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  • 151.
    Lindberg, Inger
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Flerspråkiga elevers språkutbildning2013In: Symposium 2012 : lärarrollen i svenska som andraspråk / [ed] Olofsson, Mikael, Stockholm: Stockholms universitets förlag, 2013, p. 28-51Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 152.
    Lindberg, Inger
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Flerspråkiga elevers språkutbildning2013In: Language Acquisition and Use in Multilingual Contexts: Theory and Practice / [ed] Anna Flyman Mattsson & Catrin Norrby, Lund: Lund University Press , 2013, p. 122-141Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 153.
    Lindberg, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Ungdomars attityder till svordomar ur ett andraspråksperspektiv2018Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna uppsats undersöks ett urval gymnasielevers attityder till i synnerhet svenska svordomar. Tonvikten ligger vid attityderna till svordomar hos dem som har svenska som ett andraspråk och huruvida dessa skiljer sig i förhållande till attityderna hos dem som har svenska som sitt modersmål.

    Grunden i undersökningen utgörs av en enkät som sedan kompletteras med ett antal intervjuer. Resultaten vilar alltså till störst del på kvantitativa data vilka i sin tur diskuteras utifrån Bourdieus (1991) begreppsapparat om kulturellt kapital, marknader och habitus, samt teorier kring språkets kopplingar till känslor.

    Undersökningen visar att det finns skillnader i attityder till svordomar mellan modersmålstalande och andraspråkstalande av svenska inom det föreliggande urvalet. Sammanfattningsvis tenderar de som har svenska som andraspråk att svära mindre och reagera kraftigare vid förekomster av svordomar än vad modersmålstalarna gör. Resultaten visar också att andraspråkstalarna har en tendens att bejaka svordomarnas kränkande funktioner, medan modersmålstalarna i högre utsträckning än andraspråkstalarna bejakar svordomar i syften som att förstärka yttranden eller avreagera sig vid smärta. Dessa skillnader antas kunna härledas ur de värderingar som återfinns inom den kultur respektive deltagare vuxit upp i.

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  • 154.
    Lindqvist, Nellie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Lärares förhållningssätt till elevers språkrepertoarer: Hur lärare i svenska som andraspråk och engelska planerar och genomför undervisning med flerspråkiga elever i svenska högstadie- och gymnasieskolor2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 155.
    Lubińska, Dorota
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Polish Migrants in Sweden: An Overview2013In: Folia Scandinavica Posnaniensia, ISSN 1230-4786, E-ISSN 2299-6885, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 73-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current Polish migrant group in Sweden is the largest in Scandinavia, and experienced a significant growth after the enlargement of the European Union in 2004. The present overview is an attempt to give a systematic picture of this group, and is based on a selection of publications from a larger bibliography. The bibliography was compiled by the author in order to survey the knowledge on Polish migrants in Sweden, and is attached to this overview. The overview is primarily confined to the period between 1940 and 1990 because this period is covered by the scholarly literature.

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  • 156.
    Michanek, Mårten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Makt, mångfald och motstånd i genrepedagogiken?: Genrepedagogisk skrivundervisning ur ett critical literacy-perspektiv2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 157. Milani, Tommaso M.
    et al.
    Williams, Quentin
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Space/place matters2017In: Multilingual Margins, ISSN 2221-4216, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 2-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue of Multilingual Margins on the theme of “Space/place matters” has its origin in a doctoral summer school organised in December 2016 by the Department of Linguistics and the Centre for Multilingualism and Diversities Research at the University of the Western Cape as part of a collaboration with the University of Oslo and three other South African universities – Stellenbosch University, University of Cape Town and University of the Witwatersrand – and financed by Research Council of Norway’s programme International Partnerships for Excellent Education, Research and Innovation (INTPART). Doctoral students based in Norway and South Africa attended the summer school, presented their research projects, and were encouraged to submit an article to Multilingual Margins. This was with a view to training budding scholars to deal with the peer-review process of academic publishing. This special issue is the material outcome of this process and includes three articles that have a common interest in unpicking the complex relationship between language and space/place.

  • 158.
    Mollema, Anke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Typisch Frysk?: Stancetaking in the linguistic landscape of Fryslân2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
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    Typisch Frysk?
  • 159.
    Montero-Melis, Guillermo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Speakers in motion: The role of speaker variability in motion encodingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 160.
    Montero-Melis, Guillermo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Thoughts in Motion: The Role of Long-Term L1 and Short-Term L2 Experience when Talking and Thinking of Caused Motion2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is about whether language affects thinking. It deals with the linguistic relativity hypothesis, which proposes that the language we speak influences the way we think. This hypothesis is investigated in the domain of caused motion (e.g., ‘The man rolled the tyre into the garage’), by looking at Spanish and Swedish, two languages that show striking differences in how motion events are encoded. The thesis consists of four studies. The first two focus on native speakers of Spanish and Swedish. Study I compares how Spanish and Swedish speakers describe the same set of caused motion events, directing the spotlight at how variable the descriptions are in each language. The results confirm earlier findings from semantic typology regarding the dominant ways of expressing the events in each language: Spanish behaves like a verb-framed language and Swedish like a satellite-framed language (Talmy, 2000). Going beyond previous findings, the study demonstrates—using the tools of entropy and Monte Carlo simulations—that there is markedly more variability in Spanish than in Swedish descriptions. Study II tests whether differences in how Spanish and Swedish speakers describe caused motion events are reflected in how they think about such events. Using a novel similarity arrangement task, it is found that Spanish and Swedish speakers partly differ in how they represent caused motion events if they can access language during the task. However, the differences disappear when the possibility to use language is momentarily blocked by an interference task. The last two studies focus on Swedish learners of Spanish as a second language (L2). Study III explores how Swedish learners (compared to native Spanish speakers) adapt their Spanish motion descriptions to recently encountered input. Using insights from the literature on structural priming, we find that Swedish learners initially expect to encounter in their L2, Spanish, those verb types that are typical in Swedish (manner verbs like ‘roll’) but that, with increasing proficiency, their expectations become increasingly attuned to the typical Spanish pattern of using path verbs (like ‘enter’).  These expectations are reflected in the way L2 learners adapt their own production to the Spanish input. Study IV asks whether recent linguistic experience in an L2 can affect how L2 learners think about motion events. It is found that encountering motion descriptions in the L2 that emphasize different types of information (path or manner) leads L2 speakers to perceive similarity along different dimensions in a subsequent similarity arrangement task. Taken together, the thesis argues that the study of the relation between language and thought affords more valuable insights when not posed as an either-or question (i.e., does language affect thought or not?). In this spirit, the thesis contributes to the wider aim of investigating the conditions under which language does or does not affect thought and explores what the different outcomes tell us about language, thought, and the intricate mechanisms that relate them.

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  • 161.
    Montero-Melis, Guillermo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Linnaeus University, Sweden; Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Getting the ball rolling: The cross-linguistic conceptualization of caused motion2017In: Language and Cognition, ISSN 1866-9808, E-ISSN 1866-9859, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 446-472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Does the way we talk about events correspond to how we conceptualize them? Three experiments (N = 135) examined how Spanish and Swedish native speakers judge event similarity in the domain of caused motion (‘He rolled the tyre into the barn’). Spanish and Swedish motion descriptions regularly encode path (‘into’), but differ in how systematically they include manner information (‘roll’). We designed a similarity arrangement task which allowed participants to give varying weights to different dimensions when gauging event similarity. The three experiments progressively reduced the likelihood that speakers were using language to solve the task. We found that, as long as the use of language was possible (Experiments 1 and 2), Swedish speakers were more likely than Spanish speakers to base their similarity arrangements on object manner (rolling/sliding). However, when recruitment of language was hindered through verbal interference, cross-linguistic differences disappeared (Experiment 3). A compound analysis of all experiments further showed that (i) cross-linguistic differences were played out against a backdrop of commonly represented event components, and (ii) describing vs. not describing the events did not augment cross-linguistic differences, but instead had similar effects across languages. We interpret these findings as suggesting a dynamic role of language in event conceptualization.

  • 162.
    Montero-Melis, Guillermo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Eisenbeiss, Sonja
    Narasimhan, Bhuvana
    Ibarretxe-Antuñano, Iraide
    Kita, Sotaro
    Kopecka, Anetta
    Lüpke, Friederike
    Nikitina, Tatiana
    Tragel, Ilona
    Jaeger, T. Florian
    Bohnemeyer, Juergen
    Satellite- vs. Verb-Framing Underpredicts Nonverbal Motion Categorization: Insights from a Large Language Sample and Simulations2017In: Cognitive Semantics, ISSN 2352-6408, E-ISSN 2352-6416, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 36-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Is motion cognition influenced by the large-scale typological patterns proposed in Talmy’s (2000) two-way distinction between verb-framed (V) and satellite-framed (S) languages? Previous studies investigating this question have been limited to comparing two or three languages at a time and have come to conflicting results. We present the largest cross-linguistic study on this question to date, drawing on data from nineteen genealogically diverse languages, all investigated in the same behavioral paradigm and using the same stimuli. After controlling for the different dependencies in the data by means of multilevel regression models, we find no evidence that S- vs. V-framing affects nonverbal categorization of motion events. At the same time, statistical simulations suggest that our study and previous work within the same behavioral paradigm suffer from insufficient statistical power. We discuss these findings in the light of the great variability between participants, which suggests flexibility in motion representation. Furthermore, we discuss the importance of accounting for language variability, something which can only be achieved with large cross-linguistic samples.

  • 163.
    Montero-Melis, Guillermo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, The Netherlands.
    Jaeger, T. Florian
    Changing expectations mediate adaptation in L2 production2020In: Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, ISSN 1366-7289, E-ISSN 1469-1841, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 602-617Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Native language (L1) processing draws on implicit expectations. An open question is whether non-native learners of a second language (L2) similarly draw on expectations, and whether these expectations are based on learners’ L1 or L2 knowledge. We approach this question by studying inverse preference effects on lexical encoding. L1 and L2 speakers of Spanish described motion events, while they were either primed to express path, manner, or neither. In line with other work, we find that L1 speakers adapted more strongly after primes that are unexpected in their L1. For L2 speakers, adaptation depended on their L2 proficiency: The least proficient speakers exhibited the inverse preference effect on adaptation based on what was unexpected in their L1; but the more proficient speakers were, the more they exhibited inverse preference effects based on what was unexpected in the L2. We discuss implications for L1 transfer and L2 acquisition.

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  • 164.
    Montero-Melis, Guillermo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Jaeger, T. Florian
    Bylund, Emanuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Thinking Is Modulated by Recent Linguistic Experience: Second Language Priming Affects Perceived Event Similarity2016In: Language learning, ISSN 0023-8333, E-ISSN 1467-9922, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 636-665Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Can recent second language (L2) exposure affect what we judge to be similar events? Using a priming paradigm, we manipulated whether native Swedish adult learners of L2 Spanish were primed to use path or manner during L2 descriptions of scenes depicting caused motion events (encoding phase). Subsequently, participants engaged in a nonverbal task, arranging events on the screen according to similarity (test phase). Path versus manner priming affected how participants judged event similarity during the test phase. The effects we find support the hypotheses that (a) speakers create or select ad hoc conceptual categories that are based on linguistic knowledge to carry out nonverbal tasks, and that (b) short-term, recent L2 experience can affect this ad hoc process. These findings further suggest that cognition can flexibly draw on linguistic categories that have been implicitly highlighted during recent exposure.

  • 165.
    Muni Toke, Valelia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    On the margins of the Republic: Medical encounters in a postcolonial setting and the construction of sociolinguistic orders of visibility2017In: Entangled Discourses: South-North Orders of Visibility / [ed] Caroline Kerfoot, Kenneth Hyltenstam, New York: Routledge, 2017, p. 19-36Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 166.
    Norrman, Gunnar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    The irreversibility of sensitive period effects in language development: evidence from second language acquisition in international adoptees2016In: Developmental Science, ISSN 1363-755X, E-ISSN 1467-7687, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 513-520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The question of a sensitive period in language acquisition has been subject to extensive research and debate for more than half a century. While it has been well established that the ability to learn new languages declines in early years, the extent to which this outcome depends on biological maturation in contrast to previously acquired knowledge remains disputed. In the present study, we addressed this question by examining phonetic discriminatory abilities in early second language (L2) speakers of Swedish, who had either maintained their first language (L1) (immigrants) or had lost it (international adoptees), using native speaker controls. Through this design, we sought to disentangle the effects of the maturational state of the learner on L2 development from the effects of L1 interference: if additional language development is indeed constrained by an interfering L1, then adoptees should outperform immigrant speakers. The results of an auditory lexical decision task, in which fine vowel distinctions in Swedish had been modified, showed, however, no difference between the L2 groups. Instead, both L2 groups scored significantly lower than the native speaker group. The three groups did not differ in their ability to discriminate non-modified words. These findings demonstrate that L1 loss is not a crucial condition for successfully acquiring an L2, which in turn is taken as support for a maturational constraints view on L2 acquisition.

  • 167.
    Norrman, Gunnar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Long-term language development in international adoptees2016In: Starting Over – The Language Development in Internationally-Adopted Children / [ed] Fred Genesee, Audrey Delcenserie, John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2016, p. 125-146Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The linguistic development of internationally adopted children has been studied extensively for several decades. Whereas this research has mainly concerned toddlers and pre-school children during their first years after adoption, school-age children, and adolescents, there is currently scarce empirical evidence on the long-term linguistic development in adults with adoption background. While studies of infants and pre-school children generally show fast and positive short-term progress in linguistic development, medium-term studies (4–10 years after adoption) describe adoptees as still “lagging behind” their non-adopted peers. This chapter reviews the studies to date on long-term outcomes in the linguistic development of adoptees. What happens after more than ten years of exposure and into adulthood? From the review, we conclude that slight differences between adopted and non-adopted L1 speakers of a language often remain into adulthood. In addition, the limited evidence that exists to date suggests that adults who at a young age emigrated with their families to the L2 environment, and therefore continued to develop their L1, exhibit similar levels of L2 proficiency as internationally adopted adults. However, more research is required to further substantiate and generalize the conclusions that are made on the basis of our review.

  • 168.
    Orhamn, Yolanda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Vilken roll spelar svensk språkbehärskning?: En kvalitativ undersökning av språkets roll för högutbildade invandrares möjligheter till jobb2016Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Sverige tar emot fler och fler högutbildade invandrare varje år. De börjar med att gå till de olika svenska kurser som finns som Svenska för invandrare (Sfi) eller Intensivsvenska för akademiker (Sifa), men det är ingen garanti för att lära sig svenska på en nivå som hjälper dem till en snabbare väg till arbetslivet. Undersökningen är fokuserad på invandrare som kommer till Sverige med en akademisk utbildning, det vill säga, en utbildning på universitets nivå som är minst tre år. Syftet med denna studie är att undersöka vilken roll svenskan spelar för högutbildade invandrare när det är dags att hitta ett kvalificerat jobb samt undersöka om det finns andra faktorer som hjälper dem att snabbare hitta ett kvalificerat jobb. Resultatet visar att det finns andra faktorer som väger mer än själva behärskningen av svenska. Genom de djupa intervjuerna som genomförs i studien, kommer man fram till att en av de viktigaste faktorerna som påverkar hur snabbt man hittar ett jobb är kontakter. En till faktor som informanterna anger är behärskning av engelska. Till sist påpekar informanterna att tillgången till en praktikplats är mycket viktig, inte bara för att hitta ett lämpligt jobb, utan också för att få värdefulla kontakter som kan leda till arbetsmöjligheter.

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  • 169. Palm, Clara
    et al.
    Ganuza, Natalia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hedman, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Language use and investment among children and adolescents of Somali heritage in Sweden2019In: Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, ISSN 0143-4632, E-ISSN 1747-7557, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 64-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores language use and investment among Somali-speaking children and adolescents in Sweden, through group interviews and survey data. Our findings indicate that there are incentives to invest in Somali language learning considering the reported language use patterns and the expressed positive attitudes towards Somali mother tongue instruction. The Somali language was perceived to be ‘naturally’ linked to Somali identity and to being able to claim ‘Somaliness’, not only by the adolescents but also by the surroundings. Thus, advanced Somali language proficiency was perceived as necessary for being able to pass as ‘culturally authentic’ (Jaffe, A. [2012]. “Multilingual Citizenship and Minority Languages.” In The Routledge Handbook of Multilingualism, edited by M. Martin-Jones, A. Blackledge, and A. Creese, 83–99. London: Routledge). Furthermore, being perceived as unproficient in Somali or unable to transmit the language to future generations was experienced as guilt-provoking. Nevertheless, the adolescents articulated a compliance with the dominant linguistic order in Sweden, and their school’s assimilatory language rules (‘Swedish-only’). This compliance was associated with good manners and moral behaviour, thus reflecting the potentially harmful and pervasive nature of assimilatory language ideology and policy for individual students. The findings exemplify in many ways the struggles it entails to maintain and develop a minoritised language in a majority language context and the complex ‘ideological enterprise’ of language learning with its educational and ethical dilemmas.

  • 170.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    But do I really have anything to say? Conferences and the PhD student2018In: The Nordic PhD: Surviving and succeeding / [ed] Christopher McMaster, Caterina Murphy, Jakob Rosenkrantz de Lasson, New York: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2018, p. 59-67Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 171.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    English-medium instruction in Sweden: Perspectives and practices in two upper secondary schools2016In: Journal of Immersion and Content Based Language Education, ISSN 2212-8433, E-ISSN 2212-8441, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 108-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a multi-site and multi-method doctoral dissertation study of English-medium instruction (EMI) in the Swedish context, focusing on perspectives and practices in two upper secondary schools. The research explores the status of EMI, reasons schools offer EMI, beliefs about EMI, and implementation of EMI in classrooms. The educational context is studied from an ecological perspective using methods based in linguistic ethnography. The results indicate that the few Swedish schools teaching content through another language tend to offer EMI — not content and language integrated learning (CLIL). Neither language learning nor 100% English instruction are the main goals of the schools.Translanguaging is abundant, affording both pedagogic and non-pedagogic functions. The study concludes that a development of definitions and practices of both EMI and CLIL in Sweden is needed, especially in relation to language policy and language hierarchy.

  • 172.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    From Policy to Practice: Intercultural Competence in Swedish Teacher Education2016In: Fifth international conference on the development and assessment of intercultural competence: From traditions to transitions, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish education ideology is summarized in the motto: One school for all. The growing number of multilingual pupils from diverse cultural backgrounds in the Swedish school system is, however, presenting new challenges, giving intercultural competence as a specific skill for teachers increasing importance. The present research is part of an ongoing project investigating the relationship between Swedish education policy and teacher training programs, focusing on the concept of intercultural competence, especially in relation to multilingualism and the notion of pluralism.

    The examination of the connection between official policies at a macro level and the perspectives of teacher trainers and teacher students at a micro level is accomplished through three sub-studies: 1) an analysis of the discourse of Swedish education policy; 2) an analysis of selected teacher training programs at Swedish universities; and 3) semi-structured interviews at the same universities with teacher educators, student teachers in pre-service training and mentor teachers who guide the student teachers during their practical work experience in the classroom. The first sub-study concentrates on the Swedish school law from 2010 (Skollagen, updated 2015) and the Swedish national curriculum from 2011, the unifying legal documents by which all schools must abide. The second sub-study targets teacher education at both a large university with a broad national intake of students and a smaller university with a primarily regional intake. In the third sub-study, the three informant groups offer views on whether the concept of intercultural competence is apparent throughout each step of the process from the university classroom to the student perspective to the compulsory school classroom.  Of special interest are the approaches employed by teacher educators in equipping teacher students with skills to effectively meet potential challenges and the practices promoted as appropriate for the classroom by the mentor teachers during training. The triangulation of methods allows for a deeper understanding of how intercultural competence is represented both explicitly and implicitly in teacher education in response to national policy as well as the attitudes of individual teachers and students in response to the multilingual and multicultural classroom.

    This poster will present the preliminary results of work in progress. Although the focus is on the Swedish context, how and why intercultural competence skills are being explored in teacher education is of interest to other educators as well as to researchers and practitioners involved in creating education policy for compulsory schools in other multilingual contexts. 

  • 173.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Preparing teachers to meet linguistic diversity in the Swedish compulsory school2017In: 11th ISB: 2017 International Symposium on Bilingualism, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Swedish compulsory school today, at least 140 languages are spoken by students—a situation entailing both challenges and opportunities for teachers. This paper presents an investigation of how teachers are prepared to meet these students, who may be either newly arrived and fairly new speakers of Swedish or students born in Sweden with other languages at home. The focus is on how ideological and implementational spaces for supporting linguistic diversity in the classroom are created and accessed in pre-service teacher training. First, the national curriculum for the compulsory school as well as the education plans and syllabi of obligatory pre-service teacher training courses were analysed, with an aim to identity spaces for multilingualism in these educational policies. Second, a study of teacher educators and pre-service teachers from four national universities was conducted, with semi-structured interviews to elicit their perspectives and experiences. The results reveal a lack of explicit emphasis in the national curriculum on students as a diverse population, with ideological spaces for multilingualism only implicit. Likewise, teacher educators and pre-service teachers generally feel that preparation for how to support linguistic diversity in the mainstream classroom is deficient in teacher education and could be afforded greater attention. With a lack of clear directives in policy and a lack of focus in pre-service training, there are risks of inconsistent interpretation and implementation of practices supporting linguistic diversity in the compulsory school.

     

  • 174.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Spaces for multilingualism in the Swedish school: Affordances and constraints in the national curriculum and teacher education2016In: Education and migration: Language foregrounded, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish education ideology is captured in the motto: One school for all. However, growing numbers of multilingual pupils from diverse cultural backgrounds in the Swedish school system are presenting new challenges to both teacher educators and teacher students. With approximately 20% of Sweden’s population comprised of immigrants and at least 140 languages spoken by pupils in the compulsory school system, questions of affordances and constraints for multilingualism in the school are highly relevant today. While the official response to linguistic diversity is positive, with provisions for both mother tongue tuition and minority language instruction, the question is how spaces for multilingualism are being created in general policy and practice.

    The present research is part of an ongoing project investigating multilingualism and interculturality in the Swedish compulsory school, through analyses of the discourse of education policy and selected teacher training programs, together with semi-structured interviews with teacher educators, student teachers in pre-service training and working teachers. The triangulation of methods allows for a deeper understanding of how the concepts multilingualism and interculturality are represented: on the one hand, explicitly and implicitly in teacher education in relation to national policy, and on the other hand, in the attitudes of individual teachers and students in response to the multilingual and multicultural classroom.

    This paper will present two aspects of the current study of ideological and implementational spaces for multilingual education. The first part is an analysis of the development of the national curricula from 1994 to 2011 (with addenda 2015), focusing on the implicit and explicit conceptualizations of multilingualism in the texts; and the second part is an exploration of educators’ perspectives on spaces for multilingualism in their own teacher training programs. The affordances or constraints these spaces offer are fundamental to our possibilities to promote linguistic diversity and social justice in the schools of today’s global societies. Although the focus is on the Swedish context, the present research is of interest to other educators as well as to researchers and practitioners involved in creating education policy for compulsory schools in other multilingual contexts.

     

  • 175.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    You, your supervisor, and the importance of fika2018In: The Nordic PhD : Surviving and succeeding / [ed] Christopher McMaster, Caterina Murphy, Jakob Rosenkrantz de Lasson, New York: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2018, p. 103-109Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 176.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Rosén, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education. Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Translanguaging and Education: New perspectives from the field2017In: AAAL, Portland 2017: ON-SITE PROGRAM, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The colloquium “Translanguaging and Education: New perspectives from the field” is comprised of recent research that is included in the forthcoming volume with the same name (Multilingual Matters). While studies of translanguaging in bilingual, immersion, heritage, and minority education have become more widespread in recent years, much of the current research centers on contexts in which one of the languages is English and the others are minority or heritage languages. This colloquium, however, contributes to an understanding of diversity in European schools, in which languages other than English are in focus. We include three of the eleven empirical studies in the volume from diverse European school settings (France, Belgium, and Sweden), allowing for an exploration of multilingual educational issues of today.

     

    With an aim to stimulate an active discussion on the notion of translanguaging as applied in current educational research, the emphasis will be on the possibilities the concept offers as both a theoretical lens for educational research and as a pedagogy in the classroom, as seen in the three papers. The first paper presents a study of how a French pre-school teacher creates safe spaces through translanguaging with emergent bilingual learners in a multilingual classroom of three- and four-year-old children. The second paper offers comparative case studies from two diverse elementary school classrooms in Belgium, with an investigation into how translanguaging practices may provide pedagogical scaffolding for learning. The third paper presents a comparative study of language practices in Swedish mother tongue instruction (state-funded teaching of minority languages) and the ideologies expressed by the mother tongue teachers, offering a discussion of pedagogical translanguaging. To conclude the colloquium, we will open the floor for a discussion of the applicability of the concept of translanguaging in educational research in diverse settings. 

  • 177.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Rosén, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Straszer, Boglárka
    Wedin, Åsa
    Epilogue2017In: New Perspectives on Translanguaging and Education / [ed] BethAnne Paulsrud, Jenny Rosén, Boglárka Straszer, Åsa Wedin, Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 2017, p. 226-230Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 178.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Rosén, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Straszer, Boglárka
    Wedin, Åsa
    Introduktion2018In: Transspråkande i svenska utbildningssammanhang / [ed] BethAnne Paulsrud, Jenny Rosén, Boglárka Straszer, Åsa Wedin, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 11-26Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 179.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Rosén, JennyStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.Straszer, BoglárkaWedin, Åsa
    New Perspectives on Translanguaging and Education2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This edited collection explores the immense potential of translanguaging in educational settings and highlights teachers and students negotiating language ideologies in their everyday communicative practices. It makes a significant contribution to scholarship on translanguaging and considers the need for pedagogy to reflect and embrace diversity. The chapters provide rich empirical research and document translanguaging in varied educational contexts, with studies from pre-school to adult education in different, mainly European, countries, where English is not the dominant language. Together they expand our understanding of translanguaging and how it can be applied to a variety of settings. This book will be of interest to students and researchers, especially in education, language education and applied linguistics, as well as to professionals and policymakers.

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    Table of Contents
  • 180.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Rosén, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Straszer, Boglárka
    Wedin, Åsa
    Perspectives on Translanguaging in Education2017In: New Perspectives on Translanguaging and Education / [ed] BethAnne Paulsrud, Jenny Rosén, Boglárka Straszer, Åsa Wedin, Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 2017, p. 10-19Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 181.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Rosén, JennyStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.Straszer, BoglárkaWedin, Åsa
    Transspråkande i svenska utbildningssammanhang2018Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Begreppet transspråkande är användbart för att analysera språkande där en mångfald av språkliga resurser ingår. Transspråkande som pedagogik utmanar traditionella förhållningssätt och arbetssätt till förmån för sådana där elevernas språkliga repertoarer erkänns och används i lärprocesser. Transspråkande som praktik innebär därmed att man i den pedagogiska verksamheten utgår från flerspråkighet som norm för människors sätt att vara i och använda språk.

    Författarna i denna antologi utforskar transspråkande i svensk utbildningskontext från förskola till högre utbildning och i relation till svenska styrdokument och rådande pedagogiska villkor. Syftet är att studera och synliggöra språkideologiska, teoretiska och pedagogiska perspektiv på transspråkande, bland annat som resurs för elevers utveckling och lärande, i förhållande till digitala medier, som meningsskapande praktik, som norm och ideologi samt som rum för transspråkande.

    Boken aktualiserar på så sätt frågor som många lärare brukar ställa om hur en transspråkande undervisning kan se ut och vad teoretiska och ideologiska reflektioner kring den kan innebära för den dagliga praktiken. 

    Transspråkande i svenska utbildningssammanhang vänder sig främst till lärarstuderande, verksamma lärare och andra med intresse för flerspråkighet och lärande.

  • 182.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Straszer, Boglárka
    “We know the same languages and then we can mix them”: A child’s perspectives on everyday translanguaging in the family2018In: Translanguaging as Everyday Practic / [ed] Gerardo Mazzaferro, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 49-68Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 183.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Zilliacus, Harriet
    Flerspråkighet och transspråkande i lärarutbildningen2018In: Transspråkande i svenska utbildningssammanhang / [ed] BethAnne Paulsrud, Jenny Rosén, Boglárka Straszer, Åsa Wedin, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 27-48Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 184. Peck, Amiena
    et al.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, Bellville, South Africa.
    Skinscapes2015In: Linguistic Landscape, ISSN 2214-9953, E-ISSN 2214-9961, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 133-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper argues for extending linguistic landscape studies to also encompass the body as a corporeal landscape, or ‘moving discursive locality’. We articulate this point within a narrative of a developing field of landscape studies that is increasingly attentive to the mobility and materiality of spatialized semiotics as performative, that is, as partially determining of how we come to understand ourselves ‘in place’. Taking Cape Town’s tattooing culture as an illustration, we unpack the idea of ‘the human subject as an entrepreneur of the self, as author of his or her being in the world’ (Comaroff & Comaroff, 2012: 23), by using a phenomenological methodology to explore the materiality of the body as a mobile and dynamic space of inscribed spatialized identities and historical power relations. Specifically, we focus on: how tattooed bodies sculpt future selves and imagined spaces, the imprint they leave behind in the lives of five participants in the study and ultimately the creation of bodies that matter in time and place. The paper will conclude with a discussion of what studies of corporeal landscapes may contribute to a broader field of linguistic landscape studies.

  • 185. Peck, Amiena
    et al.
    Stroud, ChristopherStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.Williams, Quentin
    Making sense of people and place in linguistic landscapes2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 186.
    Perovuo, Matilda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Our love, our language: A qualitative study on non-native speakers’ experiences of bilingual couplehood, language emotionality and self-perception in different languages2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 187.
    Prieto, Gastón
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    ”¿Me pasarías la blåbärssylt?”: Lexikaliskt inskott och genusval: hur infödda talare av spanska väljer grammatiskt genus när de skjuter in svenska substantiv i spanskt tal2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    När en infödd talare av spanska med hög behärskningsnivå i svenska samtalar med en annan individ med liknande språkbakgrund är det inte sällan fraser som ”¿me pasarías la blåbärssylt?” (”kan du skicka blåbärssylten, tack?”) uppstår. Lexikaliskt inskott (eng. noun insertion), d.v.s. att skjuta in substantiv från andraspråket i för övrigt förstaspråksdominerat tal, är ett vanligt förekommande fenomen hos tvåspråkiga. Men vad händer när de två samspelande språken har asymmetriska genussystem som spanskans och svenskans? Vilket spanskt grammatiskt genus ska man då tillskriva de inskjutna svenska enheterna som ”blåbärssylt” i rubriken? Och vad är det som styr dessa val? Två hypoteser ställs upp för att försöka få svar på dessa frågor: genusvalet styrs i större utsträckning av det inskjutna substantivets ändelsemorfem, eller så styrs det i större utsträckning av dess översättningsmotsvarighet. För att testa dessa två hypoteser genomfördes ett experiment med 30 infödda spansktalare med svenska som andraspråk där de ombads attribuera ett spanskt grammatiskt genus, maskulinum eller femininum, till en del svenska substantiv i två olika uppgifter, en lucktext och en ordlista. Resultaten visade att både de olika stimuliordens ändelsemorfem och översättningsmotsvarighet spelade en signifikativ roll för val av grammatiskt genus, och att översättningsmotsvarighet hade en relativt större påverkan på genusvalet jämfört med ändelsemorfem. Detta kan eventuellt peka på att genus hos infödda spansktalare upplevs som en inherent egenskap hos själva referenten, med påtagliga konsekvenser för hur de ser på och tänker kring omvärlden.

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    Prieto_G_kandidatuppsats_¿Me_pasarías_la_blåbärssylt?_2018
  • 188.
    Quevedo, Marta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    The influence of semantic context on accentedness, comprehensibility, and intelligibility in extemporaneous foreign accented Swedish speech2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Bilingualism is nowadays a worldwide phenomenon due to different factors such as migration, education or political and geographical reasons. These factors have led to both individual and social bilingualism, which favor an increase of communicative encounters between native and non-native speakers of a certain language.

    The above situation has contributed to a growth of studies on second language acquisition. Some of these studies have focused on native speakers’ perception and understanding of the non-native speech. More specifically, perception and effectiveness of communication through the analysis of three dimensions; accentedness, comprehensibility, and intelligibility. Although these three constructs have been intensively studied, little is known about the effect of semantic context on them. To our knowledge, just two studies have analyzed the effect of semantic context on native speakers’ judgments of the three dimensions by using read material. Therefore, this thesis extends the research on the influence of semantic context over these three dimension when the auditory stimulus corresponds to spontaneous non-native speech.

    In this thesis, the results on accentedness, comprehensibility, and intelligibility tasks of 40 native Swedish speakers are presented. The findings showed that listeners’ perceived comprehensibility of the non-native speech is affected by the use of additional contextual information. That is, the listeners who were provided with additional visual information perceived the non-native speech as significantly easier to understand than those listeners who did not receive the extra contextual support. Furthermore, the results showed that accentedness and comprehensibility perception of the listeners is influenced by their actual understanding of the non-native speech.

    Finally, this thesis proves the difficulty of studying the effect of semantic context on listeners’ response to accentedness, comprehensibility, and intelligibility when using spontaneous non-native speech. The results indicate that more research on how semantic context influences the perception of extemporaneous non-native speech is needed.

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    Quevedo_M_masteruppsats_Semantic_Context_2014
  • 189.
    Rosén, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    New speakers in a multilingual Sweden: Policy in practice2017In: 11th ISB: 2017 International Symposium on Bilingualism, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is a multilingual country: in 2014, 23.8% of students in compulsory schools spoke languages in addition to Swedish. Over 160,000 individuals applied for asylum in Sweden in 2015 many of them children aged 7-16 with the right to education during the asylum-seeking process (Swedish Migration Agency, 2016). While Sweden has educational policies and programs in place to meet the needs of multilingual students, the exceptional numbers of recent arrivals has been a challenge to the educational system. In view of the changing linguistic landscape in educational settings, the aim of this colloquium is to critically analyze how new speakers in a range of educational contexts in Sweden are constructed in policy and practice.

    To frame the four studies, the colloquium begins with a presentation of language and education in the Swedish context. Following this, the first paper examines compulsory school teacher education, specifically researching how teachers are prepared to meet increasingly diverse student populations. The study considers the perspectives of teacher educators and pre-service teachers in order to understand the ideological and implementational spaces afforded multilingualism in teacher training policies. The second paper explores tensions between conceptualizations and regulations framing languages as "mother tongues" and approaches to teaching Kurdish through the subject of mother tongue instruction to children in lower secondary school. The findings contribute to understandings of the new and traditional speaker dichotomy—a relevant issue in research on heritage or multilingual language education in all contexts. The third paper focuses on other new speakers in a Swedish primary school, namely language minority students enrolled in an English-Swedish bilingual program. As new speakers of both languages of instruction, these students may encounter particular challenges with academic content learning. However, results reveal how students resist language separation policies and legitimize their own language practices in the classroom. Finally, the fourth paper moves the focus to literacy education for adult immigrants. The study utilizes a critical sociocultural perspective on literacy and language learning to investigate how the “illiterate learner” is constructed in Swedish adult education policy and how the conceptualization is subsequently related to understandings of these new speakers as the Other. With our presentations ranging from primary school to adult education, we expand the view of the new speaker, by exploring categorizations and conceptualizations of new speakers and their language practices in Sweden. 

    To conclude, the discussant will consider the themes presented by the four papers, focusing on the ways these empirical studies shed light on the range of issues surrounding new speakers in the Swedish context. This conceptual discussion will be briefly compared to similar challenges and possibilities in other contexts before we open the floor for a dialogue amongst the participating audience and the presenting speakers.

  • 190.
    Sakakibara, Maki
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Phonological Awareness Development in Bilingual Children: How do Swedish/Danish-Japanese bilingual children develop Japanese phonological awareness in comparison with Japanese children?2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The phonological awareness development of bilingual children has been discussed from the viewpoint of whether they have an advantage compared to monolingual children. Some previous studies discovered that there were language pairs where bilingual children could have no advantage in it. However, it has not been clarified yet how bilingual children with such a language pair develop phonological awareness. The purpose of this study was to give an example of such a language pair and analyze bilingual children’s phonological awareness development in comparison with that of monolingual children.

         This study examined how 3- to 7-year-old Swedish/Danish-Japanese bilingual children developed Japanese phonological awareness in comparison with the corresponding Japanese children. Forty-five children (26 bilingual children and 19 Japanese children) participated in this study. The bilingual children lived in Sweden or Denmark and had Swedish or Danish as their strong language in general but they also spoke Japanese on a daily basis. On the other hand, the Japanese children used exclusively Japanese at home as their sole first language. The children were individually tested on two types of Japanese syllables (fundamental syllables and special syllables). The fundamental syllable section had three types of tasks (segmentation task, abstraction task and identification task) and the special syllable section had one type of task (segmentation task).

         The results showed no advantage for the bilingual children in Japanese phonological awareness development in comparison with the Japanese children. While the bilingual children developed Japanese phonological awareness with age and/or letter knowledge in the same way as the Japanese children, their developmental rate was generally slower than that of the Japanese children. Two factors appear to play a part in this finding: first, the fact that Swedish and Danish are phonologically different from Japanese so knowledge of these languages did not help the children to discover Japanese phonological structure. Second, the amount of exposure to Japanese for bilingual children was significantly less even though they spoke and understood the language well. Thus, this study suggests that bilingual children can have difficulty with regard to phonological awareness development in one of their languages when the other language is not conducive to the discovery of this language’s phonological structure and when exposure to this language is limited, even if they speak and understand the language well.

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  • 191.
    Salö, Linus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Böcker vi låtsas ha läst2020Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Jag har tidigare bloggat en del om akademisk kunskapsproduktion, ett ämne som ju omgärdas av en livaktig diskussion. Det kryllar också av böcker om akademiskt skrivande. Mer sällsynta är böcker om akademiskt läsande, och frågan om akademisk konsumtion verkar på motsvarande sätt vara tämligen oartikulerad. Denna skevhet är förstås inte representativ för den mängd av sysslor som upptar akademikers arbetsliv.

  • 192.
    Salö, Linus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Engelska eller svenska? En kartläggning av språksituationen inom högre utbildning och forskning2010Report (Other academic)
  • 193.
    Salö, Linus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Fjuttig engelska eller mossig svenska?2020Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Det centrala mediet för vetenskaplig produktion har sedan länge varit text. Med tiden har särskilt tidskriftsartikeln blivit den dominerande skriftliga genren. Under senare år tillkom artiklar i indexerade tidskrifter, varav merparten bara accepterar engelskspråkiga bidrag. Rätt mycket har övergetts längs vägen: andra medier så som film, andra skriftgenrer så som böcker och tidskriftsartiklar på andra språk, så som svenska. Allt detta finns förstås kvar inom många discipliner, men i det stora hela stöps den vetenskapliga produktionen i samma mall. Är det något att sörja? Ja, säger förespråkare för vetenskapens mångfald. Nej, säger förespråkare för vetenskapens standardisering och den akademiska kunskapens enande.

  • 194.
    Salö, Linus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Går det att prata om vetenskap på svenska?2016In: Forskning & Framsteg, ISSN 0015-7937, no 4, p. 19-19Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 195.
    Salö, Linus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. KTH, Sverige.
    Invandrarutredningen och 1970-talets språkideologiska omvälvningar: Till frågan om modersmålsundervisningens kunskapssociologi2020Report (Refereed)
  • 196.
    Salö, Linus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Kan svenskan användas som vetenskapsspråk?2020Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den starkaste drivkraften bakom den nu tioåriga språklagen var att skydda svenskan som Sveriges huvudspråk. Linus Salö gör nedslag i den då stundtals agiterade debatten och frågar sig om argumentationen står sig. Och hur ser det ut i dag: kan svenskan verkligen användas inom alla samhällsområden? Vad kan sägas säkert om det svenska språkets ställning som vetenskapsspråk?

  • 197.
    Salö, Linus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Language ideology and shifting representations of linguistic threats: a Bourdieusian re-reading of the conceptual history of domain loss in Sweden’s field of language planning2014In: English in Nordic Universities: Ideologies and Practices / [ed] Anna Kristina Hultgren, Frans Gregersen, Jacob Thøgersen, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2014, p. 83-110Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents a sociological account of the language ideological representations underpinning discourses about perceived threats from English in Sweden. The objective is to contextualize the conceptual history of “domain loss” within Sweden’s field of language planning, in conjunction with crossing discourses about minority languages and EU membership. With Bourdieu, the safeguarding of Swedish is comprehended as linked to struggles where the role of the nation-state is set in flux, opening up linguistic markets beyond its control. As a product of the relation between agents’ habitus and the field, domain loss has served to legitimize discourses about the disestablishment of the national language regime, which is interpreted as a strategy to defend the market into which agents have invested capital. 

  • 198.
    Salö, Linus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Leve ordet avnämare!2020Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Det har alltid funnits en idé om att man ska ”få ut” något av universiteten. Åsikterna om vad det ska vara har däremot skiftat: under en tid var det lika förnuftsenligt att eftersträva nationellt relevant kunskap som det sedermera blev med internationellt excellent kunskap. Vad eller vilka ska vår kunskap tjäna, och hur kan man tänka kring denna angelägna fråga?

  • 199.
    Salö, Linus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Min bok! Om att flärpa sin läsning2020Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Sist skrev jag lite om akademiskt läsande. Det finns mycket att säga om det. Jag tänkte nu bli mer personlig om den saken, för likt annat kan förhållandet till läsning präglas av levnadsbanan. Jag är ett bibliotekariebarn, som gick på Bibliotekshögskolan i Borås redan innan jag fyllt ett år (fast i gåstol). Med det följer typiskt ett livslångt förhållande till böcker. Men mina föräldrar tyckte att det var borgerligt och allmänt osympatiskt att köpa böcker, så även om huset var fullt med böcker så tillhörde de kommunen och byttes ut i ett slags långsamt flöde. Kanske just därför älskar jag att äga böcker, och tanken på att återlämna de böcker jag läst fyller mig med separationsångest. Men inte bara därför.

  • 200.
    Salö, Linus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Rusta studenter med användbart språk2020Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Det finns ett uppenbart glapp mellan forskarvärldens globala diskussion på engelska och det nationella kunskapssamhället som, flerspråkighet till trots, uppbärs på och av svenska. En klok språkpolitik för högskolesektorn bygger på denna insikt, och planlägger om publiceringsspråk och undervisningsspråk på pragmatiska, ändamålsenliga vis. Här finns goda exempel där man tycks ha utvecklat en tankegång om vad för slags språkkunskaper de utexaminerade studenterna bör ha.

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