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  • 1.
    George, Rushingisha
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik. Tanzania Fisheries Research Institute (TAFIRI), P. O. Box 9750 Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
    Seagrasses in warming oceans: physiological and biogeochemical responses2019Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The exponential increase of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations over the past 50 years has caused a rise in the global average temperature by more than 1ºC above pre-industrial levels. Ninety-three percent of this heat energy has been absorbed and stored by the oceans, increasing their temperatures, particularly in surface waters. This can produce both negative and positive impacts on the health and function of vital coastal shallow-water communities, hosting seagrasses and macroalgae, which are key primary producers and ecosystem engineers in the coastal zone. The physiological processes of these plants and the biogeochemical processes in associated sediments operate over a wide range of temperatures and their response can serve as early indicators of changes in their ecosystem function. This thesis employed a combination of laboratory, mesocosm and field based experiments to understand: 1) the responses of key physiological processes to elevated temperatures occurring frequently (and likely to occur in a future warming scenario) in seagrass meadows, and how these will affect biogeochemical processes in associated sediments, 2) the exchange of carbon dioxide between seagrass, water and atmosphere, and 3) effects of the tidal variability on biogeochemical processes of tropical seagrass sediments.

    The results showed that elevated water temperatures cause increased rates of photosynthesis in seagrasses up to a threshold temperature above which rates declines rapidly. The negative effects of temperatures reaching beyond threshold levels increased with repeated days of exposure. The rates of mitochondrial respiration in seagrasses increased with elevated temperatures until a collapse of their respiratory machinery occurred. Photorespiration did not increase linearly with elevated temperatures. The responses of the different components of the seagrass plant (i.e. leaves, shoots, rhizomes and roots) to temperature increase clearly differed, and varied within different parts of each component. Spikes of very high water temperatures, up to 40-44ºC, occur frequently during daytime at low spring tides during the northeast monsoon in the tropical intertidal areas of the western Indian Ocean, and if they occur repeatedly over several days, lead to large biomass loss in seagrasses. Such temperatures also increased methane emission and sulphide levels in seagrass-associated sediments. Submerged macrophytes in shallow coastal waters had pronounced effects on air-water fluxes of carbon dioxide, with an upward flux occurring when partial pressure of carbon dioxide is higher in the seawater than in the air and carbon dioxide escapes the water phase, and a downward flux when carbon dioxide enters the water phase. Plant cover, time of day and tidal level had pronounced consequences on emissions of methane and nitrous oxide as well as sulphide levels in tropical seagrass sediments. Emissions of methane and nitrous oxide positively correlated to sediment organic matter content and the relationship became stronger during high tide.

    The findings of this thesis indicate that intertidal seagrasses of the tropical WIO region are at special risk of declining under future warming, as they are currently living in an environment where ambient water temperatures frequently reach at, or beyond, threshold levels of key physiological processes during midday hours of low spring tides of the northeast monsoon. The negative effects of high temperature spikes may be further intensified by other anthropogenic stressors (e.g. eutrophication by land-based pollution sources). Taken together, these will reduce seagrass cover and promote the release and emission of historically deposited carbon back to the atmosphere, and this would possibly change these ecosystems from being carbon sinks to being sources and further exacerbate the negative impacts of greenhouse gases.

  • 2.
    George, Rushingisha
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik. Tanzania Fisheries Research Institute (TAFIRI), Tanzania .
    Gullström, Martin
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Mangora, Mwita M.
    Mtolera, Matern S. P.
    Björk, Mats
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    High midday temperature stress has stronger effects on biomass than on photosynthesis: A mesocosm experiment on four tropical seagrass species2018Inngår i: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 8, nr 9, s. 4508-4517Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of repeated midday temperature stress on the photosynthetic performance and biomass production of seagrass was studied in a mesocosm setup with four common tropical species, including Thalassia hemprichii, Cymodocea serrulata, Enhalus acoroides, and Thalassodendron ciliatum. To mimic natural conditions during low tides, the plants were exposed to temperature spikes of different maximal temperatures, that is, ambient (29-33 degrees C), 34, 36, 40, and 45 degrees C, during three midday hours for seven consecutive days. At temperatures of up to 36 degrees C, all species could maintain full photosynthetic rates (measured as the electron transport rate, ETR) throughout the experiment without displaying any obvious photosynthetic stress responses (measured as declining maximal quantum yield, Fv/Fm). All species except T.ciliatum could also withstand 40 degrees C, and only at 45 degrees C did all species display significantly lower photosynthetic rates and declining Fv/Fm. Biomass estimation, however, revealed a different pattern, where significant losses of both above- and belowground seagrass biomass occurred in all species at both 40 and 45 degrees C (except for C.serrulata in the 40 degrees C treatment). Biomass losses were clearly higher in the shoots than in the belowground root-rhizome complex. The findings indicate that, although tropical seagrasses presently can cope with high midday temperature stress, a few degrees increase in maximum daily temperature could cause significant losses in seagrass biomass and productivity.

  • 3.
    George, Rushingisha
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik. Tanzania Fisheries Research Institute (TAFIRI), Tanzania.
    Gullström, Martin
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Mtolera, Matern
    Björk, Mats
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Seagrass cover reduces emissions of methane, nitrous oxide and sulphide levels in organic rich tropical seagrass sediments during daytimeManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 4.
    George, Rushingisha
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik. Tanzania Fisheries Research Institute (TAFIRI), Tanzania.
    Gullström, Martin
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Mtolera, Matern
    Lyimo, Thomas
    Björk, Mats
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Methane emission and sulphide levels increase in tropical seagrass sediments during temperature stress: a mesocosm experimentManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 5.
    Ismail, Rashid
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik. Ulanga District Council, Tanzania.
    Asplund, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    George, Rushingisha
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik. Tanzania Fisheries Research Institute (TAFIRI), Tanzania.
    Buriyo, Amelia
    Gullström, Martin
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Björk, Mats
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Calcifying algae modify the air-sea flux of CO2 in tropical seagrass meadowsManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 6.
    Rasmusson, Lina
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Buapet, Pimchanok
    George, Rushingisha
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik. Tanzania Fisheries Research Institute (TAFIRI), Tanzania.
    Gunnarsson, Pontus
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Gullström, Martin
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Björk, Mats
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Effects of temperature and hypoxia on respiration, photorespiration and photosynthesis of seagrassesManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 7.
    Rasmusson, Lina
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gullström, Martin
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Gunnarsson, Pontus
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    George, Rushingisha
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik. Tanzania Fisheries Research Institute (TAFIRI), Tanzania.
    Björk, Mats
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Seagrass productivity during temperature variations: estimation of a whole plant Q10 for respiration and photosynthesis in Zostera marinaManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 8.
    Rasmusson, Lina M.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gullström, Martin
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Pontus C. B.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    George, Rushingisha
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik. Tanzania Fisheries Research Institute (TAFIRI), Tanzania.
    Björk, Mats
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Estimation of a whole plant Q10 to assess seagrass productivity during temperature shifts2019Inngår i: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, artikkel-id 12667Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Through respiration and photosynthesis, seagrass meadows contribute greatly to carbon and oxygen fluxes in shallow coastal waters. There is increasing concern about how shallow-water primary producers will react to a near-future climate scenario with increased temperature variation. When modelling primary productivity under high temperature variability, Q10 values are commonly used to predict rate changes depending on biophysical factors. Q10 values are often assumed to be constant and around 2.0 (i.e. a doubling of the rate with a temperature increase of 10 degrees C). We aimed to establish how the gas exchange of seagrass (Zostera marina) tissues at various maturity stages would respond over a broad range of temperatures. Seagrass shoot maturity stage clearly affected respiration and apparent photosynthesis, and the Q10 results indicated a skewed balance between the two processes, with a higher photosynthetic Q10 during periods of elevated temperatures. When estimating whole-plant Q10 in a realistic maximal temperature range, we found that the overall response of a seagrass plant's net O-2 exchange balance can be as much as three to four times higher than under ambient temperatures. Our findings indicate that plant tissue age and temperature should be considered when assessing and modelling carbon and oxygen fluctuations in vegetated coastal areas.

1 - 8 of 8
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