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  • 1.
    Apel, Jan
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Lund University, Sweden.
    Wallin, Paul
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Possnert, Göran
    Early Holocene human population events on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea (9200-3800 cal. BP)2018Ingår i: Quaternary International, ISSN 1040-6182, E-ISSN 1873-4553, Vol. 465, s. 276-286Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The summed probability distribution of 162 radiocarbon dates from Gotland was analysed with reference to archaeological and environmental data in order to evaluate possible variations in settlement intensity on the island. The data indicated variations in demographic development on the island, with probably several different colonization events and external influences; the pioneer settlement reached the island around 9200 cal. BP. After the initial colonization, the radiocarbon dates were rather evenly distributed until around 7700–7600 cal. BP, then there was a drop in the number of dates between 8300 and 8000 cal. BP that may be associated with the 8200 cold event. A marked decline in the number of dates between 7600 and 6000 cal. BP may be associated initially with the Littorina I transgression, but this transgression cannot explain why the Late Mesolithic period is not well represented on Gotland: the climatic development was favourable but did not result in increased human activity. The number of radiocarbon dates indicated that the population size remained low until around 6000 cal. BP, after which there was a gradual increase that reached a first ‘threshold’ after 5600 cal. BP and a second ‘threshold’ after 4500 cal. BP. The first apparent population increase was associated with the appearance of the Funnel Beaker Culture (FBC) and the second with Pitted Ware Culture (PWC) complexes. A decline in the number of dates occurred after 4300 cal. BP, i.e. towards the Late Neolithic. There was an association between the frequency distributions of the radiocarbon dates and the number of stray finds from different time periods but any correlation was not straightforward.

  • 2. Björck, Niclas
    et al.
    Larsson, Fredrik
    Molnar, Petra
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Olson, Carina
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Djur och växter2008Ingår i: Mellan hav och skog: Högmossen, en stenåldersmiljö vid en skimrande strand i norra Uppland, 2008Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 3. Blank, Malou
    et al.
    Sjögren, Karl-Göran
    Knipper, Corina
    Frei, Karin M.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Isotope values of the bioavailable strontium in inland southwestern Sweden-A baseline for mobility studies2018Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, nr 10, artikel-id e0204649Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The inland area of southwestern Sweden is well known for its well-preserved archaeological animal and human remains dating back to the Mesolithic and Neolithic (10000-4000 and 4000-1700 BC). They allow application of multiple bioarchaeological methods, giving insights into various and complementary aspects of prehistoric human life, as well as economic and social structures. One important aspect concerns human mobility and its relation to social networks and to circulation of objects. Here, strontium isotope analysis plays a crucial role. The present study aims to construct a strontium isotope baseline of southwestern Sweden with considerably greater coverage and higher resolution than previously published data. As the region has been affected by glacial events, the relation between bedrock geology and isotope signals of the bioavailable strontium in such areas is given special attention. We determined strontium isotope ratios for 61 water and five archaeological animal samples, and combined the data with previous measurements of two water and 21 non-domestic faunal samples. The results reveal a complex pattern. Several areas with distinct baseline ranges can be distinguished, although with overlaps between some of them. Overall, the bioavailable strontium isotope signals mirror the basement geology of the region. The highest ratios occur in the geologically oldest eastern parts of the Precambrian terrain, while lower ratios are found in the western part, and the lowest ratios occur in the youngest Paleozoic areas. At the same time, there are minor deviations compared to the underlying bedrock, due to glacial transport, overlying sediments, and local intrusions of younger rocks. The background data set now available allows for more nuanced and detailed interpretations of human and animal mobility in the region, in particular by identification of subregions with differing strontium isotope ratios within the Precambrian province. Also, we can now identify long distance mobility with greater confidence.

  • 4. Boethius, Adam
    et al.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Hongslo Vala, Cecilie
    Apel, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Lund University, Sweden.
    The importance of freshwater fish in Early Holocene subsistence: Exemplified with the human colonization of the island of Gotland in the Baltic basin2017Ingår i: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 13, s. 625-634Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we explore the subsistence economy of the Mesolithic pioneers on the island of Gotland in the Baltic basin, in order to evaluate the importance of freshwater fish to the Early Holocene human population. By analysing faunal remains, the distribution of 14C dates and the location of the settlement sites, we argue that earlier assumptions concerning the importance of marine mammals to the early human populations should be reconsidered. We suggest that the pioneering settlers of Gotland relied on fish to a significant extent. Radiocarbon dates taken from human bones are skewed by a freshwater reservoir effect, which can be used as an indirect indication of the significance of freshwater fish. The numerous, overgrowing lakes on the island, with their extensive biomass production and large amounts of freshwater fish, provided an important subsistence base. Even if the faunal assemblages that have survived are dominated by seal bones, the hunting season for seals was limited and the hunters mostly targeted young seals. Thus, the importance of seal have previously been overestimated and it appears that the human use of marine resources on Gotland was more limited and related to raw material needs rather than dietary necessity or specialization. Although presented as a case study; the results highlight the need to identify a freshwater fish diet among ancient foragers on a larger scale, as implications thereof can fundamentally change how foraging societies are perceived.

  • 5.
    Ersmark, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    Baryshnikov, Gennady
    Higham, Thomas
    Argant, Alain
    Castaños, Pedro
    Döppes, Doris
    Gasparik, Mihaly
    Germonpré, Mietje
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Lipecki, Grzegorz
    Marciszak, Adrian
    Miller, Rebecca
    Moreno-García, Marta
    Pacher, Martina
    Robu, Marius
    Rodriguez-Varela, Ricardo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Rojo Guerra, Manuel
    Sabol, Martin
    Spassov, Nikolai
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Valdiosera, Christina
    Villaluenga, Aritza
    Stewart, John R.
    Dalén, Love
    Genetic turnovers and northern survival during the last glacial maximum in European brown bears2019Ingår i: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 9, nr 10, s. 5891-5905Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The current phylogeographic pattern of European brown bears (Ursus arctos) has commonly been explained by postglacial recolonization out of geographically distinct refugia in southern Europe, a pattern well in accordance with the expansion/contraction model. Studies of ancient DNA from brown bear remains have questioned this pattern, but have failed to explain the glacial distribution of mitochondrial brown bear clades and their subsequent expansion across the European continent. We here present 136 new mitochondrial sequences generated from 346 remains from Europe, ranging in age between the Late Pleistocene and historical times. The genetic data show a high Late Pleistocene diversity across the continent and challenge the strict confinement of bears to traditional southern refugia during the last glacial maximum (LGM). The mitochondrial data further suggest a genetic turnover just before this time, as well as a steep demographic decline starting in the mid-Holocene. Levels of stable nitrogen isotopes from the remains confirm a previously proposed shift toward increasing herbivory around the LGM in Europe. Overall, these results suggest that in addition to climate, anthropogenic impact and inter-specific competition may have had more important effects on the brown bear's ecology, demography, and genetic structure than previously thought.

  • 6.
    Ersmark, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    Baryshnikov, Gennady
    Higham, Tom
    Argant, Alain
    Döppes, Doris
    Germonpré, Mietje
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lipecki, Grzegorz
    Marciszak, Adrian
    Pacher, Martina
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Sabol, Martin
    Valdiosera, Christina
    Villaluenga, Aritza
    Stewart, John
    Dalén, Love
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Genetic revolutions and northern survival during the last glacial maximum in European brown bearsManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 7. Fraser, Magdalena
    et al.
    Sanchez-Quinto, Federico
    Evans, Jane
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Wallin, Paul
    Knutsson, Kjel
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    New insights on cultural dualism and population structure in the Middle Neolithic Funnel Beaker culture on the island of Gotland2018Ingår i: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 17, s. 325-334Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years it has been shown that the Neolithization of Europe was partly driven by migration of farming groups admixing with local hunter-gatherer groups as they dispersed across the continent. However, little research has been done on the cultural duality of contemporaneous foragers and farming populations in the same region. Here we investigate the demographic history of the Funnel Beaker culture [Trichterbecherkultur or TRB, c. 4000–2800 cal BCE], and the sub-Neolithic Pitted Ware culture complex [PWC, c. 3300–2300 cal BCE] during the Nordic Middle Neolithic period on the island of Gotland, Sweden. We use a multidisciplinary approach to investigate individuals buried in the Ansarve dolmen, the only confirmed TRB burial on the island. We present new radiocarbon dating, isotopic analyses for diet and mobility, and mitochondrial DNA haplogroup data to infer maternal inheritance. We also present a new Sr-baseline of 0.71208 ± 0.0016 for the local isotope variation. We compare and discuss our findings together with that of contemporaneous populations in Sweden and the North European mainland.

    The radiocarbon dating and Strontium isotopic ratios show that the dolmen was used between c. 3300–2700 cal BCE by a population which displayed local Sr-signals. Mitochondrial data show that the individuals buried in the Ansarve dolmen had maternal genetic affinity to that of other Early and Middle Neolithic farming cultures in Europe, distinct from that of the contemporaneous PWC on the island. Furthermore, they exhibited a strict terrestrial and/or slightly varied diet in contrast to the strict marine diet of the PWC. The findings indicate that two different contemporary groups coexisted on the same island for several hundred years with separate cultural identity, lifestyles, as well as dietary patterns.

  • 8. Fraser, Magdalena
    et al.
    Sjödin, Per
    Sanchez-Quinto, Federico
    Evans, Jane
    Svedjemo, Gustaf
    Knutsson, Kjel
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Wallin, Paul
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    The stone cist conundrum: A multidisciplinary approach to investigate Late Neolithic/Early Bronze Age population demography on the island of Gotland2018Ingår i: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 20, s. 324-337Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Late Neolithic period in Scandinavia [LN, c. 2350-1700 cal BCE] marks a time of considerable changes in settlement patterns, economy, and material culture. This shift also lays the foundation for the demographic developments in the Early Bronze Age [EBA, c. 1700-1100 cal BCE]. However, little is presently known regarding the developments from these time-periods on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea. During the Middle Neolithic period [MN, c. 3300-2350 cal BCE], Gotland was inhabited by groups associated with the Funnel Beaker culture [TRB, c. 4000-2700 cal BCE], and the sub-Neolithic Pitted Ware culture [PWC, c. 3300-2300 cal BCE]. Some indications of connections with the Bathe Axe/Corded Ware cultures [BAC/CWC, c. 2800-2300 cal BCE] have also been found, but no typical BAC/CWC burials have been located on the island to date. Here, we investigate the chronological and internal relationship of twenty-three individuals buried in four LN/EBA stone cist burials; Haffinds, Hagur, Suderkvie, and Utalskog on Gotland. We present eleven mitochondrial genomes [from 23 X to 1271 X coverage], and twenty-three new radiocarbon dates, as well as stable isotope data for diet. We examine the local Sr-baseline range for Gotland, and present new Sr-data to discuss mobility patterns of the individuals. The genetic results are compared and discussed in light of earlier cultural periods from Gotland [TRB and PWC], and CWC from the European continent, as well as contemporaneous LN secondary burials in the MN Ansarve dolmen. We find that all burials were used into the EBA, but only two of the cists showed activity already during the LN. We also see some mobility to Gotland during the LN/EBA period based on Strontium and mitochondrial data. We see a shift in the dietary pattern compared to the preceding period on the island [TRB and PWC], and the two LN individuals from the Ansarve dolmen exhibited different dietary and mobility patterns compared to the individuals from the LN/EBA stone cist burials. We find that most of the cist burials were used by individuals local to the area of the burials, with the exception of the large LN/EBA Haffinds cist burial which showed higher levels of mobility. Our modeling of ancestral mitochondrial contribution from chronologically older individuals recovered in the cultural contexts of TRB, PWC and CWC show that the best model is a 55/45 mix of CWC and TRB individuals. A 3-way model with a slight influx from PWC [5%] also had a good fit. This is difficult to reconcile with the current archaeological evidence on the island. We suggest that the maternal CWC/TRB contribution we see in the local LN/EBA individuals derives from migrants after the Scandinavian MN period, which possible also admixed with smaller local groups connected with the PWC. Further genomic analyses of these groups on Gotland will help to clarify the demographic history during the MN to EBA time periods.

  • 9.
    Glykou, Aikaterini
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Schmitt, M.
    Kooijman, E.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Intra- and inter-tooth variation in strontium isotope ratios from prehistoric seals by laser ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry2018Ingår i: Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, ISSN 0951-4198, E-ISSN 1097-0231, Vol. 32, nr 15, s. 1215-1224Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    RationaleStrontium isotope ratios (Sr-87/Sr-86) in modern-day marine environments are considered to be homogeneous (0.7092). However, in the Baltic Sea, the Sr ratios are controlled by mixing seawater and continental drainage from major rivers discharging into the Baltic. This pilot study explores if variations in Sr can be detected in marine mammals from archaeological sites in the Baltic Sea. Methods(87)Sr/Sr-86 ratios were measured in tooth enamel from three seal species by laser ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS). The method enables micro-sampling of solid materials. This is the first time that the method has been applied to marine samples from archaeological collections. ResultsThe analyses showed inter-tooth Sr-87/Sr-86 variation suggesting that different ratios can be detected in different regions of the Baltic Sea. Furthermore, the intra-tooth variation suggests possible different geographic origin or seasonal movement of seals within different regions in the Baltic Sea through their lifetime. ConclusionsThe method was successfully applied to archaeological marine samples showing that: (1) the Sr-87/Sr-86 ratio in marine environments is not uniform, (2) Sr-87/Sr-86 differences might reflect differences in ecology and life history of different seal species, and (3) archaeological mobility studies based on Sr-87/Sr-86 ratios in humans should therefore be evaluated together with diet reconstruction.

  • 10.
    Gummesson, Sara
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Molin, Fredrik
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Taphonomy, bone surface characteristics and assemblage history: Finding Mesolithic bone depositions at Strandvägen, Motala2017Ingår i: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 13, s. 11-25Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Through taphonomic analyses, in this studywe evaluate bones surface characteristics and differences in bone accumulation on a Mesolithic settlement site, in Eastern Middle Sweden. The assemblage consists of faunal remains fromthe Mesolithic but also fromactivities dating to historical periods. All bones fromthe site, including indeterminate fragments, were analysed. Variation in bones surface characteristics were registered according to a set of taphonomic data, based on previously published studies. The variation were categorized as different texture scores and evaluated against species representation, radiocarbon datings and spatial distribution. The study underlines the potential of methodological approaches to taphonomic data and underlines the importance of including indeterminate fragments when studying human utilization of bones. The results present strong correlations between different species, bone tools and specific surface textures. It shows that a large part of the assemblage is of Mesolithic origin but also that activities dating to post-Mesolithic periods have contributed to the assemblage accumulation. Spatial analyses of the different surface textures helped to identify and separate Mesolithic activity areas of the site, thus providing an understanding of the spatial organization at intra site level, at the settlement of Strandvägen.

  • 11. Gunther, Torsten
    et al.
    Valdiosera, Cristina
    Malmström, Helena
    Urena, Irene
    Rodriguez-Varela, Ricardo
    Sverrisdottir, Oddny Osk
    Daskalaki, Evangelia A.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Skoglund, Pontus
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Uppsala University, Sweden; Harvard University, USA.
    Naidoo, Thijessen
    Svensson, Emma M.
    Maria Bermudez de Castro, Jose
    Carbonell, Eudald
    Dunn, Michael
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Iriarte, Eneko
    Arsuaga, Juan Luis
    Carretero, Jose-Miguel
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Ancient genomes link early farmers from Atapuerca in Spain to modern-day Basques2015Ingår i: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 112, nr 38, s. 11917-11922Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The consequences of the Neolithic transition in Europe-one of the most important cultural changes in human prehistory-is a subject of great interest. However, its effect on prehistoric and modern-day people in Iberia, the westernmost frontier of the European continent, remains unresolved. We present, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide sequence data from eight human remains, dated to between 5,500 and 3,500 years before present, excavated in the El Portalon cave at Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain. We show that these individuals emerged from the same ancestral gene pool as early farmers in other parts of Europe, suggesting that migration was the dominant mode of transferring farming practices throughout western Eurasia. In contrast to central and northern early European farmers, the Chalcolithic El Portalon individuals additionally mixed with local southwestern hunter-gatherers. The proportion of hunter-gatherer-related admixture into early farmers also increased over the course of two millennia. The Chalcolithic El Portalon individuals showed greatest genetic affinity to modern-day Basques, who have long been considered linguistic and genetic isolates linked to the Mesolithic whereas all other European early farmers show greater genetic similarity to modern-day Sardinians. These genetic links suggest that Basques and their language may be linked with the spread of agriculture during the Neolithic. Furthermore, all modern-day Iberian groups except the Basques display distinct admixture with Caucasus/Central Asian and North African groups, possibly related to historical migration events. The El Portalon genomes uncover important pieces of the demographic history of Iberia and Europe and reveal how prehistoric groups relate to modern-day people.

  • 12. Gustavsson, Rudolf
    et al.
    Tomtlund, Jan-Erik
    Kennebjörk, Josefina
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    IDENTITIES IN TRANSITION IN VIKING AGE ALAND?2014Ingår i: Viking Age in Aland: Insights into Identity and Remnants of Culture / [ed] Ahola, J; Frog; Lucenius, J, HELSINKI: ACADEMIA SCIENTIARM FINICA , 2014, Vol. 372, s. 159-186Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 13. Günther, Torsten
    et al.
    Malmström, Helena
    Svensson, Emma M.
    Omrak, Ayca
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Sánchez-Quinto, Federico
    Kılınç, Gülşah M.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Uppsala University, Sweden; Middle East Technical University, Turkey.
    Krzewińska, Maja
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Fraser, Magdalena
    Edlund, Hanna
    Munters, Arielle R.
    Coutinho, Alexandra
    Simões, Luciana G.
    Vicente, Mario
    Sjölander, Anders
    Jansen Sellevold, Berit
    Jørgensen, Roger
    Claes, Peter
    Shriver, Mark D.
    Valdiosera, Cristina
    Netea, Mihai G.
    Apel, Jan
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Skar, Birgitte
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Stockholms universitet, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Population genomics of Mesolithic Scandinavia: Investigating early postglacial migration routes and high-latitude adaptation2018Ingår i: PLoS biology, ISSN 1544-9173, E-ISSN 1545-7885, Vol. 16, nr 1, artikel-id e2003703Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Scandinavia was one of the last geographic areas in Europe to become habitable for humans after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). However, the routes and genetic composition of these postglacial migrants remain unclear. We sequenced the genomes, up to 57x coverage, of seven hunter-gatherers excavated across Scandinavia and dated from 9,500-6,000 years before present (BP). Surprisingly, among the Scandinavian Mesolithic individuals, the genetic data display an east-west genetic gradient that opposes the pattern seen in other parts of Mesolithic Europe. Our results suggest two different early postglacial migrations into Scandinavia: initially from the south, and later, from the northeast. The latter followed the ice-free Norwegian north Atlantic coast, along which novel and advanced pressure-blade stone-tool techniques may have spread. These two groups met and mixed in Scandinavia, creating a genetically diverse population, which shows patterns of genetic adaptation to high latitude environments. These potential adaptations include high frequencies of low pigmentation variants and a gene region associated with physical performance, which shows strong continuity into modern-day northern Europeans.

  • 14.
    Haas, Kurt
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Different preparation techniques – similar results? On the quality of thin-ground sections of archaeological bone2015Ingår i: International journal of osteoarchaeology, ISSN 1047-482X, E-ISSN 1099-1212, Vol. 25, nr 6, s. 935-945Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Palaeohistology as a valuable diagnostic instrument is dependent on the production of high-quality thin-ground sections from dry bone. The objective of this study was to consider technical differences and assess the qualitative outcomes of five techniques for preparing thin-ground sections from dry archaeological bone. Established techniques with long follow-up times and excellently documented results were compared with simpler and cheaper time-saving techniques. Evaluations were made of the quality of thin sections obtained by one classical machine-based embedding technique, two revised versions of the same technique, one manual moulding technique based on Frost's rapid technique and one manual hybrid technique. Five osteological specimens of differing quality were prepared following the manuals for these five techniques and examined microscopically with respect to a list of standardised histological and diagenetic parameters. Alterations in the specimens attributable to preparation effects were recorded, and observations were scored with reference to three criteria: section quality, technical quality and staining. The results show that embedding techniques are to prefer. Superglue should not be used as a mounting or embedding medium. Manual grinding comes with several limitations, and machine cutting and grinding are preferred. Haematoxylin staining can be successfully applied to embedded specimens, giving more information on microscopic diagenetic processes. A stepwise manual for a revision of the classical embedding technique is presented. The time required for producing sections using classical embedding techniques is shortened from 6 weeks to 3.7 days by refining the preparation/polymerization processes involved with no loss of osteological data.

  • 15.
    Hedenstierna-Jonson, Charlotte
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Krzewinska, Maja
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Sobrado, Veronica
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Price, Neil
    Günther, Torsten
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    A female Viking warrior confirmed by genomics2017Ingår i: American Journal of Physical Anthropology, ISSN 0002-9483, E-ISSN 1096-8644, Vol. 164, nr 4, s. 853-860Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    The objective of this study has been to confirm the sex and the affinity of an individual buried in a well-furnished warrior grave (Bj 581) in the Viking Age town of Birka, Sweden. Previously, based on the material and historical records, the male sex has been associated with the gender of the warrior and such was the case with Bj 581. An earlier osteological classification of the individual as female was considered controversial in a historical and archaeological context. A genomic confirmation of the biological sex of the individual was considered necessary to solve the issue.

    Materials and methods

    Genome-wide sequence data was generated in order to confirm the biological sex, to support skeletal integrity, and to investigate the genetic relationship of the individual to ancient individuals as well as modern-day groups. Additionally, a strontium isotope analysis was conducted to highlight the mobility of the individual.

    Results

    The genomic results revealed the lack of a Y-chromosome and thus a female biological sex, and the mtDNA analyses support a single-individual origin of sampled elements. The genetic affinity is close to present-day North Europeans, and within Sweden to the southern and south-central region. Nevertheless, the Sr values are not conclusive as to whether she was of local or nonlocal origin.

    Discussion

    The identification of a female Viking warrior provides a unique insight into the Viking society, social constructions, and exceptions to the norm in the Viking time-period. The results call for caution against generalizations regarding social orders in past societies.

  • 16. Heininen, Lassi
    et al.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Stockholm Univ, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Frog, -
    Ahola, Joonas
    GEOPOLITICAL PERSPECTIVES ON ALAND IN THE VIKING AGE2014Ingår i: Viking Age in Aland: Insights into Identity and Remnants of Culture / [ed] Ahola, J; Frog; Lucenius, J, HELSINKI: ACADEMIA SCIENTIARM FINICA , 2014, Vol. 372, s. 323-348Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 17.
    Krzewińska, Maja
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Stockholms universitet, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Günther, Torsten
    Hedenstierna-Jonson, Charlotte
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologi.
    Omrak, Ayça
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Yaka, Reyhan
    Kılınç, Gülşah Merve
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Somel, Mehmet
    Sobrado, Veronica
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Evans, Jane
    Knipper, Conine
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Stockholms universitet, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Genomic and Strontium Isotope Variation Reveal Immigration Patterns in a Viking Age Town2018Ingår i: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 28, nr 17, s. 2730-2738Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact of human mobility on the northern European urban populations during the Viking and Early Middle Ages and its repercussions in Scandinavia itself are still largely unexplored. Our study of the demographics in the final phase of the Viking era is the first comprehensive multidisciplinary investigation that includes genetics, isotopes, archaeology, and osteology on a larger scale. This early Christian dataset is particularly important as the earlier common pagan burial tradition during the Iron Age was cremation, hindering large-scale DNA analyses. We present genome-wide sequence data from 23 individuals from the 10th to 12th century Swedish town of Sigtuna. The data revealed high genetic diversity among the early urban residents. The observed variation exceeds the genetic diversity in distinct modern-day and Iron Age groups of central and northern Europe. Strontium isotope data suggest mixed local and non-local origin of the townspeople. Our results uncover the social system underlying the urbanization process of the Viking World of which mobility was an intricate part and was comparable between males and females. The inhabitants of Sigtuna were heterogeneous in their genetic affinities, probably reflecting both close and distant connections through an established network, confirming that early urbanization processes in northern Europe were driven by migration.

  • 18.
    Krzewińska, Maja
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Kılınç, Gülşah Merve
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Juras, Anna
    Koptekin, Dilek
    Chylenski, Maciej
    Nikitin, Alexey G.
    Shcherbakov, Nikolai
    Shuteleva, Iia
    Leonova, Tatiana
    Kraeva, Liudmila
    Sungatov, Flarit A.
    Sultanova, Alfija N.
    Potekhina, Inna
    Łukasik, Sylwia
    Krenz-Niedbała, Marta
    Dalén, Love
    Sinika, Vitaly
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Ancient genomes suggest the eastern Pontic-Caspian steppe as the source of western Iron Age nomads2018Ingår i: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 4, nr 10, artikel-id eaat4457Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    For millennia, the Pontic-Caspian steppe was a connector between the Eurasian steppe and Europe. In this scene, multidirectional and sequential movements of different populations may have occurred, including those of the Eurasian steppe nomads. We sequenced 35 genomes (low to medium coverage) of Bronze Age individuals (Srubnaya-Alakulskaya) and Iron Age nomads (Cimmerians, Scythians, and Sarmatians) that represent four distinct cultural entities corresponding to the chronological sequence of cultural complexes in the region. Our results suggest that, despite genetic links among these peoples, no group can be considered a direct ancestor of the subsequent group. The nomadic populations were heterogeneous and carried genetic affinities with populations from several other regions including the Far East and the southern Urals. We found evidence of a stable shared genetic signature, making the eastern Pontic-Caspian steppe a likely source of western nomadic groups.

  • 19.
    Kılınç, Gülşah Merve
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Kashuba, Natalija
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. University of Oslo, Museum of Cultural History, Norway.
    Yaka, Reyhan
    Sümer, Arev Pelin
    Yüncü, Eren
    Shergin, Dmitrij
    Ivanov, Grigorij Leonidovich
    Kichigin, Dmitrii
    Pestereva, Kjunnej
    Volkov, Denis
    Mandryka, Pavel
    Kharinskii, Artur
    Tishkin, Alexey
    Ineshin, Evgenij
    Kovychev, Evgeniy
    Stepanov, Aleksandr
    Alekseev, Aanatolij
    Fedoseeva, Svetlana Aleksandrovna
    Somel, Mehmet
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Krzewińska, Maja
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Investigating Holocene human population history in North Asia using ancient mitogenomes2018Ingår i: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, artikel-id 8969Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeogenomic studies have largely elucidated human population history in West Eurasia during the Stone Age. However, despite being a broad geographical region of significant cultural and linguistic diversity, little is known about the population history in North Asia. We present complete mitochondrial genome sequences together with stable isotope data for 41 serially sampled ancient individuals from North Asia, dated between c. 13,790 BP and c. 1,380 BP extending from the Palaeolithic to the Iron Age. Analyses of mitochondrial DNA sequences and haplogroup data of these individuals revealed the highest genetic affinity to present-day North Asian populations of the same geographical region suggesting a possible long-term maternal genetic continuity in the region. We observed a decrease in genetic diversity over time and a reduction of maternal effective population size (Ne) approximately seven thousand years before present. Coalescent simulations were consistent with genetic continuity between present day individuals and individuals dating to 7,000 BP, 4,800 BP or 3,000 BP. Meanwhile, genetic differences observed between 7,000 BP and 3,000 BP as well as between 4,800 BP and 3,000 BP were inconsistent with genetic drift alone, suggesting gene flow into the region from distant gene pools or structure within the population. These results indicate that despite some level of continuity between ancient groups and present-day populations, the region exhibits a complex demographic history during the Holocene.

  • 20. Landeschi, Giacomo
    et al.
    Apel, Jan
    Lundström, Victor
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Lindgren, Stefan
    Dell'Unto, Nicolo
    Re-enacting the sequence: combined digital methods to study a prehistoric cave2019Ingår i: Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences, ISSN 1866-9557, E-ISSN 1866-9565, Vol. 11, nr 6, s. 2805-2819Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This contribution seeks to demonstrate how recently developed 3D GIS platforms can help archeologists in relating to the original context legacy data that can be employed to digitally reconstruct the sequence of arbitrary layers as it was observed and then excavated in the end of the nineteenth century. This research has been conducted on the prehistoric cave of Stora Forvar, located on the small island of Stora Karlso, in South-Eastern Sweden. As a part of a research project titled The pioneer settlements of Gotland, this line of enquiry has sought to combine 3D-based digital acquisition techniques, Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and old archival material (hand-made drawings, artifacts lists, historical pictures) in order to virtually reconstruct the original sequence as it was excavated through the method of arbitrary layers. At a later stage, the reconstructed sequence has been employed to re-contextualize and analyze the distribution of artifacts so as to detect any possible pattern that could have been useful for defining the chronological boundaries of the Mesolithic phase of habitation of the cave. In brief, three main objectives can be defined: (a) to re-create a spatial connection between the artifacts retrieved at the time of the excavation and the sequence of layers, (b) to define density maps showing the relationship between volumes of layers and categories of artifacts belonging to the sequence, and (c) to further our knowledge about the Mesolithic habitation of the cave, not only vertically (chronologically) but also horizontally.

  • 21. Limburg, Karin
    et al.
    Walther, Yvonne
    Hong, Bongghi
    Olson, Carina
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Prehistoric vs. modern Baltic Sea cod fisheries: selectivity across the millennia2008Ingår i: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 275, nr 1652, s. 2659-2665Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Combining Stone Age and modern data provides unique insights for management, extending beyond contemporary problems and shifting baselines. Using fish chronometric parts, we compared demographic characteristics of exploited cod populations from the Neolithic Period (4500 BP) to the modern highly exploited fishery in the central Baltic Sea. We found that Neolithic cod were larger (mean 56.4 cm, 95% confidence interval (CI)±0.9) than modern fish (weighted mean length in catch =49.5±0.2 cm in 1995, 48.2±0.2 cm in 2003), and older (mean ages =4.7±0.11, 3.1±0.02 and 3.6±0.02 years for Neolithic, 1995, and 2003 fisheries, respectively). Fishery-independent surveys in 1995 and 2003 show that mean sizes in the stock are 16–17 cm smaller than reflected in the fishery, and mean ages approximately 1–1.5 years younger. Modelled von Bertalanffy growth and back-calculated lengths indicated that Neolithic cod grew to smaller asymptotic lengths, but were larger at younger ages, implying rapid early growth. Very small Neolithic cod were absent and large individuals were rare as in modern times. This could be owing to selective harvests, the absence of small and large fish in the area or a combination. Comparing modern and prehistoric times, fishery selection is evident, but apparently not as great as in the North Atlantic proper.

  • 22. Magnell, Ola
    et al.
    Gummesson, Sara
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Molin, Fredrik
    Zetterlund, Peter
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Mesolithic deer hunting- Prey choice of red deer (Cervus elaphus) based on age and sex distibutions2020Ingår i: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 29Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Mesolithic hunting on red deer (Cervus elaphus) has been examined by analysis of prey choice through theage and sex distributions based on dentition and morphometry of zooarchaeological remains from fiveMesolithic settlements in Sweden dating to 9000–6000 cal BP. The results indicate a general selection of individualsaged 2–5 years at most sites, while the sex distribution was skewed toward either stags or hinds. Thehunting was directed towards animals that provided high immediate and short-term returns of meat. Few observationspoint to hunting patterns that would have been associated to conservational perspectives of the reddeer populations. A comparison indicates that local and site-specific differences in hunting practise can bediscerned which probably was related to local conditions linked to environment, function of sites and huntingtraditions, but no distinct correlation of hunting pattern to chronology or different regions. The study shows thepotential to evaluate kill-off patterns in relation to optimal foraging perspectives restricted to one prey species.

  • 23.
    Malmström, Helena
    et al.
    Department of Evolutionary Biology, Uppsala University, SE-11863 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gilbert, M. Thomas P.
    Centre for GeoGenetics, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Thomas, Mark G.
    Research Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, and the AHRC Centre for the Evolution of Cultural Diversity, University College London, Gower Street,London WC1E 6BT, UK.
    Brandström, Mikael
    Department of Forest Mycology and Pathology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-10691 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Molnar, Petra
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Andersen, Pernille K.
    Department of Genetics and Biotechnology, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, University of Aarhus, PO Box 50, DK-8830 Tjele, Denmark.
    Bendixen, Christian
    Department of Genetics and Biotechnology, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, University of Aarhus, PO Box 50, DK-8830 Tjele, Denmark.
    Holmlund, Gunilla
    National Board of Forensic Medicine, Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, SE-58758 Linköping, Sweden.
    Götherström, Anders
    Department of Evolutionary Biology, Uppsala University, SE-11863 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Willerslev, Eske
    Centre for GeoGenetics, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Ancient DNA Reveals Lack of Continuitybetween Neolithic Hunter-Gatherersand Contemporary Scandinavians2009Ingår i: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 19, nr 20, s. 1758-1762Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The driving force behind the transition from a foraging to

    a farming lifestyle in prehistoric Europe (Neolithization)

    has been debated for more than a century [1–3]. Of particular

    interest is whether population replacement or cultural

    exchange was responsible [3–5]. Scandinavia holds a unique

    place in this debate, for it maintained one of the last major

    hunter-gatherer complexes in Neolithic Europe, the Pitted

    Ware culture [6]. Intriguingly, these late hunter-gatherers

    existed in parallel to early farmers for more than a millennium

    before they vanished some 4,000 years ago [7, 8]. The prolonged

    coexistence of the two cultures in Scandinavia has

    been cited as an argument against population replacement

    between the Mesolithic and the present [7, 8]. Through analysis

    of DNA extracted from ancient Scandinavian human

    remains, we show that people of the Pitted Ware culture

    were not the direct ancestors of modern Scandinavians

    (including the Saami people of northern Scandinavia) but

    are more closely related to contemporary populations of

    the eastern Baltic region. Our findings support hypotheses

    arising from archaeological analyses that propose

    a Neolithic or post-Neolithic population replacement in

    Scandinavia [7]. Furthermore, our data are consistent with

    the view that the eastern Baltic represents a genetic refugia

    for some of the European hunter-gatherer populations.

  • 24. Malmström, Helena
    et al.
    Günther, Torsten
    Svensson, Emma M.
    Juras, Anna
    Fraser, Magdalena
    Munters, Arielle R.
    Pospieszny, Łukasz
    Tõrv, Mari
    Lindström, Jonathan
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    The genomic ancestry of the Scandinavian Battle Axe Culture people and their relation to the broader Corded Ware horizon2019Ingår i: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 286, nr 1912, artikel-id 20191528Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Neolithic period is characterized by major cultural transformations and human migrations, with lasting effects across Europe. To understand the population dynamics in Neolithic Scandinavia and the Baltic Sea area, we investigate the genomes of individuals associated with the Battle Axe Culture (BAC), a Middle Neolithic complex in Scandinavia resembling the continental Corded Ware Culture (CWC). We sequenced 11 individuals (dated to 3330-1665 calibrated before common era (cal BCE)) from modern-day Sweden, Estonia, and Poland to 0.26-3.24x coverage. Three of the individuals were from CWC contexts and two from the central-Swedish BAC burial 'Bergsgraven'. By analysing these genomes together with the previously published data, we show that the BAC represents a group different from other Neolithic populations in Scandinavia, revealing stratification among cultural groups. Similar to continental CWC, the BAC-associated individuals display ancestry from the Pontic-Caspian steppe herders, as well as smaller components originating from hunter-gatherers and Early Neolithic farmers. Thus, the steppe ancestry seen in these Scandinavian BAC individuals can be explained only by migration into Scandinavia. Furthermore, we highlight the reuse of megalithic tombs of the earlier Funnel Beaker Culture (FBC) by people related to BAC. The BAC groups likely mixed with resident middle Neolithic farmers (e.g. FBC) without substantial contributions from Neolithic foragers.

  • 25.
    Malmström, Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Linderholm, Anna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Molnar, Petra
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Holmlund, Gunilla
    rättsmedicinalverket.
    Jakobsson, mattias
    Uppsala universitet.
    Götherström, Anders
    Uppsala universitet.
    High frequency of lactose intolerance in a prehistoric hunter-gatherer population in northern Europe2010Ingår i: BMC Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1471-2148, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 10, s. 89-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Genes and culture are believed to interact, but it has been difficult to find direct evidence for the process. One candidate example that has been put forward is lactase persistence in adulthood, i.e. the ability to continue digesting the milk sugar lactose after childhood, facilitating the consumption of raw milk. This genetic trait is believed to have evolved within a short time period and to be related with the emergence of sedentary agriculture.

    Results: Here we investigate the frequency of an allele (-13910*T) associated with lactase persistence in a Neolithic Scandinavian population. From the 14 individuals originally examined, 10 yielded reliable results. We find that the T allele frequency was very low (5%) in this Middle Neolithic hunter-gatherer population, and that the frequency is dramatically different from the extant Swedish population (74%).

    Conclusions: We conclude that this difference in frequency could not have arisen by genetic drift and is either due to selection or, more likely, replacement of hunter-gatherer populations by sedentary agriculturalists.

  • 26. Malmström, Helena
    et al.
    Linderholm, Anna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Durham University, UK.
    Skoglund, Pontus
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Sjödin, Per
    Gilbert, M. Thomas P.
    Holmlund, Gunilla
    Willerslev, Eske
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Götherstrom, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Ancient mitochondrial DNA from the northern fringe of the Neolithic farming expansion in Europe sheds light on the dispersion process2015Ingår i: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 370, nr 1660, artikel-id 20130373Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Neolithization process started around 12 000 years ago in the Near East. The introduction of agriculture spread north and west throughout Europe and a key question has been if this was brought about by migrating individuals, by an exchange of ideas or a by a mixture of these. The earliest farming evidence in Scandinavia is found within the Funnel Beaker Culture complex (Trichterbecherkultur, TRB) which represents the northernmost extension of Neolithic farmers in Europe. The TRB coexisted for almost a millennium with hunter-gatherers of the Pitted Ware Cultural complex (PWC). If migration was a substantial part of the Neolithization, even the northerly TRB community would display a closer genetic affinity to other farmer populations than to hunter-gatherer populations. We deep-sequenced the mitochondrial hypervariable region 1 from seven farmers (six TRB and one Battle Axe complex, BAC) and 13 hunter-gatherers (PWC) and authenticated the sequences using postmortem DNA damage patterns. A comparison with 124 previously published sequences from prehistoric Europe shows that the TRB individuals share a close affinity to Central European farmer populations, and that they are distinct from hunter-gatherer groups, including the geographically close and partially contemporary PWC that show a close affinity to the European Mesolithic hunter-gatherers.

  • 27. Malmström, Helena
    et al.
    Vilà, Carles
    Gilbert, M Thomas P
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Willerslev, Eske
    Holmlund, Gunilla
    Götherström, Anders
    Barking up the wrong tree:: Modern northern Europeans dogs fail to explain their origin2008Ingår i: BMC Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 8, nr 71Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 28. Niemi, Marianna
    et al.
    Blauer, Auli
    Iso-Touru, Terhi
    Nyström, Veronica
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Harjula, Janne
    Taavitsainen, Jussi-Pekka
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Kantanen, Juha
    Mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosomal diversity in ancient populations of domestic sheep (Ovis aries) in Finland: comparison with contemporary sheep breeds2013Ingår i: Genetics Selection Evolution, ISSN 0999-193X, E-ISSN 1297-9686, Vol. 45, s. 2-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Several molecular and population genetic studies have focused on the native sheep breeds of Finland. In this work, we investigated their ancestral sheep populations from Iron Age, Medieval and Post-Medieval periods by sequencing a partial mitochondrial DNA D-loop and the 5'-promoter region of the SRY gene. We compared the maternal (mitochondrial DNA haplotypes) and paternal (SNP oY1) genetic diversity of ancient sheep in Finland with modern domestic sheep populations in Europe and Asia to study temporal changes in genetic variation and affinities between ancient and modern populations. Results: A 523-bp mitochondrial DNA sequence was successfully amplified for 26 of 36 sheep ancient samples i.e. five, seven and 14 samples representative of Iron Age, Medieval and Post-Medieval sheep, respectively. Genetic diversity was analyzed within the cohorts. This ancient dataset was compared with present-day data consisting of 94 animals from 10 contemporary European breeds and with GenBank DNA sequence data to carry out a haplotype sharing analysis. Among the 18 ancient mitochondrial DNA haplotypes identified, 14 were present in the modern breeds. Ancient haplotypes were assigned to the highly divergent ovine haplogroups A and B, haplogroup B being the major lineage within the cohorts. Only two haplotypes were detected in the Iron Age samples, while the genetic diversity of the Medieval and Post-Medieval cohorts was higher. For three of the ancient DNA samples, Y-chromosome SRY gene sequences were amplified indicating that they originated from rams. The SRY gene of these three ancient ram samples contained SNP G-oY1, which is frequent in modern north-European sheep breeds. Conclusions: Our study did not reveal any sign of major population replacement of native sheep in Finland since the Iron Age. Variations in the availability of archaeological remains may explain differences in genetic diversity estimates and patterns within the cohorts rather than demographic events that occurred in the past. Our ancient DNA results fit well with the genetic context of domestic sheep as determined by analyses of modern north-European sheep breeds.

  • 29.
    Olson, Carina
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Björck, Niclas
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Huts and Deposition of Refuse at Fräkenrönningen, a Neolithic Coastal Dwelling Site in Eastern Middle Sweden2011Ingår i: International journal of osteoarchaeology, ISSN 1047-482X, E-ISSN 1099-1212, Vol. 21, nr 2, s. 173-186Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The present detailed taphonomic study deals with faunal remains from the Middle Neolithic site of Fräkenrönningen, located in Eastern Middle Sweden. Archaeological excavations in 1993 revealed the remnants of eight hut-structures and several different features spread over approximately 1500 m2. Large amounts of pottery and stone artefacts were recovered together with approximately 14.6 kg of burnt faunal remains. Our specific aim was to examine the depositional patterns of burnt bones at the site; the diversity between the huts and the sub-areas between the huts. Spatial patterns of seal and fish bones as well as that of the anatomical representation of seals were investigated.The refuse disposal patterns were spatially organised, and some site areas exhibited large refuse agglomerations of burnt bones. Most faunal remains were recovered immediately outside of the huts. The size of the huts did not correspond with absolute amounts of refuse. Both large and small huts showed a variation in amount of bones. The bones of harp seal (Phoca groenlandica) and ringed seal (Phoca hispida) were deposited in all areas of the site, showing a rather similar anatomical representation in all areas. The size of the huts was associated with the composition of the faunal remains. The huts in the western area were smaller in size than those in the eastern area, and they exhibited a higher frequency of fish bones. Interestingly, the fish bones showed the most marked variability between the different areas of the site. The largest amounts of fish bones were deposited in a restricted area of the north-western part of the site, in association with three of the huts. The present study highlights the importance of detailed taphonomic studies of fishbone.

  • 30.
    Olson, Carina
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Runeson, Henrik
    Sigvallius, Berit
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Människor och djur2008Ingår i: Stenålderns stationer: Arkeologi i Botniabanans spår, Riksantikvarieämbetet och Murberget, Länsmuseet Västernorrland , 2008Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 31.
    Omrak, Ayca
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Günther, Torsten
    Valdiosera, Cristina
    Svensson, Emma M.
    Malmström, Helena
    Kiesewetter, Henrike
    Aylward, William
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Genomic Evidence Establishes Anatolia as the Source of the European Neolithic Gene Pool2016Ingår i: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 26, nr 2, s. 270-275Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Anatolia and the Near East have long been recognized as the epicenter of the Neolithic expansion through archaeological evidence. Recent archaeogenetic studies on Neolithic European human remains have shown that the Neolithic expansion in Europe was driven westward and northward by migration from a supposed Near Eastern origin [1-5]. However, this expansion and the establishment of numerous culture complexes in the Aegean and Balkans did not occur until 8,500 before present (BP), over 2,000 years after the initial settlements in the Neolithic core area [6-9]. We present ancient genome-wide sequence data from 6,700-year-old human remains excavated from a Neolithic context in Kumtepe, located in northwestern Anatolia near the well-known (and younger) site Troy [10]. Kumtepe is one of the settlements that emerged around 7,000 BP, after the initial expansion wave brought Neolithic practices to Europe. We show that this individual displays genetic similarities to the early European Neolithic gene pool and modern-day Sardinians, as well as a genetic affinity to modern-day populations from the Near East and the Caucasus. Furthermore, modern-day Anatolians carry signatures of several admixture events from different populations that have diluted this early Neolithic farmer component, explaining why modern-day Sardinian populations, instead of modern-day Anatolian populations, are genetically more similar to the people that drove the Neolithic expansion into Europe. Anatolia's central geographic location appears to have served as a connecting point, allowing a complex contact network with other areas of the Near East and Europe throughout, and after, the Neolithic.

  • 32. Price, Neil
    et al.
    Hedenstierna-Jonson, Charlotte
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Krzewińska, Maja
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Günther, Torsten
    Sobrado, Verónica
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Viking warrior women? Reassessing Birka chamber grave Bj.5812019Ingår i: Antiquity, ISSN 0003-598X, E-ISSN 1745-1744, Vol. 93, nr 367, s. 181-198Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The warrior woman has long been part of the Viking image, with a pedigree that extends from the Valkyries of Old Norse prose and poetry to modern media entertainment. Until recently, however, actual Viking Age evidence for such individuals has been sparse. This article addresses research showing that the individual buried at Birka in an ‘archetypal’ high-status warrior grave—always assumed to be male since its excavation in 1878—is, in fact, biologically female. Publication, in 2017, of the genomic data led to unprecedented public debate about this individual. Here, the authors address in detail the interpretation of the burial, discussing source-critical issues and parallels.

  • 33.
    Rodríguez-Varela, Ricardo
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain.
    Günther, Torsten
    Krzewińska, Maja
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Gillingwater, Thomas H.
    MacCallum, Malcolm
    Arsuaga, Juan Luis
    Dobney, Keith
    Valdiosera, Cristina
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Girdland-Flink, Linus
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Liverpool John Moores University, UK.
    Genomic Analyses of Pre-European Conquest Human Remains from the Canary Islands Reveal Close Affinity to Modern North Africans2017Ingår i: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 27, nr 21, s. 3396-3402.e5Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The origins and genetic affinity of the aboriginal inhabitants of the Canary Islands, commonly known as Guanches, are poorly understood. Though radiocarbon dates on archaeological remains such as charcoal, seeds, and domestic animal bones suggest that people have inhabited the islands since the 5th century BCE [1–3], it remains unclear how many times, and by whom, the islands were first settled [4, 5]. Previously published ancient DNA analyses of uniparental genetic markers have shown that the Guanches carried common North African Y chromosome markers (E-M81, E-M78, and J-M267) and mitochondrial lineages such as U6b, in addition to common Eurasian haplogroups [6–8]. These results are in agreement with some linguistic, archaeological, and anthropological data indicating an origin from a North African Berber-like population [1, 4, 9]. However, to date there are no published Guanche autosomal genomes to help elucidate and directly test this hypothesis. To resolve this, we generated the first genome-wide sequence data and mitochondrial genomes from eleven archaeological Guanche individuals originating from Gran Canaria and Tenerife. Five of the individuals (directly radiocarbon dated to a time transect spanning the 7th–11th centuries CE) yielded sufficient autosomal genome coverage (0.21× to 3.93×) for population genomic analysis. Our results show that the Guanches were genetically similar over time and that they display the greatest genetic affinity to extant Northwest Africans, strongly supporting the hypothesis of a Berber-like origin. We also estimate that the Guanches have contributed 16%–31% autosomal ancestry to modern Canary Islanders, here represented by two individuals from Gran Canaria.

  • 34. Skoglund, Pontus
    et al.
    Malmström, Helena
    Omrak, Ayca
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Raghavan, Maanasa
    Valdiosera, Cristina
    Gunther, Torsten
    Hall, Per
    Tambets, Kristiina
    Parik, Jueri
    Sjögren, Karl-Göran
    Apel, Jan
    Willerslev, Eske
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Genomic Diversity and Admixture Differs for Stone-Age Scandinavian Foragers and Farmers2014Ingår i: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 344, nr 6185, s. 747-750Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Prehistoric population structure associated with the transition to an agricultural lifestyle in Europe remains a contentious idea. Population-genomic data from 11 Scandinavian Stone Age human remains suggest that hunter-gatherers had lower genetic diversity than that of farmers. Despite their close geographical proximity, the genetic differentiation between the two Stone Age groups was greater than that observed among extant European populations. Additionally, the Scandinavian Neolithic farmers exhibited a greater degree of hunter-gatherer-related admixture than that of the Tyrolean Iceman, who also originated from a farming context. In contrast, Scandinavian hunter-gatherers displayed no significant evidence of introgression from farmers. Our findings suggest that Stone Age foraging groups were historically in low numbers, likely owing to oscillating living conditions or restricted carrying capacity, and that they were partially incorporated into expanding farming groups.

  • 35. Skoglund, Pontus
    et al.
    Malmström, Helena
    Raghavan, Maanasa
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Hall, Per
    Willerslev, Eske
    Gilbert, M. Thomas P.
    Götherström, Anders
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Origins and Genetic Legacy of Neolithic Farmers and Hunter-Gatherers in Europe2012Ingår i: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 336, nr 6080, s. 466-469Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The farming way of life originated in the Near East some 11,000 years ago and had reached most of the European continent 5000 years later. However, the impact of the agricultural revolution on demography and patterns of genomic variation in Europe remains unknown. We obtained 249 million base pairs of genomic DNA from similar to 5000-year-old remains of three hunter-gatherers and one farmer excavated in Scandinavia and find that the farmer is genetically most similar to extant southern Europeans, contrasting sharply to the hunter-gatherers, whose distinct genetic signature is most similar to that of extant northern Europeans. Our results suggest that migration from southern Europe catalyzed the spread of agriculture and that admixture in the wake of this expansion eventually shaped the genomic landscape of modern-day Europe.

  • 36. Skoglund, Pontus
    et al.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Accurate sex identification of ancient human remains using DNA shotgun sequencing2013Ingår i: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 40, nr 12, s. 4477-4482Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Accurate identification of the biological sex of ancient remains is vital for critically testing hypotheses about social structure in prehistoric societies. However, morphological methods are imprecise for juvenile individuals and fragmentary remains, and molecular methods that rely on particular sex-specific marker loci such as the amelogenin gene suffer from allelic dropout and sensitivity to modern contamination. Analyzing shotgun sequencing data from 14 present-day humans of known biological sex and 16 ancient individuals from a time span of 100 to similar to 70,000 years ago, we show that even relatively sparse shotgun sequencing (about 100,000 human sequences) can be used to reliably identify chromosomal sex simply by considering the ratio of sequences aligning to the X and Y chromosomes, and highlight two examples where the genetic assignments indicate morphological misassignment Furthermore, we show that accurate sex identification of highly degraded remains can be performed in the presence of substantial amounts of present-day contamination by utilizing the signature of cytosine deamination, a characteristic feature of ancient DNA.

  • 37. Stavrum, Benithe
    et al.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Osteologisk analys av ett bränt benmaterial från Hudholmen, Malax2008Ingår i: Studia Archaeologica Ostrobotniensia, ISSN 0782-3649Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 38.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Reading bones: Stone Age hunters and seals in the Baltic2001Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a study of hunters and seals in the Stone Age in the Baltic. The ambition has been to develop and utilize methods for osteological analyses of archaeological seal bones. The main aims of the zooarchaeological analyses have been to study seal hunting strategies and the formation processes of the faunal remains. The faunal history of the harp seal in the Baltic has also been investigated.

    Skeletal material from 603 modern seals in the collections of the Swedish Museum of Natural History has been studied. The archaeological source material consists of faunal re-mains recovered from 24 Stone Age sites dating to approximately 3300-1800 cal BC. Osteological analyses have been performed on seal remains primarily from Pitted Ware culture sites on Åland and Gotland, but other contemporary sites in the Baltic area have also been examined. Geographically, the analyses are limited to the southern areas of the Baltic.

    The results show that the Baltic species of seals, and also the harp seal, share a similar sequence of epiphyseal fusion. There is a general connection between the skeletal development and life history stages in all species of seals. Epiphyseal fusion data can be utilized in zooarchaeolo-gical studies. The analyses have also shown that osteo-metric studies can reveal valuable infor-mation on the seasonality of hunting patterns. Criteria for the morphological identification of bones from harp seal and ringed seal have been developed.

    The results of the zooarchaeological studies have confirmed the importance of the harp seal in the subsistence economy on the studied sites. Ringed seal was a common prey animal on the studied sites while grey seals occur sporadically. Stone Age hunting strategies were strongly related to behavioural patterns of the seals. The hunting cannot be characterized as a mass hunting strategy. It is argued that the harp seal formed a permanent breeding population in the Baltic Sea. The hunting pressure on the Baltic harp seal population was extensive and the human impact on the breeding potential may have been significant.

    On the Stone Age sites the seals were not handled according to biological properties like species or age. Instead, the bones from all seals have been deposited together. Certain body parts seem to be handled differently than others. Especially the skulls of the seals seem to have been handled according to specific rules. A reinterpetation of the Ålandic clay idols is offered. These are seen as representations of seals rather than humans. 

  • 39.
    Storå, Jan
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Bäckström, Ylva
    Olson, Carina
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Skärgårdsbor i Östra Mellansverige under stenåldern: Osteoarkeologiska mönster2008Ingår i: Land och samhälle i förändring: Uppländska bygder i ett långtidsperspektiv, 2008Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 40.
    Storå, Jan
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Hillborg, Jessica
    Kennebjörk, Josefina
    Lindblad, Robin
    Lindeberg, Johan
    Mosseby, Jennie
    Gustavsson, Rudolf
    Ålands landskapsregering, Museibyrån.
    Late Iron Age Subsistence in the Åland Islands in light of Osteoarchaeology2012Ingår i: Stones, bones & thoughts: festschrift in honour of Milton Núñez. / [ed] Niinimäki, S., Salmi, A.-K., Kuusela, J.-M:, Okkonen, J., Uleåborg: Milton Núñezin juhlakirjan toimituskunta , 2012, s. 175-189Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 41. Sánchez-Quinto, Federico
    et al.
    Malmström, Helena
    Fraser, Magdalena
    Girdland-Flink, Linus
    Svensson, Emma M.
    Simões, Luciana G.
    George, Robert
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Australia.
    Hollfelder, Nina
    Burenhult, Göran
    Noble, Gordon
    Britton, Kate
    Talamo, Sahra
    Curtis, Neil
    Brzobohata, Hana
    Sumberova, Radka
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Megalithic tombs in western and northern Neolithic Europe were linked to a kindred society2019Ingår i: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 116, nr 19, s. 9469-9474Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Paleogenomic and archaeological studies show that Neolithic lifeways spread from the Fertile Crescent into Europe around 9000 BCE, reaching northwestern Europe by 4000 BCE. Starting around 4500 BCE, a new phenomenon of constructing megalithic monuments, particularly for funerary practices, emerged along the Atlantic facade. While it has been suggested that the emergence of megaliths was associated with the territories of farming communities, the origin and social structure of the groups that erected them has remained largely unknown. We generated genome sequence data from human remains, corresponding to 24 individuals from five megalithic burial sites, encompassing the widespread tradition of megalithic construction in northern and western Europe, and analyzed our results in relation to the existing European paleogenomic data. The various individuals buried in megaliths show genetic affinities with local farming groups within their different chronological contexts. Individuals buried in megaliths display (past) admixture with local hunter-gatherers, similar to that seen in other Neolithic individuals in Europe. In relation to the tomb populations, we find significantly more males than females buried in the megaliths of the British Isles. The genetic data show close kin relationships among the individuals buried within the megaliths, and for the Irish megaliths, we found a kin relation between individuals buried in different megaliths. We also see paternal continuity through time, including the same Y-chromosome haplotypes reoccurring. These observations suggest that the investigated funerary monuments were associated with patrilineal kindred groups. Our genomic investigation provides insight into the people associated with this long-standing megalith funerary tradition, including their social dynamics.

  • 42.
    Telldahl, Ylva
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Svensson, Emma
    Götherström, Anders
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Ostemetric and molecular sexing of cattle metapodia2012Ingår i: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 39, nr 1, s. 121-127Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Sex identification of skeletal remains based on morphology is a common practice in Zooarchaeology. Knowledge of the sex distribution of slaughtered or hunted animals may help in the interpretation of e.g. hunting or breeding strategies. Here we investigate and evaluate several osteometric criteria used to assess sex of cattle (Bos taurus) metapodia using molecular sex identification as a control of the metric data. The bone assemblage used to assess these new criteria derives from the Eketorp ringfort in the southern parts of Öland Island in Sweden. One hundred metapodia were selected for molecular analysis of sex and we were able to genetically identify the sex of 76 of these elements. The combined results of the molecular and osteometric analyses confirm a significant size difference between females and males for several measurements for both metacarpals (Mc) and metatarsals (Mt). Our results show that some measurements are applicable for metapodials. These measurements include the slenderness indices such as the Mennerich’s index 1 and 3, as well as the distal breadth (Bd), the breadth between the articular crests (Bcr), and the maximum breadth of the lateral trochlea (BFdl). We show that they can be used for sexing of both metacarpals and metatarsals. The latter measurements offer an opportunity to study fragmented elements and thus a higher number of elements may be utilized for morphological sexing of archaeological bones. Size comparisons of Mc and Mt may also aid in the separation of bulls and oxen.

  • 43.
    Telldahl, Ylva
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Svensson, Emma
    Avdelningen för evolutionsbiologi, Evolutionsbiologiskt Centrum, EBC, Uppsala universitet.
    Götherström, Anders
    Avdelningen för evolutionsbiologi, Evolutionsbiologiskt Centrum, EBC, Uppsala universitet.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Typing Late prehistoric Cows and Bulls-Osteology and Genetics of Cattle at the Eketorp ringfort on the Öland Island in Sweden2011Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, nr 6, s. 1-8Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Human management of livestock and the presence of different breeds have been discussed in archaeozoology and animal breeding. Traditionally osteometrics has been the main tool in addressing these questions. We combine osteometrics with molecular sex identifications of 104 of 340 morphometrically analysed bones in order to investigate the use of cattle at the Eketorp ringfort on the Öland island in Sweden. The fort is dated to 300–1220/50 A.D., revealing three different building phases. In order to investigate specific patterns and shifts through time in the use of cattle the genetic data is evaluated in relation to osteometric patterns and occurrence of pathologies on cattle metapodia. Males were genotyped for a Y-chromosomal SNP in UTY19 that separates the two major haplogroups, Y1 and Y2, in taurine cattle. A subset of the samples were also genotyped for one SNP involved in coat coloration (MC1R), one SNP putatively involved in resistance to cattle plague (TLR4), and one SNP in intron 5 of the IGF-1 gene that has been associated to size and reproduction.

    The results of the molecular analyses confirm that the skeletal assemblage from Eketorp is dominated by skeletal elements from females, which implies that dairying was important. Pathological lesions on the metapodia were classified into two groups; those associated with the use as draught animals and those lesions without a similar aetiology. The results show that while bulls both exhibit draught related lesions and other types of lesions, cows exhibit other types of lesions. Interestingly, a few elements from females exhibit draught related lesions. We conclude that this reflects the different use of adult female and male cattle.

    Although we note some variation in the use of cattle at Eketorp between Iron Age and Medieval time we have found little evidence for the use of different types of animals for specific purposes. The use of specific (genetic) breeds seems to be a phenomenon that developed later than the Eketorp settlement.

  • 44. Ukkonen, Pirkko
    et al.
    Aaris-Sorensen, Kim
    Arppe, Laura
    Daugnora, Linas
    Halkka, Antti
    Lougas, Lembi
    Oinonen, Markku Juhani
    Pilot, Malgorzata
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    An Arctic seal in temperate waters: History of the ringed seal (Pusa hispida) in the Baltic Sea and its adaptation to the changing environment2014Ingår i: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 24, nr 12, s. 1694-1706Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The ringed seal (Pusa hispida) is an early immigrant in the Baltic Basin and has since its arrival experienced substantial changes in the climate, salinity and productivity of the Basin. In this paper, we discuss the dispersal and distribution of the ringed seal during different stages of the Baltic Sea in relation to past and ongoing environmental changes. Subfossil ringed seal remains around the Baltic Sea and the Danish Straits were radiocarbon dated in order to map the distribution of the species in different time periods. The delta C-13 data were used in evaluating the changes in the marine character of the Baltic Basin. The sequence of the dates indicates a continuous presence of the species in the Baltic Basin. The earliest ringed seal finds come from the Skagerrak/Kattegat area (Denmark, Swedish west coast) and date to the full glacial period and Baltic Ice Lake. In the Baltic Basin, the species appears in the subfossil record during the Ancylus period, but the main part of the remains date to the Littorina stage. During the Littorina stage, the distribution of the species was at least periodically wider than today, covering also southern parts of the Baltic. The presence of breeding populations in southern parts of the Baltic during the Holocene Thermal Maximum (HTM) indicates that the winters were at least periodically cold enough for winter ice. The changes in the marine influence in the Baltic Basin can be seen in the seal collagen delta C-13 values, which serve as a proxy for qualitative changes in water mass salinity.

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