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  • 301.
    Cleve, Linn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    "Det ingår liksom att anstränga sig lite": En studie om pedagogers förhållningssätt och tankar om språkstimulerande arbetssätt för flerspråkiga barn i förskolan.2010Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to shed light on how some teachers with different backgrounds, in a homogenous Swedish-speaking and a more multicultural area, think about and work with multilingual children in preschool. My research questions concerned the teachers’ vision of how a language stimulating environment should be designed. If multilingual children need a particular design - plus positive and negative aspects of the work with multilingual preschool children, as well as if there’s differences between the statements of the various professional roles. I also wanted to find out whether children's mother tongue was spoken in the everyday praxis or not - or if the child’s origins were highlighted in other ways. Interviews were used as my reasearch metod.

    My results showed that all teachers stress the use of a nuanced, rich and naming language in everyday praxis. For children with a mother tongue other than Swedish, it becomes more important with language aid, like pictures and concrete materials, according to teachers. Problematic aspects of speaking several languages in preschool were partly organizational - to obtain staff with multilingual skills - and partly to keep a balance in also emphasizing Swedish. In two of the preschools’ everyday activity, teachers speak languages other than Swedish. They do this referring to the positive cognitive effects on the child. Contrary to this, a preschool teacher at another preschool chose not to speak other languages in everyday activity. She feels that this sends out negative signals to the children whose first language is not spoken by any of the teachers. In general, there was a position with the teachers that problems and difficulties are in the profession, making an effort forms a part of the occupation.

  • 302.
    Clyne, Michael
    et al.
    University of Melbourne.
    Norrby, Catrin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Address in pluricentric languages: The case of German and Swedish2011In: Línguas Pluricêntricas Pluricentric Languages: Variação Linguística e Dimensões Sociocognitivas Linguistic Variation and Sociocognitive Dimensions / [ed] Augusto Soares da Silva, Amadeu Torres, Miguel Gonçalves, Braga, Portugal: ALETHEIA – Associação Científica e Cultural , 2011, p. 147-160Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on address practices in German and Swedish, which bring out contrasts in address in the national varieties. It draws mainly on a large-scale project on address in a number of languages in Europe (Clyne, Norrby, Warren 2009). Data were collected in key localities of the national varieties in focus groups, interviews, chat groups and through participant observation. The results demonstrate that the dominant variation between address in the German and Austrian national varieties of German is the much greater use of titles in Austria and the much more widespread use of T in the workplace, both to superiors and at the same level of seniority. There is also variation within Germany, which highlights the issue of whether East and West German were separate national varieties during the division of Germany. In Sweden-Swedish, the V form was virtually abandoned in the 1960s and is now restricted to addressing especially very old and frail people in service encounters. In Finland Swedish, V is still employed in a way that has been abandoned in Sweden – expressing status and formality, reflecting conservatism and the influence of the Finnish language. This means that controversy as to whether V is exclusionary in Sweden is not relevant in Finland-Swedish. Our study of German and Swedish also demonstrates that knowledge of address in others’ varieties is largely stereotypical.

  • 303.
    Clyne, Michael
    et al.
    Dept of Languages and Linguistics, The University of Melbourne.
    Norrby, Catrin
    Dept of Languages and Linguistics, The University of Melbourne.
    Warren, Jane
    Dept of Languages and Linguistics, The University of Melbourne.
    Language and Human Relations: Styles of Address in Contemporary Language2009 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The way in which people address one another is crucial to expressing social relationships and is closely linked with cultural values. In English we call some people by their first names, and others 'Mr' or 'Ms', followed by their surname. In some other languages there are different ways of saying 'you' depending on the degree of social distance. Exploring practices in the family, school, university, the workplace and in letters, this book reveals patterns in the varied ways people choose to address one another, from pronouns to first names, from honorifics to titles and last names. Examples are taken from contemporary English, French, German and Swedish, using rich data from focus group research, interviews, chat groups, and participant observation.

    • A revealing investigation into the different ways people choose to address each other • Data is derived from multiple sources, such as focus groups, interviews and participant observation • Explores address practices in a variety of situations including the family, school and the workplace

  • 304.
    Collantes, Sebastian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Scrutinizing the use of online data: A critical study of the use of online forum texts in research2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Internet has given researchers a convenient and accessible tool for collecting data. It enables researchers to find natural occurring language that gives them the opportunity to save time and partake of various advantages the Internet has to offer. Web forums are deep and complex message boards occupied by online communities. These web forums are a rich source for collecting naturally occurring language that can be used for various sorts of research. Several researchers have shown that these web forums have a generous amount of advantages when used as data (Yates, 1996; Hsiung, 2000; Joinson, 2001; Im & Chee, 2006; Newhagen & Rafaeli, 2006; Misoch, 2015). However, it is equally important to understand the nature of the flaws that web forum texts as data may have. The notion of anonymity and the overrepresentation of a certain demographic groups may mislead incautious researchers collecting data from web forums.

    This paper aims to analyse several research articles which uses web forum texts as data within two different disciplines, health and social care and linguistics, in addition to classifying them as either high-stakes or low-stakes research. The goal is to investigate how researchers handle possible limitations and risks of such data. Initial results showed that high-stakes are more thorough when discussing and reporting concerns regarding their data. Evidently, health and social care high-stakes research articles reported more concerns than linguistics research articles. Several recommendations based on these results were made in the end of the paper for researchers to use when conducting research based on web forum texts.

  • 305.
    Cooper, Andrew
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    A unified account of the Old English metrical line2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study describes the verse design of Old English poetry in terms of modern phonological theory, developing an analysis which allows all OE verse lines to be described in terms of single metrical design.

    Old English poetry is typified by a single type of line of variable length, characterised by four metrical peaks. The variation evident in the lengths of OE metrical units has caused previous models to overgenerate acceptable verse forms or to develop complex typologies of dozens of acceptable forms. In this study, Metrical phonology and Optimality theory are used to highlight some aspects of the relationship between syntax, phonology and verse metrics in determining how sentences and phrases interact with the verse structure to create variation.

    The main part of the study is a metrical model based on the results of a corpus analysis. The corpus is centred on the OE poems Genesis and Andreas, complemented by selected shorter poems. A template of a prototypical line is described based on a verse foot which contains three vocalic moras, and which can vary between 2 and 4 vocalic moras distributed across 1 to 4 syllables. Each standard line is shown to consist of four of these verse feet, leading to a line length which can vary between 8 and 16 vocalic moras. It is shown that the limited variation within the length of the verse foot causes the greater variation in the length of lines. The rare, longer ‘hypermetric’ line is also accounted for with a modified analysis. The study disentangles the verse foot, which is an abstract metrical structure, from the prosodic word, which is a phonological object upon which the verse foot is based, and with which it is often congruent. Separate sets of constraints are elaborated for creating prosodic words in OE, and for fitting them into verse feet and lines. The metrical model developed as a result of this analysis is supported by three smaller focused studies.

    The constraints for creating prosodic words are defended with reference to compounds and derivational nouns, and are supported by a smaller study focusing on the metrical realisation of non-Germanic personal names in OE verse. Names of biblical origin are often longer than the OE prosodic word can accommodate. The supporting study on non-Germanic names demonstrates how long words with no obvious internal morphology in OE are adapted first to OE prosody and then to the verse structure. The solution for the metrical realisation of these names is shown to be patterned on derivational nouns.

    The supporting study on compound numerals describes how phrases longer than a verse are accommodated by the verse design. It is shown that compound numerals, which consist of two or more numeral words (e.g. 777 – seofonhund and seofon and hundseofontig) are habitually rearranged within the text to meet the requirements of verse length and alliteration.

    A further supporting study discusses the difference between the line length constraints controlling OE verse design and those for Old Norse and Old Saxon verse. Previous studies have often conflated these three closely related traditions into a single system. It is shown that despite their common characteristics, the verse design described in this study applies to all OE verse, but not to ON or OS.

  • 306.
    Cortes, Elisabet Eir
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Mapping articulatory parameters on formant patterns: From articulations to acoustics non-stop2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The traditional way of estimating the formant frequencies from articulatory data presupposes knowledge of how the vocal tract cross-sectional area varies for a given articulatory shape (Fant 1960/1970). Accordingly, in order to derive the formant pattern of a given articulation, the three-dimensional shape of the vocal tract (VT) needs to be known. In the past cross-sectional areas have typically been derived by means of ‘d-to-A rules’ that use the mid-sagittal cross-distance d at each point along the VT to produce a corresponding cross-sectional area A. X-ray and MRI data have been used to calibrate such rules (Heinz & Stevens 1964, Sundberg et al. 1987, Ericsdotter 2005). Although this procedure has produced many useful results it is time consuming and laborious. It is speaker-specific. It presupposes access to information on the three-dimensional shape of the VT, which is not experimentally readily accessible. Such observations raise the question whether sufficiently accurate alternative approaches can be developed. Is it possible to go straight from articulatory data to formant frequencies without having to construct a cross-sectional area function? If such methods could be developed it would have many uses both in phonetics and practical applications.

    This paper reports an attempt to map the time variations of selected articulatory parameters from X-ray profiles directly on the formant tracks using multiple regression analysis. Preliminary results for F1 indicate that multiple regression analysis can indeed be useful for making such predictions. The prospects of extending the present analyses to other formants are discussed.

  • 307.
    Cortes, Elisabet Eir
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Gustavsson, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    From movements to sound Contributions to building the BB speech production system2006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In terms of anatomical geometry the infant Vocal Tract undergoes significant change during development. This research note reports an attempt to reconstruct an infant VT from adult data. Comparable landmarks were identified on the fixed structures of adult articulatory lateral profiles (obtained from X-ray images) and matching infant profiles (obtained from published data in the literature, Sobotta [Putz & Pabst 2001, and personal communication from author Prof. Dr. med. R. Pabst]. The x-coordinates of the infant landmarks could be accurately derived by a linear scaling of the adult data whereas the y-values required information on both the x- and the y-coordinates of the adult. These scaling rules were applied to about 400 adult articulatory profiles to derive a set of corresponding infant articulations. A Principal Components Analysis was performed on these shapes to compare the shapes of the infant and adult articulatory spaces. As expected from the scaling results the infant space is significantly compressed in relation to the adult space suggesting that the main articulatory degree of freedom for the child is jaw opening. This finding is in perfect agreement with published descriptions of the phonetics of early vocalizations. 

  • 308.
    Cortes, Elisabet Eir
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    From articulatory to acoustic parameters non-stop: Phonetics in the fast lane2008In: Proceedings FONETIK 2008Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports an attempt to map the time variations of selected articulatory parameters (from X-ray profiles) directly on the F1, F2 and F3 formant tracks using multiple regression analysis (MRA). The results indicate that MRA can indeed be useful for predicting formant frequencies. Since the results reported here are limited to preliminary observations of F1 only, further studies including F2 and F3 are needed to evaluate the method more definitively.

  • 309. Coull, Mia
    et al.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. Fonetik.
    Kan en robot lära sig att prata?2007Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Kort notis om forskningsprojekt med robotmodeller av tidig språkutveckling (Vi föräldrar, 2007, Nr 13, s. 73)

  • 310.
    Coussé, Evie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German.
    Lexical expansion in the have and be perfect in Dutch: A constructionist prototype account2014In: Diachronica, ISSN 0176-4225, E-ISSN 1569-9714, p. 159-191Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 311.
    Coussé, Evie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German.
    Van de Velde, Freek
    Hulpwerkwoordselectie in drieledige perfecta met een modaal. Een alternatieve historische verklaring2014In: Patroon en argument: een dubbelfeestbundel bij het emeritaat van William Van Belle en Joop van der Horst / [ed] Freek Van de Velde et al., Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2014, p. 349-364Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 312.
    Coussé, Evie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German.
    Von Mengden, Ferdinand
    Freie Universität Berlin.
    Usage-based approaches to language change2014Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Usage-based approaches to language have gained increasing attention in the last two decades. The importance of change and variation has always been recognized in this framework, but has never received central attention. It is the main aim of this book to fill this gap. Once we recognize that usage is crucial for our understanding of language and linguistic structures, language change and variation inevitably take centre stage in linguistic analysis. Along these lines, the volume presents eight studies by international authors that discuss various approaches to studying language change from a usage-based perspective. Both theoretical issues and empirical case studies are well-represented in this collection. The case studies cover a variety of different languages – ranging from historically well-studied European languages via Japanese to the Amazonian isolate Yurakaré with no written history at all. The book provides new insights relevant for scholars interested in both functional and cognitive linguistic theory, in historical linguists and in language typology.

  • 313.
    Couturier Kaijser, Vilma
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Metaphorical uses of verbs of animal sounds in Swedish2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Animals often act as source domain is metaphorical shifts. In European languages, there are often several lexicalised verbs for specific sounds with a prototypical animal as subject. These verbs of animal sounds and their metaphorical meanings have been studied cross-linguistically, which have made it possible to create a classification of situations that tend to be expressed by animal metaphors. There are many verbs of animal sounds in Swedish, but their metaphorical uses are not investigated. The present study investigates the metaphorical use of verbs of animal sounds in Swedish blog text and news text. The classification is used as a starting point for analysing occurrences of 13 Swedish verbs. The study seeks to answer which situations can be expressed by the Swedish verbs, which different situations can one and the same verb express metaphorically, and how did the typological classification suit the Swedish data? The results showed that the verbs often have human subjects, and different verbs varies in the range of metaphorical uses they possess. Three types of changes were made to the classification to suit the Swedish data: situations were moved, situations were added, and situations were removed.

  • 314.
    Couturier Kaijser, Vilma
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Omöjlig, olycklig, oönskad: O-prefigerade adjektiv och particip i svensk blogg- och nyhetstext2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Affixal negation of adjectives occur in several Indo-European languages. Previous studies show recurring patterns: the affixed stem is derived and has a positive value. The affixation creates a negative antonym. This corpus-based study examines the prefix o- in modern Swedish. The form and value of prefixed stems are investigated. The results of this study show that 91.5 % of the 563 most frequent prefixed words have a derived stem and many are deverbal. Among the 100 most frequent words, the stems have a positive value. Asymmetry in the use of the prefix occurs. 11.2 % of the study’s prefixed stems do not have a non-prefixed form. 48 of the 100 most frequent words belong to the semantic type HUMAN PROPENSITY.

    The second part of this study investigates the antonymic relationship between prefixed and non-prefixed words. The prefixed word often has a more general and abstract meaning when there is no direct antonymic relationship. The prefixed word may also have an older meaning, which is no longer used today. This study shows no clear patterns in differences in generality and abstractness in meaning between the prefixed word and the lexical antonym to the non-prefixed word.

  • 315.
    Crasborn, Onno
    et al.
    Radboud University Nijmegen.
    Kooij, Els van der
    Radboud University Nijmegen.
    Waters, Dafydd
    UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience.
    Woll, Bencie
    Deafness, Cognition and Language Research Centre, UCL.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Frequency distribution and spreading behavior of different types of mouth actions in three sign languages2008In: Sign Language and Linguistics, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 45–67-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present a comparative study of mouth actions in three European sign languages: British Sign Language (BSL), Nederlandse Gebarentaal (Sign Language of the Netherlands, NGT), and Swedish Sign Language (SSL). We propose a typology for, and report the frequency distribution of, the different types of mouth actions observed. In accordance with previous studies, we find the three languages remarkably similar — both in the types of mouth actions they use, and in how these mouth actions are distributed. We then describe how mouth actions can extend over more than one manual sign. This spreading of mouth actions is the primary focus of this paper. Based on an analysis of comparable narrative material in the three languages, we demonstrate that the direction as well as the source and goal of spreading may be language-specific.

  • 316.
    Crasborn, Onno
    et al.
    Radboud University Nijmegen.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language Section.
    Waters, Dafydd
    University College London.
    Nonhebel, Annika
    Radboud University Nijmegen.
    Woll, Bencie
    University College London.
    Bergman, Brita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language Section.
    Sharing sign languague data online: Experiences from the ECHO project2007In: International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, ISSN 1384-6655, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 537-564Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    This article describes how new technological possibilities allow sign language researchers to share and publish video data and transcriptions online. Both linguistic and technological aspects of creating and publishing a sign language corpus are discussed, and standards are proposed for both metadata and transcription categories specific to sign language data. In addition, ethical aspects of publishing video data of signers online are considered, and suggestions are offered for future corpus projects and software tools.

  • 317. Creese, Angela
    et al.
    Blackledge, Adrian
    Bhatt, Arvind
    Jonsson, Carla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Juffermans, Kasper
    Li, Jinling
    Martin, Peter
    Muhonen, Anu
    Takhi, Jaspreet Kaur
    Researching bilingual and multilingual education multilingually: A linguistic ethnography2015In: The Handbook of Bilingual and Multilingual Education / [ed] Wayne E. Wright, Sovicheth Boun, Ofelia García, Wiley-Blackwell, 2015, p. 127-144Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 318.
    Cunningham, Una
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Growing up with Two Languages: A Practical Guide for the Bilingual Family2011 (ed. 3)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 319.
    Cunningham, Una
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    How much linguistics do language teachers need?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The amount of linguistics required or available as part of an undergraduate degree with a major in a foreign language degree has varied through time and from country to country. Currently in New Zealand it is possible to graduate with a double major in in European or Asian languages without ever having come closer to linguistics than a grammar or pronunciation course. Language graduates may not have studied much in the way of linguistics during their degree study. This means that if they choose to enter initial secondary teacher education, they may be quite linguistically naive, despite years of language study.

     

    Current thinking on language education is that the combination of meaningful spoken and written input in the target language, and the possibility of meaningful interaction in the target language are enough to allow students to acquire communicative competence in the target language. However, all but the most radical believe that most learners will be helped by also learning about the target language – in effect learning something of the pragmatics, syntax, morphology, phonology and phonetics of the target language. Communicative competence is the goal for language education, and this paper examines the role of implicit and explicit linguistic knowledge and linguistic teaching in the learning and teaching of languages and the disconnect between language graduates’ linguistic understanding and language education.

  • 320.
    Cunningham, Una
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Teachability and Learnability of English Pronunciation Features for Vietnamese-Speaking Learners2013In: Teaching and Researching English Accents in Native and Non-native Speakers / [ed] E. Waniek-Klimczak & L. R. Shockey, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, p. 3-14Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anyone who has tried to learn a language with a very different sound system will understand the challenges faced by speakers of a language as different as Vietnamese who are attempting to learn to speak English in a way that is intelligible to non-speakers of Vietnamese. Many learners have very limited opportunity to hear model pronunciations other than their teacher’s, and no opportunity at all to speak in English outside the classroom. Vietnamese-accented English is characterised by a number of features which ride roughshod over English morphosyntax, resulting in speech that is extremely difficult to reconstruct for the non-Vietnamese-speaking listener. Some of these features appear to be more difficult to learn to avoid than others. Phonotactic constraints in L1 appear to be persistent even in L2, and L1 phonological rules will, apparently, often apply in L2 unless they are blocked in some way. Perception of salient (to native listeners) target pronunciations is often lacking, and learners may not be aware that their pronunciation is not intelligible. Despite years of language study, many learners are unable to produce some native speaker targets. Vietnamese learners typically exhibit a set of characteristic pronunciation features in English, and the aim of this study is to see which of these are susceptible to remediation through explicit teaching. This explicit teaching is compared with a less direct, less interactive kind of teaching, involving drawing native and native-like pronunciation of problematic features of English pronunciation to the learners’ attention. The results of this study can then be interpreted in terms of teachability and learnability, which do not always go hand in hand. If we understand what kinds of phonetic features are teachable and how learnability varies for different features, we can target those features where there is a good return for effort spent, resulting in efficient teaching.

  • 321.
    Cunningham, Una
    University of Canterbury.
    The role of blogs and forums in the linguistic expectations of pilgrims on the Camino to Santiago2013In: Computer mediated discourse across languages / [ed] Laura Álvarez López, Charlotta Seiler Brylla & Philip Shaw, Stockholm: Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis, 2013, p. 137-154Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Every year thousands of pilgrims from more than a hundred countries embark on a pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela in northwestern Spain. Many of them prepare for their pilgrimage physically and mentally.  Dozens of web pages, forums and blogs in a number of languages are dedicated to helping them with this preparation. This paper examines the role of blogs, web pages and forums in constructing pilgrims on the Camino de Santiago. One of the pervasive themes of these texts is the communitas that is experienced by pilgrims without regard to language or nationality. It appears to be unproblematic to communicate even when there is no or very limited common language. The hypothesis is that material accessed by pilgrims before beginning the journey leads them to expect to be able to communicate with everyone they meet, regardless of their actual language skills. This paper uses qualitative data analysis software (NVivo 10) to look at how the web-based material treats cross-linguistic communication in the multilingual liminal space of pilgrimage on the Camino, and at how pilgrims tell the story of their expectations after the pilgrimage is complete.

  • 322.
    Cárcamo García, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Las actitudes y creencias de aprendientes brasileños de ELE hacia las variedades diatópicas del español: El caso de las formas de tratamiento2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In Brazil, diatopic language variation gains importance in the teaching of Spanish as a foreign language, due to the geographic situation of Brazil between Spanish America and as a result of its economic and cultural relations, on the one hand, with the other Latin American countries, whose official language is Spanish, and on the other hand, with Spain. This paper focuses on the study of attitudes and linguistic beliefs towards diatopic varieties of Spanish by Brazilian students of Spanish as a Foreign Language (SFL), since such attitudes and beliefs play an important role in motivating students to learn, and therefore, in their acquisition level of the foreign language. Apart from systematically studying the perceptions and attitudes regarding the diatopic varieties of Spanish, this study seeks to specifically investigate attitudes towards the forms of address in Spanish (tú, vos, usted, vosotros and ustedes), because it is a variable linguistic topic, both geographically and stylistically. Furthermore, it studies the relationship between language proficiency of the students, their academic profile and their contact with speakers of varieties of Spanish as well as the general attitudes that they have towards Hispanic varieties. Based on empirical data, the discussion considers implications for teaching of SFL in a context where Spanish is conceived as a pluricentric language. To investigate all these variables, a questionnaire was distributed to 60 Brazilian students enrolled in the Spanish courses of the Language Learning Centre at the University of Campinas, who also follow their undergraduate and posgraduate studies at the same university. Using both direct and indirect observation techniques regarding attitudes, and quantitative and qualitative analysis, the paper concludes that there is a preference for the Latin American varieties compared to the Peninsular varieties amongst Brazilian students of Spanish. These results are different from the ones presented in previous research in this area. In the case of attitudes towards the forms of address in Spanish, the results show that there is no correspondence of these attitudes with the general attitudes towards diatopic varieties, since vos, which is exclusively characteristic of the Latin American varieties, is conceived as one of the least used and most unnecessary forms in Spanish.

  • 323.
    Dahl, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    "Uno nunca sabe lo que se puede encontrar": Las construcciones impersonales con referencia humana en la traducción española de la novela negra Det som inte dödar oss de David Lagercrantz2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [es]

    El pronombre man es muy usado en sueco, tanto en lengua escrita como en lengua hablada. Es un pronombre indefinido que puede referirse a una persona o a varias y que puede tanto incluir como excluir al hablante. En esta tesina vamos a estudiar cómo se traduce man al español peninsular ya que no existe un pronombre equivalente que valga para todas las ocasiones. El análisis de una traducción del género de la novela negra que contiene muchos diálogos nos permite ver si existen diferencias entre la traducción de la narración y de los diálogos. Además, comparamos las varias construcciones usadas para traducir el pronombre man con los resultados de estudios recientes sobre el uso de las construcciones impersonales en el español peninsular hablado.

  • 324.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    An exercise in a posteriori language sampling2008In: Sprachtypologie und Universalienforschung, ISSN 1867-8319, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 208-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A central methodological issue in language typology is sampling – how to choose a representative set of languages for a typological investigation. Most proposed typological sampling methods are a priori in the sense that they are based on assumed, rather than observed, effects of biasing factors – such as genealogical and areal proximity.The advent of the World Atlas of Language Structures (WALS) creates for the first time a chance to attempt a posteriori sampling. The basic idea is to create a sample by

    removing from the set of available languages one member of each pair of languages whose typological distance – as defined in terms of the features in WALS – does not reach a predefined threshold. In

    this way, a sample of 101 languages was chosen from an initial set of the 222 languages that are best represented in WALS.The number of languages from different macroareas in this sample can be taken as an indication of the internal diversity of the area in question.Two issues are discussed in some detail: (i) the high diversity of the indigenous languages of the Americas and the tendency for these to be underrepresented by previous sampling methods; (ii) the extreme areal convergence of Mainland South East Asian languages. It is concluded that areal factors cannot be neglected in typological sampling, and that it must be questioned whether the creation of elaborate sampling algorithms makes sense.

  • 325.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Animacy and egophoricity: Grammar, ontology and phylogeny2008In: Lingua, ISSN 0024-3841, E-ISSN 1872-6135, Vol. 118, no 2, p. 141-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some results of earlier work on animacy by Kari Fraurud and the author are reviewed, demonstrating the close relationship between (i) the role of animacy as a determinant of grammatical rules and the choice between types of referential expressions, and (ii) statistical regularities in discourse. The idea that animacy is an ontological category is developed further. In the final section, the phylogenetic basis of the notions behind animacy and egophoricity is discussed. It is argued that the grammatical animacy hierarchy corresponds to a three-step cognitive scale: the self is the model for other animate individuals, which are in their turn models for inanimate objects when understood as individual ‘things’.

  • 326.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    From questionnaires to parallel corpora in typology2007In: Sprachtypologie und Universalienforschung, ISSN 0942-2919, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 172-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This rather programmatic paper discusses the use of parallel corpora in the typological study of grammatical categories. In the author’s earlier work, tense-aspect categories were studied by means of a translational questionnaire, and “cross-linguistic gram-types” were identified through their distribution in the questionnaire. It is proposed that a similar methodology could be applied to multilingual parallel corpora. The possibility of identifying grammatical markers by word-alignment methods is demonstrated with examples from Bible texts.

  • 327.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Grammatical resources and linguistic complexity: Sirionó as a language without NP coordination2008In: Language Complexity: Typology, contact, change, John Benjamins, Amsterdam/Philadelphia , 2008Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The paper discusses the relationship between cross-linguistic differences in grammatical resources and linguistic complexity. It is claimed that Sirionó (Tupí-Guaraní) lacks syntactic coordination as in English John and Mary are asleep. Instead, Sirionó employs a number of different strategies – the ‘with’ strategy, the list strategy, and the ‘also’ strategy – to make up for this. It is argued that one or more of these strategies may serve as a diachronic source of syntactic coordination. The development of syntactic coordination in a language exemplifies condensation processes in grammaticalization and increases complexity in the sense that a certain type of complex syntactic structure is introduced, and makes it possible to express in one syntactic unit what previously needed two or more.

  • 328.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Grammaticalization and Linguistic Complexity2011In: The Oxford handbook of grammaticalization / [ed] Narrog, Heiko and Heine, Bernd, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 329.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Grammaticalization in the North: Noun Phrase Morphosyntax in Scandinavian Vernacaulars2010Book (Other academic)
  • 330.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Grammaticalization in the North: Noun phrase morphosyntax in Scandinavian vernaculars2015Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book looks at some phenomena within the grammar of the noun phrase in a group of traditional North Germanic varieties mainly spoken in Sweden and Finland, usually seen as Swedish dialects, although the differences between them and Standard Swedish are often larger than between the latter and the other standard Mainland Scandinavian languages. In addition to being conservative in many respects – e.g. in preserving nominal cases and subject-verb agreement – these varieties also display many innovative features. These include extended uses of definite articles, incorporation of attributive adjectives, and a variety of possessive constructions. Although considerable attention has been given to these phenomena in earlier literature, this book is the first to put them in the perspective of typology and grammaticalization processes. It also looks for a plausible account of the historical origin of the changes involved, arguing that many of them spread from central Sweden, where they were later reverted due to the influence from prestige varieties coming from southern Scandinavia.

  • 331.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Grammatikens grundfärg är som zebrans2008In: Språktidningen, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 44-47Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 332.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Gregory Stump & Raphael A. Finkel, Morphological Typology: From Word to Paradigm, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 20132014In: Nordic Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0332-5865, E-ISSN 1502-4717, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 126-132Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 333.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Gösta Bruce2011In: Kungl. Vitterhets historie och antikvitets akademiens årsbok, Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien , 2011, p. 85-93Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 334.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    How telicity creates time2013In: Journal of Slavic Linguistics, ISSN 1068-2090, E-ISSN 1543-0391, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 45-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most treatments of temporal semantics start out from the conception of time as a line stretching from the past into the future, which is then populated with eventualities or situations. This paper explores how time can be seen as emerging from the construction of representations of reality in which the basic building blocks are static—i.e., timeless—representations, which are connected to each other by events that are transitions between them and that create an ordering which can be understood as temporal. This connects to von Wright’s “logic of change” and the “hybrid semantics” suggested by Herweg and Löbner. In this context, telicity is seen as the capacity of events, or of the predicates that express them, to “create time” in the sense of defining a before and an after. The basic elements of the model are global states, which are timeless taken in isolation but are connected by transition events, which transform one global state into another and thereby define the temporal relationships between them. Transition events, corresponding to Vendlerian achievements, represent simple changes which are then the basis for all other constructs in the model, most notably delimited states, Vendlerian activities (atelic dynamic eventualities), and accomplishments (telic non-punctual eventualities), but also time points and intervals. Transition events are further instrumental in constructing narrative structures and are responsible for narrative progression.

  • 335.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Hur exotiskt är finska?2008In: Verkko-Virittäjä, no 4/2008Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 336.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Increases in complexity as a result of language contact2009In: Convergence and Divergence in Language Contact Situations / [ed] Kurt Braunmüller, Juliane House, Amsterdam: Benjamins , 2009, p. 41-52Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 337.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Kvantitativ språktypologi2015In: Kungl. Vetenskapssamhällets i Uppsala årsbok 40/2013-14 / [ed] Lars-Gunnar Larsson, Uppsala: Kungliga Vetenskapssamhället , 2015, p. 71-81Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 338.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Polysynthesis and Complexity2017In: The Oxford Handbook of Polysynthesis / [ed] Michael Fortescue, Marianne Mithun, Nicholas Evans, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017, p. 19-29Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The notion of polysynthesis has been linked up with that of complexity from the very start. A discussion of the relationship between these two concepts is thus highly motivated, also in view of the recent increased interest in questions relating to complexity among linguists. The chapter discusses different ways of understanding and measuring complexity and how these can be applied to polysynthetic languages. Other topics treated in the chapter are how complexity develops over time in polysynthetic languages, the question of to what extent the notions of maturation and non-linearity as defined in Dahl (2004) are relevant to the synchrony and diachrony of polysynthesis, and how the complexity of constructions in polysynthetic languages compares to functionally equivalent constructions elsewhere.

  • 339.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Remarks on rarity2011In: Expecting the unexpected: exceptions in grammar / [ed] Simon, Horst J. and Wiese, Heike, Berlin; New York: Mouton de Gruyter, 2011, p. 433-436Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 340.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Review of Allen, Cynthia: Genitives in early English2010In: Diachronica, ISSN 0176-4225, E-ISSN 1569-9714, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 489-496Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 341.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Review of John A. Hawkins, Efficiency and Complexity in Grammars2007In: Studies in Language, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 485-497Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 342.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Review of Kurzon, Dennis and Adler, Silvia (eds.), Adpositions: Pragmatic, semantic and syntactic perspectives2010In: Language, ISSN 0097-8507, E-ISSN 1535-0665, Vol. 86, no 2, p. 448-450Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 343.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Review of Peter Trudgill, Investigations in sociohistorical linguistics: Stories of colonisation and contact2012In: Language in Society, ISSN 0047-4045, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 393-396Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 344.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Sirionó2014In: Lenguas de Bolivia: Oriente / [ed] Mily Crevels, Pieter Muysken, La Paz: Plural Editores, 2014, p. 99-133Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 345.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Språket och människan2011 (ed. 1. uppl.)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 346.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Språkets uppkomst2014In: En samtidig världshistoria / [ed] Maria Sjöberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2014, 1, p. 111-123Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 347.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Tense, aspect, mood, and evidentiality, linguistics of2015In: International encyclopedia of the social & behavioral sciences / [ed] James D. Wright, Oxford: Elsevier, 2015, 2 uppl., p. 210-213Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 348.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Tense-aspect-mood-evidentiality (TAME) and the Organization of Human Memory2013In: Time and TAME in language / [ed] Karina Veronica Molsing; Ana Maria Tramunt Ibaños, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013, p. 22-53Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 349.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The degenerate dative in Southern Norrbothnian2008In: Case and grammatical relations: studies in honor of Bernard Comrie / [ed] Greville G. Corbett, Michael Noonan, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2008, p. 105-126Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 350.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The “minor language” perspective2015In: Major versus Minor? Languages and Literatures in a Globalized World / [ed] Theo D’haen, Iannis Goerlandt, Roger D. Sell, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2015, p. 15-24Chapter in book (Other academic)
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