Change search
Refine search result
1234567 51 - 100 of 564
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Hur exotiskt är finska?2008In: Verkko-Virittäjä, no 4/2008Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Increases in complexity as a result of language contact2009In: Convergence and Divergence in Language Contact Situations / [ed] Kurt Braunmüller, Juliane House, Amsterdam: Benjamins , 2009, p. 41-52Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Kuinka eksoottinen kieli suomi on?2008In: Virittäjä, Vol. 4/2008, p. 545-559Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Kvantitativ språktypologi2015In: Kungl. Vetenskapssamhällets i Uppsala årsbok 40/2013-14 / [ed] Lars-Gunnar Larsson, Uppsala: Kungliga Vetenskapssamhället , 2015, p. 71-81Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 55.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Polysynthesis and Complexity2017In: The Oxford Handbook of Polysynthesis / [ed] Michael Fortescue, Marianne Mithun, Nicholas Evans, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017, p. 19-29Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The notion of polysynthesis has been linked up with that of complexity from the very start. A discussion of the relationship between these two concepts is thus highly motivated, also in view of the recent increased interest in questions relating to complexity among linguists. The chapter discusses different ways of understanding and measuring complexity and how these can be applied to polysynthetic languages. Other topics treated in the chapter are how complexity develops over time in polysynthetic languages, the question of to what extent the notions of maturation and non-linearity as defined in Dahl (2004) are relevant to the synchrony and diachrony of polysynthesis, and how the complexity of constructions in polysynthetic languages compares to functionally equivalent constructions elsewhere.

  • 56.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Remarks on rarity2011In: Expecting the unexpected: exceptions in grammar / [ed] Simon, Horst J. and Wiese, Heike, Berlin; New York: Mouton de Gruyter, 2011, p. 433-436Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Review of Allen, Cynthia: Genitives in early English2010In: Diachronica, ISSN 0176-4225, E-ISSN 1569-9714, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 489-496Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 58.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Review of John A. Hawkins, Efficiency and Complexity in Grammars2007In: Studies in Language, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 485-497Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 59.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Review of Kurzon, Dennis and Adler, Silvia (eds.), Adpositions: Pragmatic, semantic and syntactic perspectives2010In: Language, ISSN 0097-8507, E-ISSN 1535-0665, Vol. 86, no 2, p. 448-450Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 60.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Review of Peter Trudgill, Investigations in sociohistorical linguistics: Stories of colonisation and contact2012In: Language in Society, ISSN 0047-4045, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 393-396Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 61.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Sirionó2014In: Lenguas de Bolivia: Oriente / [ed] Mily Crevels, Pieter Muysken, La Paz: Plural Editores, 2014, p. 99-133Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Språket och människan2011 (ed. 1. uppl.)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 63.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Språkets uppkomst2014In: En samtidig världshistoria / [ed] Maria Sjöberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2014, 1, p. 111-123Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 64.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Tense, aspect, mood, and evidentiality, linguistics of2015In: International encyclopedia of the social & behavioral sciences / [ed] James D. Wright, Oxford: Elsevier, 2015, 2 uppl., p. 210-213Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 65.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Tense-aspect-mood-evidentiality (TAME) and the Organization of Human Memory2013In: Time and TAME in language / [ed] Karina Veronica Molsing; Ana Maria Tramunt Ibaños, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013, p. 22-53Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 66.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The degenerate dative in Southern Norrbothnian2008In: Case and grammatical relations: studies in honor of Bernard Comrie / [ed] Greville G. Corbett, Michael Noonan, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2008, p. 105-126Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 67.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The map and the terrain2008In: Theoretical Linguistics, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 53-57Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 68.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The “minor language” perspective2015In: Major versus Minor? Languages and Literatures in a Globalized World / [ed] Theo D’haen, Iannis Goerlandt, Roger D. Sell, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2015, p. 15-24Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 69.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The perfect map: Investigating the cross-linguistic distribution of TAME categories in a parallel corpus2014In: Aggregating Dialectology, Typology, and Register Analysis: Linguistic Variation in Text and Speech / [ed] Szmrecsanyi, B.; Walchli, B., Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2014, p. 268-289Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The work presented in this paper can be seen as a continuation of my earlier attempts at using quantitative methods to compare tense-aspect categories across languages using translation questionnaire data using a different kind of data - a parallel corpus of Bible translations. Here I report on a comparison of the distribution of grams labeled perfect in traditional descriptions. The results confirm earlier claims that these grams do share a core of prototypical uses and also an anti-prototype, that is, a set of uses that are left untouched until the final end of the grammaticalization process by which perfects expand into general pasts. In the grey zone between the prototype and the anti-prototype, versions in one and the same language tend to show great variation. But it is also possible to identify specific areas of cross-linguistic variation even among the more conservative perfect grams.

  • 70.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Thoughts on language-specific and crosslinguistic entities2016In: Linguistic typology, ISSN 1430-0532, E-ISSN 1613-415X, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 427-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses questions arising in connection with Martin Haspelmath’s proposal to distinguish between “descriptive categories” at the language-specific level and “comparative concepts” at the crosslinguistic level, where the latter cannot be seen as either crosslinguistic categories or category types (Haspelmath 2010). It is argued that comparative concepts may be better subsumed under the notion of “generalizing concept”, which is not tied to any specific level of analysis, and that the distinction between what is language-specific and what is crosslinguistic is not absolute. Further, it is shown that crosslinguistic pattern clusters as identified in what is here called “bottom-up typology” meshes well with the homeostatic property cluster approach to biological species.

  • 71.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Towards an ecological semantics of tense and aspect2007In: L'aspect dans les langues les théories: similitudes et différences / [ed] Daniele Monticelli, Anu Treikelder, Tartu: Université de Tartu, Centre d'études francophones Robert Schuman , 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 72.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Typology of negation2010In: The Expression of Negation / [ed] Laurence R. Horn, Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 73.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Älvdalska - eget språk eller värsting bland dialekter?2008In: Språktidningen, Vol. 1, no 6, p. 12-18Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 74.
    Dahl, Östen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Edlund, Lars-ErikUmeå universitet, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Språken i Sverige2010Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 75.
    Dahl, Östen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Gillam, J. Christopher
    Savannah River Archaeological Research Program.
    Anderson, David G.
    University of Tennessee.
    Iriarte, José
    University of Exeter.
    Copé, Silvia M.
    Linguistic Diversity Zones and Cartographic Modeling: GIS as a Method for Understanding the Prehistory of Lowland South America2011In: Ethnicity in ancient Amazonia: Reconstructing past identities from archaeology, linguistics, and ethnohistory / [ed] Hornborg, Alf; Hill, Jonathan David, Boulder, Colo: University Press of Colorado , 2011, p. 211-224Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 76.
    Dahl, Östen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Koptjevskaja Tamm, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Alienability splits and the grammaticalization of possessive constructions1998In: XVIth Scandinavian Conference of Linguistics, University of Turku & Åbo Akademi, 1998Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Dahl, Östen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Koptjevskaja Tamm, MariaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The Circum-Baltic languages: typology and contact: Vol. 1 Past and present Vol. 2 Grammar and typology2001Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 78.
    Dahl, Östen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Kinship in grammar2001In: Dimensions of possession / [ed] Irène Baron, Michael Herslund, Finn Sørensen, Philadelphia, Pa.: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2001, p. 201-225Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 79.
    Dahl, Östen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Rich agreement, everything else being equal and large-scale cross-linguistic comparison2010In: Theoretical Linguistics, ISSN 0301-4428, E-ISSN 1613-4060, ISSN 0301-4428, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 49-56Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 80.
    Dahl, Östen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The resilient dative and other remarkable cases in Scandinavian vernaculars2006In: Sprachtypologie und Universalienforschung (STUF), a special issue on Swedish in typological perspective, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 19-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 81.
    Dahl, Östen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Divan får se upp - nu kommer divalaterna!2010In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no aprilArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 82.
    Dahl, Östen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Wälchli, Bernhard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Perfects and iamitives: two gram types in one grammatical space2016In: Letras de Hoje, ISSN 0101-3335, E-ISSN 1984-7726, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 325-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the grammatical space of the two gram types – perfects and iamitives. Iamitives (from Latin iam ‘already’) overlap in their use with perfects but differ in that they can combine with stative predicates to express a state that holds at reference time. Iamitives differ from ‘already’ in having a higher frequency and showing a strong tendency to be grammaticalized with natural development predicates. We argue that iamitives can grammaticalize from expressions for ‘already’. In this study, we extract perfect grams and iamitive grams iteratively starting with two groups of seed grams from a parallel text corpus (the New Testament) in 1107 languages. We then construct a grammatical space of the union of 370 extracted grams by means of Multidimensional Scaling. This grammatical space of perfects and iamitives turns out to be a continuum without sharp boundaries anywhere.

  • 83.
    Dal' (Dahl), Esten (Östen)
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Vozniknovenie i soxranenie jazykovoj slozhnosti2009Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 84.
    David, Jonas Alexander
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Den komplexa språksituationen hos en flerspråkig talare: En fallstudie2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore and analyse the complex language situation and use of a multilingual person. The examined person is called Frida. Already at a young age she had acquired more than two languages and today she has been in relevant contact with around seven languages. This study wanted to connect to the theories and models, which are presented in today’s research on Second and Third Language Acquisition. The study was entirely based on Frida’s self reports according to the following criteria: her background of language acquisition, her proficiency levels and her attitudes and perception towards her own language situation and languages in general. These criteria had been worked out with the help of guided qualitative interviews and a self-assessment grid for the language skills. The results approved that Frida’s language use and situation is affected by the interaction of an amount of multifactorial components, which occur in a multilingual context. This analysis of Frida’s language background, her language use, attitudes and awareness gave an insight into how the underlying mechanisms of multilingualism work.

  • 85.
    Di Garbo, Francesca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Evaluative morphology and noun classification: a cross-linguistic study of Africa2013In: SKASE Journal of Theoretical Linguistics, ISSN 1336-782X, E-ISSN 1336-782X, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 114-136Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims at illustrating how, in languages with grammatical gender, this feature of noun morphology interacts with evaluative morphology. This is done on the basis of a sample of sixty-two African languages. The paper shows that interactions among gender and evaluative morphology are quite regular in the African languages. Two major types of interactions are found depending on whether a language hasa rich or a limited number of noun classes. The geographic diffusion and diachronic stability of these interactions are discussed. The correlation between gender and evaluation in the African languages has promising implications for our understanding of the two grammatical domains and fostersfurther research questions as to how common the relationships between these domains are cross-linguistically, and why they emerge in the first place.

  • 86.
    Di Garbo, Francesca
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Agbetsoamedo, Yvonne
    Non-canonical gender in African languages: A typological survey of interactions between gender and number, and between gender and evaluative morphology2018In: Non-canonical gender systems / [ed] Sebastian Fedden, Jenny Audring, Greville G. Corbett, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018, p. 176-210Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 87.
    Dicle, Ramazan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Location events in bilingual Danish and Turkish language contact: A comparative analysis of location events in Danish, Turkish and bilingual use of the two languages2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Location events can be mainly described as the relationship setting up the location of a particular object(s) in relation to the other object(s). Location events are akin to motion events whose typology is well studied in the literature especially in the work of Talmy (1991, 2000), but differ from them in that ‘motion events’ focuses on the motion, while location events focuses on the spatial relationships between the Figure, object that is being located, and the Ground, object(s) that conform to the location of the Figure. Languages express these locative relationships differently. This study analyzes how two typologically different languages, Turkish and Danish, express the location events and how bilingual speakers of these two languages express location events in both Danish and Turkish. The study utilizes quantitative and qualitative tools to analyze the data gathered from the picture based elicitation from the monolingual and bilingual speakers. The study suggests that language contact in bilingual Turkish and Danish has a major role in the operating typology of the two languages and in the encoding of the spatial relationships in location events.

  • 88.
    Dunn, Michael
    et al.
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen; Radboud University Nijmegen.
    Levinson, Stephen C.
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen.
    Lindström, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Reesink, Ger
    Radboud University Nijmegen.
    Terrill, Angela
    Radboud University Nijmegen.
    Structural phylogeny in historical linguistics: methodological explorations applied in Island Melanesia2008In: Language, ISSN 0097-8507, E-ISSN 1535-0665, Vol. 84, no 4, p. 710-759Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using various methods derived from evolutionary biology, including maximum parsimony and Bayesian phylogenetic analysis, we tackle the question of the relationships among a group of Papuan isolate languages that have hitherto resisted accepted attempts at demonstration of interrelatedness. Instead of using existing vocabulary-based methods, which cannot be applied to these languages due to the paucity of shared lexemes, we created a database of STRUCTURAL FEATURES — abstract phonological and grammatical features apart from their form. The methods are first tested on the closely related Oceanic languages spoken in the same region as the Papuan languages in question. We find that using biological methods on structural features can recapitulate the results of the comparative method tree for the Oceanic languages, thus showing that structural features can be a valid way of extracting linguistic history. Application of the same methods to the otherwise unrelatable Papuan languages is therefore likely to be similarly valid. Because languages that have been in contact for protracted periods may also converge, we outline additional methods for distinguishing convergence from inherited relatedness.

  • 89. Ender, Andrea
    et al.
    Leemann, Adrian
    Wälchli, Bernhard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Introduction2012In: Methods in Contemporary Linguistics / [ed] Andrea Ender, Adrian Leemann, Bernhard Wälchli, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2012, p. 1-17Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 90. Ender, Andrea
    et al.
    Leemann, AdrianWälchli, BernhardStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Methods in Contemporary Linguistics2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present volume is a broad overview of methods and methodologies in linguistics, illustrated with examples from concrete research. It collects insights gained from a broad range of linguistic sub-disciplines, ranging from core-disciplines to topics in cross-linguistic and language-internal diversity or contributions towards language, space and society.

  • 91. Ender, Andrea
    et al.
    Wälchli, Bernhard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The making of a festschrift, is it a ritual?2012In: Methods in Contemporary Linguistics / [ed] Ender, Andrea & Leemann, Adrian & Wälchli, Bernhard, De Gruyter Mouton , 2012, p. 143-167Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 92.
    Engstrand, Olle
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Helgasson, Petur
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The beginnings of a database for historical sound change2008In: Papers from the 21st Swedish Phonetics Conference, 2008, p. 101-104Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We report a preliminary version of a database from which examples of historical sound change can be retrieved and analyzed. To date, the database contains about 1,000 examples of regular sound changes from a variety of language families. As exemplified in the text, searches can be made based on IPA symbols, articulatory features, segmental or prosodic context, or type of change. The database is meant to provide an adequately large sample of areally and genetically balanced information on historical sound changes that tend to take place in the world’s languages. It is also meant as a research tool in the quest for diachronic explanations of genetic and areal biases in synchronic typology.

  • 93. Evans, Nicholas
    et al.
    Bergqvist, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Roque, Lila San
    The grammar of engagement I: framework and initial exemplification2018In: Language and Cognition, ISSN 1866-9808, E-ISSN 1866-9859, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 110-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human language offers rich ways to track, compare, and engage the attentional and epistemic states of interlocutors. While this task is central to everyday communication, our knowledge of the cross-linguistic grammatical means that target such intersubjective coordination has remained basic. In two serialised papers, we introduce the term 'engagement' to refer to grammaticalised means for encoding the relative mental directedness of speaker and addressee towards an entity or state of affairs, and describe examples of engagement systems from around the world. Engagement systems express the speaker's assumptions about the degree to which their attention or knowledge is shared (or not shared) by the addressee. Engagement categories can operate at the level of entities in the here-and-now (deixis), in the unfolding discourse (definiteness vs indefiniteness), entire event-depicting propositions (through markers with clausal scope), and even metapropositions (potentially scoping over evidential values). In this first paper, we introduce engagement and situate it with respect to existing work on intersubjectivity in language. We then explore the key role of deixis in coordinating attention and expressing engagement, moving through increasingly intercognitive deictic systems from those that focus on the the location of the speaker, to those that encode the attentional state of the addressee.

  • 94. Evans, Nicholas
    et al.
    Bergqvist, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Roque, Lila San
    The grammar of engagement II: typology and diachrony2018In: Language and Cognition, ISSN 1866-9808, E-ISSN 1866-9859, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 141-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engagement systems encode the relative accessibility of an entity or state of affairs to the speaker and addressee, and are thus underpinned by our social cognitive capacities. In our first foray into engagement (Part 1), we focused on specialised semantic contrasts as found in entity-level deictic systems, tailored to the primal scenario for establishing joint attention. This second paper broadens out to an exploration of engagement at the level of events and even metapropositions, and comments on how such systems may evolve. The languages Andoke and Kogi demonstrate what a canonical system of engagement with clausal scope looks like, symmetrically assigning 'knowing' and 'unknowing' values to speaker and addressee. Engagement is also found cross-cutting other epistemic categories such as evidentiality, for example where a complex assessment of relative speaker and addressee awareness concerns the source of information rather than the proposition itself. Data from the language Abui reveal that one way in which engagement systems can develop is by upscoping demonstratives, which normally denote entities, to apply at the level of events. We conclude by stressing the need for studies that focus on what difference it makes, in terms of communicative behaviour, for intersubjective coordination to be managed by engagement systems as opposed to other, non-grammaticalised means.

  • 95. Friedlaender, Jonathan S
    et al.
    Hunley, Keith
    University of New Mexico.
    Dunn, Michael
    Radboud University; Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics.
    Terrill, Angela
    Radboud University.
    Lindström, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Friedlaender, Françoise
    Linguistics More Robust Than Genetics: (Letter to the editors)2009Other (Refereed)
  • 96.
    Fuster Sansalvador, Carles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Negation in Germanic languages: A micro-typological study on negation2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionally, typological classifications have been done in a macro-typological perspective; that is,they have been based on balanced world-wide samples of languages, which often avoid includingclosely related languages, since these are supposed to act alike with respect to their typologicalfeatures and structures. However, attention has recently been drawn to the idea that even closelyrelated languages, as well as dialects within languages, may differ on their typological features. Theintention of this thesis is to give an overview of and study how the Germanic languages differ fromeach other in regards to their negative word orders and negation strategies. Mainly their negativeadverbs (English equivalent not), but also their negative indefinite quantifiers, are analyzed in mainclauses, subordinate clauses, and (negative) imperative structures. The focus lies on the standardlanguage varieties, but some of their non-standard varieties are included, in order to be able to give amore detailed description of the variation within the family. The expected result that the ratherhomogeneous described area of the Germanic languages will turn out to be much more complex, withrespect to negation aspects, is confirmed. The results show that the standard language varieties behavedifferently than the non-standard ones, which are less "rare" cross-linguistically. In addition, the nonstandardNorth-Germanic varieties show that multiple negation occurs in the North-Germanic branch,which is traditionally claimed to not occur.

  • 97.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Att skapa ett språk i en kontext2008In: Psyke og Logos: Tema: Spädbarnspsykologi, ISSN 0107-1211, Vol. 2, no 29, p. 557-579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Utan en språklig infrastruktur av relativt stabil natur blir det svårt för ett barn att finna tolkningsbara mönster i de verbala och ickeverbala stimuli det möter. Sådana stabila mönster verkar emellertid finnas i föräldrarnas språkliga agerande, vilket beskrivs och illustreras i artikeln. Huvudsaklig fokus är dock att lyfta fram och diskutera den hittills mindre uppmärksammade aspekten av barnets eget agerande för att tillägna sig de språkliga ramar och normer som utgör basen för samvaro. Ett agerande där de genom bl.a. blickbeteende och direkta frågor vidmakthåller föräldrarnas scaffoldingramar, samt själva laborerar med fraser och beteenden som de tillägnat sig genom interaktion med föräldrarna. I artikeln introduceras även begrepp som avser att benämna två kvalitativt olika former av beteenden som återfinns hos barn mellan 1 och 5 år: oinskränkt vs normkänsligt beteende. Utifrån den ständiga växelverkan mellan föräldrarnas reaktioner och responser och barnets tolkning av desamma argumenteras för att barnet guidas mot att välja en utvecklingsprocess där den ena formen av språkligt och ickespråkligt beteende ersätts av den andra.

  • 98.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Att uttrycka känslor språkligt - hinder och möjligheter2011In: VAKKI Symposium XXX: Språk och känslor / [ed] Niina Nissilä,Nestori Siponkoski, Vasa: Vasa universitet , 2011, p. 10-28Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although language and emotion has received an increasing interest during the last decades we still lack a definition of what this language consist of. In the paper it is argued that one major reason for this state of affairs relates to the fact that language and emotion reside on different poles of the dichotomies body/mind, nature/culture, etc. Thus, researchers from different camps have addressed the issue from oppositional vantage points while at the same time attempting to answer the same questions. As an alternative this paper argues that to define emotive language we need to study the actual crossing point between language and emotion, i.e. the language used together with nonverbal and vocal expressions of emotion. Drawing on a video-recorded material of interaction between children and their parents, three categories of emotive language are illustrated: autonomous, accompanying and descriptive utterances. In the paper the internal relation between these categories is discussed as well as their position vis-á-vis prior research.

  • 99.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Children's development of facework practices - An emotional endeavor2011In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 43, no 13, p. 3099-3110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses the origin and development of facework practices in young children by focusing on two kinds of practices in child–parent interaction: (1) situations in which a child’s verbal and nonverbal emotive expressions indicate a need to save face; and (2) situations in which a child uses various strategies in order to save face. Through illustrations from a longitudinal material of child–adult interaction it is argued that emotive reactions constitute the base for face awareness in children. This awareness in time turns to child facework practices, a process aided and shaped by the interactional routines with parents. The central aim of the article is to highlight these two aspects of facework, one internal, emotional and related to face; the other external and interactional. As a second aim the article will enforce that the way we analyze interaction must be transparent in that it can be understood, reviewed and contested by others.

  • 100.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Conventions for annotation and transcription of the MINT-project: Modulating child language acquisition through parent-child interaction, MAW:2011.0072018Report (Other academic)
1234567 51 - 100 of 564
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf