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  • 101.
    Emanuelsson-Paulson, Therese
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Architectural connections between Greece and Anatolia: Doric, Aeolic and polygonal2022Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 102.
    Emanuelsson-Paulson, Therese
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Eric Laufer, Architektur unter den Attaliden. Pergamon und die Städte zwischen herrscherlichem Bauengagement und Lokaltradition.2022In: Bonner Jahrbücher des Rheinischen Landesmuseums in Bonn und des Rheinischen Amtes für Bodendenkmalpflege im Landschaftsverband Rheinland und des Vereins von Altertumsfreunden im Rheinlande, ISSN 0938-9334, Vol. 222, p. 413-416Article, book review (Refereed)
    The full text will be freely available from 2025-02-01 08:12
  • 103.
    Emanuelsson-Paulson, Therese
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Local Innovations and Cultiural Reconnection: A Local Style of Doric Octagonal Columns2022Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The multi-cultural area of ancient Epirus and southern Illyria invented a distinctive local style of architecture in the late Classical and Hellenistic period, by importing previously used shapes from older local styles of Greek architecture, as the decorative elements from western Peloponnese, the prolonged columns from Macedonia and the Archaic octagonal columns from the eastern Peloponnese. Even if many of the town were founded much earlier, some as Greek colonies, others as local settlements, the large urban development and construction happened in the 3rd century BC. The towns made themselves independent from imported material by using the commonly available hard local limestone for column shaft and sandstone for capitals, materials often counted as improper by modern researchers, but not uncommonly used for Greek columns in the Hellenistic period. Their production of Doric octagonal columns held the same high technological quality as columns elsewhere in the Greek world, sometimes used with an upper story of Ionic fluted columns. After WW2 the polygonal shaped columns were downgraded as a second rate phenomenon, while earlier researchers complied with Vitruvius and counted polygonal columns as an alternative Doric shape. The Doric octagonal columns were used in highly visible and prominent locations in Epirus and Illyria, often in stoas in the city centre and was taken up as a manifestation of identity of the unified tribes of the Epirote League. The re-invention of Doric octagonal columns must therefore have been an intentional aesthetical choice of cultural self-identification within the Greek cultural sphere. 

  • 104.
    Emanuelsson-Paulson, Therese
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Poddius Castus - En podd om antiken. 28. Kolonner, stenar och annan arkitektur - med Therese Emanuelsson-Paulson2022Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Under renässansen började en idealisk bild av den grekiska arkitekturen byggas upp. Detta utifrån studier av den romerske författaren Vitruvius. En bild av en strikt arkitektonisk “ordning” formades. Vi har den doriska, den joniska och den korintiska stilen med sina olika arkitektoniska element. Men reflekterar den bilden hur man egentligen valde att bygga?

    I dagens avsnitt gästas vi av Therese Emanuelsson-Paulson, postdoc vid institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur vid Stockholms universitet, som kommer ge oss en snabbkurs i vad grekisk arkitektur egentligen är.

    Den här historiepodden handlar om allt mellan Zeus och Hades: arkitektur, slag, sex, enskilda personer, religion och mytologi, mat, bajs, konst och mycket mer. En perfekt podd för dig som vill veta mer om Romarriket, antikens Grekland, Egypten och flera av de andra folk och kulturer som levde och verkade runt Medelhavet under den här perioden.

  • 105.
    Emanuelsson-Paulson, Therese
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Polygonal columns in Cyprus2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaic polygonal columns are found in Amanthus, Idalion, Kition, Marion and Palaepaphos, where the latter is the only site with numerous examples and the polygonal shape might even be more common than other column shapes. The inspiration for polygonal columns has been sought in Egyptian or Mycenaean architecture, but probably the Assyrian and Hittite use of polygonal columns down to the 7th century BC is a more likely source of inspiration. These columns mainly carries Leaf or Helmet capitals, where the former is inspired by Assyrian or Phoenician capitals, while the later might be a local invention. In the same period similarly shaped polygonal columns with Doric capitals appears in Greece, likely originating from the same inspiration or possibly secondary inspired from Cyprus. Simultaneously in both regions, the polygonal columns vanish around 500 BC, when the war with the Persians escalates. 

    A decorated column is not a necessary; a wooden pier would often suffice. Columns and decorated architecture in general, were most often used to express once wealth, status or identity, either within the own group or collectively towards other groups of people. The use of polygonal votive columns dedicated in the open air sanctuary in Palaepaphos seems therefore to be a local religious tradition similar to the Phoenician or Canaanite sanctuaries. The column from Kition also originates in a sanctuary, next to a Phoenician temple. It is therefore possible that the few polygonal columns found in other sites, mainly sanctuaries are also dedicated by either people for Palaepaphos or of a similar tradition, possibly Phoenicians. When polygonal columns disappear around 500 BC likely either the people left or the polygonal columns were for some reason too closely connected to the invading occupying power.

  • 106.
    Emanuelsson-Paulson, Therese
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Polygonal columns in Greek architecture2020Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis studies the use of polygonal columns in Greek architecture from the Geometric to the Hellenistic period. The main purpose of the research is to study the development, distribution, design, function and use of polygonal columns in order to create a new understanding on how they fit in the development of Greek architecture. The study is based mainly on measurements documented during archeological fieldwork or from excavation reports, and it addresses a critical gap in our current knowledge of Greek architecture since no comparative study focusing on this type of column has previously been conducted.

    Polygonal or faceted columns have multi-sided shafts with flat sides of equal width. Many polygonal columns were used as status symbols, and so were placed in important monumental buildings. They were also used in combination with fluted columns and could be manufactured from expensive materials such as marble. Polygonal columns were probably cheaper to produce than their fluted counterparts, but expensive compared with the production of functional pillars and supports. The decision to use polygonal rather than round or fluted columns was probably an intentional choice. Furthermore, the development of the polygonal column does not follow the same trajectory of design as that of shafts and capitals on round or fluted columns, and so this design should therefore be studied in its own right.

    Polygonal columns were used throughout the ancient Greek world. Six groups can be identified on the basis of their shape and design, their functions, geography and chronology. Each group had its own local development in terms of style and use. First, octagonal columns with Doric octagonal capitals from the Peloponnese, the coastal islands and the southern Greek mainland in use from the Geometric to Classical period. Second, octagonal columns with Doric octagonal capitals from Hellenistic Epirus and southern Illyria. Third, Hellenistic octagonal columns with Doric octagonal capitals from other regions. Fourth, eight-sided faceted columns from Greece, Anatolia and the Tauric peninsula during the Archaic to the Hellenistic period. Fifth, Hellenistic 20- and 24-sided polygonal columns with Doric capitals in the Aegean islands and Anatolia. Sixth, polygonal columns with local capitals in Archaic Cyprus. In addition, there is evidence of the use of polygonal columns scattered around towns in the Mediterranean region. In most cases, their design and shape can be connected to one of the main regions mentioned above.

    Polygonal columns follow the general development of manufacturing techniques in Greek architecture and were used in the same manner as fluted Doric columns. Polygonal shafts were used with Doric capitals in Doric buildings from the Archaic period, but they were never used with other polygonal architectural members. They were, however, sometimes used in combination with capitals from other architectural styles, but since Doric capitals were aesthetically easier to adapt to a polygonal shape, they were usually the preferred choice. Historically, it has been suggested that polygonal columns were a simple precursor to later more complex designs and/or a more economical alternative to fluted columns; these hypotheses are contradicted by the evidence presented in this study. Polygonal columns, with their aesthetically distinctive design, seem instead to be one of the many local variations that were used in Greek architecture.

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  • 107.
    Emanuelsson-Paulson, Therese
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Polygonal Columns: Unfinished Construction or Inexpensive Fashion in Hellenistic Times?2022In: Unfertigkeit in antiker Architektur Definitionen und Ursachen: Beiträge einer Sektion des Neunzehnten Internationalen Kongresses für Klassische Archöologie in Köln und Bonn / [ed] Frank Rumscheid; Natalia Toma-Kansteiner, Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft Philipp von Zabern , 2022, p. 39-47Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Twenty-sided polygonal columns were incorporated in the Pergamene architecture, a style developed when Eumenes II and his successors monumentalized the capital of their shortly before expanded kingdom in the second century. There were earlier faceted columns in unfinished buildings at Pergamon, whereas finished polygonal columns appear in the Aegean islands at least from the third century onwards in the Doric order, as Vitruvius confirms. The polygonal columns  of the Aegean, the earlier unfinished faceted columns in Pergamon and the lack of proper stone for construction altogether inspired the use of the new shaft shape, the polygonal column, which was easily produced from the local andesite and a quicker economical choice. Therefore, the polygonal column became an inexpensive fashion for a short period of time.

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  • 108.
    Emanuelsson-Paulson, Therese
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Polygonal Columns: Unfinished Constructions or Inexpensive Fashion?2022In: Archaeology and Economy in the Ancient World: Single Contributions, Sessions 2–3 / [ed] Michael Heinzelmann; Martin Bentz, Heidelberg: Propylaeum , 2022, Vol. 53, p. 389-391Conference paper (Other academic)
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  • 109.
    Emanuelsson-Paulson, Therese
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Polygonala kolonner i grekisk arkitektur2020In: Medusa. Svensk tidskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 47-49Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 110.
    Emanuelsson-Paulson, Therese
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Regional development of architectural styles – polygonal column in sanctuaries around Argos2022Conference paper (Refereed)
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  • 111.
    Emanuelsson-Paulson, Therese
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    The Queen’s choice or the son’s political propaganda: the introduction of the Pergamene style of architecture2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The inscription on the Sanctuary of Demeter in Pergamon states that it was dedicated by Queen Apollonis, spouse of king Attalus I and the mother of the two succeeding kings Eumenes II and Attalus II. Exactly when this building project was constructed and if it was really constructed by the queen, or her sons has long been discussed, but it was probably built slightly earlier than Eumenes II’s large construction program. It was a fitting building project to undertake as a queen, being both a sanctuary and to a female goddess. The construction of sanctuary introduces a new column shaft shape, the polygonal column. Polygonal columns quickly became fashionable and commonly used in Pergamon, both the town and the newly largely expanded kingdom. Even if the Queen’s constructions of the sanctuary still remains unfinished, the stoa and the propylon introduces this new architectural style of polygonal columns in Pergamon, which under Queen Apollonis son Eumenes II becomes part his grand project of creating the new royal architectural style used in the large expansions of the town to become a metropole befitting for his greatly expanded kingdom. The largely used polygonal columns in the Pergamene architectural style was therefore probably selected and introduced by a woman, the Queen Apollonis.

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  • 112.
    Enevång Viklund, Lina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Making Sense of Material Culture: A Sensory Approach to Bird-Shaped Vessels in Imperial Age Greece2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this thesis is Roman bird-shaped glass vessels from the 1 st and 2 nd centuries AD. The vessels were containers for cosmetics and distinguished themselves from other types of unguentaria in that once they had been filled with cosmetic powder, the vessels were reheated and sealed shut by fire. The only way to extract the content was to break the tip of the bird’s tail; only then could the powder be sprinkled out. While ancient glass is a well-established field of research, studies concerning bird-shaped vessels are scarce. The present study, situated in Roman age Greece, is concerned with the sensory experiences that these objects evoked in their users and attempts to reflect the ancient lived experience of the vessels. In order to speculate on possible sensory stimuli, contextual aspects concerning where, why, and by whom these vessels were used are explored. Based on these contextual aspects, the bird-shaped vessels are studied in hypothetical scenarios where potential multisensory experiences are explored.

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    Making Sense of Material Culture: A Sensory Approach to Bird-Shaped Vessels in Imperial Age Greece
  • 113.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Ancient Place-names in the Governorate of Kafr el-Sheikh2021Book (Refereed)
  • 114.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Creating an Etymology for Coptic tamio2014In: Journal of Ancient Civilizations, ISSN 1004-9371, Vol. 29, p. 31-35Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 115.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Dual Zootoponyms in Ancient Egyptian2016In: Décrire, imaginer, construire l'espace: Toponymie égyptienne de l'Antiquité au Moyen Âge / [ed] Sylvain Dhennin, Claire Somaglino, Kairo: Institut français d'archéologie orientale du Caire, 2016, p. 117-135Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 116.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Egyptens hieroglyfer i de klassiska författarnas våld2015In: Medusa. Svensk tidskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 17-24Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 117.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Everything Is Not What It Seems: A New Examination of a Purported Naos Fragment from the 4th Century BCE in Verona2023In: Journal of Ancient Egyptian Interconnections, ISSN 1944-2815, Vol. 38 & 39, p. 117-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The author makes three observations about a purported naos fragment from the 4th century BCE, now in the Museo Archeologico in Verona. First, he refutes the long-held assumption that it represents a naos. Second, he observes that the cartouche on its front face does not belong to Nectanebo I. Third, he argues that its original location might have been in the Temple of the Escarpment at Saqqara, and perhaps within the precinct commonly called the Bubastieion, noting that there are no certain attestations of the name ‘Bubastieion’ in ancient texts.

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  • 118.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Från sentid till senantik: Föremål ur Medelhavsmuseets egyptiska samling2016Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 119.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Jan Retsö, Legenderna om förbundsarken, Appell förlag, 20212022In: Medusa. Svensk tidskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 2, p. 40-41Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 120.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Le naos de Sopdou à Saft el-Henneh (CG 70021): paléographie2014Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [fr]

    Le présent ouvrage est consacré à l’étude paléographique du naos Caire CG 70021, autrement nommé «le naos de Sopdou» d’après son dieu tutélaire. Il provient de Saft el-Henneh, chef-lieu de la XXe province de Basse-Egypte dans l’Antiquité. Ce monument date de la XXXe dynastie, période de transition ayant laissé peu d’inscriptions monumentales. Outre le fait de présenter un intérêt remarquable pour la connaissance de la théologie d’un centre régional du Delta égyptien, ce naos se distingue par l’abondance des hiéroglyphes, souvent insolites, qui composent ses textes. L’analyse approfondie de sa paléographie, réalisée signe par signe, contribue à établir la transition entre la renaissance saïte et le style ptolémaïque naissant.

  • 121.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Liv i spillror: Koptiska ostraka i Sverige2020In: Medusa. Svensk tidskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 14-20Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 122.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Onomastic Miscellanies from the North-Central Delta2015In: Bulletin de la Sociéte d'Égyptologie de Genève, ISSN 0255-6286, Vol. 30, p. 25-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four different place-names from the north-central Delta are discussed in the article: (1) thename of the town of Disūq, suggested here to derive from an ancient Egyptian expression,possibly ‘the land of Sobek’; (2) Diminka, which may be a compound meaning ‘the new landof Nechao’; (3) idb.wy rx.ty, whose westward location seems supported by a passage in theTemple of Edfu; and finally (4) srn, a hapax, read on a Saite donation stela (Uppsala VM 3208),where the geographical context indicates a location near Buto.

  • 123.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Recension av J.-L. Fournet, The rise of Coptic. Egyptian versus Greek inLate Antiquity (The Rostovzeff Lectures), Oxford & Princeton:Princeton University Press 2020. 224 pp.2020In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 20, p. 243-244Article, book review (Other academic)
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  • 124.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Resenärer. Dragomanen 23/2021. Olof Heilo (red.)2022In: Medusa. Svensk tidskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 3, p. 49-50Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 125.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Traditional Egyptian II (Ptolemaic, Roman)2016In: UCLA Encyclopedia of Egyptology / [ed] Julie Stauder-Porchet, Andréas Stauder & Willeke Wendrich, Los Angeles: UCLA , 2016, p. 1-10Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From 404 BCE - 394 CE hieroglyphic texts were in general composed in the high-status language variety termed Traditional Egyptian. This was used exclusively in religious and sacerdotal contexts and is as such opposed to Demotic, which served both as a spoken and as a written language. Traditional Egyptian is a reflex of how the late scribes perceived the classical language. The result is a morphologically impoverished Egyptian (in comparison with the classical language), in combination with a phonology that corresponds largely to Demotic. Traditional Egyptian served as a vehicle for many new compositions, in particular religious inscriptions in temples and on papyri, but also funerary, historical, and autobiographical texts. Meanwhile, older texts in the classical language continued to be copied: as long as there are no reliable means of dating texts according to linguistic criteria, it remains difficult to establish the exact corpus of texts written in Traditional Egyptian.

  • 126.
    Engsheden, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Tutankhamon utan graven2022In: Medusa. Svensk tidskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 4, p. 35-40Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 127.
    Eriksson, Niklas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Schallin, Ann-Louise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Asine revisited: En marinarkeologisk undersökning2022In: Medusa. Svensk tidskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 1, p. 49-50Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 128.
    Feiler, Yael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Musicology and Performance Studies. Teater- och dansvetenskap.
    Gud som fader, landet som moder2008In: Judisk krönika, ISSN 0345-5580, Vol. Årgång 76, no 5, p. 16-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 129. Forsén, Björn
    et al.
    Karivieri, Arja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History. Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Antikens kultur och samhällsliv.
    From Roman villa economies to Slavic nomadic life2003In: The Asea Valley Survey: An Arcadian Mountain Valley from the Palaeolithic Period until Modern Times, Svenska institutet i Athen; Paul Åströms Förlag, Sävedalen , 2003, p. 307-312Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 130.
    Galani, Georgia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    A New Roman Provincial Coin from Pella2019In: Tekmeria, ISSN 1791-7573, Vol. 14, p. 93-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to present a unique bronze coin of the Roman colony of Pella in Macedonia that was discovered during excavations of the Aristotle University at Dion. The coin belongs to a so-far unpublished issue and bears a female head on the obverse and a standing Pan on the reverse. The article discusses the iconographic types, the denomination and the dating of this issue that does not bear an imperial portrait. A dating in the 3rd century AD is suggested for its production.

  • 131.
    Galani, Georgia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Imprints of Roman Imperium: Bronze Coinages in the Republican Eastern Provinces2022Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study concerns bronze coinages of the Roman Republican provinces in the eastern Mediterranean during the 1st century BC. The Eastern Mediterranean is conventionally thought to include the areas east of the Adriatic Sea, which during the Hellenistic period included various kingdoms that had emerged from the fragmented empire of Alexander the Great. The basic criterion for the geographical boundaries used in this research is the formal transfer of those eastern regions into the Roman domain in the pre-Imperial period. Accordingly, the areas that are being studied are those that were converted into administrative provinces by the Romans before the battle of Actium and the beginning of the reign of Octavian in 27 BC; namely, the provinces of Macedonia, Asia, Cyrenaica-Crete, Bithynia-Pontus, Syria and Cilicia-Cyprus.

    The main aims are to consider all the currently known bronze coin issues from the eastern provinces, and to offer a comparative overview of them. This overview is framed both by the newly established Roman provincial administration and also the evolving idea of Roman hegemony arising from Rome’s crucial intervention in the eastern Mediterranean during the war against Mithridates VI of Pontus. More specifically, the study identifies continuity and change in bronze coin production from the Greek East under early Roman rule in order to situate these coinages in the broader historical and numismatic context of the period. This is achieved through consideration of the symbolic language (iconography and legends), the economic value (metrology) and the production patterns of coins.

    The last century of the Republic bears the signs of a rapidly transforming reality, and acts as a prelude to the Imperial era. There might not yet be an emperor appearing as a dominant individual, but the supreme authority of Rome as imperium populi Romani is present in the provinces, via her agents, and is reflected in provincial coinages. In this respect, provincial coinages are viewed as an integral part of the currency that was in use in the Roman eastern Mediterranean, which emerges as a ‘common pool’ in base metal coinage, as a common canvas for inspiration and interactions in coin iconography and metrology. Finally, provincial minting is considered as a potential mirror for the various administrative attitudes and needs of the Romans across the different provinces in the East.

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  • 132.
    Galani, Georgia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    V. di Napoli, F. Camia, V. Evangelidis, D. Grigoropoulos, D.Rogers, S. Vlizos (eds.), What’s new in Roman Greece? Recent work on the Greek Mainland and the islands in the Roman period. Proceedings of a conference held in Athens, 8–10 October 2015 (ΜΕΛΕΤΗΜΑΤΑ, 80), National Hellenic Research Foundation/Institute of Historical Research2020In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 13, p. 239-241Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 133.
    Galani, Georgia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Η νομισματική μαρτυρία για τη ρωμαϊκή αποικία του Δίου από τον Αύγουστο έως τον Αδριανό / The Numismatic Evidence on the Roman Colony of Dium from Augustus to Hadrian2019In: Η πανεπιστημιακή ανασκαφή του Δίου: Νεότερες μελέτες. Πρακτικά ημερίδας, Παρασκευή 12 Μαΐου 2017, Μουσείο Εκμαγείων Φιλοσοφικής Σχολής Αριστοτελείου Πανεπιστημίου Θεσσαλονίκης / [ed] Semeli Pingiatoglou, Thessaloniki: University Studio Press , 2019, p. 41-49Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to summarize the results of the study of the numismatic evidence on the Roman colony of Dium from Augustus (27 BC - AD 14) to Hadrian (AD 117-138), conducted for the purposes of an MA thesis. The numismatic material concerns both the coinage produced by Dium and the coins of other issuing authorities that were discovered during the excavations at the administrative and commercial center of Dium, as well as at the sanctuaries extra muros. The presentation of the excavation coins attempts to offer an insight into the range of financial transactions and the parallel use of imperial and provincial coins within a Roman colony in the Greek East.

  • 134. Gines Taylor, Catherine
    et al.
    Kabala, Irene
    Karivieri, Arja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Sigma2016In: The Eerdmans Encyclopedia of Early Christian Art and Archaeology / [ed] Paul Corby Finney, William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 2016, p. 504-504Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 135.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Att upptäcka antiken: Recensioner av Stephen L. Dyson, In pursuit of ancient pasts. A history of Classical Archaeology in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, New Haven och London 2006, och Great moments in Greek archaeology, red. Panos Valavanis, Los Angeles 20072009In: Medusa. Svensk tidskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 4, p. 38-43Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 136.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Dancing with decorum: The eclectic usage of kalathiskos dancers and pyrrhic dancers in Roman visual culture2012In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 5, p. 7-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines two groups of motifs in Roman visual culture: females modelled on kalathiskos dancers, and males modelled on pyrrhic dancers. Eclecticism is emphasized as a strategy which was used to introduce novelties that were appropriate within a Roman cultural context. The figures representing kalathiskos dancers and pyrrhic dancers were both changed in an eclectic manner and this resulted in motifs representing the goddess Victoria, and the curetes respectively.

    Kalathiskos dancers and eclectic Victoriae figure on many different media at least from the Augustan era and into the 2nd century AD. It is argued here that the establishment of these two motifs in Roman visual culture is closely related to the aesthetics which came to the fore during the reign of Augustus. Thereafter, both kalathiskos dancers and eclectic Victoriae lingered on in the Roman cultural context until many of the material categories on which they were depicted ceased to be produced.

    Unlike the kalathiskos dancers, the male figures modelled on pyrrhic dancers are so rare within Roman visual culture that we can only assume they were, to some extent, perceived as an inappropriate motif. This can most likely be explained by the negative attitude, amongst the Roman elite, towards male dancing.

  • 137.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Ett mystiskt moln över Medelhavet2010In: Medusa. Svensk tidskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 2, p. 28-28Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 138.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Evading Greek models: Three studies on Roman visual culture2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For a long time, Roman ideal sculptures have primarily been studied within the tradition of Kopienkritik. Owing to some of the theoretical assumptions tied to this practice, several important aspects of Roman visual culture have been neglected as the overall aim of such research has been to gain new knowledge regarding assumed Classical and Hellenistic models. This thesis is a collection of three studies on Roman ideal sculpture. The articles share three general aims: 1. To show that the practice of Kopienkritik has, so far, not produced convincing interpretations of the sculpture types and motifs discussed. 2. To show that aspects of the methodology tied to the practice of Kopienkritik (thorough examination and comparison of physical forms in sculptures) can, and should, be used to gain insights other than those concerning hypothetical Classical and Hellenistic model images. 3. To present new interpretations of the sculpture types and motifs studied, interpretations which emphasize their role and importance within Roman visual culture.

    The first article shows that reputed, post-Antique restorations may have an unexpected—and unwanted—impact on the study of ancient sculptures. This is examined by tracing the impact that a restored motif ("Satyrs with cymbals") has had on the study of an ancient sculpture type: the satyr ascribed to the two-figure group "The invitation to the dance". The second article presents and interprets a sculpture type which had previously gone unnoticed—The satyrs of "The Palazzo Massimo-type". The type is interpreted as a variant of "The Marsyas in the forum", a motif that was well known within the Roman cultural context. The third article examines how, and why, two motifs known from Classical models were changed in an eclectic fashion once they had been incorporated into Roman visual culture. The motifs concerned are kalathiskos dancers, which were transformed into Victoriae, and pyrrhic dancers, which were also reinterpreted as mythological figures—the curetes.

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  • 139.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Graciöst vapenskrammel: Beväpnade, manliga dansare i romersk bildvärld2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 140.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Intertextualitet och romersk visuell kultur: Ett nytt angreppssätt för romersk idealskulptur2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Projektets grundläggande forskningsfråga rör idealskulpturens roll inom den romerska världen. Sedan 1800-talets mitt har sådana skulpturer i första hand studerats som romerska kopior efter grekiska original, utifrån den kopiekritiska metoden. Men under de senaste tjugo åren har kopiekritikens dominerande ställning kritiserats upprepade gånger. Kritiken rör framför allt det faktum att metoden inte tar i beaktande skulpturernas roll inom den romerska kulturella kontexten. Men trots kritiken har inget annat angreppsätt ännu lyckats konkurrera med kopiekritiken. Detta projekt syftar till att formulera ett nytt angreppssätt för studiet av dessa fascinerande skulpturer, en metod som har en stor potential att ge nya insikter beträffande idealskulpturens plats i det romerska samhället. Det nya angreppssättet utgår ifrån konceptet intertextualitet, och det introducerar således också ett teoretiskt och tvärvetenskapligt element till den aktuella debatten om hur romerska idealskulpturer bör tolkas.

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    Program
  • 141.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Intertextuality and Roman visual culture: A new approach to Roman ideal sculpture2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this project is to acquire new knowledge regarding the role of ideal sculpture in the Roman world. Since the mid-19th century, such sculptures have been studied primarily as Roman copies of Greek originals, using the method of copy criticism. During the last two decades, the dominating influence of this approach has been repeatedly criticized as it does not investigate the place of such sculptures in the Roman cultural context. Yet, no alternative approach has managed to rival that of copy criticism. This project aims to formulate a new mode of studying this fascinating material, an approach that has great potential to produce new insights into the role of ideal sculptures in Roman society. Turning to the concept of intertextuality, this project also aims to introduce a theoretical and multidisciplinary element to the current debate on how to interpret Roman ideal sculpture.

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    Nordic TAG 2014 Programme
  • 142.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Kunst von unten? Stil und Gesellschaft in der antiken Welt von der "arte plebea" bis heute (Palilia, 27), eds. Francesco de Angelis, Jens-Arne Dickmann, Felix Pirson and Ralf von den Hoff, Deutsches Archäologisches Institut Rom. Wiesbaden 2012. 184 pp. ISBN 978-3-89500-915-02014In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 7, p. 246-248Article, book review (Other academic)
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  • 143.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Marsyas in the garden?: Small-scale sculptures referring to the Marsyas in the forum2010In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 3, p. 163-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While studying a small-scale sculpture in the collections of the Nationalmuseum in Stockholm, I noticed that it belongs to a previously unrecognized sculpture type. The type depicts a paunchy, bearded satyr who stands with one arm raised. To my knowledge, four replicas exist. By means of stylistic comparison, they can be dated to the late second to early third centuries AD. Due to their scale and rendering they are likely to have been freestanding decorative elements in Roman villas or gardens.

    The iconography of the satyrs of the type discussed is closely related to that of a group of fountain figures. These fountain figures are believed to refer to a motif well known in Roman times: the Marsyas in the forum. In this article I argue that the satyrs of the type discussed refer as well to this once famous depiction of Marsyas.

  • 144.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Marsyas Unbound2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the presentation of the workshop "Reading emotions in ancient visual culture" the following question is posed: "Why was the agonizing sculpture of Marsyas about to be flayed so popular in the early Roman empire?" This paper will suggest an answer to this question. I wish to emphasize that there was an alternative version of the myth of Marsyas, one where he manages to escape the cruel fate that Apollo had set out for him. Instead, Marsyas settled in Italy, where his image was later to be placed in Roman fora as a symbol of liberty. I will suggest that there was a Roman tradition of depicting Marsyas "unbound" - after having escaped from Apollo and arrived in Italy. Agonizing as the depictions of the hanging Marsyas are, in a Roman context they were perhaps not necessarily seen to represent the final hours of Marsyas' life.

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    Reading Emotions in Ancient Visual Culture - Programme
  • 145.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Medusa till salu i Tübingen2014In: Medusa. Svensk tidskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 49-49Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 146.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Piscina mirabilis2010In: Medusa. Svensk tidskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 3, p. 42-43Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 147.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Recension av E. Tengström, Broar till antiken. Antikens inflytande på svenskt samhälls- och kulturliv 1780-1850, Göteborg 2014, 252 s.2014In: Medusa. Svensk tidskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 39-42Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 148.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    The impact of restoration: The example of "The dancing satyr" in the Uffizi2014Conference paper (Other academic)
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    Rezeption-Zeitgeist-Fälschung Programme
  • 149.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    The impact of restoration: The example of the dancing satyr in the Uffizi2012In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 5, p. 133-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to show that reputed restorations may have an unexpected impact on the study of ancient sculpture. During the 17th-19th centuries a number of restored antiques where held in exceptionally high regard. One of the consequences of their renowned was the production of copies and adaptations in different scales and media. Such reproductions did not distinguish between the ancient and the restored parts of the work.

    Today these reproductions are centuries old, and in many cases their provenance has long since been forgotten. Therefore, such post-antique sculptures are easily misinterpreted as ancient. Subsequently, they are at times used as evidence of ancient sculptural production. Needless to say, this may cause flawed notions of Classical sculpture.

    The complexity of this relationship, between the ancient and the restored, is here exemplified by tracing the impact that a restored motif – “satyrs with cymbals” – has had on the study of an ancient sculpture type – the satyr attributed to “The invitation to the dance”.

  • 150. Hallager, Erik
    et al.
    Karivieri, Arja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Schallin, Ann-Louise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    In memoriam – Carl-Gustaf Styrenius 1929–20232023In: Hellenika, ISSN 0348-0100, no 183, p. 14-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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