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  • 1. Fossali, Maria Teresa
    et al.
    Grew, Philip
    Kunitz, Silvia
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
    Il parlato in classe: un’indagine sugli adulti che imparano una lingua straniera1999Ingår i: Indagini sociolinguistiche nella scuola e nella società italiana in evoluzione / [ed] Massimo Vedovelli, Edizioni Franco Angeli, 1999Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 2.
    Kunitz, Silvia
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Engelska institutionen.
    Collaborative attention work on gender agreement in Italian as a foreign language2018Ingår i: The Modern language journal, ISSN 0026-7902, E-ISSN 1540-4781, Vol. 102, nr S1, s. 64-81Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In cognitivist Second Language Acquisition (SLA), attention and noticing are described as psycholinguistic processes that (may) have a role in language learning. The operationalization of such constructs, however, poses methodological challenges, since neither online nor off‐line measures are coextensive with these cognitive processes that occur in the individual mind–brain. In contrast with such a perspective, the present conversation‐analytic study re‐specifies attention in social terms, as a nexus of publicly displayed actions that are jointly achieved by college level students of Italian as a foreign language as they engage in collaborative writing while planning for a group presentation to be performed in the second language (L2). More specifically, the article describes gender‐focusing sequences that are initiated by attention‐mobilizing turns with which a student directs her coparticipants’ attention to an oral or written item that is oriented to as possibly inaccurate in terms of gender assignment. The study shows the agentive role of students in identifying learnables and solving language‐related issues and provides an example of how participants do learning as a socially situated and collaborative activity by enacting immanent pedagogies (Lindwall & Lymer, 2005).

  • 3.
    Kunitz, Silvia
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA.
    Group Planning among L2 Learners of Italian: A Conversation Analytic Perspective.2013Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    In line with the call for a process-oriented and ecologically sound approach to planning in SLA (Ellis, 2005), and with the behavioral approach adopted in other fields (Murphy, 2004, 2005; Suchman, 1987, 2007), the present work applies Conversation Analysis to the study of group planning. The participants are four groups of adult learners of Italian as a foreign language, engaged in the preparation of a classroom presentation in their L2. The analysis focuses on: 1) the collaborative production of linguistic artifacts; and 2) the complex L1/L2 alternation patterns produced by the students. This type of fine-grained, emic analysis allows to respecify group planning as an intersubjective, goal-oriented activity that is done by multilingual actors as observable behavior, consisting of a nexus of laminated actions (Goodwin, 2013) that occur in the moment and over time in and through embodied talk-in-interaction.

  • 4.
    Kunitz, Silvia
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för svenska och flerspråkighet, Svenska/Nordiska språk.
    L1/L2 alternation practices in students’ task planning2018Ingår i: Conversation Analysis and Language Alternation : Capturing transitions in the classroom / [ed] Anna Filipi, Numa Markee, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2018, s. 107-128Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This conversation analytic study explores the language alternation patterns enacted by students of Italian as a Foreign Language as they engage in planning a classroom presentation. The data consist of 13 planning sessions conducted by two groups of students enrolled in a third semester course and two groups of students enrolled in a sixth semester course at a US university. The analysis shows how the participants achieve a local interactional order (Cromdal 2005) where the alternation between the L1 and the L2 embodies the distinction between planning process (in L1-English) and planning product (in L2-Italian) and achieves the transition between such components of the planning activity. Overall, the study demonstrates that language alternation is a discursive skill that constitutes a resource for planning for students at different proficiency levels.

  • 5.
    Kunitz, Silvia
    Università degli Studi di Pavia.
    La Classe di L2: luogo di contatto e conflitto tra lingue e culture2007Ingår i: Cultura e Comunicazione, ISSN 2239-1916, Vol. 1, s. 32-35Artikel i tidskrift (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 6.
    Kunitz, Silvia
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för svenska och flerspråkighet, Svenska/Nordiska språk.
    Scriptlines as emergent artifacts in collaborative group planning2015Ingår i: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 76, s. 135-149Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    By adopting a process-oriented, praxeological approach to planning research, this study illustrates how group planning is collaboratively achieved as a situated activity during interactions-for-classroom-tasks. Such approach, based on the theoretical tenets of Ethnomethodology and Conversation Analysis, gives an emic (i.e., participant-relevant), non-mentalist account of planning as a nexus of situated discursive and embodied practices. The analysis focuses on a planning session during which three adult learners of Italian as a foreign language prepare for a classroom presentation in their L2; the final planning product is a written script for the presentation. Specifically, the participants' plan for their classroom presentation emerges as orally formulated scriptlines, which are collaboratively shaped until they come to constitute a written script for the presentation. Overall, this process-oriented study provides a moment-by-moment documentation of the participants' planning practices, such as inscribing, writing aloud, translating into their L2, and retranslating into their L1. The findings suggest that teachers should give students planning time in the classroom, in order to observe the students' practices and make sure that their respective interpretations of the final task follow the same agenda. Moreover, the direct observation of the planning process could provide an opportunity for assessment for learning.

  • 7.
    Kunitz, Silvia
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Engelska institutionen.
    Markee, Numa
    Understanding the fuzzy borders of context in conversation analysis and ethnography2016Ingår i: Discourse and education / [ed] Stanton Wortham, Deoksoon Kim, Stephen May, Springer, 2016, 3, s. 1-13Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Context is one of the most difficult and contentious issues in the disciplines that study language and social interaction. While, from a historical point of view, it is possible to situate ethnographic and conversation analytic ideas about context in the different intellectual traditions of anthropology and ethnomethodological sociology, the originally sharp contrasts between these disciplines’ analytic treatments of context have become increasingly more nuanced. Furthermore, a compelling argument can be made within conversation analysis that the traditionally rather narrow conceptualization of context that is often used in analyses of ordinary conversation often needs to be expanded in institutional contexts of talk. In this chapter, we trace early developments in work on context and review major contributions to this important topic within the study of language and social interaction. Next we sketch out current work in progress, identify key problems and difficulties, and finally identify future directions for language educators and applied linguists to explore as we seek to understand this singularly difficult construct that underlies so many of our disciplinary endeavors.

  • 8.
    Kunitz, Silvia
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för svenska och flerspråkighet, Svenska/Nordiska språk.
    Skogmyr Marian, Klara
    Tracking immanent language learning behavior over time in task-based classroom work2017Ingår i: TESOL quarterly (Print), ISSN 0039-8322, E-ISSN 1545-7249, Vol. 51, nr 3, s. 507-535Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the authors explore how classroom tasks that are commonly used in task‐based language teaching (TBLT) are achieved as observable aspects of local educational order (Hester & Francis, 2000) through observable and immanently social classroom behaviors. They focus specifically on students’ language learning behaviors, which they track through the longitudinal conversation‐analytic methodology called learning behavior tracking (LBT) (Markee, 2008). From a theoretical point of view, they situate LBT within the ethnomethodological (EM) perspective on social action pioneered by Garfinkel (1967) and relate it to socially defined ways of understanding planning (Burch, 2014; Markee & Kunitz, 2013). In the empirical part of the article, the researchers analyze TBLT work that was conducted in an English as a foreign language (EFL) classroom in a Swedish junior high school. Specifically, they track the occurrences of a learnable (the spelling of the word disgusting) that was emically oriented to as such by the students as they engaged in planning and accomplishing teacher‐assigned tasks. The authors then develop an emic, sequential account of the participants’ practical reasoning and dynamically evolving epistemic positions. They argue that this kind of basic empirical research refines our understanding of how TBLT curriculum work is achieved by participants as practical, mundane, and observable activities in language classrooms, and that these insights may feed into more applied research on teacher training, thereby fostering the design of instructional innovations.

  • 9.
    Kunitz, Silvia
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för svenska och flerspråkighet, Svenska/Nordiska språk.
    Yeh, Meng
    Instructed L2 Interactional Competence in the First Year2019Ingår i: Teaching and Testing L2 Interactional Competence: Bridging Theory and Practice / [ed] M. Rafael Salaberry, Silvia Kunitz, Routledge, 2019Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter illustrates the outcomes of the first two semesters of university language instruction targeting the development of interactional competence (IC) in Chinese as a Foreign Language, with a specific focus on active listenership and topic management. IC is a crucial ability for both first language and second language (L2) speakers. The chapter also illustrates how Conversation Analysis (CA)-inspired learning outcomes for L2-Chinese have been identified and how the instructional materials have been structured following the IC pedagogical cycle suggested by A. M. Barraja-Rohan and elaborated by E. Betz and T. Huth. Conversation analysts are becoming increasingly concerned with the pedagogical implications of their findings. The students were required to write evidence-based, guided reflections in which they had to report on specific moments of their own interactions that went well and other moments that they perceived as problematic.

  • 10.
    Markee, Numa
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för svenska och flerspråkighet, Svenska/Nordiska språk.
    Kunitz, Silvia
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för svenska och flerspråkighet, Svenska/Nordiska språk.
    CA-for-SLA studies of classroom interaction: Quo vadis?2015Ingår i: The handbook of classroom discourse and interaction / [ed] Numa Markee, Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2015, s. 425-440Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 11. Markee, Numa
    et al.
    Kunitz, Silvia
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA.
    Doing planning and task performance in second language acquisition: An ethnomethodological respecification2013Ingår i: Language learning, ISSN 0023-8333, E-ISSN 1467-9922, Vol. 63, nr 4, s. 629-664Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We use insights and methods from ethnomethodological conversation analysis and discursive psychology to develop an account of embodied word and grammar searches as socially distributed planning practices. These practices, which were produced by three intermediate learners of Italian as a Foreign Language (IFL), occurred massively in natural data that were gathered during a 3-week period from a third-semester IFL course at a university in the United States. We develop a behavioral analysis of these data that shows: (1) what participants do during planning talk and how they do such talk and (2) whether they actually do what they planned to do.

  • 12. Salaberry, M. Rafael
    et al.
    Kunitz, Silvia
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för svenska och flerspråkighet, Svenska/Nordiska språk.
    Introduction2019Ingår i: Teaching and Testing L2 Interactional Competence: Bridging Theory and Practice, Routledge, 2019Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter focuses on current research on second language (L2) interactional competence (IC) and on its pedagogical implications. While research on L2 IC has been developing since the 1990s, the pedagogical implications of such research have hardly been discussed, and only a few attempts have been made to bridge the gap between research and practice with regard to the teaching of IC in the L2 classroom. It provides extended responses to the questions raised by both practitioners and researchers during the workshops and the symposium organized at the center. The chapter connects theoretical discussions on the concept of IC, empirical findings, potential pedagogical implications, and outcomes of actual research-based pedagogy primarily in the first two years of university L2 instruction. It addresses this important challenge, either directly or indirectly, whereas the section on testing provides readers with the most comprehensive analysis of actual implementations of testing procedures that incorporate the co-constructed nature of interaction in general and IC in particular.

  • 13. Salaberry, M. Rafael
    et al.
    Kunitz, SilviaStockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för svenska och flerspråkighet, Svenska/Nordiska språk.
    Teaching and Testing L2 Interactional Competence: Bridging Theory and Practice2019Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume features the latest research findings on L2 interactional competence to demonstrate the potential for developing and implementing research-based pedagogy that targets interactional competence (IC) in early instruction in a variety of L2 learning and teaching contexts. Incorporating contributions from both leading and emerging researchers in the area, the book is organized into four sections to provide a systematic account of interactional competence, defined as a set of skills required to co-construct an effective interaction with a variety of interlocutors in a variety of settings, and advocates for IC to be part of a well-rounded curriculum of L2 instruction. The volume provides a comprehensive overview of the different theoretical perspectives on IC within Conversation Analysis, and moves into a discussion of conversation-analytic research findings from a variety of contexts and of their pedagogical implications.The book then presents examples of pedagogy in practice and also illustrates the potential for implementing IC in testing settings. This volume makes a valuable contribution to the growing literature on interactional competence and will be of particular interest to graduate students and researchers in applied linguistics, SLA, language education, curriculum and instruction studies, and educational linguistics.

  • 14. Skogmyr Marian, Klara
    et al.
    Kunitz, Silvia
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för svenska och flerspråkighet, Svenska/Nordiska språk.
    “Well if we’re wrong it’s your fault”: Negotiating participation in the EFL classroom2017Ingår i: La Revue TRANEL (TRavaux NEuchâtelois de Linguistique), Vol. 67, s. 49-77Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This micro-longitudinal conversation analytic study investigates how a group of 7th grade students in Sweden negotiates participation frameworks in EFL group work. The analysis follows the changes in participation of one student, Emma, during a collaborative vocabulary quiz used to test a homework assignment. At first, Emma's participation in the task is limited and her contributions are questioned by the group members. As the activity progresses, though, Emma increasingly volunteers relevant answers and her coparticipants progressively orient to her as a knowledgeable and legitimate participant. We document the interactional means by which the students in the group enable and restrain participation in the task, and we relate these to the local physical/spatial and organizational affordances of the institutional setting. The study demonstrates how the right to active participation is negotiated on a moment-by-moment basis in and through interaction in the embodied ecology of the language classroom.

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