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  • 1101. Adam, Birgit
    et al.
    Klawonn, Isabell
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Svedén, Jenny B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Bergkvist, Johanna
    Nahar, Nurun
    Walve, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Littmann, Sten
    Whitehouse, Martin J.
    Lavik, Gaute
    Kuypers, Marcel M. M.
    Ploug, Helle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    N2-fixation, ammonium release and N-transfer to the microbial and classical food web within a plankton community2016In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 450-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the role of N2-fixation by the colony-forming cyanobacterium, Aphanizomenon spp., for the plankton community and N-budget of the N-limited Baltic Sea during summer by using stable isotope tracers combined with novel secondary ion mass spectrometry, conventional mass spectrometry and nutrient analysis. When incubated with 15N2Aphanizomenon spp. showed a strong 15N-enrichment implying substantial 15N2-fixation. Intriguingly, Aphanizomenon did not assimilate tracers of 15NH4+ from the surrounding water. These findings are in line with model calculations that confirmed a negligible N-source by diffusion-limited NH4+ fluxes to Aphanizomenon colonies at low bulk concentrations (<250 nm) as compared with N2-fixation within colonies. No N2-fixation was detected in autotrophic microorganisms <5 μm, which relied on NH4+uptake from the surrounding water. Aphanizomenon released about 50% of its newly fixed N2 as NH4+. However, NH4+ did not accumulate in the water but was transferred to heterotrophic and autotrophic microorganisms as well as to diatoms (Chaetoceros sp.) and copepods with a turnover time of ~5 h. We provide direct quantitative evidence that colony-formingAphanizomenon releases about half of its recently fixed N2 as NH4+, which is transferred to the prokaryotic and eukaryotic plankton forming the basis of the food web in the plankton community. Transfer of newly fixed nitrogen to diatoms and copepods furthermore implies a fast export to shallow sediments via fast-sinking fecal pellets and aggregates. Hence, N2-fixing colony-forming cyanobacteria can have profound impact on ecosystem productivity and biogeochemical processes at shorter time scales (hours to days) than previously thought.

  • 1102.
    Adam, Lucille
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    López-González, Moisés
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Björk, Albin
    Pålsson, Sandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Poux, Candice
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Wahren-Herlenius, Marie
    Fernández, Carmen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Spetz, Anna-Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Early Resistance of Non-virulent Mycobacterial Infection in C57BL/6 Mice Is Associated With Rapid Up-Regulation of Antimicrobial Cathelicidin Camp2018In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 9, article id 1939Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early clearance of tuberculosis is the successful eradication of inhaled bacteria before the development of an adaptive immune response. We previously showed, by utilizing a non-virulent mycobacteria infection model, that C57BL/6 mice are more efficient than BALB/c in their control of bacterial growth in the lungs during the first weeks of the infection. Here, we assessed early (within 1-3 days) innate immune events locally in the lungs to identify factors that may contribute to the control of non-virulent mycobacterial burden. We confirmed that C57BL/6 mice are more resistant to infection compared with BALB/c after intranasal inoculation with mycobacterium. Transcriptomic analyses revealed a remarkably silent signature in C57BL/6 mice despite effective control of bacterial growth. In contrast, BALB/c mice up-regulated genes associated with neutrophil and myeloid cell chemotaxis and migration. Flow cytometry analyses corroborated the transcriptomic analyses and demonstrated influx of both neutrophil and myeloid cell populations in BALB/c mice, while these did not increase in C57BL/6 mice. We further detected increased release of TNF-alpha from BALB/c lung cells but limited release from C57BL/6-derived cells. However, C57BL/6 mice showed a marked early up-regulation of the Camp gene, encoding the cathelicidin CRAMP peptide, post-mycobacterial exposure. CRAMP (LL-37 in human) expression in the lungs was confirmed using immunofluorescence staining. Altogether, these findings show that C57BL/6 mice can clear the mycobacterial infection early and that this early control is associated with high CRAMP expression in the lungs without concomitant influx of immune cells. The role of CRAMP/LL-37 during mycobacterial infection may be relevant for novel protective strategies, and warrants further studies of human cohorts.

  • 1103.
    Adam, Mickiewicz
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Demokratisk planering och medborgardeltagande: En komparativ fallstudie av olika planeringsmodeller i översiktsplaneringen av Väsby Sjöstad i Upplands Väsby2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Mickiewicz, Adam (2012)

    Demokratisk planering och medborgardeltagande - En komparativ fallstudie av olika planeringsmodeller i översiktsplaneringen av Väsby Sjöstad i Upplands Väsby [Democratic planning and citizen participation - A comparative case study of different planning models used in the comprehensive planning of Väsby Sjöstad in Upplands Väsby]

     

    Samhällsplanering, avancerad nivå

    Masteruppsats för masterexamen i samhällsplanering, 30 HP

    Handledare: Peter Schmitt

    Språk: Svenska

     

     

    Uppsatsen syftar till att undersöka hur den demokratiska planeringsmodellen hanterar frågor gällande medborgerligt deltagande. Vem har makten att påverka och förändra de politiska beslut som planeringsmodellen vilar på? Uppsatsen undersöker utifrån denna övergripande fråga i fallstudieform planeringsprocessen för ett ambitiöst och kontroversiellt framtida bostadsområde i Upplands Väsby kallat Väsby Sjöstad. Den teoretiska ansatsen utgörs av maktbegreppet och dess kopplingar till rationalitet, starkt inspirerat av Michel Foucaults och Bent Flyvbjergs maktteorier. Den huvudsakliga metoden för undersökningen är en diskursanalys. Planeringsprocessen i fallet har genomgått distinkt olika faser och utmynnat i en charrette-inspirerad metod kallad community planning. Metoden medför att en konfliktfylld och låst planeringsprocess omvandlats till en inklusiv och kommunikativ sådan. Slutsatsen är att community planning med fördel kan användas för att ge medborgare en reell makt att påverka politiska beslut och planeringsresultat, men främst under tidiga planskeden.

  • 1104. Adam, R.
    et al.
    Ade, P. A. R.
    Aghanim, N.
    Alves, M. I. R.
    Arnaud, M.
    Ashdown, M.
    Aumont, J.
    Baccigalupi, C.
    Banday, A. J.
    Barreiro, R. B.
    Bartlett, J. G.
    Bartolo, N.
    Battaner, E.
    Benabed, K.
    Benoit, A.
    Benoit-Levy, A.
    Bernard, J. -P.
    Bersanelli, M.
    Bielewicz, P.
    Bock, J. J.
    Bonaldi, A.
    Bonavera, L.
    Bond, J. R.
    Borrill, J.
    Bouchet, F. R.
    Boulanger, F.
    Bucher, M.
    Burigana, C.
    Butler, R. C.
    Calabrese, E.
    Cardoso, J. -F.
    Catalano, A.
    Challinor, A.
    Chamballu, A.
    Chary, R. -R.
    Chiang, H. C.
    Christensen, P. R.
    Clements, D. L.
    Colombi, S.
    Colombo, L. P. L.
    Combet, C.
    Couchot, F.
    Coulais, A.
    Crill, B. P.
    Curto, A.
    Cuttaia, F.
    Danese, L.
    Davies, R. D.
    Davis, R. J.
    de Bernardis, P.
    de Rosa, A.
    de Zotti, G.
    Delabrouille, J.
    Desert, F. -X.
    Dickinson, C.
    Diego, J. M.
    Dole, H.
    Donzelli, S.
    Dore, O.
    Douspis, M.
    Ducout, A.
    Dupac, X.
    Efstathiou, G.
    Elsner, F.
    Ensslin, T. A.
    Eriksen, H. K.
    Falgarone, E.
    Fergusson, J.
    Finelli, F.
    Forni, O.
    Frailis, M.
    Fraisse, A. A.
    Franceschi, E.
    Frejsel, A.
    Galeotta, S.
    Galli, S.
    Ganga, K.
    Ghosh, T.
    Giard, M.
    Giraud-Heraud, Y.
    Gjerlow, E.
    Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.
    Gorski, K. M.
    Gratton, S.
    Gregorio, A.
    Gruppuso, A.
    Gudmundsson, Jón E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC). Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita). Princeton University, USA.
    Hansen, F. K.
    Hanson, D.
    Harrison, D. L.
    Helou, G.
    Henrot-Versille, S.
    Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.
    Herranz, D.
    Hildebrandt, S. R.
    Hivon, F.
    Hobson, M.
    Holmes, W. A.
    Hornstrup, A.
    Hovest, W.
    Huffenberger, K. M.
    Hurier, G.
    Jaffe, A. H.
    Jaffe, T. R.
    Jones, W. C.
    Juvela, M.
    Keihanen, E.
    Keskitalo, R.
    Kisner, T. S.
    Kneissl, R.
    Knoche, J.
    Kunz, M.
    Kurki-Suonio, H.
    Lagache, G.
    Lahteenmaki, A.
    Lamarre, J. -M.
    Lasenby, A.
    Lattanzi, M.
    Lawrence, C. R.
    Le Jeune, M.
    Leahy, J. P.
    Leonardi, R.
    Lesgourgues, J.
    Levrier, F.
    Liguori, M.
    Lilje, P. B.
    Linden-Vornle, M.
    Lopez-Caniego, M.
    Lubin, P. M.
    Macias-Perez, J. F.
    Maggio, G.
    Maino, D.
    Mandolesi, N.
    Mangilli, A.
    Maris, M.
    Marshall, D. J.
    Martin, P. G.
    Martinez-Gonzalez, E.
    Masi, S.
    Matarrese, S.
    McGehee, P.
    Meinhold, P. R.
    Melchiorri, A.
    Mendes, L.
    Mennella, A.
    Migliaccio, M.
    Mitra, S.
    Miville-Deschenes, M. -A.
    Moneti, A.
    Montier, L.
    Morgante, G.
    Mortlock, D.
    Moss, A.
    Munshi, D.
    Murphy, J. A.
    Naselsky, P.
    Nati, F.
    Natoli, P.
    Netterfield, C. B.
    Norgaard-Nielsen, H. U.
    Noviello, F.
    Novikov, D.
    Novikov, I.
    Orlando, E.
    Oxborrow, C. A.
    Paci, F.
    Pagano, L.
    Pajot, F.
    Paladini, R.
    Paoletti, D.
    Partridge, B.
    Pasian, F.
    Patanchon, G.
    Pearson, T. J.
    Perdereau, O.
    Perotto, L.
    Perrotta, F.
    Pettorino, V.
    Piacentini, F.
    Piat, M.
    Pierpaoli, E.
    Pietrobon, D.
    Plaszczynski, S.
    Pointecouteau, E.
    Polenta, G.
    Pratt, G. W.
    Prezeau, G.
    Prunet, S.
    Puget, J. -L.
    Rachen, J. P.
    Reach, W. T.
    Rebolo, R.
    Reinecke, M.
    Remazeilles, M.
    Renault, C.
    Renzi, A.
    Ristorcelli, I.
    Rocha, G.
    Rosset, C.
    Rossetti, M.
    Roudier, G.
    Rubino-Martin, J. A.
    Rusholme, B.
    Sandri, M.
    Santos, D.
    Savelainen, M.
    Savini, G.
    Scott, D.
    Seiffert, M. D.
    Shellard, E. P. S.
    Spencer, L. D.
    Stolyarov, V.
    Stompor, R.
    Strong, A. W.
    Sudiwala, R.
    Sunyaev, R.
    Sutton, D.
    Suur-Uski, A. -S.
    Sygnet, J. -F.
    Tauber, J. A.
    Terenzi, L.
    Toffolatti, L.
    Tomasi, M.
    Tristram, M.
    Tucci, M.
    Tuovinen, J.
    Umana, G.
    Valenziano, L.
    Valiviita, J.
    Van Tent, F.
    Vielva, P.
    Villa, F.
    Wade, L. A.
    Wandelt, B. D.
    Wehus, I. K.
    Wilkinson, A.
    Yvon, D.
    Zacchei, A.
    Zonca, A.
    Planck 2015 results X. Diffuse component separation: Foreground maps2016In: Astronomy and Astrophysics, ISSN 0004-6361, E-ISSN 1432-0746, Vol. 594, article id A10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Planck has mapped the microwave sky in temperature over nine frequency bands between 30 and 857 GHz and in polarization over seven frequency bands between 30 and 353 GHz in polarization. In this paper we consider the problem of diffuse astrophysical component separation, and process these maps within a Bayesian framework to derive an internally consistent set of full-sky astrophysical component maps. Component separation dedicated to cosmic microwave background (CMB) reconstruction is described in a companion paper. For the temperature analysis, we combine the Planck observations with the 9-yr Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) sky maps and the Haslam et al. 408 MHz map, to derive a joint model of CMB, synchrotron, free-free, spinning dust, CO, line emission in the 94 and 100 GHz channels, and thermal dust emission. Full-sky maps are provided for each component, with an angular resolution varying between 7: 5 and 1 degrees. Global parameters (monopoles, dipoles, relative calibration, and bandpass errors) are fitted jointly with the sky model, and best-fit values are tabulated. For polarization, the model includes CMB, synchrotron, and thermal dust emission. These models provide excellent fits to the observed data, with rms temperature residuals smaller than 4pK over 93% of the sky for all Planck frequencies up to 353 GHz, and fractional errors smaller than 1% in the remaining 7% of the sky. The main limitations of the temperature model at the lower frequencies are internal degeneracies among the spinning dust, free-free, and synchrotron components; additional observations from external low-frequency experiments will be essential to break these degeneracies. The main limitations of the temperature model at the higher frequencies are uncertainties in the 545 and 857 GHz calibration and zero-points. For polarization, the main outstanding issues are instrumental systematics in the 100-353 GHz bands on large angular scales in the form of temperature-to-polarization leakage, uncertainties in the analogue-to-digital conversion, and corrections for the very long time constant of the bolometer detectors, all of which are expected to improve in the near future.

  • 1105. Adam, R.
    et al.
    Ade, P. A. R.
    Aghanim, N.
    Arnaud, M.
    Ashdown, M.
    Aumont, J.
    Baccigalupi, C.
    Banday, A. J.
    Barreiro, R. B.
    Bartlett, J. G.
    Bartolo, N.
    Basak, S.
    Battaner, E.
    Benabed, K.
    Benoit, A.
    Benoit-Levy, A.
    Bernard, J. -P.
    Bersanelli, M.
    Bielewicz, P.
    Bock, J. J.
    Bonaldi, A.
    Bonavera, L.
    Bond, J. R.
    Borrill, J.
    Bouchet, F. R.
    Boulanger, F.
    Bucher, M.
    Burigana, C.
    Butler, R. C.
    Calabrese, E.
    Cardoso, J. -F.
    Casaponsa, B.
    Castex, G.
    Catalano, A.
    Challinor, A.
    Chamballu, A.
    Chary, R-R.
    Chiang, H. C.
    Christensen, P. R.
    Clements, D. L.
    Colombi, S.
    Colombo, L. P. L.
    Combet, C.
    Couchot, F.
    Coulais, A.
    Crill, B. P.
    Curto, A.
    Cuttaia, F.
    Danese, L.
    Davies, R. D.
    Davis, R. J.
    de Bernardis, P.
    de Rosa, A.
    de Zotti, G.
    Delabrouille, J.
    Desert, F. -X.
    Dickinson, C.
    Diego, J. M.
    Dole, H.
    Donzelli, S.
    Dore, O.
    Douspis, M.
    Ducout, A.
    Dupac, X.
    Efstathiou, G.
    Elsner, F.
    Ensslin, T. A.
    Eriksen, H. K.
    Falgarone, E.
    Fantaye, Y.
    Fergusson, J.
    Finelli, F.
    Forni, O.
    Frailis, M.
    Fraisse, A. A.
    Francescht, E.
    Frejsel, A.
    Galeotta, S.
    Galli, S.
    Ganga, K.
    Ghosh, T.
    Giard, M.
    Giraud-Heraud, Y.
    Gjerlow, E.
    Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.
    Gorski, K. M.
    Gratton, S.
    Gregorio, A.
    Gruppuso, A.
    Gudmundsson, Jón E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC). Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita). Princeton University, USA.
    Hansen, F. K.
    Hanson, D.
    Harrison, D. L.
    Helou, G.
    Henrot-Versille, S.
    Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.
    Herranz, D.
    Hildebrandt, S. R.
    Hivon, E.
    Hobson, M.
    Holmes, W. A.
    Hornstrup, A.
    Hovest, W.
    Huffenberger, K. M.
    Hurier, G.
    Jaffe, A. H.
    Jaffe, T. R.
    Jones, W. C.
    Juvela, M.
    Keihanen, E.
    Keskitalo, R.
    Kisner, T. S.
    Kneissl, R.
    Knoche, J.
    Krachmalnicoff, N.
    Kunz, M.
    Kurki-Suonio, H.
    Lagache, G.
    Lamarre, J. -M.
    Lasenby, A.
    Lattanzi, M.
    Lawrence, C. R.
    Le Jenne, M.
    Leonardi, R.
    Lesgourgues, J.
    Levrier, F.
    Liguori, M.
    Lilje, P. B.
    Linden-Vornle, M.
    Lopez-Caniego, M.
    Lubin, P. M.
    Macias-Perez, J. F.
    Maggio, G.
    Maino, D.
    Mandolesi, N.
    Mangilli, A.
    Maris, M.
    Marshall, D. J.
    Martin, P. G.
    Martinez-Gonzalez, E.
    Masi, S.
    Matarrese, S.
    McGehee, P.
    Meinhold, P. R.
    Melchiorri, A.
    Mendes, L.
    Mennella, A.
    Migliaccio, M.
    Mitra, S.
    Miville-Deschenes, M. -A.
    Molinari, D.
    Moneti, A.
    Montier, L.
    Morgante, G.
    Mortlock, D.
    Moss, A.
    Munshi, D.
    Murphy, J. A.
    Naselsky, P.
    Nati, F.
    Natoli, P.
    Netterfield, C. B.
    Norgaard-Nielsen, H. U.
    Noviello, F.
    Novikov, D.
    Novikov, I.
    Oxborrow, C. A.
    Paci, F.
    Pagano, L.
    Pajot, F.
    Paladini, R.
    Paoletti, D.
    Pasian, F.
    Patanchon, G.
    Pearson, T. J.
    Perdereau, O.
    Perotto, L.
    Perrotta, F.
    Pettorino, V.
    Piacentini, F.
    Piat, M.
    Pierpaoli, E.
    Pietrobon, D.
    Plaszczynski, S.
    Pointecouteau, E.
    Polenta, G.
    Pratt, G. W.
    Prezeau, G.
    Prunet, S.
    Puget, J. -L.
    Rachen, J. P.
    Racine, B.
    Reach, W. T.
    Rebolo, R.
    Reinecke, M.
    Remazeilles, M.
    Renault, C.
    Renzi, A.
    Ristorcelli, I.
    Rocha, G.
    Rosset, C.
    Rossetti, M.
    Roudier, G.
    Rubino-Martin, J. A.
    Rusholme, B.
    Sandri, M.
    Santos, D.
    Savelainen, M.
    Savini, G.
    Scott, D.
    Seiffert, M. D.
    Shellard, E. P. S.
    Spencer, L. D.
    Stolyarov, V.
    Stompor, R.
    Sudiwala, R.
    Sunyaev, R.
    Sutton, D.
    Suur-Uski, A. -S.
    Sygnet, J. -F.
    Tauber, J. A.
    Terenzi, L.
    Toffolatti, L.
    Tomasi, M.
    Tristram, M.
    Trombetti, T.
    Tucci, M.
    Tuovinen, J.
    Valenziano, L.
    Valiviita, J.
    Van Tent, F.
    Vielva, P.
    Villa, F.
    Wade, L. A.
    Wandelt, B. D.
    Wehus, I. K.
    Yvon, D.
    Zacchei, A.
    Zonca, A.
    Planck 2015 results IX. Diffuse component separation: CMB maps2016In: Astronomy and Astrophysics, ISSN 0004-6361, E-ISSN 1432-0746, Vol. 594, article id A9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present foreground-reduced cosmic microwave background (CMB) maps derived from the full Planck data set in both temperature and polarization. Compared to the corresponding Planck 2013 temperature sky maps, the total data volume is larger by a factor of 3.2 for frequencies between 30 and 70 GHz, and by 1.9 for frequencies between 100 and 857 GHz. In addition, systematic errors in the forms of temperature-topolarization leakage, analogue-to-digital conversion uncertainties, and very long time constant errors have been dramatically reduced, to the extent that the cosmological polarization signal may now be robustly recovered on angular scales l greater than or similar to 40. On the very largest scales, instrumental systematic residuals are still non-negligible compared to the expected cosmological signal, and modes with l < 20 are accordingly suppressed in the current polarization maps by high-pass filtering. As in 2013, four different CMB component separation algorithms are applied to these observations, providing a measure of stability with respect to algorithmic and modelling choices. The resulting polarization maps have rms instrumental noise ranging between 0.21 and 0.27 mu K averaged over 55' pixels, and between 4.5 and 6.1 mu K averaged over 3.'4 pixels. The cosmological parameters derived from the analysis of temperature power spectra are in agreement at the 1 sigma level with the Planck 2015 likelihood. Unresolved mismatches between the noise properties of the data and simulations prevent a satisfactory description of the higher-order statistical properties of the polarization maps. Thus, the primary applications of these polarization maps are those that do not require massive simulations for accurate estimation of uncertainties, for instance estimation of cross-spectra and cross-correlations, or stacking analyses. However, the amplitude of primordial non-Gaussianity is consistent with zero within 2 sigma for all local, equilateral, and orthogonal configurations of the bispectrum, including for polarization E-modes. Moreover, excellent agreement is found regarding the lensing B-mode power spectrum, both internally among the various component separation codes and with the best-fit Planck 2015 Lambda cold dark matter model.

  • 1106. Adam, R.
    et al.
    Ade, P. A. R.
    Aghanim, N.
    Ashdown, M.
    Aumont, J.
    Baccigalupi, C.
    Banday, A. J.
    Barreiro, R. B.
    Bartolo, N.
    Battaner, E.
    Benabed, K.
    Benoit-Levy, A.
    Bersanelli, M.
    Bielewicz, P.
    Bikmaev, I.
    Bonaldi, A.
    Bond, J. R.
    Borrill, J.
    Bouchet, F. R.
    Burenin, R.
    Burigana, C.
    Calabrese, E.
    Cardoso, J. -F.
    Catalano, A.
    Chiang, H. C.
    Christensen, P. R.
    Churazov, E.
    Colombo, L. P. L.
    Combet, C.
    Comis, B.
    Couchot, F.
    Crill, B. P.
    Curto, A.
    Cuttaia, F.
    Danese, L.
    Davis, R. J.
    de Bernardis, P.
    de Rosa, A.
    de Zotti, G.
    Delabrouille, J.
    Desert, F. -X.
    Diego, J. M.
    Dole, H.
    Dore, O.
    Douspis, M.
    Ducout, A.
    Dupac, X.
    Elsner, F.
    Ensslin, T. A.
    Finelli, F.
    Forni, O.
    Frailis, M.
    Fraisse, A. A.
    Franceschi, E.
    Galeotta, S.
    Ganga, K.
    Genova-Santos, R. T.
    Giard, M.
    Giraud-Heraud, Y.
    Gjerlow, E.
    Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.
    Gorski, K. M.
    Gregorio, A.
    Gruppuso, A.
    Gudmundsson, Jón E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC). Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita). Princeton University, USA.
    Hansen, F. K.
    Harrison, D. L.
    Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.
    Herranz, D.
    Hildebrandt, S. R.
    Hivon, E.
    Hobson, M.
    Hornstrup, A.
    Hovest, W.
    Hurier, G.
    Jaffe, A. H.
    Jaffe, T. R.
    Jones, W. C.
    Keihanen, E.
    Keskitalo, R.
    Khamitov, I.
    Kisner, T. S.
    Kneissl, R.
    Knoche, J.
    Kunz, M.
    Kurki-Suonio, H.
    Lagache, G.
    Lahteenmaki, A.
    Lamarre, J. -M.
    Lasenby, A.
    Lattanzi, M.
    Lawrence, C. R.
    Leonardi, R.
    Levrier, F.
    Liguori, M.
    Lilje, P. B.
    Linden-Vornle, M.
    Lopez-Caniego, M.
    Macias-Perez, J. F.
    Maffei, B.
    Maggio, G.
    Mandolesi, N.
    Mangilli, A.
    Maris, M.
    Martin, P. G.
    Martinez-Gonzalez, E.
    Masi, S.
    Matarrese, S.
    Melchiorri, A.
    Mennella, A.
    Migliaccio, M.
    Miville-Deschenes, M. -A.
    Moneti, A.
    Montier, L.
    Morgante, G.
    Mortlock, D.
    Munshi, D.
    Murphy, J. A.
    Naselsky, P.
    Nati, F.
    Natoli, P.
    Norgaard-Nielsen, H. U.
    Novikov, D.
    Novikov, I.
    Oxborrow, C. A.
    Pagano, L.
    Pajot, F.
    Paoletti, D.
    Pasian, F.
    Perdereau, O.
    Perotto, L.
    Pettorino, V.
    Piacentini, F.
    Piat, M.
    Plaszczynski, S.
    Pointecouteau, E.
    Polenta, G.
    Ponthieu, N.
    Pratt, G. W.
    Prunet, S.
    Puget, J. -L.
    Rachen, J. P.
    Rebolo, R.
    Reinecke, M.
    Remazeilles, M.
    Renault, C.
    Renzi, A.
    Ristorcelli, I.
    Rocha, G.
    Rosset, C.
    Rossetti, M.
    Roudier, G.
    Rubino-Martin, J. A.
    Rusholme, B.
    Santos, D.
    Savelainen, M.
    Savini, G.
    Scott, D.
    Stolyarov, V.
    Stompor, R.
    Sudiwala, R.
    Sunyaev, R.
    Sutton, D.
    Suur-Uski, A. -S.
    Sygnet, J. -F.
    Tauber, J. A.
    Terenzi, L.
    Toffolatti, L.
    Tomasi, M.
    Tristram, M.
    Tucci, M.
    Valenziano, L.
    Valiviita, J.
    Van Tent, F.
    Vielva, P.
    Villa, F.
    Wade, L. A.
    Wehus, I. K.
    Yvon, D.
    Zacchei, A.
    Zonca, A.
    Planck intermediate results XLIII. Spectral energy distribution of dust in clusters of galaxies2016In: Astronomy and Astrophysics, ISSN 0004-6361, E-ISSN 1432-0746, Vol. 596, article id A104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although infrared (IR) overall dust emission from clusters of galaxies has been statistically detected using data from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS), it has not been possible to sample the spectral energy distribution (SED) of this emission over its peak, and thus to break the degeneracy between dust temperature and mass. By complementing the IRAS spectral coverage with Planck satellite data from 100 to 857 GHz, we provide new constraints on the IR spectrum of thermal dust emission in clusters of galaxies. We achieve this by using a stacking approach for a sample of several hundred objects from the Planck cluster sample. This procedure averages out fluctuations from the IR sky, allowing us to reach a significant detection of the faint cluster contribution. We also use the large frequency range probed by Planck, together with component-separation techniques, to remove the contamination from both cosmic microwave background anisotropies and the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (tSZ) signal, which dominate at v <= 353 GHz. By excluding dominant spurious signals or systematic effects, averaged detections are reported at frequencies 353 GHz <= v <= 5000 GHz. We confirm the presence of dust in clusters of galaxies at low and intermediate redshifts, yielding an SED with a shape similar to that of the Milky Way. Planck's resolution does not allow us to investigate the detailed spatial distribution of this emission (e.g. whether it comes from intergalactic dust or simply the dust content of the cluster galaxies), but the radial distribution of the emission appears to follow that of the stacked SZ signal, and thus the extent of the clusters. The recovered SED allows us to constrain the dust mass responsible for the signal and its temperature.

  • 1107. Adam, R.
    et al.
    Ade, P. A. R.
    Alves, M. I. R.
    Ashdown, M.
    Aumont, J.
    Baccigalupi, C.
    Banday, A. J.
    Barreiro, R. B.
    Bartolo, N.
    Battaner, E.
    Benabed, K.
    Benoit-Levy, A.
    Bernard, J. -P.
    Bersanelli, M.
    Bielewicz, P.
    Bonavera, L.
    Bond, J. R.
    Borrill, J.
    Bouchet, F. R.
    Boulanger, F.
    Bucher, M.
    Burigana, C.
    Butler, R. C.
    Calabrese, E.
    Cardoso, J. -F.
    Catalano, A.
    Chiang, H. C.
    Christensen, P. R.
    Colombo, L. P. L.
    Combet, C.
    Couchot, F.
    Crill, B. P.
    Curto, A.
    Cuttaia, F.
    Danese, L.
    Davis, R. J.
    de Bernardis, P.
    de Rosa, A.
    de Zotti, G.
    Delabrouille, J.
    Dickinson, C.
    Diego, J. M.
    Dolag, K.
    Dore, O.
    Ducout, A.
    Dupac, X.
    Elsner, F.
    Ensslin, T. A.
    Eriksen, H. K.
    Ferriere, K.
    Finelli, F.
    Forni, O.
    Frailis, M.
    Fraisse, A. A.
    Franceschi, E.
    Galeotta, S.
    Ganga, K.
    Ghosh, T.
    Giard, M.
    Gjerlow, E.
    Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.
    Gorski, K. M.
    Gregorio, A.
    Gruppuso, A.
    Gudmundsson, Jón E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC). Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita). Princeton University, USA.
    Hansen, F. K.
    Harrison, D. L.
    Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.
    Herranz, D.
    Hildebrandt, S. R.
    Hobson, M.
    Hornstrup, A.
    Hurier, G.
    Jaffe, A. H.
    Jaffe, T. R.
    Jones, W. C.
    Juvela, M.
    Keihanen, E.
    Keskitalo, R.
    Kisner, T. S.
    Knoche, J.
    Kunz, M.
    Kurki-Suonio, H.
    Lamarre, J. -M.
    Lasenby, A.
    Lattanzi, M.
    Lawrence, C. R.
    Leahy, J. P.
    Leonardi, R.
    Levrier, F.
    Liguori, M.
    Lilje, P. B.
    Linden-Vornle, M.
    Lopez-Caniego, M.
    Lubin, P. M.
    Macias-Perez, J. F.
    Maggio, G.
    Maino, D.
    Mandolesi, N.
    Mangilli, A.
    Maris, M.
    Martin, P. G.
    Martinez-Gonzalez, E.
    Masi, S.
    Matarrese, S.
    Melchiorri, A.
    Mennella, A.
    Migliaccio, M.
    Miville-Deschenes, M. -A.
    Moneti, A.
    Montier, L.
    Morgante, G.
    Munshi, D.
    Murphy, J. A.
    Naselsky, P.
    Nati, F.
    Natoli, P.
    Norgaard-Nielsen, H. U.
    Oppermann, N.
    Orlando, E.
    Pagano, L.
    Pajot, F.
    Paladini, R.
    Paoletti, D.
    Pasian, F.
    Perotto, L.
    Pettorino, V.
    Piacentini, F.
    Piat, M.
    Pierpaoli, E.
    Plaszczynski, S.
    Pointecouteau, E.
    Polenta, G.
    Ponthieu, N.
    Pratt, G. W.
    Prunet, S.
    Puget, J. -L.
    Rachen, J. P.
    Reinecke, M.
    Remazeilles, M.
    Renault, C.
    Renzi, A.
    Ristorcelli, I.
    Rocha, G.
    Rossetti, M.
    Roudier, G.
    Rubino-Martin, J. A.
    Rusholme, B.
    Sandri, M.
    Santos, D.
    Savelainen, M.
    Scott, D.
    Spencer, L. D.
    Stolyarov, V.
    Stompor, R.
    Strong, A. W.
    Sudiwala, R.
    Sunyaev, R.
    Suur-Uski, A. -S.
    Sygnet, J. -F.
    Tauber, J. A.
    Terenzi, L.
    Toffolatti, L.
    Tomasi, M.
    Tristram, M.
    Tucci, M.
    Valenziano, L.
    Valiviita, J.
    Van Tent, F.
    Vielva, P.
    Villa, F.
    Wade, L. A.
    Wandelt, B. D.
    Wehus, I. K.
    Yvon, D.
    Zacchei, A.
    Zonca, A.
    Planck intermediate results XLII. Large-scale Galactic magnetic fields2016In: Astronomy and Astrophysics, ISSN 0004-6361, E-ISSN 1432-0746, Vol. 596, article id A103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent models for the large-scale Galactic magnetic fields in the literature have been largely constrained by synchrotron emission and Faraday rotation measures. We use three different but representative models to compare their predicted polarized synchrotron and dust emission with that measured by the Planck satellite. We first update these models to match the Planck synchrotron products using a common model for the cosmic-ray leptons. We discuss the impact on this analysis of the ongoing problems of component separation in the Planck microwave bands and of the uncertain cosmic-ray spectrum. In particular, the inferred degree of ordering in the magnetic fields is sensitive to these systematic uncertainties, and we further show the importance of considering the expected variations in the observables in addition to their mean morphology. We then compare the resulting simulated emission to the observed dust polarization and find that the dust predictions do not match the morphology in the Planck data but underpredict the dust polarization away from the plane. We modify one of the models to roughly match both observables at high latitudes by increasing the field ordering in the thin disc near the observer. Though this specific analysis is dependent on the component separation issues, we present the improved model as a proof of concept for how these studies can be advanced in future using complementary information from ongoing and planned observational projects.

  • 1108. Adam, R.
    et al.
    Aghanim, N.
    Ashdown, M.
    Aumont, J.
    Baccigalupi, C.
    Ballardini, M.
    Banday, A. J.
    Barreiro, R. B.
    Bartolo, N.
    Basak, S.
    Battye, R.
    Benabed, K.
    Bernard, J. -P.
    Bersanelli, M.
    Bielewicz, P.
    Bock, J. J.
    Bonaldi, A.
    Bonavera, L.
    Bond, J. R.
    Borrill, J.
    Bouchet, F. R.
    Boulanger, F.
    Bucher, M.
    Burigana, C.
    Calabrese, E.
    Cardoso, J. -F.
    Carron, J.
    Chiang, H. C.
    Colombo, L. P. L.
    Combet, C.
    Comis, B.
    Couchot, F.
    Coulais, A.
    Crill, B. P.
    Curto, A.
    Cuttaia, F.
    Davis, R. J.
    de Bernardis, P.
    de Rosa, A.
    de Zotti, G.
    Delabrouille, J.
    Di Valentino, E.
    Dickinson, C.
    Diego, J. M.
    Dore, O.
    Douspis, M.
    Ducout, A.
    Dupac, X.
    Elsner, F.
    Ensslin, T. A.
    Eriksen, H. K.
    Falgarone, E.
    Fantaye, Y.
    Finelli, F.
    Forastieri, F.
    Frailis, M.
    Fraisse, A. A.
    Franceschi, E.
    Frolov, A.
    Galeotta, S.
    Galli, S.
    Ganga, K.
    Genova-Santos, R. T.
    Gerbino, Martina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC). Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita). Università La Sapienza, Italy.
    Ghosh, T.
    Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.
    Gorski, K. M.
    Gruppuso, A.
    Gudmundsson, Jón E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC). Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita). Princeton University, USA.
    Hansen, F. K.
    Helou, G.
    Henrot-Versille, S.
    Herranz, D.
    Hivon, E.
    Huang, Z.
    Ilic, S.
    Jaffe, A. H.
    Jones, W. C.
    Keihanen, E.
    Keskitalo, R.
    Kisner, T. S.
    Knox, L.
    Krachmalnicoff, N.
    Kunz, M.
    Kurki-Suonio, H.
    Lagache, G.
    Lahteenmaki, A.
    Lamarre, J. -M.
    Langer, M.
    Lasenby, A.
    Lattanzi, M.
    Lawrence, C. R.
    Le Jeune, M.
    Levrier, F.
    Lewis, A.
    Liguori, M.
    Lilje, P. B.
    Lopez-Caniego, M.
    Ma, Y. -Z.
    Macias-Perez, J. F.
    Maggio, G.
    Mangilli, A.
    Maris, M.
    Martin, P. G.
    Martinez-Gonzalez, E.
    Matarrese, S.
    Mauri, N.
    McEwen, J. D.
    Meinhold, P. R.
    Melchiorri, A.
    Mennella, A.
    Migliaccio, M.
    Miville-Deschenes, M. -A.
    Molinari, D.
    Moneti, A.
    Montier, L.
    Morgante, G.
    Moss, A.
    Naselsky, P.
    Natoli, P.
    Oxborrow, C. A.
    Pagano, L.
    Paoletti, D.
    Partridge, B.
    Patanchon, G.
    Patrizii, L.
    Perdereau, O.
    Perotto, L.
    Pettorino, V.
    Piacentini, F.
    Plaszczynski, S.
    Polastri, L.
    Polenta, G.
    Puget, J. -L
    Rachen, J. P.
    Racine, B.
    Reinecke, M.
    Remazeilles, M.
    Renzi, A.
    Rocha, G.
    Rossetti, M.
    Roudier, G.
    Rubino-Martin, J. A.
    Ruiz-Granados, B.
    Salvati, L.
    Sandri, M.
    Savelainen, M.
    Scott, D.
    Sirri, G.
    Sunyaev, R.
    Suur-Uski, A. -S.
    Tauber, J. A.
    Tenti, M.
    Toffolatti, L.
    Tomasi, M.
    Tristram, M.
    Trombetti, T.
    Valiviita, J.
    Van Tent, F.
    Vielva, P.
    Villa, F.
    Vittorio, N.
    Wandelt, B. D.
    Wehus, I. K.
    White, M.
    Zacchei, A.
    Zonca, A.
    Planck intermediate results XLVII. Planck constraints on reionization history2016In: Astronomy and Astrophysics, ISSN 0004-6361, E-ISSN 1432-0746, Vol. 596, article id A108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate constraints on cosmic reionization extracted from the Planck cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. We combine the Planck CMB anisotropy data in temperature with the low-multipole polarization data to fit Lambda CDM models with various parameterizations of the reionization history. We obtain a Thomson optical depth tau = 0.058 +/- 0.012 for the commonly adopted instantaneous reionization model. This confirms, with data solely from CMB anisotropies, the low value suggested by combining Planck 2015 results with other data sets, and also reduces the uncertainties. We reconstruct the history of the ionization fraction using either a symmetric or an asymmetric model for the transition between the neutral and ionized phases. To determine better constraints on the duration of the reionization process, we also make use of measurements of the amplitude of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (kSZ) effect using additional information from the high-resolution Atacama Cosmology Telescope and South Pole Telescope experiments. The average redshift at which reionization occurs is found to lie between z = 7.8 and 8.8, depending on the model of reionization adopted. Using kSZ constraints and a redshift-symmetric reionization model, we find an upper limit to the width of the reionization period of Delta z < 2.8. In all cases, we find that the Universe is ionized at less than the 10% level at redshifts above z similar or equal to 10. This suggests that an early onset of reionization is strongly disfavoured by the Planck data. We show that this result also reduces the tension between CMB-based analyses and constraints from other astrophysical sources.

  • 1109. Adam, R.
    et al.
    Gerbino, Martina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC). Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita). Università La Sapienza, Italy.
    Gudmundsson, Jón E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC). Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita). Princeton University, USA.
    Lawrence, C. R.
    Zonca, A.
    Planck 2015 results I. Overview of products and scientific results2016In: Astronomy and Astrophysics, ISSN 0004-6361, E-ISSN 1432-0746, Vol. 594, article id A1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Space Agency's Planck satellite, which is dedicated to studying the early Universe and its subsequent evolution, was launched on 14 May 2009. It scanned the microwave and submillimetre sky continuously between 12 August 2009 and 23 October 2013. In February 2015, ESA and the Planck Collaboration released the second set of cosmology products based on data from the entire Planck mission, including both temperature and polarization, along with a set of scientific and technical papers and a web-based explanatory supplement. This paper gives an overview of the main characteristics of the data and the data products in the release, as well as the associated cosmological and astrophysical science results and papers. The data products include maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, diffuse foregrounds in temperature and polarization, catalogues of compact Galactic and extragalactic sources (including separate catalogues of Sunyaev-Zeldovich clusters and Galactic cold clumps), and extensive simulations of signals and noise used in assessing uncertainties and the performance of the analysis methods. The likelihood code used to assess cosmological models against the Planck data is described, along with a CMB lensing likelihood. Scientific results include cosmological parameters derived from CMB power spectra, gravitational lensing, and cluster counts, as well as constraints on inflation, non-Gaussianity, primordial magnetic fields, dark energy, and modified gravity, and new results on low-frequency Galactic foregrounds.

  • 1110.
    Adama, Onyanta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Governing from Above: Solid Waste Management in Nigeria's New Capital City of Abuja2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This doctoral dissertation examines how the symbolic character of a relocated capital city influences and intersects with local conditions to shape the governance structure and relations in service delivery. The focus is on Abuja, the new capital city of Nigeria, and the sector studied is solid waste management. Abuja was planned to avoid the numerous problems facing other Nigerian cities. Contrary to the intention of government and planners, the city now houses the fastest growing slum in the country. There are various possible explanations for these outcomes but this study pays particular attention to the conception of Abuja as a symbol of national unity.

    The ‘good governance’ agenda is often promoted by the World Bank and donors as a way of handling the numerous challenges facing African governments, including service delivery. A major expectation of the agenda is that local governments manage the urban development process in conjunction with an array of institutions ranging from the private sector to community groups and households. An underlying notion is that of a minimalist national state. This is not the case in Abuja, where governance is conducted at higher levels and the municipal council remains largely invisible. This is manifested in solid waste management, where the municipal council has no jurisdiction over the sector. In addition, community groups and households play very minimal roles in the governance of services. Drawing on the concept of space and place, the study concludes that the types of institutions found and their roles and relations are shaped by the national function of the city and the local power relations.

    The study draws on primary and secondary data. Interviews were conducted with state officials, community leaders, households and interest groups, such as the private sector. Secondary data were obtained from government documents, studies and newspaper reports.

  • 1111.
    Adama, Onyanta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Urban imaginaries: funding mega infrastructure projects in Lagos, Nigeria2018In: GeoJournal, ISSN 0343-2521, E-ISSN 1572-9893, Vol. 83, no 2, p. 257-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s globalized world, mega infrastructure projects have emerged as one of the most popular strategies for attracting private capital and repositioning cities on the competitive landscape. The Lagos Megacity Project (LMCP) was launched to address a longstanding infrastructure crisis and to reinvent Lagos as a modern megacity. Using the LMCP as a case study, the paper examined the challenges facing the funding of mega infrastructure projects. Special attention is given to how capital is mobilized, the kinds of alliances or networks found and what gets prioritized. The paper observed that the alliance formed between the federal, Lagos and Ogun state governments to mobilize public funds quickly unraveled largely due to disputes traceable to the apportioning of fiscal and political responsibilities and the distribution of functions between the different tiers of government. Under the LMCP, disputes emerged between the federal government and the Lagos State Government (LSG) over who was responsible for what. A history of opposition politics and a highly politicized resource allocation system further made cooperation between the two particularly difficult. Furthermore, the LMCP signalled a renewed drive by the LSG to attract private investments through public–private partnership. The paper noted a host of problems but crucially there is a preference for elite projects, a practice that is reinforcing socio-spatial exclusion and confirms the persistent inequalities that accompany neoliberal and modernist projects. At the broadest level, the paper points to how modernist projects are fractured or undermined by specific ideologies and practices.

  • 1112.
    Adama, Onyanta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Nzeadibe, Thaddeus Chidi
    Dealing with Waste: Resource Recovery and Entrepreneurship in Informal Solid Waste Management in African Cities2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The scope of the problem of waste management in African cities continues to change across space and time in line with changing socio-economic, political and environmental conditions. Crucially, the failure of the formal systems has paved the way for the informal sector. The overall aim of the book is to capture the dynamism and complexity of Informal Sector Solid Waste Management (ISSWM). The main argument is that while the poverty reduction potential of ISSWM remains valid and is acknowledged; there are broader issues to consider.

  • 1113.
    Adamczak, Franciszek
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science.
    On kloedenellids and cytherellids (Ostracoda Platycopa) from the Silurian of Gotland.1966Book (Other academic)
  • 1114.
    Adamek, Stanislaw A.
    Stockholm College.
    Die Ideologie des Rechts, 1: Ursprung und Grundlagen des Rechts1944Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 1115.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    A Narratable Self as Addressed by Human Rights2017In: Policy Futures in Education, ISSN 1478-2103, E-ISSN 1478-2103, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 252-261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper extends the critique in earlier research of human rights as exclusive of otherness and difference by introducing the work of Adriana Cavarero (2000) on a narratable self. Hence, the formation of human rights is thus about the relations between different narratable selves, not just Western ones. A narrative learning, drawing on Cavarero (2000), shifts the focus in human rights learning from learning about the other to exposing one’s life story narrative through relationality.

  • 1116.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Claiming and Reaffirming Universality of Human Rights: Comparing the Role of UNESCO in Relation to the UN 1948 and 19932009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis explores the role of United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in the drafting and formulation of the universal human rights in 1948 as well as its contribution at the Vienna Conference, when the universality of the human rights was reaffirmed after the Cold War. Using concept analysis on the reports published by UNESCO for the drafting of the Universal Declaration on Human Rights and the Vienna Declaration deepens the understanding of the influence of the organization within the United Nations (UN) system at these points in time. By applying an intersectional approach to the concept of “cultural dialogue”, the theoretical tool of “intersectional dialogue” is created in order to analyze and understand the process that occurred in the UN Commission when delegates from all over the world met to draft and discuss the universality of human rights. The conceptual framework of “universality” by Langlois is used in analyzing the parallel process of UNESCO in order to understand the universality of the human rights through local interpretations and particular values. The thesis held by Langlois, that the universality of human rights enables a global platform for oppressed and marginalized people to share their local stories based on particular values within a human rights discourse, is contested in the analysis.

  • 1117.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Columbia University, USA.
    Human rights for more than one voice: rethinking political space beyond the global/local divide2014In: Ethics & Global Politics, ISSN 1654-4951, E-ISSN 1654-6369, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 163-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper considers political agency and space as found in Cavarero's For More Than One Voice: Toward a Philosophy of Vocal Expression in order to take a critical philosophical approach to human rights education (HRE) and the political implications of its increasingly legal discourse. Like Arendt, Cavarero is concerned with a radical rethinking of political space, as not limited to place or legal borders, but bound by our human condition of plurality and relationality. Both Arendt and Cavarero want politics to be coupled with justice, nevertheless, Cavarero provides a notion of politics that lets us think beyond territorial terms of a polis, which opens for exploring an expanded conceptualization of human rights politics, as not bound by national legislative measures, but as concerning political action in-between human beings. In contrast to the dominant discourse on ‘human rights experts’ who frame the content for HRE, the notion of ‘absolute local space’ questions the dichotomy of universal/particular in raising the importance of a plurality of unique voices who create a spectrum for the universality of rights.

  • 1118.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Human Rights Learning: The Significance of Narratives, Relationality and Uniqueness2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Whereas educational policy is mainly concerned with the content of Human Rights Education (HRE), philosophers of education have widely explored the subject and her social condition in terms of social justice education. This thesis draws on philosophers of education in exploring the subject rather than the content of HRE, focusing the study on ontological rather than epistemological aspects of learning. In this thesis learning is explored through narratives, as a relational process of becoming. The turn to narrative is taken against the dominant historical narrative of human rights as a Western project. This turn concerns how claims toward universalism of human rights exclude difference and equally concerns how notions of particularity overshadows the uniqueness in life stories. The concept of uniqueness serves to elucidate the complexity of the subject, not easily reduced into social categorizations, a concept drawn from Adriana Cavarero and Hannah Arendt.

  • 1119.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    In a Man's words - the politics of female representation in the public2017In: Studier i Pædagogisk Filosofi, ISSN 2244-9140, E-ISSN 2244-9140, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 55-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What one decides fi t for appearance through writing and speech bears a political signifi cance that risk being distorted through both language, reception in the public, and through calls for gendered representations. How can work of female philosophers be interpreted as a concern for the world from that of having to respond to a male-dominated discourse through which speech becomes trapped into what one might represent as ‘other’? In this paper, I explore the public reception of two female thinkers who question, in diff erent ways, the domi-nant notion of the author or philosopher as a male subject; what kind of limitations does the relative notion of ‘female’ pose political action, and how can privilege constitute a hindrance to feminist solidarity?

  • 1120.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Intersectional Dialogue - A Cosmopolitical Dialogue of Ethics2013In: Cosmopolitan Civil Societies: An Interdisciplinary Journal, ISSN 1837-5391, E-ISSN 1837-5391, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 45-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article is based on a critical cosmopolitan outlook on dialogue as not aimed at reaching consensus, but rather keeping dialogue of difference open, with the ability to reach common understanding of human rights on conflicting grounds. Intersectional dialogue is used as a concept that opens up possibilities to study, in a pragmatic sense, the ‘cosmopolitan space’ in which different axles of power met in the historical drafting of human rights. By enacting analysis of United Nations (UN) documents from 1948 on the process of drafting the Universal Declaration on Human Rights (UDHR) the conceptualization of intersectional dialogue is put to work. The utopian foundation for deliberative democracy as dialogue in the absence of power and interest does not acknowledge the reality in which the human rights were negotiated and debated. The paper questions the dominant narrative of a western philosophical ground for the universality of human rights.

  • 1121.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Learning Human Rights Through One's Life Story: A Narratable Self as Addressed by Human RightsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 1122.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Paideia and Cosmopolitan Education: On Subjectification, Politics and Justice2017In: Philosophy as interplay and dialogue: viewing landscapes within philosophy / [ed] Torill Strand, Richard Smith, Anne Pirrie, Zelia Gregoriou, Mariana Papastephanou, Zürich: LIT Verlag, 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 1123.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Reconciling Universality and Particularity through a Cosmopolitan Outlook on Human Rights2012In: Cosmopolitan Civil Societies: An Interdisciplinary Journal, ISSN 1837-5391, E-ISSN 1837-5391, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 22-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human rights are today criticized as not compatible with different cultural values and the debate has circulated around Asian values and Islamic values as in dichotomy with human rights as universal ethics (Ignatieff, 2003). The theoretical dichotomy between universality and particularity is questioned pragmatically in this paper through a historical study. The working process of drafting the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) in 1946-48, which included thousands of people, is explored as a cosmopolitan space in which individuals from different cultural contexts met to negotiate human rights through cultural narratives. The process where particular values were negotiated with universal notion on human rights resulted in a common proclamation (UDHR) without a common philosophical or ideological ground. This paper puts forth a thesis that human rights discourse can work as a cosmopolitan space, in which particular value systems meet in processes characterized by conflict and cohesion. Hence human rights can be understood as a master narrative compatible with different conflicting cultural narratives (Gibson & Somers, 1994).

  • 1124.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Re-Thinking Relations in Human Rights Learning: The Politics of Narratives2014In: Journal of Philosophy of Education, ISSN 0309-8249, E-ISSN 1467-9752, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 293-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human Rights Education (HRE) has traditionally been articulated in terms of cultivating better citizens or world citizens. The main preoccupation in this strand of HRE has been that of bridging a gap between universal notions of a human rights subject and the actual locality and particular narratives in which students are enmeshed. This preoccupation has focused on ‘learning about the other’ in order to improve relations between plural ‘others’ and ‘us’ and reflects educational aims of national identity politics in citizenship education. The article explores the learning of human rights through narratives in relations, drawing on Hannah Arendt and Sharon Todd. For this re-thinking of relations in learning human rights, the article argues that HRE needs to address both competing historical narratives on the drafting of the Universal Declaration on Human Rights (UDHR) as well as unique life narratives of learners.

  • 1125.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    The Critical Potential of Using Counter Narratives in Human Rights Education2018In: Critical Human Rights, Citizenship, and Democracy Education: Entanglements and Regenerations / [ed] Michalinos Zembylas, André Keet, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 1126.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    The praxis of ethics and justice in human rights learning: examining the limits of progressive education2017In: Ethics and Education, ISSN 1744-9642, E-ISSN 1744-9650, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 37-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    School and education can be seen as an extension of the home as Hannah Arendt stresses, where children are protected in a space in which they can learn and grow, a space that is not yet public. This distinction of education as “not yet public” can be seen in contrast to John Dewey who explores notions of democracy as a process in education, where education and school is regarded as a mini society. This paper explores several challenges with progressive education and, specifically, of human rights education, through the work of Arendt (1959) and Dewey (1990) on the notions of responsibility and children’s human rights. Where do we as educators draw the distinction between taking responsibility of raising awareness of global injustices and human rights violations with the next generation without falling pray to dissolution that the gap between political imaginary and reality faces us with, or risking violating children’s “safe space” in school that according to Arendt should be a space that is neither private nor public, but a free zone for thinking and learning with others? Do we bring into the classroom discrimination and segregation by drawing on social categorizations with the pretext of questioning the same on the basis of “equal rights”? If ethical and relational dimensions of education are to be taken seriously then human rights education is a risky practice since it involves children’s sense of being and it raises questions that may not be dealt with properly or solvable for the children exposed.

  • 1127.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Toward Cosmopolitan Ethics in Teacher Education: An Ontological Dimension of Learning Human Rights2014In: Ethics and Education, ISSN 1744-9642, E-ISSN 1744-9650, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 29-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a globalization trend in teacher education, emphasizing the role of teachers to make judgments based on human rights in their teaching profession. Rather than emphasizing the epistemological dimension of acquiring knowledge about human rights through teacher education, an ontological dimension is emphasized in this paper of what it means to become a professional teacher. An ontological dimension of ‘learning to become’ can be captured in critical examination of a cosmopolitan awareness of teachers in relation to judgment and justice. I read the critique through studies on human rights in teacher education, which transforms notions of openness and respect in relations marked by difference.

  • 1128.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Women and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights2018Book (Refereed)
  • 1129.
    Adami, Rebecca
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Bron, Agnieszka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    The Way to Democracy Through Education and Learning in Sweden2007In: Journal für Politische Bildung, ISSN 2191-8244Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 1130.
    Adami, Rebecca
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Hållander, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Testimony and Narrative as a Political Relation: the Question of Ethical Judgment in Education2015In: Journal of Philosophy of Education, ISSN 0309-8249, E-ISSN 1467-9752, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we explore the role of film in educational settings and argue that testimony and narrative are dependent upon each other for developing ethical judgments. We use the film 12 Angry Men to enhance our thesis that the emotional response that sometimes is intended in using film as testimonies in classrooms requires a specific listening; a listening that puts pupils at risk when they relate testimonies to their own life narratives. The article raises the importance of listening in training narrative ethos in relation to violence witnessed in film. The article contributes by enhancing an understanding of a relational dimension to testimony and narrative, which, in an Arendtian sense, is also put forward as a political relation.

  • 1131. Adamo, A.
    et al.
    Smith, L. J.
    Gallagher, J. S.
    Bastian, N.
    Ryon, J.
    Westmoquette, M. S.
    Konstantopoulos, I. S.
    Zackrisson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Larsen, S. S.
    Silva-Villa, E.
    Charlton, J. C.
    Weisz, D. R.
    Revealing a ring-like cluster complex in a tidal tail of the starburst galaxy NGC 21462012In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 426, no 2, p. 1185-1194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the discovery of a ring-like cluster complex in the starburst galaxy NGC?2146. The Ruby Ring, so named due to its appearance, shows a clear ring-like distribution of star clusters around a central object. It is located in one of the tidal streams that surround the galaxy. NGC?2146 is part of the Snapshot Hubble U-band Cluster Survey (SHUCS). The WFC3/F336W data have added critical information to the available archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging set of NGC?2146, allowing us to determine ages, masses and extinctions of the clusters in the Ruby Ring. These properties have then been used to investigate the formation of this extraordinary system. We find evidence of a spatial and temporal correlation between the central cluster and the clusters in the ring. The latter are about 4?Myr younger than the central cluster, which has an age of 7?Myr. This result is supported by the Ha emission which is strongly coincident with the ring, and weaker at the position of the central cluster. From the derived total Ha luminosity of the system, we constrain the star formation rate density to be quite high (SSFR = 0.47?M??yr-1?kpc-2). The Ruby Ring is the product of an intense and localized burst of star formation, similar to the extended cluster complexes observed in M?51 and the Antennae, but more impressive because it is quite isolated. The central cluster contains only 5 per cent of the total stellar mass in the clusters that are determined within the complex. The ring-like morphology, the age spread and the mass ratio support a triggering formation scenario for this complex. We discuss the formation of the Ruby Ring in a collect and collapse framework. The predictions made by this model agree quite well with the estimated bubble radius and expansion velocity produced by the feedback from the central cluster, making the Ruby Ring an interesting case of triggered star formation.

  • 1132.
    Adamo, Angela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Super Star Clusters in Blue Compact Galaxies: Evidence for a near-infrared flux excess and properties of the starburst phase2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Luminous Blue compact galaxies (BCGs) are metal-poor actively star-forming systems, characterised by bright ultraviolet and blue luminosities. Hubble Space Telescope high-resolution data have revealed that the luminous star-forming knots in these galaxies are composed of hundreds of young massive star clusters. In this work we present a systematic study of the star cluster populations in BCGs with important implications for the formation history of their host systems. The studied galaxies show recently increased star formation rates and a high fraction of massive clusters, probably as a result of minor/major merger events. The age distributions have a peak of cluster formation at only 3 - 4 Myr, unveiling a unique sample of clusters still partially embedded. A considerable fraction of clusters (30 - 50 %), mainly younger than 10 Myr, shows an observed flux excess between 0.8 and 2.2 μm. This so-called near-infrared (NIR) excess is impossible to reproduce even with the most recent spectral synthesis models (that include a self-consistent treatment of the photoionized gas). The origin of the NIR excess, which still remains unexplained, challenges our understanding of the cluster formation process under extreme conditions.

    The results achieved in this work have produced important insights into the cluster formation process in BCGs. We suggest that the BCG environment has most likely favoured the compression and collapse of giant molecular clouds into compact massive star clusters. The cluster formation efficiency (i.e., the fraction of star formation happening in star clusters) in BCGs is higher than the reported 8 - 10 %, for quiescent spirals and local star-forming galaxies. Luminous BCGs have a cluster formation efficiency comparable to luminous infrared galaxies and spiral starburst nuclei (the averaged value is  about 30 %), suggesting an important role of the merger event in the cluster formation.

  • 1133.
    Adamo, Angela
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Kruijssen, J. M. D.
    Bastian, N.
    Silva-Villa, E.
    Ryon, J.
    Probing the role of the galactic environment in the formation of stellar clusters, using M83 as a test bench2015In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 452, no 1, p. 246-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a study of the M83 cluster population, covering the disc of the galaxy between radii of 0.45 and 4.5 kpc. We aim to probe the properties of the cluster population as a function of distance from the galactic centre. We observe a net decline in cluster formation efficiency (Gamma, i.e. amount of star formation happening in bound clusters) from about 26 per cent in the inner region to 8 per cent in the outer part of the galaxy. The recovered Gamma values within different regions of M83 follow the same Gamma versus star formation rate density relation observed for entire galaxies. We also probe the initial cluster mass function (ICMF) as a function of galactocentric distance. We observe a significant steepening of the ICMF in the outer regions (from -1.90 +/- 0.11 to -2.70 +/- 0.14) and for the whole galactic cluster population (slope of -2.18 +/- 0.07) of M83. We show that this change of slope reflects a more fundamental change of the 'truncation mass' at the high-mass end of the distribution. This can be modelled as a Schechter function of slope -2 with an exponential cutoff mass (M-c) that decreases significantly from the inner to the outer regions (from 4.00 to 0.25 x 10(5) M-circle dot) while the galactic M-c is approximate to 1.60 x 10(5) M-circle dot. The trends in Gamma and ICMF are consistent with the observed radial decrease of the Sigma (H-2), hence in gas pressure. As gas pressure declines, cluster formation becomes less efficient. We conclude that the host galaxy environment appears to regulate (1) the fraction of stars locked in clusters and (2) the upper mass limit of the ICMF, consistently described by a near-universal slope -2 truncated at the high-mass end.

  • 1134.
    Adamo, Angela
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Ostlin, Goeran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Zackrisson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Probing Cluster Formation under Extreme Conditions: Super Star Clusters in Blue Compact GalaxiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The numerous and massive young star clusters in blue compact galaxies (BCG) are used to investigate the properties of their hosts. We test whether BCGs follow claimed relations between the cluster population and their hosts, such as the cluster specific luminosity in the U band, TL(U), and the star formation rate density ΣSFR; the V bandluminosity of the brightest youngest cluster, Mbrightest, and the mean star formation Vrate (SFR); the cluster formation efficiency versus the ΣSFR. We find that BCGs fairly well reproduce the relations, supporting a scenario where cluster formation and environmental properties of the host are correlated. They occupy, in all the diagrams, the regions of higher SFRs, suggesting the extreme nature of the starburst operating in these systems. We suggest that the BCG environment has most likely favoured the compression and collapse of the giant molecular clouds, enhancing the local star formation efficiency, so that massive clusters have been formed. The cluster formation efficiency (i.e., the fraction of star formation happening in star clusters) in BCGs is higher than the 8-10 % reported from quiescent spirals and dwarf starburst galaxies. BCGs have a cluster formation efficiency comparable to luminous IR galaxies and spiral starburst nuclei (the averaged value is ∼ 30 %).

  • 1135.
    Adamo, Angela
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Ryon, J. E.
    Messa, Matteo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Kim, H.
    Grasha, K.
    Cook, D. O.
    Calzetti, D.
    Lee, J. C.
    Whitmore, B. C.
    Elmegreen, B. G.
    Ubeda, L.
    Smith, L. J.
    Bright, S. N.
    Runnholm, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Andrews, J. E.
    Fumagalli, M.
    Gouliermis, D. A.
    Kahre, L.
    Nair, P.
    Thilker, D.
    Walterbos, R.
    Wofford, A.
    Aloisi, A.
    Ashworth, G.
    Brown, T. M.
    Chandar, R.
    Christian, C.
    Cignoni, M.
    Clayton, G. C.
    Dale, D. A.
    de Mink, S. E.
    Dobbs, C.
    Elmegreen, D. M.
    Evans, A. S.
    Gallagher, J. S.
    Grebel, E. K.
    Herrero, A.
    Hunter, D. A.
    Johnson, K. E.
    Kennicutt, R. C.
    Krumholz, M. R.
    Lennon, D.
    Levay, K.
    Martin, C.
    Nota, A.
    Östlin, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Pellerin, A.
    Prieto, J.
    Regan, M. W.
    Sabbi, E.
    Sacchi, E.
    Schaerer, D.
    Schiminovich, D.
    Shabani, F.
    Tosi, M.
    Van Dyk, S. D.
    Zackrisson, E.
    Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey with The Hubble Space Telescope: Stellar Cluster Catalogs and First Insights Into Cluster Formation and Evolution in NGC 6282017In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 841, no 2, article id 131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the large effort that is producing comprehensive high-level young star cluster (YSC) catalogs for a significant fraction of galaxies observed with the Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) Hubble treasury program. We present the methodology developed to extract cluster positions, verify their genuine nature, produce multiband photometry (from NUV to NIR), and derive their physical properties via spectral energy distribution fitting analyses. We use the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 628 as a test case for demonstrating the impact that LEGUS will have on our understanding of the formation and evolution of YSCs and compact stellar associations within their host galaxy. Our analysis of the cluster luminosity function from the UV to the NIR finds a steepening at the bright end and at all wavelengths suggesting a dearth of luminous clusters. The cluster mass function of NGC 628 is consistent with a power-law distribution of slopes similar to-2 and a truncation of a few times 10(5) M-circle dot. After their formation, YSCs and compact associations follow different evolutionary paths. YSCs survive for a longer time frame, confirming their being potentially bound systems. Associations disappear on timescales comparable to hierarchically organized star-forming regions, suggesting that they are expanding systems. We find massindependent cluster disruption in the inner region of NGC 628, while in the outer part of the galaxy there is little or no disruption. We observe faster disruption rates for low mass (<= 10(4) M-circle dot) clusters, suggesting that a massdependent component is necessary to fully describe the YSC disruption process in NGC 628.

  • 1136.
    Adamo, Angela
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Zackrisson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Östlin, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Hayes, M.
    Observatory of Geneva, Switzerland.
    On the Origin of the Red Excess in Very Young Super Star Clusters: The Case of SBS 0335-052E2010In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 725, no 2, p. 1620-1628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The spectral energy distribution analysis of very young unresolved star clusters challenges our understanding of the cluster formation process. Studies of resolved massive clusters in the Milky Way and in the nearby Magellanic Clouds show us that the contribution from photoionized gas is very important during the first Myr of cluster evolution. We present our models which include both a self-consistent treatment of the photoionized gas and the stellar continuum and quantify the impact of such a nebular component on the total flux of young unresolved star clusters. A comparison with other available models is considered. The very young star clusters in the SBS 0335-052E dwarf starburst galaxy are used as a test for our models. Due to the low metallicity of the galactic medium our models predict a longer lasted nebular phase which contributes between 10% and 40% of the total near-infrared (NIR) fluxes at around 10 Myr. We thus propose a possible solution for the observed flux excess in the six bright super star clusters (SSCs) of SBS 0335-052E. Reines et al. showed that the observed cluster fluxes, in the red-optical and NIR range, sit irreconcilably above the stellar continuum models provided. We find that in the age range estimated from the Hα emission we can explain the red excess in all six SSCs as due to nebular emission, which at cluster ages around 10 Myr still affects the NIR wavebands substantially.

  • 1137. Adamo, Angela
    et al.
    Östlin, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Bastian, N.
    Zackrisson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Livermore, R. C.
    Guaita, Lucia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    HIGH-RESOLUTION STUDY OF THE CLUSTER COMPLEXES IN A LENSED SPIRAL AT REDSHIFT 1.5: CONSTRAINTS ON THE BULGE FORMATION AND DISK EVOLUTION2013In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 766, no 2, p. 105-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyze the clump population of the spiral galaxy Sp 1149 at redshift 1.5. Located behind the galaxy cluster MACS J1149.5+2223, Sp 1149 has been significantly magnified allowing us to study the galaxy on physical scales down to similar to 100 pc. The galaxy cluster frame is among the targets of the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH), an ongoing Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Multi-Cycle Treasury program. We have used the publicly available multi-band imaging data set to reconstruct the spectral energy distributions of the clumps in Sp 1149, and derive, by means of stellar evolutionary models, their physical properties. We found that 40% of the clumps observed in Sp 1149 are older than 30 Myr and can be as old as 300 Myr. These are also the more massive (luminous) clumps in the galaxy. Among the complexes in the local reference sample, the star-forming knots in luminous blue compact galaxies could be considered progenitor analogs of these long-lived clumps. The remaining 60% of clumps have colors comparable to local cluster complexes, suggesting a similar young age. We observe that the Sp 1149 clumps follow the M proportional to R-2 relation similar to local cluster complexes, suggesting similar formation mechanisms although they may have different initial conditions (e.g., higher gas surface densities). We suggest that the galaxy is experiencing a slow decline in star formation rate and a likely transitional phase toward a more quiescent star formation mode. The older clumps have survived between 6 and 20 dynamical times and are all located at projected distances smaller than 4 kpc from the center. Their current location suggests migration toward the center and the possibility of being the building blocks of the bulge. On the other hand, the dynamical timescale of the younger clumps is significantly shorter, meaning that they are quite close to their birthplace. We show that the clumps of Sp 1149 may account for the expected metal-rich globular cluster population usually associated with the bulge and thick disk components of local spirals.

  • 1138.
    Adamo, Angela
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Östlin, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Zackrisson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Probing cluster formation under extreme conditions: massive star clusters in blue compact galaxies2011In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 417, no 3, p. 1904-1912Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The numerous and massive young star clusters in blue compact galaxies (BCGs) are used to investigate the properties of their hosts. We test whether BCGs follow claimed relations between cluster populations and their hosts, such as the fraction of the total luminosity contributed by the clusters as function of the mean star formation rate (SFR) density, the V-band luminosity of the brightest youngest cluster as related to the mean host SFR and the cluster formation efficiency (i.e. the fraction of star formation happening in star clusters) versus the density of the SFR. We find that BCGs follow the trends, supporting a scenario where cluster formation and environmental properties of the host are correlated. They occupy, in all the diagrams, the regions of higher SFRs, as expected by the extreme nature of the starbursts operating in these systems. We find that the star clusters contribute almost to the 20 per cent of the UV luminosity of the hosts. We suggest that the BCG starburst environment has most likely favoured the compression and collapse of the giant molecular clouds, enhancing the local star formation efficiency, so that massive clusters have been formed. The estimated cluster formation efficiency supports this scenario. BCGs have a cluster formation efficiency comparable to luminous IR galaxies and spiral starburst nuclei (the averaged value is similar to 35 per cent) which is much higher than the 8-10 per cent reported for quiescent spirals and dwarf star-forming galaxies.

  • 1139.
    Adamo, Angela
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Östlin, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Zackrisson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Probing the near-IR flux excess in young star clusters2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the results of a recent study of young star clusters (YSCs) in luminous blue compact galaxies (BCGs). The age distributions of the YSCs suggest that the starburst episode in Haro 11, ESO 185-IG13, and Mrk 930 started not more than 30-40 Myr ago. A peak of cluster formation only 3 - 4 Myr old is observed, unveiling a unique sample of clusters still partially embedded. A considerable fraction of clusters (30 - 50%), mainly younger than 10 Myr, shows an observed flux excess between 0.8 and 2.2 micron. This so-called near-infrared (NIR) excess is impossible to reproduce even with the most recent spectral synthesis models (that include a self-consistent treatment of the photoionized gas). We have used these YSCs to probe the very early evolution phase of star clusters. In all the three host galaxies, the analysis is limited to the optically brightest objects, i.e., systems that are only partially embedded by their natal cocoons (since deeply embedded clusters are probably too faint to be detected). We discuss possible explanations for this NIR excess, in the context of IR studies of both extragalactic young star clusters and resolved massive star forming regions in the Milky Way and in the nearby Magellanic Clouds.

  • 1140.
    Adamo, Angela
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Östlin, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Zackrisson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Hayes, Matthew
    The Extremely Young Star Cluster Population In Haro 112010In: Galaxy Wars: Star Formation and Stellar Populations in Interacting Galaxies / [ed] Beverly Smith, James Higdon, Sarah Higdon, and Nathan Bastian, San Francisco: Astronomical Society of the Pacific , 2010, p. 74-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have performed a deep multi-band photometric analysis of the star cluster population of Haro 11. This starburst galaxy (log L_FUV = 10.3 L_sun) is considered a nearby analogue of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at high redshift. The study of the numerous star clusters in the systems is an effective way to investigate the formation and evolution of the starburst phase. In fact, the SED fitting models have revealed a surprisingly young star cluster population, with ages between 0.5 and 40 Myr, and estimated masses between 10^3 and 10^7 solar masses. An independent age estimation has been done with the EW(Halpha) analysis of each cluster. This last analysis has confirmed the young ages of the clusters. We noticed that the clusters with ages between 1 and 10 Myr show a flux excess in H (NIC3/F160W) and/or I (WFPC2/F814W) bands with respect to the evolutionary models. Once more Haro 11 represents a challenge to our understanding.

  • 1141.
    Adamo, Angela
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Östlin, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Zackrisson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hayes, Matthew
    The Massive Star Clusters in the Dwarf Merger ESO 185-IG13: is the Red Excess Ubiquitous in Starbursts?2011In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 414, no 3, p. 1793-1812Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We have investigated the starburst properties of the luminous blue compact galaxy ESO 185-IG13. The galaxy has been imaged with the high resolution cameras onboard to the Hubble Space Telescope. From the UV to the IR, the data reveal a system shaped by hundreds of young star clusters, and fine structures, like a tidal stream and a shell. The presence of numerous clusters and the perturbed morphology indicate that the galaxy has been involved in a recent merger event. Using previous simulations of shell formation in galaxy mergers we constrain potential progenitors of ESO 185-IG13. The analysis of the star cluster population is used to investigate the properties of the present starburst and to date the final merger event, which has produced hundreds of clusters younger than 100 Myr. We have found a peak of cluster formation only 3.5 Myr old. A large fraction of these clusters will not survive after 10-20 Myr, due to the "infant mortality" caused by gas expulsion. However, this sample of clusters represents an unique chance to investigate the youngest phases of cluster evolution. As already observed in the analog blue compact galaxy Haro 11, a fraction of young clusters are affected by a flux excess at wavelengths longer than 8000 \AA. Ages, masses, and extinctions of clusters with this NIR excess are estimated from UV and optical data. We discuss similarities and differences of the observed NIR excess in ESO 185-IG13 clusters with other cases in the literature. The cluster ages and masses are used to distinguish among the potential causes of the excess. We observe, as in Haro 11, that the use of the IR and the (commonly used) I band data results in overestimates of age and mass in clusters affected by the NIR excess. This has important implications for a number of related studies of star clusters.

  • 1142.
    Adamo, Angela
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Östlin, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Zackrisson, Erik
    Hayes, Matthew
    Tracing the star formation history of three Blue Compact galaxies through the analysis of their star clusters2009Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    We present preliminary results from a study of the compact star cluster populations in three local luminous blue compact galaxies: ESO 185-IG 013, ESO 350-IG 038 (a.k.a. Haro 11), and MRK 930. These systems show peculiar morphologies and the presence of hundreds of SCs that have been produced by the past, recent, and/or current starburst phases. We use a complete set of HST images ranging from the UV to IR for each galaxy. Deep images in V (WFPC2/f606w) and I (WFPC2/f814w) are used to capture most of the star cluster candidates up to the old ones (fainter) which have had, in the past, less possibility to be detected. The other bands are used in the SED fitting technique for constraining ages and masses. Our goals are to investigate the evolution of these three blue compact galaxies and the star cluster formation impact on their star formation history.

  • 1143.
    Adamo, Angela
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Östlin, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Zackrisson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Hayes, Matthew
    Observatoire Astronomique de l'Université de Genève.
    Cumming, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Micheva, Genoveva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Super star clusters in Haro 11: properties of a very young starburst and evidence for a near-infrared flux excess2010In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, MNRAS, Vol. 407, no 2, p. 870-890Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have used multiband imaging to investigate the nature of an extreme starburst environment in the nearby Lyman break galaxy analogue Haro 11 (ESO350-IG038) by means of its stellar cluster population. The central starburst region has been observed in eight different high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) wavebands, sampling the stellar and gas components from UV to near-infrared. Photometric imaging of the galaxy was also carried out at 2.16μm by NaCo AO instrument at the ESO Very Large Telescope. We constructed integrated spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for about 200 star clusters located in the active star-forming regions and compared them with single stellar population models (suitable for physical properties of very young cluster population) in order to derive ages, masses and extinctions of the star clusters. The cluster age distribution we recover confirms that the present starburst has lasted for 40Myr, and shows a peak of cluster formation only 3.5 Myr old. With such an extremely young cluster population, Haro 11 represents a unique opportunity to investigate the youngest phase of the cluster formation process and evolution in starburst systems. We looked for possible relations between cluster ages, extinctions and masses. Extinction tends to diminish as a function of the cluster age, but the spread is large and reaches the highest dispersion for clusters in partial embedded phases (<5Myr). A fraction of low-mass (below 104 Msolar), very young (1-3Myr) clusters is missing, either because they are embedded in the parental molecular cloud and heavily extinguished, or because of blending with neighbouring clusters. The range of the cluster masses is wide; we observe that more than 30 per cent of the clusters have masses above 105 Msolar, qualifying them as super star clusters. Almost half of the cluster sample is affected by flux excesses at wavelengths >8000Å which cannot be explained by simple stellar evolutionary models. Fitting SED models over all wavebands leads to systematic overestimates of cluster ages and incorrect masses for the stellar population supplying the light in these clusters. We show that the red excess affects also the HST F814W filter, which is typically used to constrain cluster physical properties. The clusters which show the red excess are younger than 40Myr we discuss possible physical explanations for the phenomenon. Finally, we estimate that Haro 11 has produced bound clusters at a rate almost a factor of 10 higher than the massive and regular spirals, like the Milky Way. The present cluster formation efficiency is ~38 per cent of the galactic star formation rate.

  • 1144.
    Adamo, Angela
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Östlin, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Zackrisson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Papaderos, P.
    Bergvall, N.
    Rich, R. M.
    Micheva, Genoveva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Star cluster formation and evolution in Mrk 930: properties of a metal-poor starburst2011In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 415, no 3, p. 2388-2406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the analysis of the large population of star clusters in the blue compact galaxy (BCG) Mrk 930. The study has been conducted by means of a photometric analysis of multiband data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We have reconstructed the spectral energy distributions of the star clusters and estimated the age, mass and extinction for a representative sample. Similar to previous studies of star clusters in BCGs, we observe a very young cluster population with 70 per cent of the systems formed less than 10 Myr ago. In Mrk 930, the peak in the star cluster age distribution at 4 Myr is corroborated by the presence of Wolf-Rayet spectral features, and by the observed optical and infrared (IR) line ratios [OIII]/H beta and [Ne III]/[Ne II]. The recovered extinction in these very young clusters shows large variations, with a decrease at older ages. It is likely that our analysis is limited to the optically brightest objects (i.e. systems only partially embedded in their natal cocoons; the deeply embedded clusters being undetected). We map the extinction across the galaxy using low-resolution spectra and the H alpha-to-H beta ratio, as obtained from ground-based narrow band imaging. These results are compared with the extinction distribution recovered from the clusters. We find that the mean optical extinction derived in the starburst regions is close to the averaged value observed in the clusters [more than 80 per cent of the systems have E(B - V) <= 0.2mag], but locally, do not trace the more extinguished clusters. Previous HST studies of BCGs have revealed a population of young and extremely red super star clusters. We detect a considerable fraction of clusters affected by a red excess also in Mrk 930. The nature of the red excess, which turns up at near-IR wavelengths (I band and longwards), remains unknown. We compare the cluster formation history and the star formation history, the latter derived from the fit of spectral population synthesis models to the spectra. We find a general agreement between the two independently estimated quantities. Using the cluster properties, we perform a study of the host environmental properties. We find that the cluster formation efficiency (the fraction of star formation happening in clusters) is significantly higher, suggesting a key role of the environment for the formation of these massive objects.

  • 1145.
    Adamow, Goscha
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Förskolan i ett mångkulturellt samhälle: Pedagogers föreställningar kring mångkulturellt arbete på förskolan2010Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to describe, understand and analyze the thought behind the perception amongst pedagogues´ on multicultural work in preschools, based on an intercultural perspective. In this study, I questioned the pedagogues´ view on the work in preschools that prepares children for a life in a multicultural society and also the way they describe the cultural challenges.

    The study was accomplished and questions were answered by studying current literature and previous research in the field. I also interviewed four pedagogues from two different preschools located in separate areas.

    This study shows that many opinions that pedagogues expressed in the interviews can be traced back to an “us vs. them” perspective, in which your own culture, the Swedish one in this case, is the most critical and should receive the greatest attention in preschool. At the same time, the study shows that the more experience pedagogues had from multicultural preschools the greater acceptance they had for other cultures. These pedagogues also had an advanced in the development of intercultural competence.

     

  • 1146. Adams, John
    et al.
    Pike, Tim
    Corna, Laurie M.
    Platts, Loretta G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Worts, Diana
    McDonough, Peggy
    Di Gessa, Giorgio
    Sacker, Amanda
    Glaser, Karen
    Price, Debora
    How do female lifecourses affect income in retirement?2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This Briefing Note examines the influence of various lifecourses on income in retirement. The primary focus of this note is to consider how women’s retirement income is affected by motherhood. This includes the impact of taking time out of work to care for children, as well as the implications of the Motherhood Penalty, which is the observation that mothers tend to have reduced incomes relative to women without children.

  • 1147.
    Adams, Jonathan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities.
    Ships, innovation and social change: aspects of carvel shipbuilding in northern Europe 1450-18502003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 1148. Adams, Jonathan
    et al.
    Heß, Cordelia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Fear and Loathing in the North: Muslims and Jews in Medieval Scandinavia and the Baltic Region2013Report (Other academic)
  • 1149.
    Adams Lyngbäck, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    I Don't Feel Like Myself: Women's Accounts of Normality and Authenticity in the Field of Menstruation2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this master thesis is to contribute to a deeper understanding of women’s experiences in regard to menstrually related suffering. These particular experiences are examined in relation to notions of normality and authenticity. The study designed for this purpose is based on the life world of women in order to explore these ideas. The visceral signs originating from within the body are generally understood to be undetectable when working properly. Such is not the case for many women who menstruate. The cyclical change in physical and mental states associated with the menstrual cycle provide an opportunity to study how going in and out of different ways of being in the world influence human experience. Thematic interviews were conducted asking ten women living in Sweden to share their experiences of suffering related to the menstrual cycle. A phenomenological approach with focus on the body was used to study how changing ways of being in the world contribute to the construction of illness and health. Beginning with discussions about their experiences of suffering revealed that women thought in terms of when they felt like themselves and when they did not. Organization of time was interrelated with how women understood their experiences. Emphasizing recurring negative experiences lead to contemplation about causes of suffering and comparison of different states of being. The lack of ‘one’s selfness’ due to what is commonly referred to as PMS represents the dilemma these women describe. The need to have control over the outward representation of one’s self is discussed in light of different medical technologies like SSRI antidepressant use and hormonal therapies which revealed that women saw the origins of their suffering to be a product of society but tightly connected to their identity as women and were not willing to be without a menstrual cycle. Phenomenological ideas about embodiment were used to understand how suffering was seen both as a sign of health and as a part of the self.

  • 1150.
    Adams Lyngbäck, Liz
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Experiences, networks and uncertainty: parenting a child who uses a cochlear implant2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this dissertation project is to describe the ways people experience parenting a deaf child who uses a cochlear implant. Within a framework of social science studies of disability this is done by combining approaches using ethnographic and netnographic methods of participant observation with an interview study. Interpretations are based on the first-person perspective of 19 parents against the background of their related networks of social encounters of everyday life. The netnographic study is presented in composite conversations building on exchanges in 10 social media groups, which investigates the parents’ meaning-making in interaction with other parents with similar living conditions. Ideas about language, technology, deafness, disability, and activism are explored. Lived parenting refers to the analysis of accounts of orientation and what 'gets done' in respect to these ideas in situations where people utilize the senses differently. In the results, dilemmas surrounding language, communication and cochlear implantation are identified and explored. The dilemmas extend from if and when to implant, to decisions about communication modes, intervention approaches, and schools. An important finding concerns the parents’ orientations within the dilemmas, where most parents come up against antagonistic conflicts. There are also examples found of a development process in parenting based on lived, in-depth experiences of disability and uncertainty which enables parents to transcend the conflictive atmosphere. This process is analyzed in terms of a social literacy of dis/ability.

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