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  • 101.
    Enqvist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Stewardship in an urban world: Civic engagement and human–nature relations in the Anthropocene2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Never before have humans wielded a greater ability to alter and disrupt planetary processes. Our impact is becoming so noticeable that a new geological epoch has been proposed – the Anthropocene – in which Earth systems might no longer maintain the stable and predictable conditions of the past 12 millennia. This is particularly evident in the rapid expansion of urban areas, where a majority of humans now live and where environmental changes such as rising temperatures and habitat loss are happening faster than elsewhere.  In light of this, questions have been raised about what a more responsible relationship between humans and the rest of the planet might look like. Scholars in sustainability science employ the concept of ‘stewardship’ in searching for an answer; however, with multiple different applications and definitions, there is a need to better understand what stewardship is or what novelty it might add to sustainability research. This thesis investigates stewardship empirically through two case studies of civic engagement for protecting nature in cities – Bengaluru, India and New York City, USA. Further, the thesis also proposes a conceptual framework for how to understand stewardship as a relation between humans and the rest of nature, based on three dimensions: care, knowledge and agency. This investigation into stewardship in the urban context uses a social–ecological systems approach to guide the use of mixed theory and methods from social and natural sciences. The thesis is organized in five papers. Paper I reviews defining challenges in managing urban social–ecological systems and proposes that these can more effectively be addressed by collaborative networks where public, civic, other actors contribute unique skills and abilities. Paper II and Paper III study water resource governance in Bengaluru, a city that has become dependent on external sources while its own water bodies become degraded and depleted.Paper II analyzes how locally based ‘lake groups’ are able to affect change through co-management arrangements, reversing decades of centralization and neglect of lakes’ role in Bengaluru’s water supply.Paper III uses social–ecological network analysis to analyze how patterns in lake groups’ engagements and collaborations show better fit with ecological connectivity of lakes.Paper IV employs sense of place methods to explore how personal bonds to a site shapes motivation and goals in waterfront stewardship in New York City. Finally,Paper V reviews literature on stewardship and proposes a conceptual framework to understand and relate different uses and underlying epistemological approaches in the field. In summary, this thesis presents an empirically grounded contribution to how stewardship can be understood as a human–nature relation emergent from a deep sense ofcare and responsibility, knowledge and learning about how to understand social–ecological dynamics, and theagency and skills needed to influence these dynamics in a way that benefits a greater community of humans as others. Here, the care dimension is particularly important as an underappreciated aspect of social–ecological relations, and asset for addressing spatial and temporal misalignment between management institutions and ecosystem. This thesis shows that care for nature does not erode just because green spaces are degraded by human activities – which may be crucial for promoting stewardship in the Anthropocene.

  • 102.
    Mengiste, Tekalign Ayalew
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Struggle for Mobility: Risk, hope and community of knowledge in Eritrean and Ethiopian migration pathways towards Sweden2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    On the basis of the ethnographic fieldwork conducted in Sweden, Italy, Sudan and Ethiopia during 2013–2015, this study examines the motivations, organizations and impact of overland migratory journeys from Ethiopia and Eritrea across the Sahara Desert and Mediterranean Sea to Sweden. The analysis involves the exploring of how migrants strive to prepare, manage and survive the multiple risks and structural barriers they encounter: the exits from Eritrea and Ethiopia, negotiations and contacts with various brokers and facilitators, organized crime and violence, restrictive border controls, passage through the Desert and high Sea and finally, ‘managing the asylum system in Sweden’. Further, it maps how the process of contemporary refugee mobility and multiple transitions is facilitated by the entanglement of transnational social relations and smuggling practices. The study argues for a perspective wherein migration journeys are embedded in and affected by the process of dynamic intergenerational, translocal and transnational social relations, material practices and knowledge productions. It depicts how practices and facilitations of irregular migratory mobility reproduce collective knowledge that refugees mobilize to endure risks during their journey, establishing a community and creating a home after arriving at the destination location.

  • 103.
    Galli, Raoul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Symboliskt kapital2017In: Nyckelbegrepp i socialantropologin / [ed] Raoul Galli, Stockholm: Socialantropologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet , 2017, 2 uppl, p. 42-44Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I Bourdieus konstruktion av begreppet symboliskt kapital ingår ett centralt element som synliggör att det slags fenomen som symboliskt kapital söker ringa in – att någon specifik tillgång eller egenskap igenkänns som värdefull och tillerkänns värde – också väsentligen misskänns (eng. misrecognition) av den aktuella gruppen, som ett av dem själva konstruerat värde. Istället uppfattas den maktform som det uppskattade och värderade ger upphov till, snarare som en fullt legitim-, d.v.s. naturlig, form av kraft, styrka, utstrålning och överordning. Det gör att denna typ av social makt utövas under andra premisser än exempelvis ekonomiskt/materiell makt, eftersom det eventuella egenintresset och strategiska kalkylerandet för att ackumulera symboliskt kapital som maktresurs, blir mer osynligt genom just sin uppfattade ”naturlighet”. Häri ligger ett slags förnekelse och kollektivt självbedrägeri som kan vara närmast avgörande för gruppens hierarkiska stabilitet och sociala ordning.

  • 104.
    Nyqvist, Anette
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Talking like an institutional investor: On the gentle voice of financial giants2017In: Power, policy and profit: Corporate engagements in politics and government / [ed] Christina Garsten, Adrienne Sörbom, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 105. Abram, Simone
    et al.
    Bianco, B. Feldman
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Salazar, N.
    de Genova, N.
    The free movement of people around the world would be Utopian: IUAES World Congress 20132017In: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, ISSN 1070-289X, E-ISSN 1547-3384, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 123-155Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article contains the text and discussion of a debate held at the IUAES World Congress in Anthropology at Manchester University in 2013. The motion was proposed by Bela Feldman-Bianco (State University of Campinas), seconded by Noel Salazar (University of Leuven) and was opposed by Shahram Khosravi (Stockholm University), seconded by Nicholas de Genova (then at Goldsmiths' College). The debate was chaired by Simone Abram (Durham University).

  • 106.
    Olsson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Guide to Comfort: The Diasporic Practices of Swedish Clubs in Southern Spain2017In: Nordic Journal of Migration Research, ISSN 1799-649X, E-ISSN 1799-649X, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 156-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article demonstrates how large social clubs are operating at the locus of an ethnic community-making of Swedish migrants in Southern Spain. The clubs are selectively targeting the relatively wealthy (ethnic) Swedish individuals of older age, offering them a home-like social arena ‘in Swedish’ in which the mediation of information and services is just one of the ‘guidelines’ the clubs offer to ensure the members a comfortable lifestyle in Spain. In this social space, the Swedish migrants meet, socialise and, to some extent, also consume, rather than participating and integrating in Spanish society. The article argues that the practices used by the social clubs are becoming part of the infrastructure guiding migrants towards a Swedish diasporic lifestyle in Southern Spain.

  • 107.
    Nyqvist, Anette
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Materiality and Organization of Gold2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 108.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Precarious Status of Working-Class Men in Iran2017In: Current history (1941), ISSN 0011-3530, E-ISSN 1944-785X, Vol. 116, no 794, p. 355-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sociopolitical transition can be observed best in the shift of the symbolic position of working-class men: from veneration in the first decade after the revolution to condemnation three decades later.

  • 109.
    Nyqvist, Anette
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Travelling Story of Pettersson in the Pacific2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 110.
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Tinkering with Knowledge: Representational Practices and Scaling in U.S. Think Tanks2017In: Knowledge and Power in an Overheated World / [ed] Thomas Hylland Eriksen, Elisabeth Schober, Oslo: Department of Social Anthropology, University of Oslo , 2017, p. 98-125Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Think tanks, or policy institutes, are becoming significant ‘sites of normativity’ on the global political scene. While their primary concern often is to provide knowledge,based on which decision makers can make informed choices, they also play a part in setting organizational agendas and priorities, and in mobilizing for political action. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in think tanks in Washington DC, the paper engages with the modes representation used by policy experts as they strive to get traction and 99establish credibility for their ideas. The work of policy experts can be understood as a form of ‘bricolage,’ in which information and normative perspectives are tinkeredwith and are thus afforded truth-value. The use of distanciation and proximation techniques facilitates the continuous scale-making processes in which policy experts are involved and makes possible the ‘evacuation of the near future’.

  • 111.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Kikon, Dolly
    Wayfinding: Indigenous Migrants in the Service Sector of Metropolitan India2017In: South Asia: Journal of South Asian Studies, ISSN 0085-6401, E-ISSN 1479-0270, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 447-462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last decade, large numbers of indigenous youth from the uplands of Northeast India have migrated to metropolitan cities across the country. Many end up in the new service sector, getting jobs in high-end restaurants, shopping malls and spas. The demand for their labour is due to their un-Indian 'exotic Asian' appearance and a reputation for being hardworking and loyal. Such labour market value is a remarkable reversal of their position considering the earlier colonial stereotypes of their savagery and disobedience, reproduced through the de-politicisation of their armed insurrections during the post-colonial period. This paper addresses their daily experiences of vulnerability and marginality as well as the freedom and aspirations that a migratory life seem to engender.

  • 112.
    Vonderau, Asta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Zur Poetik der Infrastruktur: Technologien des Kühlens und der Imagination im digitalen Kapitalismus2017In: Zeitschrift für Volkskunde, ISSN 0044-3700, Vol. 113, no 1, p. 24-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [de]

    This article examines the downside of digitization processes industrial and infrastructural locations that facilitate virtual connectivity and collectivities. Based on the case of Facebook's data center in the Northern Swedish town of Lulea, the article describes processes of cloud infrastructuring. In the course of such infrastructuring processes, various technologies, communities of actors, stocks of knowledge and expertise, moral values, and organizational structures come together, new socio-technical figuration emerge, and social change is enabled. Particular attention is given to imaginings as a practice of knowledge production inherent to processes of infrastructuring. The article links what appears as merely virtual data flows to material and political channels, revealing their multiple local entanglements.

  • 113.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    A Different Story of Coal: The Power of Power in Northeast India2016In: Industrialising Rural India: Land, policy and resistance / [ed] Kenneth Bo Nielsen, Patrik Oskarsson, Routledge, 2016, p. 107-122Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter points to the critical role energy and energy infrastructures plays in modern societies. It is argued that the ways in which different sources of energy are extracted, produced, refined, transported and consumed enable or produce certain social arrangements and eventually condition the very structure of society. Power, in other words, is loaded with power. Here I am interested in coal and then the small-scale, unregulated coal mining that takes place on indigenous lands in Northeast India. The story told revolves around the intervention by the National Green Tribunal putting a ban on what is termed as “un-scientific mining”. While this intervention is highly condemned by certain local actors, there are also those that hope this eventually will break the spell of coal.   

  • 114.
    Graham, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Anthropologists Are Talking about Queer Anthropology2016In: Ethnos, ISSN 0014-1844, E-ISSN 1469-588X, Vol. 81, no 2, p. 364-377Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 115.
    Pipinis, Justas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Art as Infrastructure2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper seeks to describe and explain the social efficacy of art by addressing it as contemporary western infrastructure for social cohesion. Social cohesion refers here not to teleological status quo, but to pluralistic, yet fairly peaceful co-habitation, allowing for gradual change while preserving continuity of the group identity.

    Employing Actor-Network Theory, this paper views artistic practice as actor-network assemblage process making connections and vehicles that enable movement of ideas, values, visions and dissents throughout the community. Parallel memberships of the same actors in artistic and non-artistic actor-networks create conditions for artistic meanings to “bleed over” also into other spheres of the social life where they can gain efficacy far beyond the “art world”. Art infrastructure operates under particular “regime of art” that suspends some of the “real world” rules and sanctions ambiguity, facilitating less confrontational reconciliation of diverse and contradictory meanings than is customary in e.g. science, religion, politics, economy, railways, sewage or other infrastructures that also have impact on social cohesion.

    Debates about the definitions of “art” or particular objects’ belonging to “art” emerge in this perspective as debates on the scope of applicability of the “regime of art”, as it may have significant social consequences.

    By outlining an infrastructural theory of art this paper seeks to fill a theoretical gap in a rather fragmented field of anthropology of art and to propose novel ways to deploy insights from anthropological engagements with infrastructure. Empirical data of this paper come from a five weeks fieldwork in Alaska.

  • 116.
    Behtoui, Alireza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Beyond social ties: The impact of social capital on labour market outcomes for young Swedish people2016In: Journal of Sociology, ISSN 1440-7833, E-ISSN 1741-2978, Vol. 52, no 4, p. 711-724Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study makes use of a dataset which contains material relating to young Swedish people who have recently completed their studies and started working. It explores whether using social networks as such or using individuals' resources which are accessible through social networks (social capital) provides relative advantages in the competition for better jobs. Interest in this topic stems from the recent development of sociological theories in this field. The results indicate that the use of social ties is a common way to find a job in the highly regulated Swedish labour market, but that informal recruitment methods per se provide no relative advantages in the competition for better jobs. On the other hand, given the same demographic characteristics, socioeconomic background and educational attainments, there is a positive association between resources embedded in an individual's social network (social capital) and the quality of the jobs obtained.

  • 117.
    Körling, Gabriella
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Comments on Ruben Andersson "Here Be Dragons: Mapping an Ethnography of Global Danger"2016In: Current Anthropology, ISSN 0011-3204, E-ISSN 1537-5382, Vol. 57, no 6, p. 2p. 723-724Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 118.
    Rabo, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Conflicts and identities among Assyrians/Syriacs in Sweden2016In: Identity and Conflict in the Middle East and Its Diasporic Cultures / [ed] Mazen Naous, Balamand: University of Balamand , 2016, p. 143-159Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 119.
    Olsson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Diaspora: ett begrepp i utveckling2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kunskapsöversikten visar att det finns ett stort policyintresse för frågor som har med diaspora att göra och särskilt de sidor av diaspora som handlar om relationer med och engagemang för hemlandet. Det finns också starka forskningsmiljöer – inte minst i Danmark och Norge – som kan bidra med kunskap om diasporors engagemang i hemlandet och remitteringarnas betydelse för utveckling och återuppbyggnad. Det finns i en del fall en påtaglig optimism både bland forskare och politiska beslutsfattare kring diasporans betydelse inom framförallt utvecklingsoch återuppbyggnadsverksamhet. Ett exempel som tas upp i kunskapsöversikten är hemortsföreningarna och deras bidrag till hemorterna. De diasporiska organisationernas bidrag till att bygga upp lokalsamhällena i det krigsdrabbade Somalia (inklusive Somaliland och Puntland) är ett annat. Ett tredje exempel är de somaliska transnationella nätverkens välfärdsinsatser och system för självhjälp som också har en påtaglig transnationell förankring. Trots många ”goda” exempel och värderingar från forskarhåll har diaspora ingen patentlösning på utvecklingsproblemen att erbjuda politiska beslutsfattare. Den kritiska granskningen av diaspora kan ställa en rad frågor om t ex vad diasporornas ekonomiska och politiska intressen i hemlandet har för betydelse och hur detta påverkar de insatser som de ger. Det finns också kritiska frågor att ställa kring diasporornas demokratiska mandat bland migrantbefolkningen. Dessutom finns ofta ett intresse från hemlandets sida av att kontrollera sin befolkning i diaspora och i vissa fall också använda sina diasporor som brickor i mellanstatliga spel. Många politiska beslutsfattare och policyprofessionella är tveksamma till samverkan med diasporiska organisationer. Osäkerheten kan förmodligen förstärkas om man uteslutande tittar på diasporornas instrumentella förmåga att leverera t ex bistånd på ett effektivt, korrekt och rättssäkert sätt. Diasporor är inga hjälporganisationer – inte ens när diaspora representeras av föreningar – och det är inte i första hand professionell administration, expertis och stora samt beständiga finansiella resurser som är diasporans varumärke. En slutsats som kan dras från denna kunskapsöversikt är att diaspora istället ska sättas i ett sammanhang som mer liknar en civilsamhällelig rörelse än en organisation med fasta strukturer. Diaspora ska snarare ses som en rörelse där engagemanget för det egna folket kan ta sig många uttryck. Med tanke på omfattningen av alla de olika remitteringar som når migranternas hemländer finns här en stor potential. Det finns ett stort värde i att diaspororna utvecklar stödjande praktiker till migranter och hemlandsbefolkning. Det är viktigt för dem som behöver hjälpen att sådana praktiker får utvecklas och fortleva. Särskilt med tanke på att diasporor många gånger lyckas nå fram med hjälp där andra organisationer misslyckats.

  • 120.
    Uimonen, Paula
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Digital Narratives in Anthropology2016In: The Anthropologist as Writer: Genres and Contexts in the Twenty-First Century / [ed] Helena Wulff, New York: Berghahn Books, 2016, p. 243-253Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 121.
    González-Fernández, Tania
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Entre nodos y nudos: ambivalencias emocionales en la migración transnacional: Una aproximación etnográfica a las emociones a partir de familias transnacionales entre Bolivia y España2016In: Odisea. Revista de Estudios Migratorios, ISSN 2408-445X, no 3, p. 99-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on multi-sited ethnographic fieldwork carried out in Bolivia and Spain, this article explores the reconfiguration of family relations maintained by middle-aged migrant women in a context of transnational migration. Indeed, transnational migration triggers contradictory feelings for those leaving and for those who stay behind. The individuals interviewed repeatedly express mixed feelings of guilt, pride, sadness and satisfaction, often interwoven with meaningful silences, demands, and expectations. In this particular instance, the aim is to visibilize the emotional dimension inherent in family relations at a distance to demonstrate how migration is also affected by the weight of care responsibilities, the family life course, gender roles, or intergenerational relations.

  • 122.
    Leivestad, Hege
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Thedvall, Renita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Evaluation by Colors: Assessing “Joy at Work” in Preschools by the Colors Green, Yellow and Red2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 123.
    Pollack Sarnecki, Hannah
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Favela Funk – Ways of Being Young in the Urban Peripheries of Rio de Janeiro2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decades, funk music produced in the favelas of Rio de Janeiro has been travelling the world as a genre of contemporary cool. Construed as both hip and authentic and consumed globally, it has become a political and commercial asset in the nation’s rise to economic dominance and in Rio’s campaign to become a global city. In Brazil, however, favela funk draws the boundaries between the shanty towns of the urban margins, where it remains a social practice, and the state, by which it is condemned and sometimes prohibited for lyrics that allude to violence in an alleged glorification of gang power. This dissertation is an ethnographic inquiry into social life and power relations in one of the favelas of Rio de Janeiro. It tells the story of how a drug-dealing faction challenges the sovereignty of the state on its turf by means of both arms and the control and distribution of pleasure and fun. Funk, in this account, emerges as an immensely popular social practice and thus an instrument of drug-dealing power. By treating violence and the sexually explicit as both unifying and fragmenting in the social dynamics of this place, the dissertation uncovers the paths that favela youth tread in the context of severe poverty, vulnerability and limited access to state institutions and formal employment.

  • 124. Vandenhelsken, Mélanie
    et al.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Fluid attachments in Northeast India: introduction2016In: Asian Ethnicity, ISSN 1463-1369, E-ISSN 1469-2953, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 330-339Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This introduction presents the context and theoretical basis of fluidity of attachments in Northeast India. A large cultural, linguistic, and ethnic diversity, an international border situation, and various forms of unsettled relations with ‘mainstream India’ characterize Northeast India. These aspects form the frame of highly dynamic movements of identity and ethnicity formation. This special issue includes five papers that focus on these dynamics in terms of ‘fluidity’; they present new situations of shift between different layers of identification, re-signification of cultural practices in the process of their selection as emblems of groups‘ identity, changes in groups’ specific practices after religious conversion, and shifts from one identity to another. They show that shifts of ethnic identity are old processes in the region, whereas other levels of identification, such as lineages, clans, villages, and new ‘cosmopolitan’ identities coexist alongside ethnic identity, and gain particular salience in certain situations or points of time.

  • 125.
    Haaland Pers, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    I gränslandet mellan statsrepresentant och privatperson: En etnografisk studie av svenska privat-twittrande poliser2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna masteruppsats behandlar gruppen privat-twittrande poliser – individer som i egenskap av privatpersoner skildrar sitt förhållningssätt och sina åsikter kring sitt yrke som polis genom sociala medie-forumet Twitter. Studien är baserad på etnografiskt fältarbete utfört under hösten 2014. Sedan den svenska Polisens officiella intåg på sociala medier under början av 2010-talet har fler och fler yrkesverksamma poliser börjat använda digitala plattformar såsom Twitter, Facebook och Instagram för att skildra en egen syn på den polisiära yrkesrollen samt diskutera Polisens samhällsfunktion och verksamhetsförfarande. Till skillnad från officiella myndighetsrepresentanter på Twitter står de privat-twittrande poliserna fria från det direkta representativa ansvar som det innebär att professionellt företräda staten och behöver således inte enbart handla i enlighet med den officiella verksamhetsagendan. Trots friheten från direkt ansvar upplevs dock många av individerna, av allmänheten, som polisrepresentanter i och med deras primärt yrkesrelaterade kommunikation. I gränslandet mellan statsrepresentant och privatperson upprättas en säregen maktposition vilken, med hjälp av Twitter som socialt verktyg, förstärker de privat-twittrande polisernas möjligheter att prägla och nyansera den samhälleliga föreställningen om det polisiära varandet.

  • 126.
    Uimonen, Paula
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    "I'm a picture girl.": Mobile photography in Tanzania2016In: Digital photography and everyday life: Empirical studies on material visual practices / [ed] Edgar Gómez Cruz, Asko Lehmuskallio, New York: Routledge, 2016, p. 19-34Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter focuses on mobile photography in Tanzania, with an emphasis on the materiality of production and circulation. Shaped by the materiality of the mobile phone, a personal artefact that embodies cultural expectations of modernity and social mobility, mobile photography mediates the management of social relations, the performance of cultural identity and the creative agency of self-expression, while fuelling fears of commercial exploitation and loss of control. On the one hand, mobile phones afford possession of a camera device, allowing people to explore and engage in photography in everyday life. In a Tanzanian context, mobile photography is thus a relatively accessible entry point into modern forms of self-representation and self-expression, captured with digital technology and distributed over mobile networks. On the other hand, since mobile phones are personalized artefacts, functioning like material extensions of the self, mobile photography also carries conflicting narratives of loss and control, while the mediated construction of modern subjects is shaped by structural conditions of social inequality and cultural commodification.

  • 127.
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Imaginable Futures: Anticipatory knowledge and narratives of futurity in U.S. think tanks2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 128.
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Imaginable Futures: Anticipatory Knowledge, Evidence, and Narratives of Futurity in Think Tanks2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 129.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Into the Grid: Hydropower and Subaltern Politics in Northeast India2016In: Staking Claims: The Politics of Social Movements in Contemporary Rural India / [ed] Uday Cahndra, Daniel Taghioff, Oxford University Press, 2016, p. 64-83Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 130.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Introducing the Anthropologist as Writer: Across and Within Genres2016In: The Anthropologist as Writer: Genres and Contexts in the Twenty-First Century / [ed] Helena Wulff, New York: Berghahn Books, 2016, p. 1-18Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Taking existing conversations in anthropology as a point of departure, the mission of this volume is twofold: first, to identify different writing genres that anthropologists actually engage with; second, to argue for the usefulness and necessity for anthropologists of taking  writing as a craft seriously and of writing across and within genres in new ways. This introductory chapter contextualizes anthropological writing historically and theoretically, moves on to my own experience of writing cultural (dance) journalism as one instance of broadening anthropological writing, and concludes by offering an overview of ways of writing anthropology as discussed in the following chapters: in relation to the making of an anthropological career, ethnographic writing, journalistic and popular writing, and writing across genres. 

  • 131.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Is Good Intention Enough to Be Heard? On Appadurai's 'Capacity to Aspire'2016In: Voice and Matter Communication: Communication, Development and the Cultural Return / [ed] Oscar Hemer, Tomas Tufte, Göteborg: Nordicom, 2016, p. 225-239Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The point of departure for my contribution is a reflection over Appadurai’s approach to hope in relation to the contradictions between the politics and moralities of recognition versus redistribution and the ascription of individualising or structural explanations for the predicament of poor people. The will to give recognition is perspectivised in relation to contemporary developmental ideologies that make grassroots’ connections a moral value. However, an emphasis on hope as a basically individual characteristic or a cultural trait is also problematized in relation to the arguments of traditional ‘theories of ascription’. The explanation of other people’s actions tends to stress their own characteristics rather than the situational conditions under which they act. This may be a constraint for how even well intended academic discourse is received, transforming cultural or individual explanations into static models of the “blame-the-victim” type.

  • 132.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Jorden vi ägde: Resursanvändning, genus och privatisering av mark i nordöstra Indien2016In: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademiens årsbok, Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, 2016, p. 77-95Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 133.
    Pan, Darcy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Laboring Through Uncertainty: an ethnography of the Chinese state, labor NGOs, and development2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study sets out to understand how international development projects supporting labor activism work in contemporary China. It focuses on the lived experiences of and relationships among a group of grassroots⁠ labor NGOs in the province of Guangdong, South China; intermediary NGOs in Hong Kong; and Western funding agencies that try to bring about social change in postsocialist China where the political climate is still highly restrictive and the limits of the state’s tolerance for activism are ambiguous and uncertain. Foregrounding the notion of uncertainty, this study investigates how state control is exercised by examining a specific logic of practices, discourses, and a mode of existence that constantly mask and unmask the state. More specifically, this study explores how the uncertainty about the boundaries of permissible activism is generative of a sociopolitical realm in which variously positioned subjects mobilize around the idea of the state, which in turn leads to articulations and practices conducive to both self-censorship and a contingent space of activism. Viewed as such, the idea of uncertainty becomes an enabler through which certain kinds of practices, relationships, and networks are made possible and enacted, and through which a sociopolitical realm of intimacy is constituted by and constitutive of these relationships, networks, and practices. Situated in the domain of uncertainty, this study examines the ways in which uncertainty, both as an analytical idea and an ontological existence, produces an intimate space where labor activists not only effectively self-censor but also skillfully map the gray zone between the relatively safe and the unacceptably risky choices.

  • 134.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Magical formulae for market futures: Tales from the World Economic Forum meeting in Davos2016In: Anthropology Today, ISSN 0268-540X, E-ISSN 1467-8322, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 18-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Markets are often portrayed as being organized by way of rationalized knowledge, objective reasoning, and the fluctuations of demand and supply. In parallel, and often mixed with this modality of knowledge, magical beliefs and practices are prevalent. Business leaders, management consultants, and financial advisors are often savvy in the art of creatively blending the ‘objective facts’ of markets with magical formulae, rites, and imaginaries of the future. This article looks at the World Economic Forum's yearly Davos meeting as a large-scale ritual that engages senior executives of global corporations, top-level politicians, and civil society leaders to contribute to the overall aim of ‘improving the world’. The Davos gathering has become a vital part of the business calendar, just as much for the intensity of its networking as for the declarations of action from the speakers’ podiums. The presentations and performances in Davos work as ‘technologies of enchantment’ in Gell's (1992) sense, instilling a sense of agency onto participants. The ritual also contributes towards securing the acquiescence of individuals and organizations in a transnational network of politico-economic intentionalities. By invoking global and regional challenges and risks, discussing possible scenarios and solutions, presenters invoke a sense of urgency and contribute to the articulation of global ‘problems’ and ‘solutions’. It is proposed that the magic of Davos resides to a large extent in the ritualized form of interaction and the technologies of enchantment through which it is set up.

  • 135.
    Galli, Raoul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Medelklassernas varumärkta fack: Tjänstemännen och kampen om klassifikationen2016In: Tjänstemännen och deras rörelser: Fackligt arbete bland svenska tjänstemän ur ett hundraårigt perspektiv: En forskarantologi / [ed] Anders Björnsson, Stockholm: TAM-Arkiv , 2016Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 136.
    Høyer Leivestad, Hege
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Motility2016In: Keywords of mobility: Critical Engagements / [ed] Noel B. Salazar, Kiran Jayaram, New York: Berghahn Books, 2016, p. 133-151Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 137.
    Graham, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Official optimism in the face of an uncertain future Swedish reactions to climate change threats2016In: Environmental Change and the World's Futures: Ecologies, Ontologies and Mythologies / [ed] Jonathan Paul Marshall, Linda H. Connor, Routledge, 2016, p. 233-246Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 138.
    Nyqvist, Anette
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    On Some Nice Benefits and One Big Challenge of The Second File2016In: The anthropologist as writer: genres and contexts in the twenty-first century / [ed] Helena Wulff, New York: Berghahn Books, 2016, p. 161-171Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 139.
    Moksnes, Heidi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Papperslösa arbetare och möjligheterna för facklig organisering2016In: Irreguljär migration i Sverige: Rättigheter, vardagserfarenheter, motstånd och statliga kategoriseringar / [ed] Maja Sager, Helena Holgersson, Klara Öberg, Göteborg: Daidalos, 2016Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 140.
    Gustavsson, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Nyberg, Catarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Westin, Charles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Plurality and continuity-Understanding self-identity of persons with intellectual disability2016In: Alter;European Journal of Disability Research ;Journal Europeen de Recherche Sur le Handicap, ISSN 1875-0672, E-ISSN 1875-0680, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 310-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this article is to explore the complexity and continuity of self-identities of persons with intellectual disability. This is done by close reading of four life stories. The findings are that intellectually disabled people's self-identities are basically plural and fluid. A fruitful approach to understanding this plurality is given by positioning theory developed by Harre & Langenhove. We analyze the subject's sense of continuity in terms of our own concept of inner dialogue. Our point of departure is a review of literature with special focus on multiple identities. We distinguish between three strands of knowledge within this field: (1) sociological studies of other-defined, identities, which are hard to change; (2) psychological studies of dynamic, self-defined identities characterized by adaptation and continuity, and (3) discursive studies of fluid and plural self- and other-defined identities. The third strand has contributed significantly to the field of disability studies by transcending the classic dichotomy of normalcy or deviancy (of identity) of persons with intellectual disabilities. In our aim to probe deeper into the issues of plurality and continuity of self-defined identities, we turn to Stuart Hall's noteworthy text: Who needs identity?' (Hall & Du Gay, 1996). Hall proposes that a new direction for a theory of identity needs to build on input from discursive studies, but it should also embrace the question of how the subject maintains a sense of personal continuity.

  • 141.
    Schwabe, Siri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Promised Lands: Memory, Politics, and Palestinianness in Santiago de Chile2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is a comprehensive attempt to grapple with diasporic Palestinianness in Santiago de Chile. Based on long-term fieldwork from 2013 to 2014 within Palestinian-Chilean networks, organizations, and places it explores how an inherently political Palestinianness is constituted, expressed and explored via memory on the one hand and processes related to space and place on the other. Palestinianness is employed here as a concept that captures all that goes into maintaining a Palestinian presence in Santiago. Rather than a fixed category, Palestinianness is something that works and is worked upon in ways that are inseparable from, in this case, the context of lived life in the Chilean capital. It is a host of experiences and practices that cannot be neatly separated, but that are constantly weaved together in steadily recurrent, but sometimes disruptive and surprising patterns. By interrogating Palestinianness within the distinct context of present-day Santiago, the thesis unsettles and reconfigures conceptualizations of the relationship between memory, space, and politics. It does so by delving into the ambiguities at play in Palestinian-Chilean relationships to the often uncomfortable memory politics of post-dictatorship and the ongoing Palestinian struggle respectively. To shed light on the dynamics at play, transmemory is introduced as a concept that seeks to capture the spatial and spatially mobile qualities of memory. The thesis argues that by engaging with traveling memories of life and conflict in the old land and simultaneously rejecting involvement with continuously troubling memories of the recent Chilean past, Palestinian-Chileans form a collective politics of Palestinianness that is nonetheless distinctly marked by an inescapable Chileanness.

  • 142.
    Nyqvist, Anette
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Reform and Responsibility in the Remaking of the Swedish National Pension System: Opening the Orange Envelope2016Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book is a close up and detailed study through a national pension system. It is about how a policy, such as a national pension system, shifts responsibility from state to individuals and, thus, work to reconfigure the state – citizen relationship. The book reads as an ethnographic example of how contemporary power works by way of new forms of governance; it is an exploration into the art of governing and it includes the governed subjects – the citizens – of a large scale governmental policy process.

    With Sweden’s recently reformed national pension system as the illustrative example I depict how new forms of governance effectively shift responsibility from state level to an individual level. More specifically, I shed light on how politicians, technocrats and bureaucrats work to educate and foster the general public into responsible, hard working and financially literate citizens. I also show that such attempts are not readily accepted or adopted by the citizens at the receiving end of the pension policy and instead of providing stability and security this social security policy invokes a sense of insecurity in Swedish citizens. 

  • 143.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Södertörn University College, Sweden.
    Risk, resilience, and alternative futures: Scenario-building at the World Economic Forum2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The implications of globalization and geopolitical shifts are central concerns in think tanks and other organizations geared to producing knowledge about the contemporary world. The World Economic Forum, a nonprofit international organization headquartered in Geneva, concentrates a large part of its work around the production of The Global Risks Report. The paper discusses the The Global Risks Report and the models of alternative futures outlined in the report, as examples of organizational scenario-building. The report draws on expertise available within the different communities and knowledge networks created by the WEF and builds on research, projects, debates and initiatives piloted by the organization. It is suggested that the risk scenarios articulate a particular form of ‘anticipatory knowledge’, geared to contribute to the shaping of political priorities and agendas. The scenarios aim to shape perceptions of what constitute ‘global problems’, and how they might best be addressed and governed and confer a degree of agency onto the organization and its partner organizations, i.e. the world’s largest transnational corporations. Hence, they contribute to anticipatory governance, i.e. governance geared to integrate imaginaries of the future into regulatory processes.

  • 144. Nouwen, Ward
    et al.
    Van Praag, Lore
    Van Caudenberg, Rut
    Clycq, Noel
    Timmerman, Christiane
    Björklöf, Marie (Contributor)
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Strömberg, Isabella (Contributor)
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    School-based Prevention and Intervention Measures and Alternative Learning Approaches to Reduce Early School Leaving2016Report (Other academic)
  • 145.
    Macek, Ivana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Skam, skuld och upprättelse2016In: Krig/fred: RJ:s årsbok 2016/2017 / [ed] Jenny Björkman, Arne Jarrick, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2016, p. 151-167Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 146.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Copenhagen Business School, Denmark.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Södertörn University College, Sweden.
    Small places, big stakes: "Meetings" as moments of ethnographic momentum2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The World Economic Forum is essentially a world of meetings: staged, circumvented, formal, organized meetings to which access is tightly restricted. The annual Davos meeting, the WEF show case meeting, is also a microcosm of the organization, set up in a small place but speaking to bigger issues. Ethnographic fieldwork in organizations such as the WEF – and more broadly incorporations, state agencies, and international organizations – often involves doing fieldwork in workshops, at ceremonies, and at other staged, formal events. In addition, such fieldwork tends to be multilocal, mobile, and discontinuous. What, if anything, can we learn from doing ethnography in such small, temporary meeting places, where we may not even have full access?

    The paper shows that researching an organization such as the WEF is as methodologically and theoretical challenging as it is rewarding. It is argued that to understand the practices constituting meetings we need to broaden the perspective of the meeting as a phenomenon. The meeting as research locus should not be seen as a given entity, but as a contingent and continually constructed social arena. In the WEF case the meeting is both a continuous organizing effort, and a social arena, temporarily bounded in time and space.

  • 147.
    Behtoui, Alireza
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Neergaard, Anders
    Social capital and the educational achievement of young people in Sweden2016In: British Journal of Sociology of Education, ISSN 0142-5692, E-ISSN 1465-3346, Vol. 37, no 7, p. 947-969Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on Bourdieu's conceptualization of social capital (the social stratification perspective), this study examines the impact of social capital on the educational outcomes of young people in Sweden, with a focus on the extra-familial aspect of social capital - that is, social capital generated by parental networks and active membership in various social organizations and friendship networks. The results indicate that the class background of respondents is the main predictor of access to all three forms of extra-familial social capital. However, after controlling for class background, the children of racialized immigrant groups are more likely to have access to more types of social capital than others. All three aspects of extra-familial social capital positively influence the educational performance of pupils.

  • 148.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Anthropologist as Writer: Genres and Contexts in the Twenty-First Century2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Writing is crucial to anthropology, but which genres are anthropologists expected to master in the 21th century? This book explores how anthropological writing shapes the intellectual content of the discipline and academic careers. First, chapters identify the different writing genres and contexts anthropologists actually engage with. Second, this book argues for the usefulness and necessity of taking seriously the idea of writing as a craft and of writing across and within genres in new ways. Although academic writing is an anthropologist's primary genre, they also write in many others, from drafting administrative texts and filing reports to composing ethnographically inspired journalism and fiction.

  • 149.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Forest of Our Lives: In and Out of Political Ecology2016In: Conservation and Society, ISSN 0972-4923, E-ISSN 0975-3133, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 380-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, I seek to bring together a number of environmental histories to think about the place of forest in our lives. It is partly autobiographical in the sense that it concerns forest issues that 1, for various reasons, have been entangled with recently. These are the making of carbon (REDD+) forests in Northeast India, preservation of the urban forests and planting of indigenous trees in Karura forests in Nairobi, Kenya, and the transformation of Swedish forests into vast industrial plantations. I come to these issues with little knowledge about the forest ecology or the flora and fauna, as such, but rather as a scholar with earlier experience of analysis of the social and political dynamics involved in conflicts over forests, that is, how differently powered actors seek to appropriate, stake claims to or control the forest. Hence, my point of departure and analytical framework is largely that of political ecology. In a conversation about the work of the anthropologist Brian Morris, I will point to the thinness of such an approach and open up aspects that are critical to Morris' way of engaging with the interactions of people, plants, insects, and animals. This, I will argue, is a truly grounded environmental anthropology.

  • 150.
    Nyqvist, Anette
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Many Faces of Gold2016Conference paper (Other academic)
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