulness of this for language comparison. Our method has applications for basic research in linguistic typology, as well as for NLP tasks like transfer learning for dependency parsing, which has been shown to benefit from word order information.

  • 2171.
    Östling, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Börstell, Carl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Gärdenfors, Moa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Wirén, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Universal Dependencies for Swedish Sign Language2017In: Proceedings of the 21st Nordic Conference on Computational Linguistics / [ed] Jörg Tiedemann, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2017, p. 303-308Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the first effort to annotate a signed language with syntactic dependency structure: the Swedish Sign Language portion of the Universal Dependencies treebanks. The visual modality presents some unique challenges in analysis and annotation, such as the possibility of both hands articulating separate signs simultaneously, which has implications for the concept of projectivity in dependency grammars. Our data is sourced from the Swedish Sign Language Corpus, and if used in conjunction these resources contain very richly annotated data: dependency structure and parts of speech, video recordings, signer metadata, and since the whole material is also translated into Swedish the corpus is also a parallel text.

  • 2172.
    Östling, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Börstell, Carl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Wallin, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Enriching the Swedish Sign Language Corpus with Part of Speech Tags Using Joint Bayesian Word Alignment and Annotation Transfer2015In: Proceedings of the 20th Nordic Conference of Computational Linguistics: NODALIDA 2015, May 11-13, 2015, Vilnius, Lithuania / [ed] Beáta Megyesi, Linköping University Electronic Press, 2015, p. 263-268Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have used a novel Bayesian model of joint word alignment and part of speech (PoS) annotation transfer to enrich the Swedish Sign Language Corpus with PoS tags. The annotations were then hand-corrected in order to both improve annotation quality for the corpus, and allow the empirical evaluation presented herein.

  • 2173.
    Östling, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Wirén, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Compounding in a Swedish Blog Corpus2013In: Computer mediated discourse across languages / [ed] Laura Álvarez López, Charlotta Seiler Brylla & Philip Shaw, Stockholm: Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis, 2013, p. 45-63Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2174.
    Ćwiek, Aleksandra
    et al.
    Bielefeld University.
    Włodarczak, Marcin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Heldner, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Wagner, Petra
    Bielefeld University.
    Acoustics and discourse function of two types of breathing signals2017In: Nordic Prosody: Proceedings of the XIIth Conference, Trondheim 2016 / [ed] Eggesbø Abrahamsen, Jardar Koreman, Jacques van Dommelen, Wim A., Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2017, p. 83-91Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Breathing is fundamental for living and speech, and it has been a subject of linguistic research for years. Recently, there has been a renewed interest in tackling the question of possible communicative functions of breathing (e.g. Rochet-Capellan & Fuchs, 2014; Aare, Włodarczak & Heldner, 2014; Włodarczak & Heldner, 2015; Włodarczak, Heldner, & Edlund, 2015). The present study set out to determine acoustic markedness and communicative functions of pauses accompanied and non-accompanied by breathing. We hypothesised that an articulatory reset occurring in breathing pauses and an articulatory freeze in non-breathing pauses differentiates between the two types. A production experiment was conducted and some evidence in favour of such a phenomenon was found. Namely, in case of non-breathing pauses, we observed more coarticulation evidenced by a more frequent omission of plosive releases. Our findings thus give some evidence in favour of the communicative function of breathing.

  • 2175. Šimko, Juraj
    et al.
    Aalto, Daniel
    Lippus, Pärtel
    Włodarczak, Marcin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Vainio, Martti
    Pith, perceived duration and auditory biases: Comparison among languages2015In: Proceedings of the 18th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences / [ed] Maria Wolters, Judy Livingstone, Bernie Beattie, Rachel Smith, Mike MacMahon, Jane Stuart-Smith, Jim Scobbie, Glasgow: University of Glasgow , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In addition to fundamental frequency height, its movement is also generally assumed to lengthen the perceived duration of syllable-like sounds. The lengthening effect has been observed for some languages (US English, French, SwissGerman, Japanese) but reported to be absent for another (Thai, Latin American Spanish, German). In this work, native speakers of Estonian, Finnish, Mandarin and Swedish performed a two-alternative forced choice duration discrimination experiment with pairs of complex tones varying in several acoustic dimensions. According to a logistic regression analysis, the duration judgements are affected by intensity, f0 level, and f0 movement for all languages, but the strength of these influences varies across languages and a pattern revealed by the relative strengths correlates with phonological properties of the languages. The findings are discussed in the light of current hypotheses of the origin of pitch modulation of perceived duration.

  • 2176.
    Šimko, Juraj
    et al.
    University of Helsinki.
    Włodarczak, Marcin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Suni, Antti
    University of Helsinki.
    Heldner, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Vainio, Martti
    University of Helsinki.
    Coordination between f0, intensity and breathing signals2017In: Nordic Prosody: Proceedings of the XIIth Conference, Trondheim 2016 / [ed] Eggesbø Abrahamsen, Jardar Koreman, Jacques van Dommelen, Wim A., Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2017, p. 147-156Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper presents preliminary results on temporal coordination of breathing, intensity and fundamental frequency signals using continuous wavelet transform. We have found tendencies towards phase-locking at time scales corresponding to several prosodic units such as vowel-to-vowel intervals and prosodic words. The proposed method should be applicable to a wide range of problems in which the goal is finding a stable phase relationship in a pair of hierarchically organised signals.

41424344 2151 - 2176 of 2176
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