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  • 1. Adamczyk, Bartosz
    et al.
    Sietio, Outi-Maaria
    Strakoya, Petra
    Prommer, Judith
    Wild, Birgit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. University of Vienna, Austria; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hagner, Marleena
    Pihlatie, Mari
    Fritze, Hannu
    Richter, Andreas
    Heinonsalo, Jussi
    Plant roots increase both decomposition and stable organic matter formation in boreal forest soil2019In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, article id 3982Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Boreal forests are ecosystems with low nitrogen (N) availability that store globally significant amounts of carbon (C), mainly in plant biomass and soil organic matter (SOM). Although crucial for future climate change predictions, the mechanisms controlling boreal C and N pools are not well understood. Here, using a three-year field experiment, we compare SOM decomposition and stabilization in the presence of roots, with exclusion of roots but presence of fungal hyphae and with exclusion of both roots and fungal hyphae. Roots accelerate SOM decomposition compared to the root exclusion treatments, but also promote a different soil N economy with higher concentrations of organic soil N compared to inorganic soil N accompanied with the build-up of stable SOM-N. In contrast, root exclusion leads to an inorganic soil N economy (i.e., high level of inorganic N) with reduced stable SOM-N buildup. Based on our findings, we provide a framework on how plant roots affect SOM decomposition and stabilization.

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