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  • 101. Preiser, Rika
    et al.
    Biggs, Reinette
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    De Vos, Alta
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Social-ecological systems as complex adaptive systems: organizing principles for advancing research methods and approaches2018Inngår i: Ecology & Society, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 23, nr 4, artikkel-id 46Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The study of social-ecological systems (SES) has been significantly shaped by insights from research on complex adaptive systems (CAS). We offer a brief overview of the conceptual integration of CAS research and its implications for the advancement of SES studies and methods. We propose a conceptual typology of six organizing principles of CAS based on a comparison of leading scholars' classifications of CAS features and properties. This typology clusters together similar underlying organizing principles of the features and attributes of CAS, and serves as a heuristic framework for identifying methods and approaches that account for the key features of SES. These principles can help identify appropriate methods and approaches for studying SES. We discuss three main implications of studying and engaging with SES as CAS. First, there needs to be a shift in focus when studying the dynamics and interactions in SES, to better capture the nature of the organizing principles that characterize SES behavior. Second, realizing that the nature of the intertwined social-ecological relations is complex has real consequences for how we choose methods and practical approaches for observing and studying SES interactions. Third, engagement with SES as CAS poses normative challenges for problem-oriented researchers and practitioners taking on real-world challenges.

  • 102.
    Queiroz, Cibele
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. University of Lisbon, Portugal.
    Beilin, Ruth
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Lindborg, Regina
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturgeografi och kvartärgeologi (INK).
    Farmland abandonment: Threat or opportunity for biodiversity conservation? A global review2014Inngår i: Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, ISSN 1540-9295, E-ISSN 1540-9309, Vol. 12, nr 5, s. 288-296Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Farmland abandonment is changing rural landscapes worldwide, but its impacts on biodiversity are still being debated in the scientific literature. While some researchers see it as a threat to biodiversity, others view it as an opportunity for habitat regeneration. We reviewed 276 published studies describing various effects of farmland abandonment on biodiversity and found that a study's geographic region, selected metrics, assessed taxa, and conservation focus significantly affected how those impacts were reported. Countries in Eurasia and the New World reported mainly negative and positive effects of farmland abandonment on biodiversity, respectively. Notably, contrasting impacts were recorded in different agricultural regions of the world that were otherwise similar in land-use and biodiversity characteristics. We showed that the conservation focus (pre- or post-abandonment) in different regions is an important factor influencing how scientists address the abandonment issue, and this may affect how land-use policies are defined in agricultural landscapes.

  • 103.
    Reyers, Belinda
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Moore, Michele-Lee
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. University of Victoria, Canada.
    Biggs, Reinette
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Galaz, Victor
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Social-Ecological Systems Insights for Navigating the Dynamics of the Anthropocene2018Inngår i: Annual Review Environment and Resources, ISSN 1543-5938, E-ISSN 1545-2050, Vol. 43, s. 267-289Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Social-ecological systems (SES) research offers new theory and evidence to transform sustainable development to better contend with the challenges of the Anthropocene. Four insights from contemporary SES literature on (a) intertwined SES, (b) cross-scale dynamics, (c) systemic tipping points, and (d) transformational change are explored. Based on these insights, shifts in sustainable development practice are suggested to recognize and govern the complex and codeveloping social and ecological aspects of development challenges. The potential susceptibility of SES to nonlinear systemic reconfigurations is highlighted, as well as the opportunities, agency, and capacities required to foster reconfigurative transformations for sustainable development. SES research proposes the need for diverse values and beliefs that are more in tune with the deep, dynamic connections between social and ecological systems to transform development practice and to support capacities to deal with shocks and surprises. From these perspectives, SES research offers new outlooks, practices, and novel opportunity spaces from which to address the challenges of the Anthropocene.

  • 104.
    Rockström, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Falkenmark, Malin
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Allan, T.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Gordon, Line
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Jagerskog, A.
    Kummu, M.
    Lannerstad, M.
    Meybeck, M.
    Molden, D.
    Postel, S.
    Savenije, H. H. G.
    Svedin, Uno
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Turton, A.
    Varis, O.
    The unfolding water drama in the Anthropocene: towards a resilience-based perspective on water for global sustainability2014Inngår i: Ecohydrology, ISSN 1936-0584, E-ISSN 1936-0592, Vol. 7, nr 5, s. 1249-1261Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The human influence on the global hydrological cycle is now the dominant force behind changes in water resources across the world and in regulating the resilience of the Earth system. The rise in human pressures on global freshwater resources is in par with other anthropogenic changes in the Earth system (from climate to ecosystem change), which has prompted science to suggest that humanity has entered a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene. This paper focuses on the critical role of water for resilience of social-ecological systems across scales, by avoiding major regime shifts away from stable environmental conditions, and in safeguarding life-support systems for human wellbeing. It highlights the dramatic increase of water crowding: near-future challenges for global water security and expansion of food production in competition with carbon sequestration and biofuel production. It addresses the human alterations of rainfall stability, due to both land-use changes and climate change, the ongoing overuse of blue water, reflected in river depletion, expanding river basin closure, groundwater overexploitation and water pollution risks. The rising water turbulence in the Anthropocene changes the water research and policy agenda, from a water-resource efficiency to a water resilience focus. This includes integrated land and water stewardship to sustain wetness-dependent ecological functions at the landscape scale and a stronger emphasis on green water management for ecosystem services. A new paradigm of water governance emerges, encouraging land-use practices that explicitly take account of the multifunctional roles of water, with adequate attention to planetary freshwater boundaries and cross-scale interactions.

  • 105.
    Rockström, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Falkenmark, Malin
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Folke, Carl
    Lannerstad, Mats
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Barron, Jennie
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Enfors, Elin
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Gordon, Line
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Heinke, Jens
    Hoff, Holger
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Pahl-Wostl, Claudia
    Water resilience for human prosperity2014Bok (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The world's human population now constitutes the largest driving force of changes to the biosphere. Emerging water challenges require new ideas for governance and management of water resources in the context of rapid global change. This book presents a new approach to water resources, addressing global sustainability and focusing on socio-ecological resilience to changes. Topics covered include the risks of unexpected change, human impacts and dependence on global water, the prospects for feeding the world's population by 2050, and a pathway for the future. The book's innovative and integrated approach links green and blue freshwater with terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem functions and use. It also links changes arising from land-use alteration with the impacts of those changes on social-ecological systems and ecosystem services. This is an important, state-of-the-art resource for academic researchers and water resource professionals, and a key reference for graduate students studying water resource governance and management.

  • 106.
    Rockström, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Gordon, Line
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Falkenmark, Malin
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Engwall, Maria
    Linkages among water vapour flows, food production and terrestrial ecosystem services.1999Inngår i: Conservation Ecology, ISSN 1195-5449, Vol. 3, nr 2Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Global freshwater assessments have not addressed the linkages among water vapor flows, agricultural food production, and terrestrial ecosystem services. We perform the first bottom-up estimate of continental water vapor flows, subdivided into the major terrestrial biomes, and arrive at a total continental water vapor flow of 70,000 km3/yr (ranging from 56,000 to 84,000 km3/yr). Of this flow, 90% is attributed to forests, including woodlands (40,000 km3/yr), wetlands (1400 km3/yr), grasslands (15,100 km3/yr), and croplands (6800 km3/yr). These terrestrial biomes sustain society with essential welfare-supporting ecosystem services, including food production. By analyzing the freshwater requirements of an increasing demand for food in the year 2025, we discover a critical trade-off between flows of water vapor for food production and for other welfare-supporting ecosystem services. To reduce the risk of unintentional welfare losses, this trade-off must become embedded in intentional ecohydrological landscape management

  • 107.
    Rockström, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Germany; University of Potsdam, Germany.
    Kotzé, Louis
    Milutinović, Svetlana
    Biermann, Frank
    Brovkin, Victor
    Donges, Jonathan
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Germany.
    Ebbesson, Jonas
    Stockholms universitet, Juridiska fakulteten, Juridiska institutionen.
    French, Duncan
    Gupta, Joyeeta
    Kim, Rakhyun
    Lenton, Timothy
    Lenzi, Dominic
    Nakicenovic, Nebojsa
    Neumann, Barbara
    Schuppert, Fabian
    Winkelmann, Ricarda
    Bosselmann, Klaus
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Lucht, Wolfgang
    Schlosberg, David
    Richardson, Katherine
    Steffen, Will
    The planetary commons: A new paradigm for safeguarding Earth-regulating systems in the Anthropocene2024Inngår i: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 121, nr 5, artikkel-id e2301531121Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Anthropocene signifies the start of a no-analogue trajectory of the Earth system that is fundamentally different from the Holocene. This new trajectory is characterized by rising risks of triggering irreversible and unmanageable shifts in Earth system functioning. We urgently need a new global approach to safeguard critical Earth system regulating functions more effectively and comprehensively. The global commons framework is the closest example of an existing approach with the aim of governing biophysical systems on Earth upon which the world collectively depends. Derived during stable Holocene conditions, the global commons framework must now evolve in the light of new Anthropocene dynamics. This requires a fundamental shift from a focus only on governing shared resources beyond national jurisdiction, to one that secures critical functions of the Earth system irrespective of national boundaries. We propose a new framework—the planetary commons—which differs from the global commons framework by including not only globally shared geographic regions but also critical biophysical systems that regulate the resilience and state, and therefore livability, on Earth. The new planetary commons should articulate and create comprehensive stewardship obligations through Earth system governance aimed at restoring and strengthening planetary resilience and justice. 

  • 108. Rockström, Johan
    et al.
    Norström, Albert V.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Matthews, Nathanial
    Biggs, Reinette (Oonsie)
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Harikishun, Ameil
    Huq, Saleemul
    Krishnan, Nisha
    Warszawski, Lila
    Nel, Deon
    Shaping a resilient future in response to COVID-192023Inngår i: Nature Sustainability, E-ISSN 2398-9629, nr 6, s. 897-907Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Science today defines resilience as the capacity to live and develop with change and uncertainty, which is well beyond just the ability to ‘bounce back’ to the status quo. It involves the capacity to absorb shocks, avoid tipping points, navigate surprise and keep options alive, and the ability to innovate and transform in the face of crises and traps. Five attributes underlie this capacity: diversity, redundancy, connectivity, inclusivity and equity, and adaptive learning. There is a mismatch between the talk of resilience recovery after COVID-19 and the latest science, which calls for major efforts to align resilience thinking with sustainable development action.

  • 109.
    Rockström, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Steffen, Will
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Noone, Kevin
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad miljövetenskap (ITM).
    Persson, Åsa
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Nykvist, Björn
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    de Wit, Chynthia
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad miljövetenskap (ITM).
    Rodhe, Henning
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Meteorologiska institutionen (MISU).
    Sörlin, Sverker
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Constanza, Robert
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Svedin, Uno
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Falkenmark, Malin
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Karlberg, Louise
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Walker, Brian
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Planetary boundaries: Exploring the safe operating space for humanity2009Inngår i: Ecology & Society, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 14, nr 2Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 110.
    Rockström, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Steffen, Will
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Noone, Kevin
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad miljövetenskap (ITM).
    Persson, Åsa
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Nykvist, Björn
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    de Wit, Cynthia
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad miljövetenskap (ITM).
    Rodhe, Henning
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Meteorologiska institutionen (MISU).
    Sörlin, Sverker
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Constanza, Robert
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Svedin, Uno
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Falkenmark, Malin
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Karlberg, Louise
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Walker, Brian
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    A safe operating space for humanity2009Inngår i: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 461, nr 24 Sept, s. 472-475Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 111. Scheffer, Marten
    et al.
    Bascompte, Jordi
    Bjordam, Tone K.
    Carpenter, Stephen R.
    Clarke, Laurie B.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Marquet, Pablo
    Mazzeo, Nestor
    Meerhoff, Mariana
    Sala, Osvaldo
    Westley, Frances R.
    Dual thinking for scientists2015Inngår i: Ecology & Society, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 20, nr 2, artikkel-id 3Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies provide compelling evidence for the idea that creative thinking draws upon two kinds of processes linked to distinct physiological features, and stimulated under different conditions. In short, the fast system-I produces intuition whereas the slow and deliberate system-II produces reasoning. System-I can help see novel solutions and associations instantaneously, but is prone to error. System-II has other biases, but can help checking and modifying the system-I results. Although thinking is the core business of science, the accepted ways of doing our work focus almost entirely on facilitating system-II. We discuss the role of system-I thinking in past scientific breakthroughs, and argue that scientific progress may be catalyzed by creating conditions for such associative intuitive thinking in our academic lives and in education. Unstructured socializing time, education for daring exploration, and cooperation with the arts are among the potential elements. Because such activities may be looked upon as procrastination rather than work, deliberate effort is needed to counteract our systematic bias.

  • 112.
    Schill, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Anderies, John M.
    Lindahl, Therese
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Polasky, Stephen
    Cárdenas, Juan Camilo
    Crépin, Anne-Sophie
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Janssen, Marco A.
    Norberg, Jon
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Schlüter, Maja
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    A more dynamic understanding of human behaviour for the Anthropocene2019Inngår i: Nature Sustainability, E-ISSN 2398-9629, Vol. 2, nr 12, s. 1075-1082Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Human behaviour is of profound significance in shaping pathways towards sustainability. Yet, the approach to understanding human behaviour in many fields remains reliant on overly simplistic models. For a better understanding of the interface between human behaviour and sustainability, we take work in behavioural economics and cognitive psychology as a starting point, but argue for an expansion of this work by adopting a more dynamic and systemic understanding of human behaviour, that is, as part of complex adaptive systems. A complex adaptive systems approach allows us to capture behaviour as ''enculturated' and 'enearthed', co-evolving with socio-cultural and biophysical contexts. Connecting human behaviour and context through a complex adaptive systems lens is critical to inform environmental governance and management for sustainability, and ultimately to better understand the dynamics of the Anthropocene itself.

  • 113.
    Schlüter, Maja
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Haider, L. Jamila
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Lade, Steven J.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Australian National University, Australia.
    Lindkvist, Emilie
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Martin, Romina
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Orach, Kirill
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Wijermans, Nanda
    Univ Stockholm, Stockholm Resilience Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Capturing emergent phenomena in social-ecological systems: an analytical framework2019Inngår i: Ecology & Society, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 24, nr 3, artikkel-id 11Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Social-ecological systems (SES) are complex adaptive systems. Social-ecological system phenomena, such as regime shifts, transformations, or traps, emerge from interactions among and between human and nonhuman entities within and across scales. Analyses of SES phenomena thus require approaches that can account for (1) the intertwinedness of social and ecological processes and (2) the ways they jointly give rise to emergent social-ecological patterns, structures, and dynamics that feedback on the entities and processes that generated them. We have developed a framework of linked action situations (AS) as a tool to capture those interactions that are hypothesized to have jointly and dynamically generated a social-ecological phenomenon of interest. The framework extends the concept of an action situation to provide a conceptualization of SES that focusses on social-ecological interactions and their links across levels. The aim of our SE-AS (social-ecological action situations) framework is to support a process of developing hypotheses about configurations of ASs that may explain an emergent social-ecological phenomenon. We suggest six social-ecological ASs along with social and ecological action situations that can commonly be found in natural resource or ecosystem management contexts. We test the ability of the framework to structure an analysis of processes of emergence by applying it to different case studies of regime shifts, traps, and sustainable resource use. The framework goes beyond existing frameworks and approaches, such as the SES framework or causal loop diagrams, by establishing a way of analyzing SES that focuses on the interplay of social-ecological interactions with the emergent outcomes they produce. We conclude by discussing the added value of the framework and discussing the different purposes it can serve: from supporting the development of theories of the emergence of social-ecological phenomena, enhancing transparency of SES understandings to serving as a boundary object for interdisciplinary knowledge integration.

  • 114.
    Schultz, Lisen
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Duit, Andreas
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Statsvetenskapliga institutionen.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Participation, Adaptive Co-management, and Management Performance in the World Network of Biosphere Reserves2011Inngår i: World Development, ISSN 0305-750X, E-ISSN 1873-5991, Vol. 39, nr 4, s. 662-671Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Analyzing survey-responses from 146 Biosphere Reserves in 55 countries we investigate how stakeholder participation and adaptive co-management practices are linked to management performance. Effectiveness in conventional conservation was positively affected by participation of scientists, but negatively affected by participation of volunteers. Effectiveness in sustainable development goals was associated to participation by local inhabitants. Adaptive co-management practices were associated with a higher level of effectiveness in achieving development goals, and this higher effectiveness did not seem to be at the expense of biodiversity conservation.

  • 115.
    Schultz, Lisen
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Olsson, Per
    Enhancing ecosystem management through social-ecological inventories: lessons from Kristianstads Vattenrike, Sweden2007Inngår i: Environmental Conservation, ISSN 0376-8929, Vol. 34, nr 2, s. 140-152Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental policy increasingly emphasizes involvement of local users and land owners in ecosystem management, but conservation planning is still largely a bureaucratic-scientific endeavour of identifying biological values for protection. Neither biological inventories nor stakeholder analyses, that tend to focus on conflicting interests, capture human resources in the landscape or the social structures and processes underlying biological conservation values. Social-ecological inventories are therefore proposed during the preparation phase of conservation projects as a means to identify people with ecosystem knowledge that practise ecosystem management. The method presented here focuses on local steward groups acting outside official management plans. In a social-ecological inventory of a river basin of southern Sweden, local steward groups, their ecosystem management activities, motives and links to other actors involved in ecosystem management were identified through interviews, participatory observations and a review of documents and other written material. Several hundred active local stewards were organized in 10 local steward groups that managed and monitored a range of ecosystem services at different spatial scales. Contributions of local stewards included on-site ecosystem management, long-term and detailed monitoring of species and ecosystem dynamics, local ecological knowledge, public support for ecosystem management and specialized networks. Two conservation projects are used to illustrate how local steward groups came together in multi-level networks and collaborated around specific conservation issues. The projects have been linked to ecosystem management at the landscape level through a flexible municipality organization, the Ecomuseum Kristianstads Vattenrike (EKV). EKV has acted as a ‘bridging organization’, coordinating and connecting many of the local steward groups to organizations and institutions at other levels. The process has been guided by social capital and shared visions for the whole landscape. The study shows that ecosystem management likely relies on multi-level collaboration and social-ecological inventories may help identify actors that are fundamental in such management systems. Social-ecological inventories should be employed in any attempt to develop and implement ecosystem management.

  • 116.
    Schultz, Lisen
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Science, Sweden; Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Österblom, Henrik
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Olsson, Per
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Adaptive governance, ecosystem management, and natural capital2015Inngår i: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 112, nr 24, s. 7369-7374Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    To gain insights into the effects of adaptive governance on natural capital, we compare three well-studied initiatives; a landscape in Southern Sweden, the Great Barrier Reef in Australia, and fisheries in the Southern Ocean. We assess changes in natural capital and ecosystem services related to these social-ecological governance approaches to ecosystem management and investigate their capacity to respond to change and new challenges. The adaptive governance initiatives are compared with other efforts aimed at conservation and sustainable use of natural capital: Natura 2000 in Europe, lobster fisheries in the Gulf of Maine, North America, and fisheries in Europe. In contrast to these efforts, we found that the adaptive governance cases developed capacity to perform ecosystem management, manage multiple ecosystem services, and monitor, communicate, and respond to ecosystem-wide changes at landscape and seascape levels with visible effects on natural capital. They enabled actors to collaborate across diverse interests, sectors, and institutional arrangements and detect opportunities and problems as they developed while nurturing adaptive capacity to deal with them. They all spanned local to international levels of decision making, thus representing multilevel governance systems for managing natural capital. As with any governance system, internal changes and external drivers of global impacts and demands will continue to challenge the long-term success of such initiatives.

  • 117. Steffen, Will
    et al.
    Persson, Åsa
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Deutsch, Lisa
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Zalasiewicz, J.
    Crumley, Carole
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Gordon, Line
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Rockström, Johan
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Svedin, Uno
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    The anthropocene: from global change to planetary stewardship2011Inngår i: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 40, nr 7, s. 739-761Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past century, the total material wealth of humanity has been enhanced. However, in the twenty-first century, we face scarcity in critical resources, the degradation of ecosystem services, and the erosion of the planet's capability to absorb our wastes. Equity issues remain stubbornly difficult to solve. This situation is novel in its speed, its global scale and its threat to the resilience of the Earth System. The advent of the Anthropence, the time interval in which human activities now rival global geophysical processes, suggests that we need to fundamentally alter our relationship with the planet we inhabit. Many approaches could be adopted, ranging from geo-engineering solutions that purposefully manipulate parts of the Earth System to becoming active stewards of our own life support system. The Anthropocene is a reminder that the Holocene, during which complex human societies have developed, has been a stable, accommodating environment and is the only state of the Earth System that we know for sure can support contemporary society. The need to achieve effective planetary stewardship is urgent. As we go further into the Anthropocene, we risk driving the Earth System onto a trajectory toward more hostile states from which we cannot easily return.

  • 118.
    Steffen, Will
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Australian National University, Australia.
    Richardson, Katherine
    Rockström, Johan
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Cornell, Sarah E.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Fetzer, Ingo
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Bennett, Elena M.
    Biggs, Reinette
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stellenbosch University, South Africa .
    Carpenter, Stephen R.
    de Vries, Wim
    de Wit, Cynthia A.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för miljövetenskap och analytisk kemi.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Gerten, Dieter
    Heinke, Jens
    Mace, Georgina M.
    Persson, Linn M.
    Ramanathan, Veerabhadran
    Reyers, Belinda
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Natural Resources and the Environment, CSIR, South Africa.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    Planetary boundaries: Guiding human development on a changing planet2015Inngår i: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 347, nr 6223Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The planetary boundaries framework defines a safe operating space for humanity based on the intrinsic biophysical processes that regulate the stability of the Earth system. Here, we revise and update the planetary boundary framework, with a focus on the underpinning biophysical science, based on targeted input from expert research communities and on more general scientific advances over the past 5 years. Several of the boundaries now have a two-tier approach, reflecting the importance of cross-scale interactions and the regional-level heterogeneity of the processes that underpin the boundaries. Two core boundaries-climate change and biosphere integrity-have been identified, each of which has the potential on its own to drive the Earth system into a new state should they be substantially and persistently transgressed.

  • 119.
    Steffen, Will
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Australian National University, Australia.
    Rockström, Johan
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Richardson, Katherine
    Lenton, Timothy M.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Royal Swedish Academy of Science, Sweden.
    Liverman, Diana
    Summerhayes, Colin P.
    Barnosky, Anthony D.
    Cornell, Sarah E.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Crucifix, Michel
    Donges, Jonathan F.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Germany.
    Fetzer, Ingo
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Lade, Steven J.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Australian National University, Australia.
    Scheffer, Marten
    Winkelmann, Ricarda
    Schellnhuber, Hans Joachim
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Australian National University, Australia.
    Trajectories of the Earth System in the Anthropocene2018Inngår i: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 115, nr 33, s. 8252-8259Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We explore the risk that self-reinforcing feedbacks could push the Earth System toward a planetary threshold that, if crossed, could prevent stabilization of the climate at intermediate temperature rises and cause continued warming on a Hothouse Earth pathway even as human emissions are reduced. Crossing the threshold would lead to a much higher global average temperature than any interglacial in the past 1.2 million years and to sea levels significantly higher than at any time in the Holocene. We examine the evidence that such a threshold might exist and where it might be. If the threshold is crossed, the resulting trajectory would likely cause serious disruptions to ecosystems, society, and economies. Collective human action is required to steer the Earth System away from a potential threshold and stabilize it in a habitable interglacial-like state. Such action entails stewardship of the entire Earth System-biosphere, climate, and societies-and could include decarbonization of the global economy, enhancement of biosphere carbon sinks, behavioral changes, technological innovations, new governance arrangements, and transformed social values.

  • 120. Steneck, R. S.
    et al.
    Hughes, T. P.
    Cinner, J. E.
    Adger, W. N.
    Arnold, S. N.
    Berkes, F.
    Boudreau, S. A.
    Brown, K.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Gunderson, L.
    Olsson, Per
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Scheffer, M.
    Stephenson, E.
    Walker, B.
    Wilson, J.
    Worm, B.
    Creation of a Gilded Trap by the High Economic Value of the Maine Lobster Fishery2011Inngår i: Conservation Biology, ISSN 0888-8892, E-ISSN 1523-1739, Vol. 25, nr 5, s. 904-912Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Unsustainable fishing simplifies food chains and, as with aquaculture, can result in reliance on a few economically valuable species. This lack of diversity may increase risks of ecological and economic disruptions. Centuries of intense fishing have extirpated most apex predators in the Gulf of Maine (United States and Canada), effectively creating an American lobster (Homarus americanus) monoculture. Over the past 20 years, the economic diversity of marine resources harvested in Maine has declined by almost 70%. Today, over 80% of the value of Maine's fish and seafood landings is from highly abundant lobsters. Inflation-corrected income from lobsters in Maine has steadily increased by nearly 400% since 1985. Fisheries managers, policy makers, and fishers view this as a success. However, such lucrative monocultures increase the social and ecological consequences of future declines in lobsters. In southern New England, disease and stresses related to increases in ocean temperature resulted in more than a 70% decline in lobster abundance, prompting managers to propose closing that fishery. A similar collapse in Maine could fundamentally disrupt the social and economic foundation of its coast. We suggest the current success of Maine's lobster fishery is a gilded trap. Gilded traps are a type of social trap in which collective actions resulting from economically attractive opportunities outweigh concerns over associated social and ecological risks or consequences. Large financial gain creates a strong reinforcing feedback that deepens the trap. Avoiding or escaping gilded traps requires managing for increased biological and economic diversity. This is difficult to do prior to a crisis while financial incentives for maintaining the status quo are large. The long-term challenge is to shift fisheries management away from single species toward integrated social-ecological approaches that diversify local ecosystems, societies, and economies.

  • 121. Söderqvist, T.
    et al.
    Sundbaum, Cecilia
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Mäler, Karl-Göran
    Bringing Ecologists and Economists Together: the Askö Meetings and Papers2011Bok (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The Askö meetings are an annual forum where leading economists and ecologists come together to discuss the myriad issues and challenges surrounding sustainable development. Organized by the Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics and held on the Island of Askö in the Stockholm Archipelago, Sweden, the meetings facilitate a dialogue in which various players with differing perspectives can arrive at common conclusions and solutions that benefit us all.   Bringing Ecologists and Economists Together showcases ten papers chosen from Askö meetings held from 1993 to 2002. Most of them were written for a wide audience and published in well-renowned journals, and each one is introduced by an ecologist and an economist who place the papers in a contemporary context. Lucid and accessible, these papers are important reading for students and researchers in ecology, economics and environmental sciences as well as anyone else interested in how ecologists and economists can agree upon crucial sustainability issues.   "Meeting the sustainability challenge on our human-dominated planet requires creative, interdisciplinary collaborations like those that take place at the Askö meetings. The results of such collaborations, like this collection of Askö-essays and commentaries, represent a significant contribution to our future."   Jane Lubchenco, Professor of Marine Biology and Oregon State University Distinguished Professor of Zoology and the administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)   “The Askö meetings were extraordinary and full of impassioned debate. The bridges we did find in rare moments were formed between scholars who recognized the need for a minimum level of complexity, enjoying exploring the full range of non-linear behavior, with unexpected flips and unknowns, where transformations are possible, where novelty dominates. Such periods are often viewed as a curse, not as an opportunity, but these wonderful, flexible meetings opened some of our eyes.”    Buzz Holling, Professor in Ecological Sciences at the University of Florida   “The bright minds that the Askö meetings bring together have shaped an essential cross-border research agenda and societal discussion. It is wonderful to read this overview and realize how relevant these ideas still are.”   Aart de Zeeuw, Professor in Environmental Economics at Tilburg University and Director, Tilburg Sustainability Institute

  • 122.
    Søgaard Jørgensen, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Carroll, Scott P.
    Evolution in the Anthropocene: Informing Governance and Policy2019Inngår i: Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution and Systematics, ISSN 1543-592X, E-ISSN 1545-2069, Vol. 50, s. 527-546Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Anthropocene biosphere constitutes an unprecedented phase in the evolution of life on Earth with one species, humans, exerting extensive control. The increasing intensity of anthropogenic forces in the twenty-first century has widespread implications for attempts to govern both human-dominated ecosystems and the last remaining wild ecosystems. Here, we review how evolutionary biology can inform governance and policies in the Anthropocene, focusing on five governance challenges that span biodiversity, environmental management, food and other biomass production, and human health. The five challenges are: (a) evolutionary feedbacks, (b) maintaining resilience, (c) alleviating constraints, (d) coevolutionary disruption, and (e) biotechnology. Strategies for governing these dynamics will themselves have to be coevolutionary, as eco-evolutionary and social dynamics change in response to each other.

  • 123.
    Søgaard Jørgensen, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Patrik J. G.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden; WorldFish, Malaysia.
    Malmros, Karin
    Troell, Max
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Zorzet, Anna
    Aktipis, Athena
    Brown, Zachary
    Corriere, Yves
    Downes, Sharon
    Dunn, Robert R.
    Epstein, Graham
    Frisvold, George
    Grohn, Yrjo
    Gujar, Govind Tikaramsa
    Hawthorne, David
    Jasovsky, Dusan
    Klein, Eili Y.
    Klein, Franziska
    Lhermie, Guillaume
    Mota-Sanchez, David
    Omoto, Celso
    Scott, H. Morgan
    Wemli, Didier
    Carroll, Scott P.
    Coevolutionary Governance of Antibiotic and Pesticide Resistance2020Inngår i: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 35, nr 6, s. 484-494Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Development of new biocides has dominated human responses to evolution of antibiotic and pesticide resistance. Increasing and uniform biocide use, the spread of resistance genes, and the lack of new classes of compounds indicate the importance of navigating toward more sustainable coevolutionary dynamics between human culture and species that evolve resistance. To inform this challenge, we introduce the concept of coevolutionary governance and propose three priorities for its implementation: (i) new norms and mental models for lowering use, (ii) diversifying practices to reduce directional selection, and (iii) investment in collective action institutions to govern connectivity. We highlight the availability of solutions that facilitate broader sustainable development, which for antibiotic resistance include improved sanitation and hygiene, strong health systems, and decreased meat consumption.

  • 124.
    Søgaard Jørgensen, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Jansen, Raf E. V.
    Avila Ortega, Daniel Itzamna
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Wang-Erlandsson, Lan
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Bolincentret för klimatforskning (tills m KTH & SMHI). Member of the Leibnitz Association, Potsdam, Germany.
    Donges, Jonathan
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Member of the Leibnitz Association, Potsdam, Germany.
    Österblom, Henrik
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Olsson, Per
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Nyström, Magnus
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Lade, Steven J.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholms universitet, Nordiska institutet för teoretisk fysik (Nordita). Australian National University, Canberra, Australia.
    Hahn, Thomas
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Peterson, Garry
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Crépin, Anne-Sophie
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Evolution of the polycrisis: Anthropocene traps that challenge global sustainability2023Inngår i: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 379, nr 1893, artikkel-id 20220261Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Anthropocene is characterized by accelerating change and global challenges of increasing complexity. Inspired by what some have called a polycrisis, we explore whether the human trajectory of increasing complexity and influence on the Earth system could become a form of trap for humanity. Based on an adaptation of the evolutionary traps concept to a global human context, we present results from a participatory mapping. We identify 14 traps and categorize them as either global, technology or structural traps. An assessment reveals that 12 traps (86%) could be in an advanced phase of trapping with high risk of hard-to-reverse lock-ins and growing risks of negative impacts on human well-being. Ten traps (71%) currently see growing trends in their indicators. Revealing the systemic nature of the polycrisis, we assess that Anthropocene traps often interact reinforcingly (45% of pairwise interactions), and rarely in a dampening fashion (3%). We end by discussing capacities that will be important for navigating these systemic challenges in pursuit of global sustainability. Doing so, we introduce evolvability as a unifying concept for such research between the sustainability and evolutionary sciences.

  • 125.
    Søgaard Jørgensen, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Wernli, Didier
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Carroll, Scott P.
    Changing antibiotic resistance: sustainability transformation to a pro-microbial planet2017Inngår i: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, ISSN 1877-3435, E-ISSN 1877-3443, Vol. 25, s. 66-76Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Decades of overuse, misuse, and environmental antibiotic pollution has increased the global pool of resistant bacteria. With estimates of hundreds of thousands of annual human deaths and a lack of new drugs to replace old ones, antimicrobial resistance probably constitutes one of the greatest human health and sustainability challenges of the 21st century. To safeguard treatable infections, a deliberate social-ecological transformation is needed toward stewardship of the global microbiome and long-term sustainable use of antibiotics. We review the foundation for such a transformation using recent insights from sustainability science, evolutionary biology and health, and the understanding of human interactions with microbes as two intertwined complex adaptive systems. A coherent strategy should acknowledge humans as the source of the world's strongest evolutionary force, reflect that antibiotics are building blocks of modern health systems, and strive to build social-ecological resilience to minimize levels of resistance and avoid over dependency on innovation of new drugs. Bottom up opportunities for seeding the transformation include participatory monitoring and stewardship of our personal and environmental microbiomes, as well as collective consumer action. Top down priorities include regular international institutions to coordinate multi-level action.

  • 126.
    Tengö, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Hill, Rosemary
    Malmer, Pernilla
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Raymond, Christopher M.
    Spierenburg, Marja
    Danielsen, Finn
    Elmqvist, Thomas
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Weaving knowledge systems in IPBES, CBD and beyond-lessons learned for sustainability2017Inngår i: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, ISSN 1877-3435, E-ISSN 1877-3443, Vol. 26-27, s. 17-25Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Indigenous peoples and local communities live in, manage and own vast areas often rich in biodiversity and critical for ecosystem services. Bridging indigenous and local knowledge systems with scientific knowledge systems is vital to enhance knowledge, practice, and ethics to move towards sustainability at multiple scales. We focus on international science-policy processes and present a framework for evidence-based guidance on how tasks to mobilise, translate, negotiate, synthesise and apply multiple forms of evidence can bridge knowledge systems. Effective engagement of actors, institutions and knowledge-sharing processes is crucial in each of these tasks. We use examples from the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) to illustrate and discuss our framework.

  • 127.
    Troell, Max
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Science, Sweden.
    Naylor, Rosamond L.
    Metian, Marc
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Beveridge, Malcolm
    Tyedmers, Peter H.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Science, Sweden.
    Arrow, Kenneth J.
    Barrett, Scott
    Crépin, Anne-Sophie
    Ehrlich, Paul R.
    Gren, Åsa
    Kautsky, Nils
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Levin, Simon A.
    Nyborg, Karine
    Österblom, Henrik
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Polasky, Stephen
    Scheffer, Marten
    Walker, Brian H.
    Xepapadeas, Tasos
    de Zeeuw, Aart
    Does aquaculture add resilience to the global food system?2014Inngår i: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 111, nr 37, s. 13257-13263Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aquaculture is the fastest growing food sector and continues to expand alongside terrestrial crop and livestock production. Using portfolio theory as a conceptual framework, we explore how current interconnections between the aquaculture, crop, livestock, and fisheries sectors act as an impediment to, or an opportunity for, enhanced resilience in the global food system given increased resource scarcity and climate change. Aquaculture can potentially enhance resilience through improved resource use efficiencies and increased diversification of farmed species, locales of production, and feeding strategies. However, aquaculture's reliance on terrestrial crops and wild fish for feeds, its dependence on freshwater and land for culture sites, and its broad array of environmental impacts diminishes its ability to add resilience. Feeds for livestock and farmed fish that are fed rely largely on the same crops, although the fraction destined for aquaculture is presently small (similar to 4%). As demand for high-value fed aquaculture products grows, competition for these crops will also rise, as will the demand for wild fish as feed inputs. Many of these crops and forage fish are also consumed directly by humans and provide essential nutrition for low-income households. Their rising use in aquafeeds has the potential to increase price levels and volatility, worsening food insecurity among the most vulnerable populations. Although the diversification of global food production systems that includes aquaculture offers promise for enhanced resilience, such promise will not be realized if government policies fail to provide adequate incentives for resource efficiency, equity, and environmental protection.

  • 128. van den Bergh, Jeroen
    et al.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Polasky, Stephen
    Scheffer, Marten
    Steffen, Will
    What if solar energy becomes really cheap? A thought experiment on environmental problem shifting2015Inngår i: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, ISSN 1877-3435, E-ISSN 1877-3443, Vol. 14, s. 170-179Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Solving one environmental problem may often invoke or intensify another one. Such environmental problem shifting (EPS) is a neglected topic in global sustainability research. Indeed, it is difficult to study as it requires the merging of insights from various research areas. Here we identify relevant studies, and provide an illustration and guidelines for the systematic study of EPS. As a modest thought experiment to illustrate the relevance of EPS, we consider solutions to scarcity of energy resources and climate change that, due to their extreme nature, may lead to considerable environmental problem shifting. We qualitatively assess the likely environmental and socioeconomic impacts of three hypothetical energy futures to highlight the possibility that as we resolve one environmental problem, another may be aggravated. We further present a set of guidelines to study EPS in a systematic and focused way. Here we stress that shifting can be mediated by biophysical as well as socioeconomic mechanisms, which means that its analysis requires a genuine interdisciplinary effort.

  • 129. van der Leeuw, Sander
    et al.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    The social dynamics of basins of attraction2021Inngår i: Ecology & Society, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 26, nr 1, artikkel-id 33Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we conceptualize transformations as societal shifts from one basin of attraction to another. Such shifts occur when a society's information processing system is no longer fit to deal with the dynamics with which the society is involved. To understand when this might be the case, we conceive of a dynamic interaction between two domains, the cognitive one (containing a society's knowledge, values, language, customs, technology etc. that structure information processing) and the environmental one (consisting of the dynamics of the environment within which a society is embedded), which interact through resonance. The two domains are interdependent and coevolve to shape both the information-processing of a society (its culture) and the environment with which it interacts. Crucial in this dynamic is the process of category formation. We used a model that distinguishes between closed and open categories, which allows us to dynamically relate, but distinguish, a certainty sphere (closed categories dominate), a possibility sphere (open categories dominate), and a problem sphere (absence of categories). Narratives anchor societies' values and dynamics and shape the wider culture of society, making phenomena comprehensible. To foster cultural transitions, narratives need to be modified. To do so, one has to search for narratives in which open categories dominate, and then insert new elements in them. This requires an analysis of the narratives to determine their degree of openness. A tentative approach to such an analysis is offered.

  • 130. Walker, Brian
    et al.
    Crépin, Anne-Sophie
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Nyström, Magnus
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Anderies, John M.
    Andersson, Erik
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. North-West University, South Africa; University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Elmqvist, Thomas
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Queiroz, Cibele
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Global Resilience Partnership, Sweden.
    Barrett, Scott
    Bennett, Elena
    Cardenas, Juan Camilo
    Carpenter, Stephen R.
    Chapin III, F. Stuart
    de Zeeuw, Aart
    Fischer, Joern
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Levin, Simon
    Nyborg, Karine
    Polasky, Stephen
    Segerson, Kathleen
    Seto, Karen C.
    Scheffer, Marten
    Shogren, Jason F.
    Tavoni, Alessandro
    van den Bergh, Jeroen
    Weber, Elke U.
    Vincent, Jeffrey R.
    Response diversity as a sustainability strategy2023Inngår i: Nature Sustainability, E-ISSN 2398-9629, Vol. 6, nr 6, s. 621-629Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Financial advisers recommend a diverse portfolio to respond to market fluctuations across sectors. Similarly, nature has evolved a diverse portfolio of species to maintain ecosystem function amid environmental fluctuations. In urban planning, public health, transport and communications, food production, and other domains, however, this feature often seems ignored. As we enter an era of unprecedented turbulence at the planetary level, we argue that ample responses to this new reality — that is, response diversity — can no longer be taken for granted and must be actively designed and managed. We describe here what response diversity is, how it is expressed and how it can be enhanced and lost.

  • 131. Westerberg, Bengt
    et al.
    Björklund, JohannaFolke, CarlStockholms universitet, Övriga enheter, Stockholm Resilience Centre.Jagers, SverkerLundholm, CeciliaSamhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Pedagogiska institutionen.Moberg, FredrikSörlin, SverkerStockholms universitet, Övriga enheter, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Utmaningen — forskare om en hållbar mänsklighet2008Collection/Antologi (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 132. Westerberg, Bengt
    et al.
    Folke, CarlStockholms universitet.Jagers, SverkerLundholm, CeciliaStockholms universitet.Moberg, FredrikStockholms universitet.Sörlin, Sverker
    Utmaningen: Forskare om en hållbar framtid2008Collection/Antologi (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 133.
    Westley, Frances
    et al.
    Social Innovation Generation, University of Waterloo, Canada.
    Olsson, Per
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Nilsson, Måns
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Galaz, Victor
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Tipping toward sustainability: emerging pathways of transformation2011Inngår i: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 40, nr 7, s. 762-780Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the links between agency, institutions, and innovation in navigating shifts and large-scale transformations toward global sustainability. Our central question is whether social and technical innovations can reverse the trends that are challenging critical thresholds and creating tipping points in the earth system, and if not, what conditions are necessary to escape the current lock-in. Large-scale transformations in information technology, nano-and biotechnology, and new energy systems have the potential to significantly improve our lives; but if, in framing them, our globalized society fails to consider the capacity of the biosphere, there is a risk that unsustainable development pathways may be reinforced. Current institutional arrangements, including the lack of incentives for the private sector to innovate for sustainability, and the lags inherent in the path dependent nature of innovation, contribute to lock-in, as does our incapacity to easily grasp the interactions implicit in complex problems, referred to here as the ingenuity gap. Nonetheless, promising social and technical innovations with potential to change unsustainable trajectories need to be nurtured and connected to broad institutional resources and responses. In parallel, institutional entrepreneurs can work to reduce the resilience of dominant institutional systems and position viable shadow alternatives and niche regimes.

  • 134. Westley, Frances R.
    et al.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Iconic images, symbols, and archetypes: their function in art and science2018Inngår i: Ecology & Society, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 23, nr 4, artikkel-id 31Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between art and science is one of contrasts and commonalities. We look at one commonality between art and science: the central role of iconic images. We argue that iconic images are the touchstone symbols in both art and science and provide similar functions for both. We propose that these iconic images provoke an openness and a receptivity to our deepest emotional capacities and a connection between those and the dynamics of the broader social-ecological systems in which we operate. Such iconic images may also act as attractors that provoke the emergence of increasing levels of intellectual and aesthetic self-organization, not only at an individual level, but also in terms of larger social, scientific, or artistic fields. Finally, through a combination of this attraction and this connection, iconic images may play a role in transformation.

  • 135. Worm, B
    et al.
    Barbier, EB
    Beaumont, N
    Duffy, JE
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Halpern, BS
    Jackson, JBC
    Lotze, HK
    Micheli, F
    Palumbi, SR
    Sala, E
    Selkoe, KA
    Stachowicz, JJ
    Watson, R
    Biodiversity loss in the ocean: How bad is it? Response2007Inngår i: Science, Vol. 316, s. 1282-1285Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 136. Worm, B
    et al.
    Barbier, EB
    Beaumont, N
    Duffy, JE
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Halpern, BS
    Jackson, JBC
    Lotze, HK
    Micheli, F
    Palumbi, SR
    Sala, E
    Selkoe, KA
    Stachowicz, JJ
    Watson, R
    Response to comments on “Impacts of biodiversity loss on ocean ecosystem services”2007Inngår i: Science, Vol. 316, s. 1285d-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 137. Wu, Tong
    et al.
    Rocha, Juan
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Future Earth, Sweden; The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Berry, Kevin
    Chaigneau, Tomas
    Hamann, Maike
    Lindkvist, Emilie
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Qiu, Jiangxiao
    Schill, Caroline
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden; .
    Shepon, Alon
    Crepin, Anne-Sophie
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Triple Bottom Line or Trilemma? Global Tradeoffs Between Prosperity, Inequality, and the Environment2024Inngår i: World Development, ISSN 0305-750X, E-ISSN 1873-5991, Vol. 178, artikkel-id 106595Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A key aim of sustainable development is the joint achievement of prosperity, equality, and environmental integrity: in other words, material living standards that are high, broadly -distributed, and low -impact. This has often been called the triple bottom line. But instead, what if there is a trilemmathat inhibits the simultaneous achievement of these three goals? We analysed international patterns and trends in the relationships between per -capita gross national income, the Gini coefficient for income distribution, and per -capita ecological footprint from 1995 to 2017, benchmarking them against thresholds from the existing literature. A dynamicanalysis of the trajectories of 59 countries and a staticanalysis of a larger sample of 140 countries found that none met the triple bottom line, and that instead there were widespread tradeoffs among the three indicators. These tradeoffs, leading to divergent national trajectories and country clusters, show that common pair -wise explanations such as Kuznets Curves do not adequately capture important development dynamics. In particular, while only a few countries simultaneously met the thresholds for prosperity and equality on the one hand and equality and environment on the other, none did for prosperity and environment. Moreover, inequality likely makes resolving this critical tradeoff more difficult. Our findings suggest that mitigating the sustainability trilemma may require countries - especially those that are already prosperous - to prioritize economic redistribution and environmental stewardship over further growth.

  • 138.
    Yletyinen, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Butler, Will
    Ottersen, Geir
    Andersen, Ken H.
    Bonanomi, Sara
    Diekert, Florian K.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Lindegren, Martin
    Nordström, Marie C.
    Richter, Andries
    Rogers, Lauren
    Romagnoni, Giovanni
    Weigel, Benjamin
    Whittington, Jason D.
    Blenckner, Thorsten
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Stenseth, Nils C.
    When is a fish stock collapsed?Manuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 139.
    Österblom, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. South American Institute for Resilience and Sustainability Studies, Uruguay; The University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Bebbington, J.
    Blasiak, Robert
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Sobkowiak, M.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Transnational Corporations, Biosphere Stewardship, and Sustainable Futures2022Inngår i: Annual Review Environment and Resources, ISSN 1543-5938, E-ISSN 1545-2050, Vol. 47, s. 609-635Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Corporations are perceived as increasingly powerful and critically important to ensuring that irreversible climatological or ecological tipping points on Earth are not crossed. Environmental impacts of corporate activities include pollution of soils, freshwater and the ocean, depletion of ecosystems and species, unsustainable use of resources, changes to air quality, and alteration of the global climate. Negative social impacts include unacceptable working conditions, erosion of traditional practices, and increased inequalities. Multiple formal and informal mechanisms have been developed, and innovative examples of corporate biosphere stewardship have resulted in progress. However, the biosphere crisis underscores that such efforts have been insufficient and that transformative change is urgently needed. We provide suggestions for aligning corporate activities with the biosphere and argue that such corporate biosphere stewardship requires more ambitious approaches taken by corporations, combined with new and formalized public governance approaches by governments.

  • 140.
    Österblom, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Crona, Beatrice I.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Nyström, Magnus
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Troell, Max
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Marine Ecosystem Science on an Intertwined Planet2017Inngår i: Ecosystems (New York. Print), ISSN 1432-9840, E-ISSN 1435-0629, Vol. 20, nr 1, s. 54-61Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Marine ecosystem science has developed since the 1940s, when humans obtained the ability to spend substantial time underneath the surface of the ocean. Since then, and drawing on several decades of scientific advances, a number of exciting research frontiers have emerged. We find: Understanding interacting drivers of change, Identifying thresholds in ecosystems, and Investigating social-ecological dynamics to represent particularly interesting frontiers, which we speculate will soon emerge as new mainstreams in marine ecosystem science. However, increasing human impacts on ecosystems everywhere and a new level of global connectivity are shifting the context for studying, understanding, and managing marine ecosystems. As a consequence, we argue that ecosystem scientists today also need to address a number of critical challenges and devote new energy and expertise to Modeling the Anthropocene, Operationalizing resilience, and Understanding social-ecological dynamics across scales. This new deep dive into unknown waters requires a number of strategies to be successful. We suggest that marine ecosystem scientists need to actively: Prepare for the unexpected, cross boundaries, and understand our cognitive limitations to further develop the exciting field of marine ecosystem science.

  • 141.
    Österblom, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics.
    Emergence of Global Adaptive Governance for Stewardship of Regional Marine Resources2013Inngår i: Ecology & Society, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 18, nr 2, s. 4-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Overfishing has historically caused widespread stock collapses in the Southern Ocean. Until recently, illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing threatened to result in the collapse of some of the few remaining valuable fish stocks in the region and vulnerable seabird populations. Currently, this unsustainable fishing has been reduced to less than 10% of former levels. We describe and analyze the emergence of the social-ecological governance system that made it possible to curb the fisheries crisis. For this purpose, we investigated the interplay between actors, social networks, organizations, and institutions in relation to environmental outcomes. We drew on a diversity of methods, including qualitative interviews, quantitative social network and survey data, and literature reviews. We found that the crisis triggered action of an informal group of actors over time, which led to a new organization (ISOFISH) that connected two independent networks (nongovermental organizations and the fishing industry), and later (COLTO) linked to an international body and convention (CCAMLR). The emergence of the global adaptive governance systems for stewardship of a regional marine resource took place over a 15-year period. We describe in detail the emergence process and illustrate the usefulness of analyzing four features of governance and understanding social-ecological processes, thereby describing structures and functions, and their link to tangible environmental outcomes.

  • 142.
    Österblom, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Globalization, marine regime shifts and the Soviet Union2015Inngår i: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 370, nr 1659, artikkel-id 20130278Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Regime shifts have been observed in marine ecosystems around the world, with climate and fishing suggested as major drivers of such shifts. The global and regional dynamics of the climate system have been studied in this context, and efforts to develop an analogous understanding of fishing activities are developing. Here, we investigate the timing of pelagic marine regime shifts in relation to the emergence of regional and global fishing activities of the Soviet Union. Our investigation of official catch statistics reflects that the Soviet Union was a major fishing actor in all large marine ecosystems where regime shifts have been documented, including in ecosystems where overfishing has been established as a key driver of these changes (in the Baltic and Black Seas and the Scotian Shelf). Globalization of Soviet Union fishing activities pushed exploitation to radically new levels and triggered regional and global governance responses for improved management. Since then, exploitation levels have remained and increased with new actors involved. Based on our exploratory work, we propose that a deeper understanding of the role of global fishing actors is central for improved management of marine ecosystems.

  • 143.
    Österblom, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. South American Institute for Resilience and Sustainability Studies, Uruguay; The University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Science, Sweden.
    Rocha, Juan
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. South American Institute for Resilience and Sustainability Studies, Uruguay; Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Bebbington, Jan
    Blasiak, Robert
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Jouffray, Jean-Baptiste
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Science, Sweden.
    Selig, Elizabeth R.
    Wabnitz, Colette C. C.
    Bengtsson, Frida
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Crona, Beatrice
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Science, Sweden.
    Gupta, Radhika
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Henriksson, Patrik J.G.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Science, Sweden; WorldFish, Malaysia.
    Johansson, Karolin A.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Merrie, Andrew
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Nakayama, Shinnosuke
    Ortuño Crespo, Guillermo
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Rockström, Johan
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Germany.
    Schultz, Lisen
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Sobkowiak, Madlen
    Søgaard Jørgensen, Peter
    Spijkers, Jessica
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Troell, Max
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Science, Sweden.
    Villarrubia-Gómez, Patricia
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Lubchenco, Jane
    Scientific mobilization of keystone actors for biosphere stewardship2022Inngår i: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 12, artikkel-id 3802Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The biosphere crisis requires changes to existing business practices. We ask how corporations can become sustainability leaders, when constrained by multiple barriers to collaboration for biosphere stewardship. We describe how scientists motivated, inspired and engaged with ten of the world’s largest seafood companies, in a collaborative process aimed to enable science-based and systemic transformations (2015–2021). CEOs faced multiple industry crises in 2015 that incentivized novel approaches. New scientific insights, an invitation to collaborate, and a bold vision of transformative change towards ocean stewardship, created new opportunities and direction. Co-creation of solutions resulted in new knowledge and trust, a joint agenda for action, new capacities, international recognition, formalization of an organization, increased policy influence, time-bound goals, and convergence of corporate change. Independently funded scientists helped remove barriers to cooperation, provided means for reflection, and guided corporate strategies and actions toward ocean stewardship. By 2021, multiple individuals exercised leadership and the initiative had transitioned from preliminary and uncomfortable conversations, to a dynamic, operational organization, with capacity to perform global leadership in the seafood industry. Mobilizing transformational agency through learning, collaboration, and innovation represents a cultural evolution with potential to redirect and accelerate corporate action, to the benefit of business, people and the planet. 

  • 144.
    Österblom, Henrik