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  • 101.
    Asker, Lars
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Boström, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Papapetrou, Panagiotis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Persson, Hans
    Identifying Factors for the Effectiveness of Treatment of Heart Failure: A Registry Study2016In: IEEE 29th International Symposiumon Computer-Based Medical Systems: CBMS 2016, IEEE Computer Society, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An administrative health register containing health care data for over 2 million patients will be used to search for factors that can affect the treatment of heart failure. In the study, we will measure the effects of employed treatment for various groups of heart failure patients, using different measures of effectiveness. Significant deviations in effectiveness of treatments of the various patient groups will be reported and factors that may help explaining the effect of treatment will be analyzed. Identification of the most important factors that may help explain the observed deviations between the different groups will be derived through generation of predictive models, for which variable importance can be calculated. The findings may affect recommended treatments as well as high-lighting deviations from national guidelines.

  • 102.
    Asker, Lars
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Papapetrou, Panagiotis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Boström, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Learning from Swedish Healthcare Data2016In: Proceedings of the 9th ACM International Conference on PErvasive Technologies Related to Assistive Environments, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, article id 47Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present two ongoing projects aimed at learning from health care records. The first project, DADEL, is focusing on high-performance data mining for detrecting adverse drug events in healthcare, and uses electronic patient records covering seven years of patient record data from the Stockholm region in Sweden. The second project is focusing on heart failure and on understanding the differences in treatment between various groups of patients. It uses a Swedish administrative health register containing health care data for over two million patients.

  • 103.
    Aspling, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Animals, plants, people and digital technology: exploring and understanding multispecies-computer interaction2015In: Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment Technology, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2015, article id 55Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding interactions involving humans and computers has ever since its establishment in the early 1980s been a key foundation for the field of human-computer interaction (HCI) and its development. The idea that important features are going on inside the human brain (i.e. classical HCI theory/first wave) has been challenged by the importance to understand both context and collaboration among humans (i.e. modern HCI theory/second wave) and by comprising human values and experiences (i.e. contemporary HCI theory/third wave) [27]. As such, the field has been permeated by anthropocentrism, engaged in designing and accounting for human users and diverse aspects of human life.

  • 104.
    Aspling, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Theorizing Animal–Computer Interaction as Machinations2017In: International journal of human-computer studies, ISSN 1071-5819, E-ISSN 1095-9300, Vol. 98, p. 135-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increased involvement of animals in digital technology and user-computer research opens up for new possibilities and forms of interaction. It also suggests that the emerging field of Animal–Computer Interaction (ACI) needs to reconsider what should be counted as interaction. The most common already established forms of interaction are direct and dyadic, and limited to domesticated animals such as working dogs and pets. Drawing on an ethnography of the use of mobile proximity sensor cameras in ordinary wild boar hunting we emphasize a more complex, diffuse, and not directly observable form of interaction, which involves wild animals in a technological and naturalistic setting. Investigating human and boar activities related to the use of these cameras in the light of Actor-Network Theory (ANT) and Goffman's notion of strategic interaction reveals a gamelike interaction that is prolonged, networked and heterogeneous, in which members of each species is opposed the other in a mutual assessment acted out through a set of strategies and counter-strategies. We stress the role of theory for the field of ACI and how conceptualizations of interaction can be used to excite the imagination and be generative for design. Seeing interaction as strategies and acknowledging the existence of complex interdependencies could potentially inspire the design of more indirect and non-dyadic interactions where a priori simplifications of design challenges as either human or animal can be avoided.

  • 105.
    Aspling, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Chiodo, Elisa
    Smelling, pulling, and looking: unpacking similarities and differences in dog and human city life2015In: Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment Technology, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2015, article id 64Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The problem of understanding animals, e.g., what they want and what they are doing, are recurrent matters for the emerging field of animal-computer interaction (ACI). We focus on animals in the city by bridging the field with urban studies and open up for new design opportunities in terms of the possibilities of new digital technology to re-configure animal city life. We present an ethnomethodological video analysis of the negotiations and interactional work between two leashed pugs and a handler walking down a street. We unpack similarities and differences between the two species in terms of their interests and intentions in an urban environment through detailed examination of the moments in the walk when the leash is pulled taut. We show how a strained leash can result from a conflict between the dog’s attentiveness towards other dogs by smelling and looking, and the human’s urge to move along. We propose design directions supporting the dogs’ wants and needs by accessing the handler with information on the dogs’ curiosities in other dogs by visualizing the invisible scent-universe of the dogs and encourage dog-dog interaction.

  • 106.
    Aspling, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Wang, Jinyi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Plant-computer interaction, beauty and dissemination2016In: Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Animal-Computer Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, article id 5Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We inquire into ways of understanding plant interaction through a triangulation of four approaches: a multispecies ethnography of people's ordinary practices and doings in relation to sakura trees during their short blossoming season; readings of theoretical works on human-plant relations and plants' urge to spread; a systematic review of how plants are involved in computing and computer systems; and finally a review study on how cherry blossoms are used in design and architecture. We bring these together and propose to discuss the involvement of florae in computer systems and design items through the lens of understanding plant interaction as temporally extended dissemination and agency to spread. The design intent within Animal-Computer Interaction (ACI) has been to develop systems where non-human species are seen as "users". If such an approach is applied to plants, then we need to frame research in a direction that aims to give us an understanding of what these sorts of users are doing. Since the most successful forms of dissemination are hedonic, we argue that researchers should focus more specifically on system design that supports aesthetic interaction, rather than supporting abstract contemplation, as has been common within Human-Computer Interaction (HCI).

  • 107.
    Ayele, Workneh Y.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juell-Skielse, Gustaf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    User Implications for Cloud Based Public Information Systems: A Survey of Swedish Municipalities2015In: Proceedings of the 2015 2nd International Conference on Electronic Governance and Open Society: Challenges in Eurasia, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2015, p. 217-227Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of cloud computing has implications for digital service provision in the private and public sector. These implications can introduce opportunities and challenges for user organizations. Evaluation of implications by prioritization and reduction of variables aids in procurement and adoption of cloud based public information systems. However, so far little research is available to evaluate implications of cloud computing in the public sector.

    The evaluation of implications is carried out through a survey of Swedish municipalities. Quantitatively summarizing the collected data a list of prioritized implications were obtained. In addition to this through a statistical analysis technique called exploratory factor analysis the number of implications are reduced by grouping them into factors.

    The result shows that the most significant implications for cloud based public information systems are remote access from anywhere at any time, access to and flexibility to choose between state of the art technologies as well as large dependency on vendor and less customization possibilities. A prioritized list of implications is presented from the perspective of users of cloud based public information systems. Through factor analysis we are able to reduce the number of opportunities to six and challenges to four. For future research we suggest to evaluate implications of cloud based public information systems from suppliers' perspective.

  • 108.
    Ayele, Workneh Y.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juell-Skielse, Gustaf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hjalmarsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Johannesson, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    A Method for Designing Digital Innovation Contest Measurement Models2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As contests become more popular means for organizing digital innovation, the need for measuring contest performance increases. The Digital Innovation Contest Measurement-model (DICM-model), which is the basis for this study was designed based on a single case study, and its evaluation indicated that there is a need for a customizable methodological approach that can accommodate differences in organizational requirements for designing and refining DICM-models. Therefore, in this paper, we present a summary of the evaluation of the DICM-model and propose a nine-step method to design and refine DICM-models using a quality oriented approach. The proposed method is based on the Goal-Question-Metric and the Balanced Scorecard to elicit measures and to enable agility in measuring the fulfilment of measurement goals of innovation contests. Also, the method facilitates knowledge management to refine, record and communicate best practices. An exante evaluation of the method indicates that the method provides practical support in designing and improving a DICM model. For future study, it is suggested to widen the scope of the method to aid in the design of measurement models for digital innovations using open data, in general.

  • 109.
    Ayele, Workneh Y.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juell-Skielse, Gustaf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hjalmarsson, Anders
    Johannesson, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Unveiling DRD: A Method for Designing Digital Innovation Contest Measurement Models2018In: Systems, Signs & Actions, ISSN 1652-8719, E-ISSN 1652-8719, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 25-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing open data market opens possibilities for the development of viable digital artifacts that facilitate the creation of social and business values. Contests are becoming popular means to facilitate the development of digital artifacts utilizing open data. The increasing popularity of contests gives rise to a need for measuring contest performance. However, the available measurement model for digital innovation contests, the DICM-model, was designed based on a single case study and there is a need for a methodological approach that can accommodate for contests’ variations in scope. Therefore, we use design science to construct a nine-step method, the DRD method, to design and refine DICM-models. The DRD-method is designed using goal- and quality oriented approaches. It extends innovation measurement to the application domain of digital innovation contests and provides an improvement of innovation measurement as it offers a new solution for a known problem. The DRD-method provides comprehensive support to practice for designing and refining DICM-models and supports reflection and organizational learning across several contests. For future study, we suggest an ex-post evaluation of the method inconjunction with real contests and systematic efforts to generalize the method within as well as beyond the context of the contest. Finally, we propose to further investigate the potential of topdown and goal oriented approaches to measure open and iterative forms of innovation.

  • 110.
    Ayele, Workneh Yilma
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juell-Skielse, Gustaf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hjalmarsson, Anders
    Johannesson, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Evaluating Open Data Innovation: a Measurement Model for Digital Innovation Contests2015In: PACIS 2015 proceedings, AIS electronic library , 2015, Vol. paper 204Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital innovation contests emerge as important intermediaries in open data markets. However the understanding of how contests affect innovation value chains is low and there is a lack of innovation measurement frameworks to support the management of digital innovation contests. Therefore, in this paper we apply design science to design a measurement model for digital innovation contests from the organizer’s perspective that adds to the available knowledge of innovation measurement. We use a recent case of digital innovation contests to motivate the model and discuss its implications on the innovation value chain. The measurement model contributes with new knowledge in the area of open data innovation and provides support for practice in managing innovation through digital innovation contests. For future research we intend to enhance the model to also measure the effects on innovation ecosystems, to operationalize the measures and to evaluate the model in several digital innovation contests as well as to include the perspective of the participants.

  • 111. Ayman Shamma, David
    et al.
    Brown, Barry
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Bentley, Frank
    Conversations In, Through, and Around Media Objects2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 112.
    Back, Jon
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Papadogoula, Fani Athina
    Waern, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    The Challenges of Designing a Gender-Aware Pervasive Game2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes our approach to designing a pervasive game with teenage girls as its main audience. In doing so, we are faced with two challenges: the challenge of gender-aware game design, and the challenge of integrating a pervasive game into the everyday lives of young women. In this paper, we describe our core design goals and the rationale for these goals. Based on these goals, we outline the core design elements, and how these were appreciated by a young women audience in a first player workshop.

  • 113.
    Bahati, Bernard
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. University of Rwanda, Rwanda.
    Fors, Uno
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Using student-generated questions and peer-responses as a formative e-assessment strategy: Students acting as more knowledgeable others2017In: Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education / [ed] Jon Dron, Sanjaya Mishra, Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education, 2017, p. 108-117Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Student-generated questions and peer-responses can support formative assessment practices through student self-questioning and peer scaffolding. So far, the studies on student-generated questions and peer-responses have focused on reading comprehension. This study focused on student-generated questions used in the context of the student-based formative e-assessment through peer scaffolding. This study's aim was two-fold: Firstly, we wanted to examine whether there was a relationship between the thinking levels exhibited in student-generated questions and the thinking levels exhibited in their corresponding peer-responses. Secondly, we wanted to analyse the level of students’ satisfaction with their peers’ responses. Using a Bloom’s Taxonomy-based assessment rubric, the student generated-questions and peer-responses were rated following three thinking levels: basic, medium, and high. The results show that the thinking levels exhibited in the student-generated questions are not the same as the thinking levels exhibited in their corresponding peer-responses. In addition, all students were not immediately satisfied with their peer-responses. In the end, we realised that through this exercise, the student-questioners and the student-respondents were respectively engaged in a “meaning-seeking” and “meaning-making” exercise and the longer the time for reaching the consensus, the more this exercise grew stronger and became much more significant.

  • 114.
    Bahati, Bernard
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. University of Rwanda, Rwanda.
    Fors, Uno
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Tedre, Matti
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Can Student Engagement in Online Courses Predict Performance on Online Knowledge Surveys?2017In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 73-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The link between student engagement and academic performance has been widely examined. However, most of these studies have focused on ascertaining the existence of such a relationship on the summative assessment level. By comparing students’ experience points in an online course and students’ scores on online knowledge surveys (KS), this study examined the relationship between student engagement and performance on online KS on the formative assessment level. Knowledge surveys were developed and formatively administered in four sections of an online Integration of ICT in Education course. Using Moodle Feedback Module, knowledge surveys were designed based on three key elements: learning objectives, the course content, and the revised Bloom’s Taxonomy of learning objectives. Using rated multiple choice KS questions, the correlation between students’ scores on KSs and students’ experience points was calculated using SPSS. The results show that students’ confidence levels in ability to answer KS questions increased in some of the course sections and decreased in others.  The student engagement in online course was positively—but weakly—related to student performance on online KS and the strength of this relationship increased as the course unfolded. Our conclusion is that student engagement in online courses would not be an accurate predictor of student performance on online Knowledge surveys right at the beginning of an instructional process.

  • 115.
    Bahati, Bernard
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Tedre, Matti
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Fors, Uno
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Evode, Mukama
    Exploring feedback practices in formative assessment in Rwandan higher education: a multifaceted approach is needed2016In: International Journal of Teaching and Education, ISSN 1993-3916, Vol. IV, no 2, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inspired by the current scholarship that indicates that, if used well, formative assessment and feedback can advance student’s learning, this paper explores the practices of feedback in formative assessment in Rwandan higher education, specifically at the University of Rwanda. The study used aqualitative approach with the aim of gaining lecturers’ and students’ perspectives on formative assessment and feedback; and exploring different ways formative assessment and feedback were practiced. Using data collected through interviews, student focus group discussions, and document analysis; the paper shows that formative assessment and feedback were understood in the context of binding prescription within the boundaries of limited description in academic regulations. Feedback was in most cases reduced to marks, and lecturers – who portrayed themselves as information providers, mastery checkers, and performance appraisers - were in full charge of all formative assessment efforts. The paper also shows that lack of clarity and feed forward instructionsin too-much-delayed lecturers’ written feedback led students to just receive feedback and not use it to enhance their performance. Building on this study’s findings and on the existing literature, the paper suggests three important moves whereby a collaborative research-based approach that will bring together different stakeholders will help to move away from a single-sided approach to a multifaceted approach in both perception and practice of formative assessment and feedback at the University of Rwanda.

  • 116.
    Bakari, Jabiri Kuwe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    A Holistic Approach for Managing ICT Security in Non-Commercial Organisations: A Case Study in a Developing Country2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The research reported here is about improvement of the ICT security management process in non-commercial organisations in order to reduce possible financial damage, taking into consideration the realities found in developing countries. The research took place in a developing country—Tanzania, where five organisations were involved.

    The study is organised into seven papers covering: the state of ICT security management in the organisations; prerequisites when utilising the existing ICT security management approaches in attaining a solution for managing ICT security in the organisations; issues and challenges of managing ICT security; important aspects to be taken into consideration in order to successfully manage ICT security; and how the management of ICT security in non-commercial organisations could be improved. Among others, the research was motivated by the observed need for bridging the perception gap between the management and technicians when dealing with the ICT security problem, and consequently extending to a common understanding by the staff in the various departments and specialities within and between the departments.

    The thesis contributes to increased empirical knowledge on the importance of the holistic ICT security management process. Particularly, our main contribution is the proposed holistic approach for managing ICT security in non-commercial organisations, organised in the form of guidelines with two main phases: the initialisation phase which involved the introduction of the ICT security management process in the organisation; and the internalised and continuous phase.

  • 117. Balke, Tina
    et al.
    Cranefield, Stephen
    Di Tosto, Gennaro
    Mahmoud, Samhar
    Paolucci, Mario
    Savarimuthu, Bastin Tony Roy
    Verhagen, Harko
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Simulation and NorMAS2013In: Normative Multi-Agent Systems, Dagstuhl: Schloss Dagstuhl--Leibniz-Zentrum fuer Informatik , 2013, Vol. 4, p. 171-189Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, we discuss state of the art and future perspective of the study of norms with simulative methodologies, in particular employing agent-based simulation. After presenting the state of the art and framing the simulative research on norms in a norm life-cycle schema, we list those research challenges that we feel more apt to be tackled by the simulative approach. We conclude the chapter with the indications for the realization of a NorMAS simulation platform, illustrated by selected scenarios. 

  • 118. Balke, Tina
    et al.
    Mahmood, Samhar
    Neumann, Martin
    Verhagen, Harko
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Analysing the Electrical Patient Recruiting Agent System using the WIT trinity2014In: Proceedings of the European Conference on Social Intelligence (ECSI-2014), 2014, p. 329-335Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 119.
    Barabanov, Rostyslav
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Social Sciences, DSV.
    Kowalski, Stewart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Yngström, Louise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Information Security Metrics: State of the Art: State of the art2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Managing something that is not measured is difficult to near impossible and Information Security is not an exception. Effective measurement and reporting are required in order to demonstrate compliance, improve effectiveness and efficiency of controls, and ensure strategic alignment in an objective, reliable, and efficient manner. The main purpose of the report is to examine the present state of the art of information security measurement from an organizational standpoint and to present the reader with enough relevant information so as to facilitate a holistic understanding of the area. To a lesser degree, this document may be used as a high-level guidance on the common challenges of information security measurement and possible ways for addressing them, and on where to find more in-depth information on the subject. This report is produced as part of the Controlled Information Security (COINS) research project funded by the Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency (MSB).

  • 120.
    Barkhuus, Louise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Television on the Internet: New Practices, New Viewers2009In: International Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM , 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Television is increasingly viewed through computers in the form of downloaded or steamed content, yet computer based television consumption has received little attention in HCI. In this paper we describe a study of the uses and practices of tech-savvy college students, studying their television consumption through the internet. We find that users personalize their viewing but that TV is still a richly social experience - not as communal watching, but instead through communication around television programs. We explore new possibilities for technology-based interaction around television.

  • 121.
    Barkhuus, Louise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    The Mismeasurement of Privacy: Using Contextual Integrity to Reconsider Privacy in HCI2012In: CHI '12: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2012, p. 367-376Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Privacy is a widely studied concept in relation to social computing and sensor-based technologies; scores of research papers have investigated people’s ‘privacy preferences’ and apparent reluctance to share personal data. In this paper we explore how Ubicomp and HCI studies have approached the notion of privacy, often as a quantifiable concept. Leaning on several theoretical frameworks, but in particular Nissenbaum’s notion of contextual integrity, we question the viability of obtaining universal answers in terms of people’s ‘general’ privacy practices and apply elements of Nissenbaum’s theory to our own data in order to illustrate its relevance. We then suggest restructuring inquiries into information sharing in studies of state-of-the-art technologies and analyze contextually grounded issues using a different, more specific vocabulary. Finally, we provide the first building blocks to such vocabulary.

  • 122.
    Barkhuus, Louise
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Brown, Barry
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    The Sociality of Fieldwork: Designing for Social Science Research Practice and Collaboration2012In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 17TH ACM INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON SUPPORTING GROUP WORK, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2012, p. 35-44Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Supporting scientific practice has been a longstanding goal of CSCW research. This paper explores how we might design for social science research practices and collaboration. Drawing on sixteen interviews with fieldwork-based social scientists we document the importance of small-scale long-term collaborative arrangements for research and intellectual work - pairs of researchers who work together in-depth over their careers, developing a common yet distinctive view of their research field. This contrasts with the large-scale short-lived collaborations that have classically been the target of cyber-infrastructure work. We describe technology practices among social scientists and how these can inform technology design for fieldwork practices.

  • 123.
    Barkhuus, Louise
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Brown, Barry
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Unpacking the television: User practices around a changing technology2009In: Transactions n Computer-Human Interaction, Vol. 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the changing television watching practices amongst early adopters of personal hard-disk video recorders (such as Tivo) and Internet downloading of video. Through in- depth interviews with 21 video enthusiasts, we describe how the rhythms of television watching change when decoupled from broadcast TV schedules. Devices such as Tivo do not simply replace videotapes; TV watching becomes more active as programs are gathered from the schedules, played from a stored collection and fast forwarded and paused during playback. Downloads users exploit the Internet to view shows and movies not broadcast, yet this watching is not fundamentally different from recording shows using a PVR, since both involve selection of shows from a limited range and a wait before the shows can be watched.

  • 124.
    Barkhuus, Louise
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Brown, Barry
    Mobile Life Centre @ Stockholm University, , .
    Bell, Marek
    University of Glasgow, , .
    Sherwood, Scott
    University of Glasgow, , .
    Hall, Malcolm
    University of Glasgow, , .
    Chalmers, Matthew
    University of Glasgow, , .
    Awareness and Repartee: Sharing location on the go2008In: International Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 125.
    Barkhuus, Louise
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cowan, Lisa
    University of California, San Diego, , .
    Griswold, William
    University of California, San Diego, , .
    Hollan, James
    University of California, San Diego, , .
    Engaging the Periphery for Visual Communication on Mobile Phones2010In: Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, IEEE , 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While mobile phones have become ubiquitous instruments of communication and social interaction, they still require explicit interaction, placing high demands on attention. Engaging the periphery of users’ attention offers opportunities for awareness and interaction while reducing demands on attention and risks of disruption. We explore the mobile peripheral design space with Emotipix, an application for camera phones that turns the background of the phone’s display into a place for visual conversations. We conducted an exploratory 2-week user study with 6 pairs and one 4- person group, and found that Emotipix facilitated ongoing social practices. Our study shows that there is an unexploited opportunity to use mobile phones for peripheral awareness. We provide recommendations for managing users’ expectations, desires for control, and privacy in mobile peripheral display design.

  • 126.
    Barkhuus, Louise
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Engström, Arvid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Zoric, Goranka
    Watching the footwork: second screen interaction at a dance and music performance2014In: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, p. 1305-1314Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interactive mobile technologies have become part of audience experiences of live performances in terms of both general media sharing and specific (sometimes official) extra content. At the same time, high bandwidth affords streaming of live events to mobile devices. We take advantage of these technologies in our high resolution, panoramic image video stream and study a scenario of audience members viewing the very same live event they are watching on a tablet. The video stream on the tablet is navigational and enables audience members to pan and zoom in the real-time video feed. We studied audience interaction and impressions in three performances of a dance and music show and found distinct uses of the second screen video stream. We emphasize that despite initial reluctance, the observed utilization of the technology opened up for new potential practices. Our study shows how working with perceived conflict in technology can still open up design space for interactive technologies.

  • 127.
    Barkhuus, Louise
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Jorgensen, Tobias
    Copenhagen University, , .
    Engaging the Crowd at Large Musical Events2008In: International Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work-in-progress we explore audience behavior at large musical events and present our prototype, a ‘cheering meter’ developed to aid voting at rap competitions. We report from use of the cheering meter at eight concerts and conclude by highlighting how augmented interaction can increase the sense of participation among the audience at large-scale performances.

  • 128.
    Barkhuus, Louise
    et al.
    University of California, USA.
    Lecusay, Robert
    University of California, USA.
    Social Infrastructures as Barriers and Foundation for Informal Learning: Technology Integration in an Urban After-School Center2012In: Computer Supported Cooperative Work, ISSN 0925-9724, E-ISSN 1573-7551, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 81-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we explore the relationship between social learning environments and the technological ecologies that practitioners, learners, and researchers develop to sustain them. Through an examination of ethnographic research conducted at an urban after- school learning program we show how social, technological and power infrastructures influence learning and interaction in this setting. Adopting a holistic approach we examine how technologies are integrated into activities in this program to support the learning of the after-school youth. We emphasize both positive and negative infrastructures that contribute to the learning environment and discuss how identifying these infrastructures are one of the first steps towards understanding and informing technology design in informal learning settings.

  • 129.
    Barkhuus, Louise
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Acting with Technology: Rehearsing for Mixed-Media Live Performances2016In: CHI '16 Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, p. 864-875Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital technologies provide theater with new possibilities for combining traditional stage-based performances with interactive artifacts, for streaming remote parallel performances and for other device facilitated audience interaction. Compared to traditional theater, mixed-media performances require a different type of engagement from the actors and rehearsing is challenging, as it can be impossible to rehearse with all the functional technology and interaction. Here, we report experiences from a case study of two mixed-media performances; we studied the rehearsal practices of two actors who were performing in two different plays. We describe how the actors practiced presence during rehearsal in a play where they would be geographically remote, and we describe the challenges of rehearsing with several remote and interactive elements. Our study informs the broader aims of interactive and mixed media performances through addressing critical factors of implementing technology into rehearsal practices.

  • 130.
    Barkhuus, Louise
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ekenberg, Love
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Forsberg, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Sauter, Willmar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Interactive Performances as a Means of Social Participation and Democratic Dialogue2014In: International Reports on Socio-Informatics (IRSI), ISSN 1861-4280, E-ISSN 1861-4280, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 11-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this position paper we present our ongoing research in relation to cultivating democracy and civic participation through the writing and performance of interactive theater experiences1. We provide an example of a performance that facilitates audience participation through expression and sharing of opinions and emotions, by means of digital technologies. The performance leads to further discussion within the community and inspires more artistic and theatrical experiences in this context.

  • 131.
    Barkhuus, Louise
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Tashiro, Juliana
    University of California, San Diego, , .
    Social networking on the go: Students' socialization in the age of Facebook2010In: International conference on Human factors in computing systems (CHI), ACM , 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most research regarding online social networks such as Facebook, MySpace, Linked-In and Friendster has looked at these networks in terms of activity within the online network, such as profile management and friending behavior. In this paper we are instead focusing on offline socializing structures around an online social network (exemplified by Facebook) and how this can facilitate in- person social life for students. Because students lead nomadic lives, they find Facebook a particularly useful tool for initiating and managing social gatherings, and as they adopt mobile technologies that can access online social networks, their ad-hoc social life is further enabled. We conclude that online social networks are a powerful tool for encouraging peripheral friendships, important in particular to students. We emphasize that the use of online social networks must be viewed from a perspective of use that involves both mobile and stationary platforms and that it is important to relate online and offline social practices.

  • 132.
    Bathallath, Sameer
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Smedberg, Åsa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Kjellin, Harald
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Impediments to Effective Management of Project Interdependencies: A Study of IT/IS Project Portfolios2017In: Journal of Electronic Commerce in Organizations, ISSN 1539-2937, E-ISSN 1539-2929, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 16-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interdependencies between projects have come to play a more active role in the decision on IT/IS portfolios and their constituent projects. However, managing these interdependencies can be a complex task, especially when the number and degree of interdependencies among projects are high. In times of uncertainty, unexpected challenges can seriously disrupt projects and, consequently, their interdependencies. This may threaten the project portfolio from achieving its final goal. The study aims to investigate the difficulties associated with managing project interdependence along the development cycle of the project portfolio. The study was conducted using a qualitative approach and semi-structured interviews with managers from four leading organizations in Saudi Arabia. The findings reveal three main categories of factors that increased the difficulty of managing project interdependencies in large IT/IS project portfolios: insufficient understanding of human responsibilities in the whole portfolio, unpredictability of the environment, and technology barriers and constraints.

  • 133.
    Bathallath, Sameer
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Smedberg, Åsa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Kjellin, Harald
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    INVESTIGATING THE SOURCES OF DIFFICULTIES IN MANAGING PROJECT INTERDEPENDENCIES: A STUDY OF IT/IS PROJECT PORTFOLIOS2016In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 9th IADIS INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE INFORMATION SYSTEMS 2016 / [ed] Miguel Baptista Nunes, Pedro Isaías, Philip Powell, IADIS Press, 2016, p. 71-82Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interdependencies between projects can take a major role in IT/IS project portfolios. However, managing these interdependencies can be a difficult task, especially when the number and diversity of projects grow large in scale. In times of unexpected events, extra management efforts are inevitable for treating the subsequent effects on the projects and their interdependencies, and for maintaining high-performance portfolios. Complexity is also a concern for managers, and a growing complexity level may threatens the project portfolio from achieving its final goal. This paper investigates the managerial issues and difficulties in handling project interdependencies. For a closer look at these interdependencies and to gain more understanding of the problem area, a qualitative study was conducted based on semi-structured interviews with managers from four leading organizations in different industries in Saudi Arabia. The findings reveal three main sources of difficulty in managing project interdependencies in IT/IS project portfolios: 1) Insufficient understanding of human responsibilities in the whole portfolio, 2) Environmental change and 3) Technological constraints.

  • 134.
    Bathallath, Sameer
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Smedberg, Åsa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Kjellin, Harald
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Managing project interdependencies in IT/IS project portfolios: a review of managerial issues2016In: International journal of information systems and project management, ISSN 2182-7796, E-ISSN 2182-7788, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 67-82Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adequately managing project interdependencies among diverse and simultaneous projects is deemed critical for successful implementation of project portfolios. The challenge is significant because it may entail managing a complex network of project interdependencies that keeps changing over time. The present study investigates the managerial challenges that may undermine effective management of project interdependencies in IT/IS project portfolios. The investigation is based on evidence from reviewing relevant literature and documented studies associated with managing project interdependencies. The main contribution of this study is to discuss three managerial challenges of project interdependencies in project portfolios. We discuss the challenges from three perspectives: types of interdependencies; patterns of interaction in interdependencies; and cost/benefit impact of project interdependencies.

  • 135.
    Bathallath, Sameer
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Smedberg, Åsa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Kjellin, Harald
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Project interdependency management in IT/IS project portfolios: from a systems perspective2016In: Procedia Computer Science, ISSN 1877-0509, E-ISSN 1877-0509, Vol. 100, p. 928-934Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Capitalizing on inter-project interdependencies is widely accepted as being crucial for Information Technology/Information Systems (IT/IS) project portfolio success. However, handling these interdependencies becomes a source of increased management complexity as project portfolios get larger, increasingly diverse, and are much influenced by their environments. This then can lead to less predictable situations regarding the portfolio performance as a whole. Though there are many methods available for optimally selecting projects and cross-checking possible synergies and interdependencies among the projects in the portfolio, it remains unclear how one can gain control over the complexity of managing these interdependencies. In this study, we address the problem of handling many project interdependencies that continuously change and develop within a large IT/IS project portfolio. We found that the existing methods for selecting and managing the projects within a portfolio do not focus enough on how interdependencies can disrupt the balance of the whole project portfolio system. To tackle the problem, we propose a systemic approach using the Viable System Model to enhance the way that these interdependencies can be effectively managed in view of the overall portfolio system. We suggest that the Viable System Model, as a supplement to traditional IT/IS project portfolio management approaches, is recursively applied to diagnose and manage the complexity of project interdependencies within IT/IS project portfolios.

  • 136.
    Bathallath, Sameer
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Smedberg, Åsa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Kjellin, Harald
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    The Viable System Model for Diagnosing and Handling IT-Project Interdependencies in Large Portfolios2018In: International Journal of Information Technology Project Management, ISSN 1938-0232, E-ISSN 1938-0240, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adequately considering project interdependencies has shown to be a determinant of how successful IT/IS project portfolios are managed. However, this can be especially troublesome since there is no universal way to handle many project interdependencies that continue to change over time due to environmental uncertainty or unexpected decisions. This can seriously disrupt portfolio performance. In this article, the authors used the systems perspective to address the problem of managing multiple IT-project interdependencies in complex IT/IS portfolio environment. In particular, the authors propose using the cybernetic model Viable System Model to facilitate thinking and reasoning concerning the difficulty of managing IT-project interdependencies. To validate their approach and to ensure the appropriateness of it, the authors used real-world problem situations drawn from multiple case studies conducted in four leading organizations in Saudi Arabia. The findings support that the Viable System Model can be applied to assist in diagnosing and handling of IT-project interdependencies.

  • 137. Benyon, David
    et al.
    Gambäck, Björn
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Mival, Oli
    Webb, Nick
    How Was Your Day? Evaluating a Conversational Companion2013In: IEEE Transactions on Affective Computing, ISSN 1949-3045, E-ISSN 1949-3045, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 299-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The How Was Your Day(HWYD) companion is an embodied conversational agent that can discuss work-related issues, entering free-form dialogues while discussing issues surrounding a typical work day. The open-ended nature of these interactions requires new models of evaluation. Here, we describe a paradigm and methodology for evaluating the main aspects of such functionality in conjunction with overall system behavior, with respect to three parameters: functional ability (i.e., does it do the rightthing conversationally), content (i.e., does it respond appropriately to the semantic context), and emotional behavior (i.e., given the emotional input from the user, does it respond in an emotionally appropriate way). We demonstrate the functionality of our evaluation paradigm as a method for both grading current system performance, and targeting areas for particular performance review. We show correlation between, for example, automatic speech recognition performance and overall system performance (as is expected in systems of this type), but beyond this, we show where individual utterances or responses, indicated as positive or negative, characterize system performance, and demonstrate how our combination evaluation approach highlights issues (both positive and negative) in the companion system's interaction behavior.

  • 138. Benyon, David
    et al.
    Höök, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Nigay, Laurence
    Spaces of Interaction2010In: Proceedings of ACM/BCS Visions of Computer Science, International Academic Research Conference, Edinburgh, ACM/BCS , 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 139.
    Bergdahl, Nina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Fors, Uno
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    ‘So, You Think It’s Good’ - Reasons Students Engage When Learning with Technologies – a Student Perspective2018In: EDULEARN18: Proceedings / [ed] L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez, I. Candel Torres, The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development, 2018, p. 9556-9563Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Student engagement is significantly related to school success. With the increasing digitalisation of education, it is essential to explore if student engagement is affected by the uptake of learning technologies (LTs). The aim of this study was to approach what factors students perceive to influence their engagement when learning with technologies. This was done by asking students to report their level of engagement and fill in a questionnaire to evaluate a classroom intervention designed to facilitate engagement. The intervention included a learner assessment application, a virtual learning environment (VLE) And a separate tablet the teacher used to access the shared workspace. These LTs facilitated instant feedback between the teacher and the students and enabled multiple simultaneous dialogues which allowed all students to engage with both content and peers. Results show that students’ invested effort in learning activities were related to their reported levels of engagement. Surprisingly, in this intervention, control and stress showed no correlation with engagement. Some aspects of peer modelling and feedback showed weak correlations, albeit these were non-significant. Instead, students reported that feeling ‘content with one’s outcomes’ and ‘engaging in learner-centred dialogues’ were their main reasons to engage. Moreover, students’ reasons to engage in short tasks were not the same as their reasons to engage with long-term goals, such as completing their assignment. The results show that conditions for learning changed when implementing LTs. As conditions for learning changed, so did students’ reasons to engage. Moreover, insights into students’ reasons to engage and reported levels of engagement to suggest that obtaining this information can be useful to identify students in at-risk zones and offer them the support needed. Orchestration of inclusive engagement and implications for future designs are discussed.

  • 140.
    Bergholtz, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Andersson, Birger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Johannesson, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Abstraction, Restriction, and Co-creation: Three Perspectives on Services2010In: Advances in Conceptual Modeling – Applications and Challenges, Berlin: Springer Verlag , 2010, p. 107-116Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent surge in the interest of services has brought a plethora of applications of the service concept. There are business services and software services, software-as-a-service, platform-as-a-service, and infrastructure-as-a-service. There is also a multitude of definitions of the service concept. In this paper, we propose not a new definition of service but a conceptual model of the service concept that views services as perspectives on the use and offering of resources. The perspectives addressed by the model are: service as a means for abstraction; service as means for providing restricted access to resources; and service as a means for co-creation of value.

  • 141.
    Bergholtz, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Andersson, Birger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Johannesson, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Towards a Model of Services Based on Cocreation, Abstraction and Rights Distribution2015In: Correct Software in Web Applications and Web Services / [ed] Bernhard Thalheim, Klaus-Dieter Schewe, Andreas Prinz, Bruno Buchberger, Cham: Springer, 2015, p. 29-44Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The term service is today defined and used in a multitude of ways, which are often ambiguous and contradictory. The absence of a commonly agreed-upon definition of the term makes it difficult to distinguish, describe and classify services. In order to address these issues, this chapter proposes a model of services that helps in analysing the concept. The model encompasses three perspectives: service as a means for cocreation of value, service as a means for abstraction and service as a means for distributing rights. The model does not suggest a definition of the term service but shows how the service concept can be analysed using a number of related concepts, like service resource, service process and service offering. The model has its theoretical foundation in the Resource-Event-Agent (REA) ontology and Hohfeld’s classification of rights.

  • 142.
    Bergholtz, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ekenberg, Love
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hansson, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Johannesson, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Snygg, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Framework for evaluating tools used in edemocracy: transparency, autonomy, consensus and pluralism2014In: DSV Writers Hut 2014: proceedings  August 21-22, 2014, Åkersberga, Sweden, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of e-democracy has been around for a while. However, the intercontextual understanding of this is still immature which complicates interdisciplinarity and communication with a diversity of stakeholders, resulting in a weak participation and implementation of e-services. This is even more emphasized in an international setting, not the least in the context of various European Union initiatives regarding e-service provision. To increase the participation in the context, e-democracy services can be utilized for strengthening individual capabilities as well as political processes. The effective design of such processes requires tools to support decision-making, collaboration, and collaborative decision-making, voting engagement and involvement in the democratic process. This article presents an evaluation framework suitable for tools for e-democracy aiming at forming a constructive base for implementing an efficient support for enabling an increased participation in vital democratic processes.

  • 143.
    Bergholtz, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Eriksson, Owen
    Johannesson, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Towards a Sociomaterial Ontology2013In: Advanced Information Systems Engineering Workshops: CAiSE 2013 International Workshops. Proceedings / [ed] Xavier Franch, Pnina Soffer, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, p. 341-348Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The management of social phenomena in conceptual modelling requires a novel understanding of the notion of representation. In particular, the principles for the existence and identification of objects need to be reconsidered. To do this, the paper draws on the current ontological discourse in information systems engineering and proposes a sociomaterial ontology for supporting conceptual modeling. The ontology shows how organisational entities are grounded in physical ones and how they can be understood in terms of deontic notions like privileges, duties and powers. The sociomaterial ontology is able to assist designers in creating understandable and robust conceptual models.

  • 144.
    Bergholtz, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Johannesson, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Andersson, Birger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Towards a model of services based on co-creation, abstraction and restriction2011In: International Conference on Conceptual Modeling (ER) 2011, Brussels: Springer , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The term service is today defined and used in a multitude of ways, and there is no usage characteristic that is common for all of these ways. As a consequence natural language terms used for describing services are ambiguous and often confusing. The lack of a common agreed upon definition of the term makes it difficult to understand and classify services as well as distinguish them from non-service concepts. In this paper, we do not propose a new definition of service but a model of services that helps in analysing the concept. The model is based on three perspectives: service as a means for co-creation of value, service as a means for abstraction, and service as a means for providing restricted access to resources.

  • 145.
    Bider, Ilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    AGILE RESEARCH IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS FIELD: ANALYSIS FROM KNOWLEDGE TRANSFORMATION PERSPECTIVE2015In: Proceedings of the 8th IADIS International Conference on Information Systems 2015 / [ed] Miguel Baptista Nunes, Pedro Isaías, Philip Powell, IADIS Press, 2015, p. 3-10Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the relative success of agile methods in software development, the idea of having agile processes started to be tested in other areas, for example, agile business process development. This trend already reached the research community and there have appeared some materials that suggest using agility in research projects. Analysis of these suggestions, however, shows that they do not go beyond finding superficial analogy between the concepts of the software development and research projects. The paper presents a deeper analysis of the concept of agile research in Information Systems (IS) based on the analysis of the research projects from the knowledge transformation perspective. As a basis for analysis, the SECI model of Nonaka is used. Based on this analysis, several suggestions are made on how to conduct agile research in IS, e.g. prioritize relevance over vigor, test early for a practical purpose, use own experience and reflections, etc. It is also shown that some research types, like action research and design science, are more suitable for conducting agile research than others. The paper also gives analysis of risks of non-agile research, and presents an example where they are revealed.    

  • 146.
    Bider, Ilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Analysis of Agile Software Development from the Knowledge Transformation Perspective2014In: Perspectives in business informatics research: 13th International Conference, BIR 2014, Lund, Sweden, September 22-24, 2014. Proceedings / [ed] Björn Johansson, Berlin: Springer, 2014, p. 143-157Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the Agile Software Development (ASD) has been successfully promoted in the last 15 years, there is no agreement on how to determine whether a particular project is agile or not. Some practitioners consider agility as strict usage of a specific methodology, e.g. SCRUM, others consider agility as adhering to Agile Manifesto. The lack of common view on ASD prevents creating common guidelines on when the usage of ASD is appropriate. This paper presents a model of ASD that helps to differentiate it from the traditional, phase-based development, and more strictly defines the area of its applicability. The model has been built based on the knowledge transformation perspective, as the author considers it to be the most differentiating perspective when comparing ASD to traditional software development. For building the model, the ideas from SECI model of Nonaka have been exploited. The results, in the form of requirements to be fulfilled for successful employment of ASD, are demonstrated through analysis of completed ASD projects.

  • 147.
    Bider, Ilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Analyzing communication capabilities of CM/ACM systems with the help of Language/Action perspective2015In: Thriving on Adaptability: best practices for knowledge workers, Lighthouse Point: Future Strategies Inc. , 2015Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 148.
    Bider, Ilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Can the systems perspective help in attaining success in software engineering projects? Inquiry into the area of applicability for agile software development2015In: Software Engineering in the Systems Context: addressing frontiers, practice and education. / [ed] Ivar Jacobson, Harold "Bud" Lawson, London: College Publications, 2015, no 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper is devoted to finding out whether employing the systems perspective can help in converting the tacit knowledge of expert software engineers into an explicit form to be transferred to novices and non-technical stakeholders of the software projects. It suggests a simple framework, dubbed SPC, that is based on distinguishing three interconnected systems involved in a software development projects: the software itself (S), the software project (P), and the context in which the software is or to be deployed (C). The usefulness of the framework is demonstrated on using SPC for determining the area of applicability of the agile software development. This is accomplished by building models of traditional and agile software development projects and analyzing the properties of these models. The models are built based on the knowledge transformation perspective, as the author considers it to be the most differentiating perspective between the agile and traditional software development. For building the models, the ideas from SECI model of Nonaka have been used. In addition, the paper presents some ideas on how the SPC framework can be used for analyzing other issues related to software development.

  • 149.
    Bider, Ilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Functional Decomposition of a Socio-Technical System: What is Missing?2015In: STPIS 2015: Socio-Technical Perspective in IS Development: Proceedings / [ed] Stewart Kowalski, Peter Bednar, Ilia Bider, CEUR-WS.org , 2015, p. 114-120Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper discusses the needs of new expressive means for modeling a socio-technical system as consisting of functional components that are connected to each-other through the output-input relationships. The discussion is based on an example of depicting so-called feedback connections between the functional components of a system. The need to introduce a feedback connection arises when two connected components are heavily dependent on the intellectual activity of people who man the components. In such a situation, there is a risk that the output from one component could be misinterpreted by the component which takes it as an input. Using a simplified example of a software development project, the paper introduces the notion of a feedback connection and discusses the ways it could be realized in a socio-technical system.

  • 150.
    Bider, Ilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    In Search for a Good Theory: Commuting between Research and Practice in Business Process Domain2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Kurt Lewin’s statement “There is nothing more practical than a good theory” says not so much about what is good for practice, but rather what it means to have a good theory. There exist a number of competing theories in the business process domain. The current paper is devoted to one of those that lie outside the mainstream direction. The purpose of the paper is not to present the theory as such, but to present the stages of how it was developed with the aim of becoming a “good” theory from the practical point of view. The paper is written as an experience report and goes through different stages of the development where research efforts where intermixed with practical tests. The theory in question is the state-oriented view on business processes. The basic idea of this theory lies in application of the general principles of the theory of dynamic systems to the business domain. The main direction for practical application of theoretical results is the development of IT-support for loosely structured business processes. Besides giving the history of the related research and practical efforts, the paper discusses the lessons learned that can be of interest for the development of other theoretical models/views in the business process domain.

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