Change search
Refine search result
1234567 101 - 150 of 1323
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 101.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Solutions to alcohol and drug problems – is treatment a prerequisite?2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Most of what we know about recovery from alcohol and drug problems comes from treatment outcome studies. However, although this was for long disregarded by treatment providers as well as main stream researchers, reports of unassisted recovery or “self-change” have been common. This presentation will give a brief historical overview over research in this area, and present some results from recent Swedish and other studies on the prevalence of, and processes underlying, such solutions.

  • 102.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Some core findings in research on self-change and some implications for practice2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 103.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Spontanremission bei Alkohol- und Drogenmissbrauch: Die Klassiker2006In: Selbstheilung von der Sucht, Berlin: VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften , 2006, p. 49-82Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 104.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    The encounter between practice and reserarch - can we strike a balance?2009In: Evidence and Practical Knowledge in Substance Abuse Treatment. A basis for discussion. / [ed] H. Jenner & V. Segréus, Växjö: Växjö University Press , 2009, p. 69-87Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 105.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    The encounter between research and practice. Swedish addiction care as an example2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    One of the motives behind the call for evidence-based practice and the launching of national guidelines for the care and treatment of addiction problems has been the wish to implement new steering forces for what clients are offered by the system. Thus, the argument has gone, we need to abandon legal and bureaucratic rules, logistics and economy, staff policy etc. as the main decisive factors behind what clients are offered, in favour of a commitment to creating the best possible outcome in the individual case. At the same time, many practitioners have felt that a strong demand to adhere to “top-down” guidelines, formulated by experts, threatens their professional self-esteem and identity, and deprives their interaction with the client of human and moral content. Against the background of a brief overview over recent attempts to “evidence-base” addiction care in Sweden, this presentation will discuss various ways of interpreting concepts such as “evidence based” and “knowledge based”, and various claims concerning what types of knowledge that are needed to be able to create more responsive and effective treatment systems. In addition, some suggestions will be put forward as to how we might be able to reconcile expert and everyday knowledge, and create a fruitful interaction between practice and research.

  • 106.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    The social context of recovery from addiction2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 107.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Vad betyder evidensbasering för missbrukarvården?2009In: Mot en bättre missbrukarvård?: En undersökning om förutsättningar för att evidensbasera missbrukarvården i fyra organisationer. / [ed] I. Christophs, Stockholm: Stockholms universitet , 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 108.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Vad är problemet?: Perspektiv på missbruk och beroende.2009In: Missbruk och behandling.Gamla problem - nya lösningar?: Socialtjänstforum - ett möte m,ellan forskning och socialtjänst., Stockholm: Forskningsrådet för arbetsliv och social forskning - FAS , 2009Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 109.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    “Vägar ut ur missbruk och beroende – med och utan behandling”2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 110.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Vägar ut ur missbruket – med och utan behandling. Om vetenskaplig och annan kunskap och om aktuella utmaningar för missbrukarvården.2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 111.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Vägar ut ur missbruket: om olika sätt att lösa alkohol- och narkotikaproblem och om behandlingens roll2003In: Blir det bättre med behandling?: en konferens i Göteborg 8-9 april 2003, Stockholm: Forskningsrådet för arbetsliv och socialvetenskap (FAS) , 2003, p. 35-49Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 112.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Vård och behandling - utmaningar för framtiden2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 113.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    What is the worst thing you could get hooked on?: Popular images of addiction problems in contemporary Sweden2009In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 373-398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimsTo investigate potentially crucial aspects of Swedes' perceptions of nine different addictions

    Data and methodsPopulation survey, sent out to 2,000 adult Swedes (18-74 years), focusing on the perceived severity of, responsibility for, options to recover from, and character of addiction to cigarettes, snuff, alcohol, cannabis, amphetamine, cocaine, heroin, medical drugs, and gambling.

    ResultsThere are large differences in the ways in which various addiction problems are perceived. Whereas tobacco use, and to some extent gambling, are seen as relatively harmless "habits", not particularly easy to get hooked on but easy to quit, the use of drugs such as heroin, amphetamine, and cocaine is seen as a major societal problem, and users are seen both as "sinners" who need to mend their ways and as powerless "victims". In between comes the use and misuse of alcohol, cannabis and medical drugs, about which perceptions are more divided.

    ConclusionsRespondents tend to downplay the risks and dangers with addictive habits that are common and familiar in mainstream culture, and to dramatise the risks and dangers with such habits that are uncommon or "strange". This may have unfortunate consequences for addicts' options to find a path out of their predicaments.

  • 114.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Återhämtning från missbruk och beroende utan (och med) behandling2012In: Handbok i missbrukspsykologi - teori och tillämpning / [ed] Claudia Fahlke, Malmö: Liber , 2012, 1:1, p. 422-435Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 115.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Christophs, Irja
    Kan forskning påverka praktiken: En utvärdering av olika sätt att återföra forskningsresultat inom missbrukarvården2005Report (Other academic)
  • 116.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Christophs, Irja
    Vägen till vården: kvinnors och mäns skäl att söka hjälp respektive börja behandling för alkoholproblem2005Report (Other academic)
  • 117.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Cunningham, John
    Wallander, Lisa
    Collin, Lina
    Att förbättra sina dryckesvanor: om olika mönster för förändring och om vad vården betyder2007Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 118.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Koski-Jännes, Anja
    Cunningham, John
    How should substance use problems be handled?: popular views in Sweden, Finland, and Canada2014In: Drugs and Alcohol Today, ISSN 1745-9265, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 19-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Although the way in which, for example, substance use problems are conceived and reacted to (by experts and treatment professionals but also by the environment), can have vast consequences for those directly or indirectly concerned, there is little systematic knowledge about how various preferred approaches differ between types of problems and sociocultural settings. In an ambition to at least partly mend this gap, this paper aims to compare how the general public in Sweden, Finland, and Canada appraise four generically different approaches to dealing with substance use problems, as these are applied to problem use of alcohol, cannabis, heroin, and cigarettes.

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper uses data from three national surveys, aimed at uncovering how representative population samples from Sweden, Finland, and Canada perceive and understand the character of, and the proper way of handling, various addictive problems. Data from these surveys have been used to discern and operationalize four basic “models of helping and coping” as these have been outlined by Brickman et al. (1982). The analysis has aimed at investigating how the popular preferences for either of these models vary with type of addiction (to cigarettes, alcohol, cannabis, and other (“hard”) drugs, national setting, and potentially important respondent characteristics.

    Findings – The results point to large differences between the ways in which the general public understands the proper way of handling the four types of addiction, and shows, for example, that addiction to “hard” drugs is predominantly perceived as a matter for expert treatment, whereas smoking, or addiction to cigarettes, is more often perceived as a bad habit which the user is able to break on her/his own. In addition, the popularity of different handling models is found to vary between countries, and with personal characteristics such as gender, age, and substance use experiences.

    Originality/value – The study is one of few that have systematically tried to find out how various forms of substance use problems, or addiction, are conceived and reacted to in various national and social settings.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 119.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Oscarsson, L.
    Att utvärdera behandlingseffekter vid alkoholmissbruk: några metodfrågor och deras implikationer för behandlings- och riktlinjearbete2006In: Faktaunderlag till Nationella riktlinjer för missbruks- och beroendevård, Stockholm: Socialstyrelsen , 2006, p. 253-264Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 120.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Palm, Jessica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Storbjörk, Jessica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    'More cure and less control' or 'more care and lower costs'? Recent changes in services for problem drug users in Stockholm and Sweden2009In: Drugs: education prevention and policy, ISSN 0968-7637, E-ISSN 1465-3370, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 479-496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the development of drug services in Stockholm, Sweden since the mid-1990s. Initially, data were collected as part of a European Union comparative study of the development of drug services in six major European cities. However, the present article uses these data to analyse to what extent the traditional 'Swedish model' of dealing with narcotic drugs can be said to have come to a crossroad. The article describes and analyses changes in drug use, and in the structure, organization and utilization of social services based, as well as healthcare-based drug services in Stockholm during the past decade. As pointed out in the article, the 'drug-free society' is still the ultimate goal of Swedish drug policy. However, as the Stockholm example hints, when it comes to the care and treatment of individual drug problems, there seems to be an on-going shift, from in-patient treatment towards measures such as substitution treatment, outpatient care and housing. The article discusses whether these changes signify a softening of Sweden's restrictive drug policy, or whether they rather point to a 're-medicalization' of drug services, and shift in focus from 'cure' and social re-integration towards a focus on 'care' and on attempts to avoid 'public nuisance'.

  • 121.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Raitasalo, Kirsimarja
    Melberg, Hans Olov
    Schreckenberg, Dirk
    Peschel, Christine
    Klingemann, Justyna
    Koski-Jännes, Anja
    Popular Images of Addiction2014Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 122.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Wallander, Lisa
    Vad är problemet? Uppfattningar om alkoholens skadeverkningar2017In: Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift, ISSN 1104-1420, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 149-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I det följande visar vi att uppfattningarna om och definitionerna av alkoholvanor, som setts och ses som olämpliga eller avvikande, i själva verket är både motsägelsefulla och sinsemellan motstridiga, och att de har skiftat över tid och med sammanhang. Artikeln analyserar denna brist på samsyn och diskuterar vilka implikationer den kan tänkas ha för framtida forskning, praktik och policyöverväganden på området. Analysen är i huvudsak empirisk och deskriptiv, och vi har för enkelhetens skull avstått från att tillämpa exempelvis Benoits (2003) respektive Bacchis (2009) förvisso intressanta resonemang kring de berörda frågorna.

  • 123.
    Blomqvist, Jan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Wallander, Lisa
    Åt var och en vad hon behöver? En vinjettstudie av socialarbetares bedömningar och val av insats vid missbruksproblem2004Report (Other academic)
  • 124.
    Bloomfield, Kim
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Grittner, Ulrike
    Charité Medical School Berlin, Germany.
    Gustafsson, Nina-Katri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Changes in alcohol consumption in Denmark after a tax decrease on spirits2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 125. Bloomfield, Kim
    et al.
    Grittner, Ulrike
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). IFT Institut für Therapieforschung, Germany.
    Piontek, Daniela
    Drinking patterns at the sub-national level: What do they tell us about drinking cultures in European countries?2017In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 342-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:

    A drinking pattern is not only a major drinking variable, but is also one indicator of a country's drinking culture. In the present study, we examine drinking patterns within and across the neighbouring countries of Denmark and Germany. The aim of the research is to determine to what extent drinking patterns differ or are shared at the sub-national level in the two countries.

    Method:

    Data came from the German 2012 Epidemiological Survey of Substance Use (n = 9084) 18-64 years (response rate 54%), and the Centre for Alcohol and Drug Research's 2011 Danish national survey (n = 5133) 15-79 years (response rate 64%), which was reduced to a common age range, producing a final n = 4016. The drinking pattern variable included abstention, moderate drinking, heavy drinking, risky single occasion drinking (RSOD), and was investigated with bivariate statistics and gender-specific hierarchical cluster analysis.

    Results:

    For men three clusters emerged: one highlighting abstention and RSOD, moderate/heavy drinking, RSOD and RSOD + heavy drinking. For women, two clusters appeared: one highlighting abstention and moderate/heavy drinking and the other highlighting RSOD and RSDO + heavy drinking. The clusters revealed different geographical patterning: for men, a west vs. east divide; for women, a north-south gradient.

    Conclusions:

    The analysis could identify for each gender clusters representing both separate and shared drinking patterns as well as distinctive geographical placements. This new knowledge can contribute to a new understanding of the dynamics of drinking cultures and could indicate new approaches to prevention efforts and policy initiatives.

  • 126. Bloomfield, Kim
    et al.
    Hope, Ann
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alcohol survey measures for Europe: A literature review2013In: Drugs: education prevention and policy, ISSN 0968-7637, E-ISSN 1465-3370, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 348-360Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports the results of a purposive review of the different alcohol survey instruments currently used in survey research. The review was conducted to support the development of a standardized comparative survey methodology for Europe. It examines various types of instruments used to measure alcohol consumption, risky drinking, alcohol abuse and dependence, social consequences and third-party harm. The review of literature provides several insights for a European comparative survey. The beverage-specific quantity-frequency measure is recommended for use across countries. A reference period of 1 year for alcohol consumption is considered important if one is to link associated problems with alcohol intake. With regard to risky drinking, objective measures based on the quantity of approximately 60-70 g of ethanol per drinking occasion are preferable to subjective measures of drunkenness. In choosing an instrument for measuring abuse and dependence, the key issue is to decide whether the instrument is to serve as a screening or diagnostic tool. In the case of screening, the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test or the Rapid Alcohol Problem Screen-4 appears more appropriate. But if one desires to approximate a diagnostic category, then the Composite International Diagnostic Interview or another operationalization of ICD-10/DSM-IV criteria would be the better choice. Due to a lack of validated scales for social consequences and third-party harm, no recommendations are justified.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 127.
    Bloomfield, Kim
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Wicki, Matthias
    Addiction Suisse, Suisse.
    Gustafsson, Nina-Katri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Mäkelä, Pia
    THL, Finland.
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Changes in alcohol-related problems after alcohol policy changes Denmark, Finland and Sweden2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 128.
    Bloomfield, Kim
    et al.
    Centre for Alcohol and Drug Research, Copenhagen Division, Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Wicki, Matthias
    the Swiss Institute for the prevention of Alcohol and other Drug Problems (SIPA), Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Gustafsson, Nina-Katri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Mäkelä, Pia
    National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Helsinki, Finland.
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Changes in Alcohol-Related Problems After Alcohol Policy Changes in Denmark, Finland, and Sweden2010In: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1937-1888, Vol. 71, no 1, p. 32-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: European Union travelers' allowances for alcohol import to Denmark, Sweden, and Finland were abolished in 2004. In addition, excise taxes on alcohol were lowered in 2003 and 2005 in Denmark, and in 2004 in Finland. Using northern Sweden as a control site, this study examines whether levels of reported alcohol problems have changed in Denmark, Finland, and southern Sweden as a consequence of these policy changes. Method: Annual cross-sectional surveys were conducted in Denmark, Finland, and Sweden from 2003 to 2006. Five dependency items and seven extrinsic alcohol-related problems were examined. Changes were analyzed within each country/region with logistic regressions and tested for short- and long-term changes. Differential change was also tested between each country and the control site, northern Sweden. Results: Prevalence of alcohol problems decreased over the study period. Only in selected subgroups did problems increase. This mainly occurred in the samples for northern Sweden and Finland, and mostly among older age groups and men. In relation to the control site, however, no increases in problem prevalence were found. Conclusions: Our findings on a decline in reported alcohol problems largely agree with published reports on alcohol consumption over the same period in the study countries. They do not agree, however, with findings on changes in health and social statistics in Finland and Denmark, where some significant increases in alcohol-related harm have been found.

  • 129. Bobak, M.
    et al.
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Pikhart, H
    Kubinova, R.
    Malyutine, S.
    Pajak, A.
    Kurilovitch, S.
    Topor, R.
    Nikitin, Y.
    Marmot, M.
    Contributions of drinking patterns to differences in rates of alcohol related problems between three urban populations2004In: Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0917-5040, E-ISSN 1349-9092, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 238-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To examine, on empirical data, whether drinking patterns, in addition to overall alcohol consumption, contribute to differences in rates of alcohol related problems between populations. Design: Cross sectional survey. Settings: One Russian, one Polish, and one Czech city. Participants: 1118 men and 1125 women randomly selected from population registers. Main outcome measures: Problem drinking; negative social consequences of drinking; alcohol consumption and drinking pattern. Results: Rates of problem drinking and of negative consequences of drinking were much higher in Russian men (35% and 18%, respectively) than in Czechs (19% and 10%) or Poles (14% and 8%). This contrasts with substantially lower mean annual intake of alcohol reported by Russian men (4.6 litres) than by Czech men (8.5 litres), and with low mean drinking frequency in Russia (67 drinking sessions per year, compared with 179 sessions among Czech men). However, Russians consumed the highest dose of alcohol per drinking session (means 71 g in Russians, 46 g in Czechs, and 45 g in Poles), and had the highest prevalence of binge drinking. In women, the levels of alcohol related problems and of drinking were low in all countries. In ecological and individual level analyses, indicators of binge drinking explained a substantial part of differences in rates of problem drinking and negative consequences of drinking between the three countries. Conclusions: These empirical data confirm high levels of alcohol related problems in Russia despite low volume of drinking. The binge drinking pattern partly explains this paradoxical finding. Overall alcohol consumption does not suffice as an estimate of alcohol related problems at the population level.

  • 130. Bodin, M.
    et al.
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Predictors of abstinence and nonproblem drinking after 12-step treatment in Sweden2006In: Journal of Studies on Alcohol, ISSN 0096-882X, E-ISSN 1934-2683, Vol. 67, no 1, p. 139-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    The aims of this study were to identify individual predictors of 12 months continuous abstinence and nonproblem drinking after Swedish inpatient Minnesota Model treatment and to evaluate the outcome variance explained by pretreatment, within-treatment, and posttreatment factors for each outcome, separately and in conjunction.

    METHOD:

    One-hundred and twenty-nine men and 47 women were interviewed on admission to Swedish Minnesota Model treatment and after 12 months. Two interviewers who were not involved in treatment delivery performed structured interviews. Statistical analyses included bivariate and multivariate logistic regression models applied to pair-wise contrasts of three types of treatment outcome.

    RESULTS:

    The final multivariate models for the three pair-wise contrasts explained 71% (abstinence vs problem drinking), 44% (nonproblem drinking vs problem drinking), and 25% (abstinence vs. nonproblem drinking) of outcome variance. Abstention and nonproblem drinking were both differentiated from problem drinking by the completion of aftercare, satisfaction with treatment, and number of public addiction care contacts. When contrasted with nonproblem drinking, abstention was predicted by the endorsement of a baseline goal to stop drinking and a higher degree of posttreatment affiliation with mutual-help groups.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Results from this study support the fact that treatment is only one of many factors that contributes to an outcome and suggests issues that may need consideration in similar treatment settings.

  • 131. Bodin, Maria
    et al.
    Romelsjö, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Predictors of 2-year drinking outcomes in a Swedish treatment sample2007In: European Addiction Research 2007;13:136-143., Vol. 13, p. 136-143Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 132. Bodin, Maria
    et al.
    Romelsjö, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Secondary outcomes: Group and individual change and relationships to drinking outcomes2007In: Addiction Research & Theory 2007;15:587-599., Vol. 15, no 587-599Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 133.
    Bogren, Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alcohol short-circuits important part of the brain': Swedish newspaper representations of biomedical alcohol research2017In: Addiction Research and Theory, ISSN 1606-6359, E-ISSN 1476-7392, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 177-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The media has a central role in communicating and constructing health knowledge, including communicating research findings related to alcohol consumption. However, research on news reporting about alcohol is still a relatively small field; in particular, there are few studies of the reporting of biomedical alcohol and drug research, despite the assumed increasing popularity of biomedical perspectives in public discourse in general. The present article addresses the representational `devices' used in Swedish press reporting about biomedical alcohol research, drawing on qualitative thematic analysis of the topics, metaphors, and optimist versus critical frames used in presenting biomedical research findings. In general, the press discourse focuses on genetic factors related to alcohol problems, on the role of the brain and the reward system in addiction, and on medication for treating alcohol problems. Metaphors of `reconstruction' and `reprograming' of the reward system are used to describe how the brain's function is altered in addiction, whereas metaphors of `undeserved reward' and `shortcuts' to pleasure are used to describe alcohol's effects on the brain. The study indicates that aspects of the Swedish press discourse of biomedical alcohol research invite reductionism, but that this result could be understood from the point of view of both the social organization of reporting and the intersection of reporting, science, and everyday understandings rather than from the point of view of the news articles only. Moreover, some characteristics of the media portrayals leave room for interpretation, calling for research on the meanings ascribed to metaphors of addiction in everyday interaction.

  • 134.
    Bogren, Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Biologically responsible mothers and girls who "act like men": Shifting discourses of biological sex difference in Swedish newspaper debate on alcohol in 1979 and 19952010In: Feminist Media Studies, ISSN 1468-0777, E-ISSN 1471-5902, no iFirst, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on a qualitative analysis of Swedish newspaper debates in 1979 and 1995, this articleexamines how Swedish newspapers refer to biological sex difference as central to drinking practices. The study shows that women are a special category of concern in debate about gender and drinking in both 1979 and 1995. Further, it shows that Swedish newspapers draw upon biology in different ways in the two years. In 1979, debate about drinking during pregnancy and Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is central and newspapers link biomedical research on FAS to the moral idea that mothers do anything to avoid harm to children. In 1995, debate about girls’ drinking habits is central and newspapers link sex hormones and neurotransmitters to the moral idea that girls shouldn’t “drink like men.” These differences are discussed in the context of Swedish media interest in evolutionary psychology and biomedical solutions to alcohol problems during the 1990s.

  • 135.
    Bogren, Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Constructing gender in Swedish press debate about alcohol 2000-2008: the role of biology in gender discourse2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 136.
    Bogren, Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Gender and Alcohol:  The Swedish Press Debate2011In: Journal of Gender Studies, ISSN 0958-9236, E-ISSN 1465-3869, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 155-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dominant approach to gender in alcohol research still conceives of gender in terms of binary roles and looks for explanations for gender differences in drinking. This paper challenges the binary approach, and instead analyzes the categorization of gender as created in Swedish newspaper stories about alcohol, published between 2000 and 2008. Specific categories examined include “responsible mothers”, “responsible parents”, “party girls”, “career women with drinking problems”, “violent men who drink” and “beer-drinking, sexist male athletes”. Based on this examination, the paper discusses how the media stories do and/or undo gender and how they encourage readers to act by the categories of drinkers that they describe. The study shows that the Swedish media stories produce multiple ways of interpreting drinking. Some of the stories undo gender through linking “male” behaviour (drinking heavily) to female bodies, while others undo gender by treating parenthood as more important than gender. Importantly, however, other stories reproduce the discourse of heteronormativity and gender binarism. The study suggests that analyses of media texts need to take the complexity of ‘undoing gender’ into account, for example by avoiding the assumption that gender is either undone or reproduced.

  • 137.
    Bogren, Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Karin Boye: normer, makt och styrning2015In: Sociologi genom litteratur: skönlitteraturens möjligheter och sociologins begränsningar / [ed] Christofer Edling, Jens Rydgren, Lund: Arkiv förlag & tidskrift, 2015, p. 73-83Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 138.
    Bogren, Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Mellan risk och njutning: genus, sexualitet och alkoholkultur vid början av 2000-talet2014In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 91, no 6, p. 574-586Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 139.
    Bogren, Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Sexualitet2010In: Ett delat samhälle: Makt, intersektionalitet och social skiktning / [ed] Christofer Edling, Fredrik Liljeros, Liber , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 140.
    Bogren, Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Sign of the times? Gender, sexuality, and drinking stories2014In: International journal on drug policy, ISSN 0955-3959, E-ISSN 1873-4758, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 359-360Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 141.
    Bogren, Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Studying social power in textual data: Combining tools for analyzing meaning and positioning2010In: Critical Discourse Studies, ISSN 1740-5904, E-ISSN 1740-5912, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 73-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Texts are language excerpts produced from specific points of view; they communicate specific worldviews and values. This implies that social science research on power in texts can benefit from an analysis of the perspective from which a story is presented. Nevertheless, discussion of concrete tools for doing this at the level of practical analysis is less common. This article describes a set of tools for analyzing positioning at two different levels: the level of enunciation – which focuses on narrator and audience positions – and the level of utterance – which focuses on positions in stories. Moreover, addressing readers less familiar with discourse analysis and students new to discourse analysis, the article argues that combining tools for analyzing positioning with more general tools for analyzing meaning is advantageous because this allows for more detailed analysis of social power in texts and for more detailed description of the analytical process.

  • 142.
    Bogren, Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Studying social power in textual data: combining tools for analyzing meaning and positioning2009Report (Other academic)
  • 143.
    Bogren, Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Symbolic Gender Boundaries in News Discourse on Psychotropics Use and Drinking: An Analysis of the Swedish Press Debate 2000–20092013In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 57-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychotropics and alcohol are psychoactive substances with different cultural meanings and opposing gender associations. This paper examines the Swedish press debate ongender and psychotropics and compares it with the press debate on gender and alcohol, aiming toidentify the conditions under which gendered moral boundaries of acceptable/unacceptableconsumption are defended. The study shows that boundaries acquire a heightened moral status innews stories (1) that deal with a topic related to cultural ideas about essential gender difference,(2) where the cultural status of the psychoactive substance is linked to selfish and/or hedonisticmotives, and (3) where innocent victims of consumption can be identified. Moreover, it shows thatthe “bad” characters constructed through this moral boundary are portrayed as exhibiting“excessive masculinity” and “insufficient femininity”. On the basis of these findings, it is arguedthat newspaper discourse on psychotropics and alcohol still relies quite heavily on gendered andheteronormative ideas.

  • 144.
    Bogren, Alexandra
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Winter, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Knowledge production, communication and utilization: Studying biomedical alcohol research2013In: Drugs and Alcohol Today, ISSN 1745-9265, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 28-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - A growing body of social research analyzes how the biomedical interest in detailed molecular aspects of our bodies (genes, biomarkers, DNA) affect everyday notions of health, risk, and responsibility for health problems. However, this research focus has been largely neglected in social alcohol research. The purpose of this paper is to report on some early findings from a study of media portrayals of biomedical alcohol research and to present a rationale for studying biomedical alcohol research more broadly.

    Design/methodology/approach - The empirical discussion is based on textual analysis of 90 newspaper articles published in Swedish newspapers between 1995 and 2010 and one-on-one semi-structured interviews with 24 newspaper readers about their interpretation of the newspaper portrayals. The motives for studying biomedical alcohol research more broadly are discussed in relation to existing research and theories of biomedicalization.

    Findings - Firstly, we find that a large majority of the newspapers cite biomedical researchers to explain the mechanisms of addiction, and that biomedical research is often presented as revolutionary in scope. However, journalists also act as storytellers who explain the biomedical research results to readers. The reward system proved to be a central notion among the interviewees, who had their own, different and varying definitions of the concept. Secondly, we suggest a framework for analyzing how biomedical knowledge is produced, communicated and utilized by three types of key actors.

    Originality/value - The study presents a novel framework for studying biomedical alcohol research.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Fulltext
  • 145.
    Boman, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Svenska folkets alkoholkonsumtion under 20052006Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 146.
    Boman, Ulrika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Engdahl, Barbro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Gustafsson, Nina-Katri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Hradilova Selin, Klara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alkoholkonsumtionen i Sverige fram till år 20052006Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Alkoholkonsumtionen i Sverige fram till år 2005
  • 147.
    Boman, Ulrika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Engdahl, Barbro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Gustafsson, Nina-Katri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Hradilova-Selin, Klara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alkoholkonsumtionen i Sverige fram till år 2005.2006Report (Other academic)
  • 148.
    Boman, Ulrika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Hradilova Selin, Klara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Svensson, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alkoholkonsumtionen i Sverige fram till 20062007Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 149. Boman, Ulrika
    et al.
    Nordström, T.
    Leifman, H.
    Romelsjö, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alkohol och sjukskrivning: analyser på individ- och befolkningsnivå2005In: Den höga sjukfrånvaron - problem och lösningar / [ed] S. Marklund, M. Bjurvald, C. Hogstedt, E. Palmer & T. Teorell, Stockholm: Arbetslivsinstitutet , 2005, p. 63-111Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 150. Bond, J.
    et al.
    Borges, G.
    Cherpitel, C.
    Greenfield, T.
    Irving, H.M.
    Kanteres, F.
    Rehm, J.
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Taylor, B.
    The more you drink, the harder you fall: a systematic review and meta-analysis of how acute alcohol consumption and injury or collision risk increase together2010In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, ISSN 0376-8716, Vol. 110, no 1-2, p. 108-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    

    Alcohol consumption causes injury in a dose-response manner. The most common mode of sustaining an alcohol-attributable injury is from a single occasion of acute alcohol consumption, but much of the injury literature employs usual consumption habits to assess risk instead. An analysis of the acute dose-response relationship between alcohol and injury is warranted to generate single occasion- and dose-specific relative risks. A systematic literature review and meta-analysis was conducted to fill this gap. Linear and best-fit first-order model were used to model the data. Usual tests of heterogeneity and publication bias were run. Separate meta-analyses were run for motor vehicle and non-motor vehicle injuries, as well as case-control and case-crossover studies. The risk of injury increases non-linearly with increasing alcohol consumption. For motor vehicle accidents, the odds ratio increases by 1.24 (95% CI: 1.18-1.31) per 10-g in pure alcohol increase to 52.0 (95% CI: 34.50-78.28) at 120 g. For non-motor vehicle injury, the OR increases by 1.30 (95% CI: 1.26-1.34) to an OR of 24.2 at 140 g (95% CI: 16.2-36.2). Case-crossover studies of non-MVA injury result in overall higher risks than case-control studies and the per-drink increase in odds of injury was highest for intentional injury, at 1.38 (95% CI: 1.22-1.55). Efforts to reduce drinking both on an individual level and a population level are important. No level of consumption is safe when driving and less than 2 drinks per occasion should be encouraged to reduce the risk of injury.

1234567 101 - 150 of 1323
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf