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  • 101.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    How Large Was Mars? An investigation of the dimensions of a legendary Swedish warship, 1563–15642019In: Mariner´s mirror, ISSN 0025-3359, E-ISSN 2049-680X, Vol. 105, no 3, p. 260-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish warship Mars was considered to have been one of the largest ships in the world when it exploded and sank in 1564. The problem is that no written accounts clearly reveal its dimensions. This article reviews how different researchers have discussed the size of Mars in the past. It also aims to shed new light on this topic by using information from the archaeological survey carried out at the wreck site since 2011. Even if the result is approximate it clearly shows that Mars was indeed an impressively large ship by sixteenth century standards, but not as large as many previous researchers have thought.

  • 102.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Invasionsfartyget som blev en mjölskuta: identifieringen av ”Dalarövraket” som strussen Bodekull (1661-1678)2018In: Forum navale, ISSN 0280-6215, E-ISSN 2002-0015, no 74, p. 12-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2003 a well preserved shipwreck was discovered north of Dalarö in the Stockholm Archipelago. Artefacts indicated that the ship sank during the mid or later half of the 17th century. An archaeological survey revealed that even if the vessel was very small it showed many details that are usually found on large sailing warships, such as gun ports along the sides and a lion figure head. Despite the massive attention the wreck has achieved, from researchers, media and others, the original identity of the wreck has remained an open question until now. In the preserved minutes and letters of the Swedish Admiralty kept in the Military Archives reveal that the Swedish king Karl X Gustav ordered a number of small vessels to be used for transport of horses and soldiers in his war against Denmark in 1659. After the unpredicted death of the king, the campaign against Denmark was cancelled and the unfinished ships were rebuilt in different ways. One of these was Bodekull, which was built under supervision of the newly recruited English Master Shipwright Thomas Day between 1659 and 1661. As the design was changed during construction, several unique details, that are also visible on the wreck, are mentioned in the preserved correspondence between the shipyard and the Admiralty. In October 1678 the Bodekull was sent from Kalmar to grind cereals ata mill along the coast. Despite his instructions he sailed to Fagerholmen in the Stockholm archipelago. On its way back the ship hit a rock and sank. 20 barrels of water soaked flour was sent to Stockholm. This article summarizes the archival research that has led to the identification of the ship.

  • 103.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Riksäpplet (1676): resurrecting a neglected wreck2017In: Baltic and beyond: Change and continuity in shipbuilding: Proceedings of the Fourteenth International Symposium on Boat and Ship Archaeology, Gdańsk 2015 / [ed] Jerzy Litwin, Gdańsk: National Maritime Museum , 2017, p. 39-48Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 104.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Skeppsvrak i Haninge skärgård2017In: Haninge - kulturhistorisk översikt, Haninge: Haninge kommun , 2017, p. 30-33Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 105.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Södertörn University, Sweden.
    The ship Riksäpplet and the introduction of English naval architecture in Sweden in the 17th century2017In: Post-Medieval Archaeology, ISSN 0079-4236, E-ISSN 1745-8137, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 309-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 84-gun ship Riksapplet was one of the first ships in Sweden built under supervision of the newly recruited English master. In 1676, the ship came adrift, struck a rock and sank. In 2015 a minor field survey of the wreck was undertaken. An inventory of finds recovered from the wreck in various museum collections and in private hands has been compiled and the preserved correspondence from the construction of the ship has been re-examined. This material has provided new insights regarding the peculiarities and special architecture of Riksapplet.

  • 106.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Rönnby, Johan
    Mars (1564): the initial archaeological investigations of a great 16th-century Swedish warship2017In: International Journal of Nautical Archaeology, ISSN 1057-2414, E-ISSN 1095-9270, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 92-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Before the Swedish warship Mars exploded and sank in action against a combined Danish and Lubeckian fleet in 1564, it was one of the largest ships in the world. In 2011 the wreck was relocated off the island of Oland in the Baltic Sea. Thanks to the favourable conditions in the brackish water, about two thirds of the hull is preserved on the sea bottom, including the stern with the large sterncastle. The aim of this article is to present initial archaeological observations and results of work since 2011. We briefly describe the historical context and research perspectives regarding this wreck.

  • 107.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Livet efter döden: Hanteringen av döda2009In: Döda personers sällskap: Gravmaterialens identiteter och kulturella uttryck / [ed] I-M. Back Danielsson, I. Gustin, A. Larsson, N. Myrberg & S. Thedéen, Stockholm: Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Stockholms universitet , 2009, p. 35-55Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present text concerns theoretical and methodological aspects of burial archaeology with special attention given to the temporal dimension. It is argued that burial places need to be discussed individually from a bottom-up perspective in order to minimise the bias of regional and culture-centred generalisations. Such a microarchaeological approach focuses on social practice involved in the disposal of the dead as a mediating level between the local and particular on one hand and the normative and general on the other. Further, it is argued that the horizontal stratigraphy of burial places needs to be investigated in order to distinguish phases of change and alteration within sites. Such phases constitute more relevant points of departure for comparisons with phases of other sites, thus facilitating a more nuanced discussion on periods of contact and hybridisation between different social groups.

  • 108.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Mesolithic Childhoods: Changing Life-Courses of Young Hunter-Fishers in the Stone Age of Southern Scandinavia2012In: Childhood in the Past: An International Journal, ISSN 1758-5716, E-ISSN 2040-8528, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 20-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper stresses the importance of distinguishing between different categories of children in order to better understand their changing lives and their shifting relations with the adult world. The example is taken from the Mesolithic burial/settlement site of Skateholm at the southernmost coast of Sweden. By contrasting grave content and spatial arrangement of the site it is argued that the inhabitants recognised differences between infants (<1 year), younger children up to seven years, and older children between about eight to thirteen years. The children seem to have started to engage in the adult world by the age of seven or eight, and by the age of around fourteen years, their graves are inseparable from those of the adults. Individuals of the intermediate age-group, between the ages nine to thirteen, are completely missing among the burials. It is suggested that their absence is not singularly due to lower mortality rate, but rather that this age-span constituted a socially distinct transitional phase between childhood and adulthood.

  • 109.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Reala kroppar och dödens realitet: Rumslighet och horisontell stratigrafi på Ajvide och Skateholm2009In: I tillvarons gränsland: perspektiv på kroppen mellan liv och död / [ed] Ekengren, F. & Nilsson Stutz, L., Lund: Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens historia, Lunds universitet , 2009, p. 106-145Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Slavoj Zizek har föreslagit som experiment att man under kärleksakten skulle tänka på sin partners reala materialitet, dvs vad kroppens tunna biologiska skal döljer i form av blod, slem, tarmar och ben, och sedan försöka fortsätta med akten. Zizeks poäng här är att illustrera Jacques Lacans Imaginära, Reala och Symboliska dimensioner; kroppen som vi vanligtvis (vill) se den är i hög grad en Imaginär och Symbolisk omskrivning av sin Reala materialitet. Sådana omskrivningar är dock inte allmänmänskligt givna, relationerna mellan det imaginära, symboliska och Reala varierar mellan olika kollektiv över tid och rum; vi kan mao faktiskt tänka oss att någonstans någongång kopulerar två biologiska enheter av blod, kött och slem med varandra utan att bekymras av sin reala konstitution.

    Naturligtvis är även döden något Realt och dess oundviklighet tenderar även den att omskrivas eller tom förträngas för att göra den acceptabel och fattbar. Synen på kroppen är i högsta grad kopplad till de praktiker som är knutna till döden och döda kroppar; de kan analyseras för att diskutera synen på det döda (och tillika livet i viss grad). Med utgångspunkt i dessa kroppens och dödens Realiteter diskuteras hanteringen av döda kroppar (människor såväl som djur) under mesolitikum och neolitikum utifrån gravfälten i Ajvide och Skateholm.

  • 110.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Recension av Åsa Berggrens avhandling 'Med kärret som källa. Om begreppen offer och ritual inom arkeologin'2012In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 19, p. 228-230Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 111.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    The skin I live in. The materiality of body imagery2015In: Own and be owned: Archaeological approaches to the concept of possessions / [ed] Alison Klevnäs, Charlotte Hedenstierna-Jonson, Stockholm: Department of archaeology and classical studies, Stockholm university , 2015, p. 49-72Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 112.
    Fast, Malin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    De norska grottmålningarna och ljuset2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The relation between the cave and the circumpolar light conditions has long been a part of the interpretation of the meaning of the Norwegian cave art. This paper explores the relationship by trading the concept of a sensory dichotomy between light and darkness for that of a perceptual relationship between the paintings, the environment and the light.

  • 113.
    Gustin, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
     Kvinnan, tornet och makten i Bjälbo2009In: Triangulering: historisk arkeologi vidgar fälten / [ed] M. Mogren, M. Roslund, B. Sundnér & J. Wienberg, Lund: Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens historia, Lunds Universitet , 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 114.
    Gustin, Ingrid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Magnus, Bente
    Birka och Hovgården2009Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 115.
    Haking, Linn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Tracing Upper Palaeolithic People in Caves: Methodological developments of cave space analysis, applied to the decorated caves of Marsoulas, Chauvet and Rouffignac, southern France2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Upper Palaeolithic cave art research has tended to focus on the images themselves, rather than the physical and social circumstances of their production. This dissertation explores and develops new practice-based ways of investigating cave art. A method analysing features of the cave environment, such as light, space and accessibility, internal conditions etc., and how these relate to traces of human activity, is developed and applied to three decorated caves from Upper Palaeolithic in southern France: Marsoulas (Haute-Garonne), Chauvet (Ardèche) and Rouffignac (Périgord). New insights are suggested into the underlying practice of cave art and its significance in Upper Palaeolithic societies.

  • 116.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    A short note about Stone Age farmers who did not adopt elk hunting, and elk hunters who did not adopt farming2010In: Transference. Interdisciplinary Communications, ISSN 0809-8735, Vol. 2008/2009Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 117.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Ancestors in the lake? On the ritual display and deposition of human skulls at Kanaljorden, Motala, SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 118.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Early pottery among hunter-horticulturalists and hunter-gatherers in central Fenno-Scandinavia2009In: Early Farmers, Late Foragers, and Ceramic Traditions: On the Beginning of Pottery in the Near East and Europe / [ed] Dragos Gheorghiu, Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars , 2009, p. 215-238Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The hunter-gatherers of Mälardalen (eastern central Sweden) adopted ceramic technology at the same time as they adopted aspects of farming around 3900 cal. BC. The region thus appears to be a classic case of “Neolithisation”, with hunter-gatherers turning hunter-horticulturalists, adopting cereal cultivation and cattle herding along with the characteristic pottery of the Funnel Beaker Culture (albeit with local and regional peculiarities). Immediately to the north of the Funnel Beaker Culture (TRB) of Mälardalen, there lived hunter-gatherers of the northern Scandinavian Slate Culture that did not adopt either agriculture or pottery during the period in question. Thus, in central Scandinavia, there was formed a border between part-time farmers with pottery to the south, and hunter-gatherers without pottery to the north. However, while pottery was absent in Mälardalen before 3900 cal. BC, ceramics appeared already 5000 cal. BC immediately to the east, on Åland, a group of islands in the middle of the Baltic Sea. The oldest pottery along the eastern shores of the Baltic Sea, including the Åland archipelago, appeared in hunter-gatherer contexts, the centuries before 5000 cal. BC. During this time we have a contrast between hunter-gatherers with pottery to the east, and hunter-gatherers without pottery to the west. The Early Neolithic funnel-beaker pottery of Mälardalen display several peculiarities reminiscent of Comb Ware designs. Around 3300 cal. BC the eastern traits are accentuated with the introduction of pointed bottomed vessels and pits arranged in “chessmanner”, a pottery that is known as the Pitted Ware tradition. Parallel to these changes in the design of pottery, the settlement pattern was rearranged with a larger focus on aquatic resources and a diminishing role for agricultural practices.

  • 119.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Foreign in origin and local in pattern: Mesolithic pottery around the Baltic Sea2009In: Mesolithic horizons: papers presented at the Seventh International Conference on the Mesolithic in Europe, Belfast, 2005 / [ed] McCartan, S., Schulting, R., Warren, G. & Woodman, P., Oxford: Oxbow Books , 2009, p. 397-406Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 120.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Mesolithic skull depositions at Kanaljorden, Motala, Sweden2011In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 19, p. 244-246Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 121.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    North of the "North-group"? The TRB of Mälardalen and Bergslagen, Eastern central Sweden2013In: From funeral monuments to household pottery: Current advances in Funnel Beaker Culture (TRB/TBK) research: proceedings of the BorgerMeetings 2009, The Netherlands / [ed] J. A. Bakker, S. B.C. Bloo, M. K. Dütting, Oxford: Archeopress, 2013, p. 159-170Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 122.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Rituell praktik i trattbägarkulturens norra gränsland: Tidigneolitiska gravar och offerplatser i Mälardalen, östra Mellansverige2012In: Agrarsamfundenesekspansion i nord: Symposium på Tanums Hällristningsmuseum, Underslös, Bohuslän, d. 25.-29. maj 2011 / [ed] Flemming Kaul, Lasse Sørensen, København: Nordlige Verdener, Nationalmuseet København , 2012, p. 87-101Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 123.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Rituella våtmarksdepositioner från äldre stenålder på Kanaljorden i Motala2011In: Motalabygd, Årsskrift för Motala Musei- och hembygdsföreningArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 124.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    The early 'Trichterbecher' of Mälardalen, eastern Central Sweden2011In: Bericht der Römisch-Germanischen Kommission, ISSN 0341-9312, Vol. 89, p. 111-134Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 125.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Tiny islands in a far sea: On the seal hunters of Åland, and the Nortwestern limit in the spread of early pottery2009In: Ceramics Before Farming: The Dispersal of Pottery Among Prehistoric Eurasian Hunter-Gatherers / [ed] Jordan, P. & Zvelebil, M., Walnut Creek, Calif.: Left Coast Press , 2009, p. 375-393Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 126.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Skandfer, Marianne
    Local perspectives on innovation and dispersal of ceramic technologies in northern Stone Age foraging and farming societiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 127. Hegardt, Johan
    et al.
    Källén, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Translated Objects: The Olov Janse Case2014In: Museum Worlds: Advances in Research, ISSN 2049-6729, E-ISSN 2049-6737, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 42-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the movements of archaeological and ethnographic objects and museum collections connected with the Swedish-born archaeologist and ethnographer Olov R. T. Janse (1892–1985). Janse pursued a cosmopolitan career in the years between 1920 and 1960, in and between the national contexts of Sweden, France, Indochina, the Philippines, and the United States, where he found himself in different political contexts such as colonialism, nationalism, and the Cold War. He initiated object exchanges between French and Swedish museums, and he collected archaeological and ethnographic objects from Indochina and the Philippines for museums in Sweden, France, and the United States. The complexity of object movements in the wake of Olov Janse's career suggests that we should think and talk about object mobility in terms of translation rather than simple transmission. In seven sections, each exploring one chapter of Janse's life, we discuss how changes in world politics became entangled with changes in Janse's own position as an archaeologist and ethnographer, affecting the movements of objects and contributing to an active translation of their meaning.

  • 128. Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Archaeology and the present2018In: The Encyclopedia of Archaeological Sciences / [ed] Sandra L. López Varela, John Wiley & Sons, 2018, p. 68-72Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeology is not only the disinterested study of the human past and its remains but also a way of making a positive impact on present society. Archaeology tells a variety of powerful stories about past and present and offers suggestive metaphors to contemporary society; archaeological methods and approaches can be applied to learn more about contemporary society and to trigger in people existential thoughts and emotions; archaeological expertise can be applied to help solve challenges in contemporary society. It is important for future generations of archaeologists to be aware of these dimensions and to explore and apply them critically in professional practice.

  • 129.
    Isaksson, Sven
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Lipid residue analyses of Early Neolithic funnel-beaker pottery from Skogsmossen, eastern Central Sweden, and the earliest evidence of dairying in Sweden2012In: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 39, no 12, p. 3600-3609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study address the question of the use and function of Early Neolithic (4000-3000 cal. BC) funnel-beaker pots from Malardalen in eastern Central Sweden. The material studied is pottery from a wetland offering at the site Skogsmossen in the province of Vastmanland. While deposited under ritual circumstances in a fen, the pots were likely used in a domestic domain on the settlement adjacent to the offering fen, prior to final deposition. The lipid analysis indicate a varied vessel use, there are traces of aquatic resources, plants, terrestrial animals and milk. The identification of milk residue is the oldest so far from Sweden.

  • 130.
    Jansson, Ingmar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Korolevskie/knjazeskie centry epochi vikingov v Skandindinavii i na Rusi2009In: Historyja i archealohija Polacka i Polackaj zjamli. Materyjaly V Miznarodnaj navukovaj kanferencii (24-25 kastrycnika 2007 g.): History and Archaeology of Polotsk and Polotsk land. Scientific articles and materials of the 5th International Conference / [ed] T.A. Dzumantaeva, Polack, Belarus: Polotsk National Historical and Cultural Museum-Reserve , 2009, p. 208-232Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 131. Jennings, Justin
    et al.
    Berg, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Capriata Estrada, Camila
    Alvarado Sánchez, Elina
    Gavilán Vargas, Alcides
    Vallejo, Irela
    Excavation in the Ceremonial/Residential Zone2015In: Tenahaha and the Wari State: A View of the Middle Horizon from the Cotahuasi Valley / [ed] Justin Jennings, Willy Yépez Álvarez, Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press , 2015, p. 70-92Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 132.
    Jonsson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Eastern contacts based on the coin finds2009In: Situne Dei, ISSN 1653-8498, p. 57-67Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With the help of coin finds from the Viking Age contacts between Sweden and East Europe are discussed

  • 133.
    Jonsson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Myntfynd i Sverige2009In: Myntstudier, ISSN 1652-2303, no 2, p. 25-28Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Short summary of coin finds in Sweden 0-1800 AD (679.669 pcs) including distribution maps for the middle ages and the modern period

  • 134.
    Jonsson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Östervålafyndet i Uppsala universitets myntkabinett2009In: Opus mixtum / [ed] Harald Nilsson, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet , 2009, p. 127-131Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Three Swedish coins found in a church yard in Östervåla are listed and discussed. They can be regarded as the content of pocket money deposited in the mid-15th c. Comparisons are made with similar finds.

  • 135.
    Jonsson, Kenneth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Suchodolski, Stanislaw
    A new coin type of Boleslaw the Brave found in Sweden2009In: Wiadomosci Numizmatyczne, ISSN 0043-5155, Vol. LIII, no 187, p. 29-39Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A new coin type of Boleslaw the Brave 992-1025 found in a hoard on Gotland and other contemporary coins are discussed

  • 136.
    Jonsson, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Dangerous Death and Dangerous Dead: Examples from Scandinavian burial practices from the Middle Ages to the Early Modern Period2009In: Döda personers sällskap/On the threshold: Gravmaterialens identiteter och kulturella uttryck/burial archaeology in the twenty-first century / [ed] Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie, Stockholm: Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Stockholms universitet , 2009, p. 173-186Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 137.
    Jonsson, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Gravskick och gravseder från medeltid till 1800-tal2009In: Arkeologi i Södra Råda, Stockholm: Riksantikvarieämbetet , 2009, p. 139-154Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 138.
    Jonsson, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Kyrkogården och kyrkan i Västerhus – en arkeologisk tillbakablick2009In: Västerhus: Kapell, kyrkogård och befolkning, Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhets historie och antikvitets akademien , 2009, p. 9-25Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 139.
    Jonsson, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Tills döden skiljer oss åt...: Sociala markörer i medeltida gravskick i Västerhus på Frösön, Löddeköpinge i Skåne och Peterskyrkan i Tønsberg2009In: Västerhus: Kapell, kyrkogård och befolkning, Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhets historie och antikvitets akademien , 2009, p. 40-73Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 140. Karlsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Los rastros de una crisis mundial: Descubrimientos arqueológicos y antropológicos de las antiguas bases de misiles nucleares soviéticos en Cuba2017Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a photo essay in Spanish presenting a research project within contemporary archaeology studying Soviet nuclear missile sites in Cuba from the 1962 world crisis.

  • 141.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Abandon Ship! Digging out the Dead from the Vendel Boat-Graves2015In: Norwegian Archaeological Review, ISSN 0029-3652, E-ISSN 1502-7678, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The boat-grave cemetery at Vendel, Uppland, is one of the iconic sites of first-millennium Sweden. The high-status grave-goods and weaponry have been widely displayed and studied since their discovery over 130 years ago. Yet it is rarely mentioned that the burial ground had been almost completely ransacked long before archaeologists stepped in. The celebrated finds are only a fraction of the wealth that was originally buried at the site.

    This is the first evaluation of the evidence of disturbance from Vendel since the excavations in the late 19th century. The ancient re-opening of the graves is reconstructed through the letters and diaries of the excavator, Hjalmar Stolpe, as well as the various preliminary and final reports. Evidence is presented that the main parts of the burials, notably the human bones, were systematically dug out of nearly every grave and removed from the site. The reopening probably took place during the Christianization period, before or during the construction of the nearby church in the 13th century. This is an example of the widespread reworking of monuments at this time, specifically highlighting the significance accorded to buried human remains.

  • 142.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Deaths matter2016In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 24, p. 49-56Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 143.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Give and take: grave goods and grave robbery in the early middle ages2015In: Own and be owned: archaeological approaches to the concept of possession, Stockholm: Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University , 2015, p. 157-189Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 144.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Introduction: the nature of belongings2015In: Own and be owned: archaeological approaches to the concept of possession / [ed] Alison Klevnäs, Charlotte Hedenstierna-Jonson, Stockholm: Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University , 2015, p. 1-22Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 145.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Overkill: reopening graves to maim the dead in Anglo-Saxon England2015In: Kończyny, kości i wtórnie otwarte groby w dawnych kulturach = Limbs, bones, and reopened graves in past societies / [ed] Leszek Gardeła, Kamil Kajkowski, Bytów: Muzeum Zachodniokaszubskie w Bytowie , 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 146.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Hedenstierna-Jonson, CharlotteStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Own and be owned: archaeological approaches to the concept of possession2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 147.
    Klevnäs, Alison Margaret
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    ‘Imbued with the Essence of the Owner’: Personhood and Possessions in the Reopening and Reworking of Viking-Age Burials2016In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 456-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the wide range of grave disturbance practices seen in Viking-age burials across Scandinavia. It argues that the much-debated reopenings at high-profile sites, notably the Norwegian royal' mounds, should be seen against a background of widespread and varied evidence for burial reworking in Scandinavia throughout the first-millennium ad and into the Middle Ages. Interventions into Viking-age graves are interpreted as disruptive, intended to derail practices of memory-creation set in motion by funerary displays and monuments. However, the reopening and reworking of burials were also mnemonic citations in their own right, using a recurrent set of practices to make heroic, mythological, and genealogical allusions. The retrieval of portable artefacts was a key element in this repertoire, and in this article I use archaeological and written sources to explore the particular concepts of ownership which enabled certain possessions to work as material citations appropriating attributes of dead persons for living claimants.

  • 148.
    Klevnäs, Alison Margaret
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Whodunnit? Grave robbery in Anglo-Saxon England and the Merovingian kingdoms2013Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Grave robbery is widely recorded in the cemeteries of early medieval Europe, but this research is the first systematic regional study. Critically assesses all that is currently known of grave disturbance in the Merovingian kingdoms, and shows that there is significant evidence for the same practice in Anglo-Saxon England. Investigates in detail an intensive outbreak in 6th-7th century Kent. Aims to advance the debate about early medieval disturbance from general discussion of explanatory possibilities to evaluation of specific interpretations and their compatibility with the archaeological evidence. The conclusions have significant implications for the interpretation of grave robbery across early medieval Europe, and for recognizing and understanding grave disturbance more widely.

  • 149.
    Krzewińska, Maja
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Günther, Torsten
    Hedenstierna-Jonson, Charlotte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Omrak, Ayça
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Yaka, Reyhan
    Kılınç, Gülşah Merve
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Somel, Mehmet
    Sobrado, Veronica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Evans, Jane
    Knipper, Conine
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Genomic and Strontium Isotope Variation Reveal Immigration Patterns in a Viking Age Town2018In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 28, no 17, p. 2730-2738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact of human mobility on the northern European urban populations during the Viking and Early Middle Ages and its repercussions in Scandinavia itself are still largely unexplored. Our study of the demographics in the final phase of the Viking era is the first comprehensive multidisciplinary investigation that includes genetics, isotopes, archaeology, and osteology on a larger scale. This early Christian dataset is particularly important as the earlier common pagan burial tradition during the Iron Age was cremation, hindering large-scale DNA analyses. We present genome-wide sequence data from 23 individuals from the 10th to 12th century Swedish town of Sigtuna. The data revealed high genetic diversity among the early urban residents. The observed variation exceeds the genetic diversity in distinct modern-day and Iron Age groups of central and northern Europe. Strontium isotope data suggest mixed local and non-local origin of the townspeople. Our results uncover the social system underlying the urbanization process of the Viking World of which mobility was an intricate part and was comparable between males and females. The inhabitants of Sigtuna were heterogeneous in their genetic affinities, probably reflecting both close and distant connections through an established network, confirming that early urbanization processes in northern Europe were driven by migration.

  • 150.
    Källén, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Madeleine Colani och den besvärliga kroppen2014In: Med hjärta och hjärna: en vänbok till professor Elisabeth Arwill-Nordbladh / [ed] Henrik Alexandersson, Alexander Andreeff, Annika Bünz, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
123456 101 - 150 of 261
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