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  • 151.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Introduction: the nature of belongings2015In: Own and be owned: archaeological approaches to the concept of possession / [ed] Alison Klevnäs, Charlotte Hedenstierna-Jonson, Stockholm: Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies , 2015, p. 1-22Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 152.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Necromancy, ancestral wisdom and grave reopening practices2019In: Tidens landskap: En vänbok till Anders Andrén / [ed] Ljung, Cecilia et al, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2019, p. 98-100Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 153.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Overkill: reopening graves to maim the dead in Anglo-Saxon England2015In: Kończyny, kości i wtórnie otwarte groby w dawnych kulturach [Limbs, bones, and reopened graves in past societies] / [ed] Leszek Gardeła, Kamil Kajkowski, Bytów: Muzeum Zachodniokaszubskie w Bytowie , 2015, p. 177-213Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 154.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Whodunnit? Grave robbery in Anglo-Saxon England and the Merovingian kingdoms2013Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Grave robbery is widely recorded in the cemeteries of early medieval Europe, but this research is the first systematic regional study. Critically assesses all that is currently known of grave disturbance in the Merovingian kingdoms, and shows that there is significant evidence for the same practice in Anglo-Saxon England. Investigates in detail an intensive outbreak in 6th-7th century Kent. Aims to advance the debate about early medieval disturbance from general discussion of explanatory possibilities to evaluation of specific interpretations and their compatibility with the archaeological evidence. The conclusions have significant implications for the interpretation of grave robbery across early medieval Europe, and for recognizing and understanding grave disturbance more widely.

  • 155.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Hedenstierna-Jonson, CharlotteStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Own and be owned: archaeological approaches to the concept of possession2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 156.
    Krzewińska, Maja
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Günther, Torsten
    Hedenstierna-Jonson, Charlotte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Omrak, Ayça
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Yaka, Reyhan
    Kılınç, Gülşah Merve
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Somel, Mehmet
    Sobrado, Veronica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Evans, Jane
    Knipper, Conine
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Genomic and Strontium Isotope Variation Reveal Immigration Patterns in a Viking Age Town2018In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 28, no 17, p. 2730-2738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact of human mobility on the northern European urban populations during the Viking and Early Middle Ages and its repercussions in Scandinavia itself are still largely unexplored. Our study of the demographics in the final phase of the Viking era is the first comprehensive multidisciplinary investigation that includes genetics, isotopes, archaeology, and osteology on a larger scale. This early Christian dataset is particularly important as the earlier common pagan burial tradition during the Iron Age was cremation, hindering large-scale DNA analyses. We present genome-wide sequence data from 23 individuals from the 10th to 12th century Swedish town of Sigtuna. The data revealed high genetic diversity among the early urban residents. The observed variation exceeds the genetic diversity in distinct modern-day and Iron Age groups of central and northern Europe. Strontium isotope data suggest mixed local and non-local origin of the townspeople. Our results uncover the social system underlying the urbanization process of the Viking World of which mobility was an intricate part and was comparable between males and females. The inhabitants of Sigtuna were heterogeneous in their genetic affinities, probably reflecting both close and distant connections through an established network, confirming that early urbanization processes in northern Europe were driven by migration.

  • 157.
    Källén, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Madeleine Colani och den besvärliga kroppen2014In: Med hjärta och hjärna: en vänbok till professor Elisabeth Arwill-Nordbladh / [ed] Henrik Alexandersson, Alexander Andreeff, Annika Bünz, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 158.
    Källén, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Reflexion (I)2009In: Döda personers sällskap: Gravmaterialens identiteter och kulturella uttryck / [ed] Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie et. al., Stockholm: Stockholms Universitet , 2009, p. 81-84Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 159.
    Källén, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Stones Standing: Archaeology, Colonialism, and Ecotourism in Northern Laos2015Book (Refereed)
  • 160.
    Källén, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Artelius, Tore
    Arkeologisk Framtid: Arkeologmötet 20082009Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Sedan 1994 arrangerar Svenska Arkeologiska Samfundet konferenser som kretsar kring arkeologins roll för människan och samhället. Det åttonde Arkeologmötet hölls i april 2008 på Kulturen i Lund, med temat Framtidens arkeologier - tendenser och visioner. Femton aktiva arkeologer, forskare, kulturskribenter, politiker och myndighetspersoner inviterades för att ge sin syn på den arkeologiska framtiden. I den här boken finner du deras samtidsanalyser och framtidsvisioner presenterade o tretton essäer.

  • 161.
    Källén, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. The Swedish History Museum, Sweden.
    Hegardt, Johan
    A Cosmopolitan History of Archaeology: The Olov Janse Case2014In: Bulletin of the History of Archaeology, ISSN 1062-4740, E-ISSN 2047-6930, Vol. 24, article id 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The life of international archaeologist Olov Janse (1892–1985) demonstrates the complexity of personal identify formation. Janse worked in Europe, Scandinavia, South East Asia and North America, spoke many different languages, controlled many collections of artefacts, changed identity or character at least five times, and nationality, three times. It is hoped the themes, elucidated through Janse’s story, will encourage comparisons with, and analyses of, the careers of other cosmopolitan archaeologists, and instigate an international history of archaeology focused on mobility, translation and networks, rather than one based on the impact of archaeology on the development of nation-states.

    A correction article relating to the abstract and author affiliation of this publication can be found here: http://dx.doi.org/10.5334/bha.248

  • 162.
    Källén, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Jakobsson, Mikael
    A Hobbling Marriage: On the relationship between the collections and the societal mission of the Museum of National Antiquities in Stockholm2009In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 17, p. 149-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the late 19th century, the new Museum of National Antiquities in Stockholm was a cutting-edge institution for the presentation of ideas of a universal human development from primitive to modern – ideas that were at the heart of the European colonial project. We argue that the archaeological collections with their unaltered 19th-century structures still represent a narrative that reproduces a colonial understanding of the world, a linear arrangement of essential cultural groups according to a teleological development model. Contrary to this, the contemporary mission of the Museum, inspired by the late 20th-century postcolonial thinking, is directed towards questioning this particular narrative. This problematic relationship is thus present deep within the structure of the Museum of National Antiquities as an institution, and it points to the need for long-term strategic changes to make the collections useful for vital museum activity in accordance with the Museum’s mission.

  • 163.
    Källén, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Sanner, Inga
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature.
    Making Cultural History: An Introduction2013In: Making Cultural History: New Perspectives on Western Heritage / [ed] Anna Källén, Stockholm: Nordic Academic Press, 2013, p. 7-14Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 164.
    Körlinge, Max
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Eskilstunakistornas bruk och återbruk: Tidigkristna gravmonument i Östergötland under medeltiden2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies the fragmentation and reuse of early christian monuments ("eskilstunakistor") in churches in Östergötland during the medieval period. This is found to have been done in two stages. The first stage shows a collectivization of society. Within religion the change from ancestoral cult towards the saints' cult is important as the fragments are reused like relics. During the second stage the collectivization has been fulfilled, and the reuse is instead part of the christian churches' strategy for incorporating old powerful symbols from the landscape into their own church building.

  • 165.
    Larsson, Sabina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Heliga vatten: Vattencentrerad kult och vattnets symbolik under Skandinaviens kristnande2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay aims to explore continuity in water centric cult within the period of the Christianization of Scandinavia (ca 800-1100 AD) and to understand the changing of symbolism of water in pre-Christian cult and early Christian religion. It has previously been thought that Christian priests took over the old holy wells and renamed them after saint, all to ease the pagan people into a Christian lifestyle. But archaeological evidence shows that the cult at these wells, and other water centric sites, where almost completely abandoned a few hundred years before the Christians came to Scandinavia. The Christians should not have felt the need to transform this tradition since it was only practiced in a very small and supposedly private scale. On the contrary, religious activities at these wells seems to increase with the new religion and perhaps this is explained by Christianity itself. Water was an important element in the liturgi and especially in baptism. In early Christian Europe special chapels were built to baptize children but also grown men and women and historical sources speak of the importance of baptism in "living water". This essay discusses the possibility that these wells were used to baptize the newly converted Christians, thus receiving its sacred status. The official sping cult ended in the 16th century with the Protestant Reformation as it was prohibited but still the wells were visited and the cult was kept alive.

  • 166.
    Leonardsson, Sasha
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Norrby stenar - ett domarringsgravfält i Närke och dess bygdeanknytning2018Student paper second term, 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this essay I will analyze Norrby stenar stone circles in Närke in order to understand the stone circles in relation to the society and landscape around them. I will also compare older with newer reasearch in order to understand how archaeologists have seen the stone circles over time. To do so, I will put the stone circles in relation to the norse mythology and the ideology about Midgård.

  • 167.
    Leonardsson, Sasha
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Smålandsstenar och Närkes Norrby stenar: Domarringsgravfält och folkvandringstida bygder2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay is about the stone circles Norrby Stenar and Smålandsstenar. I will discuss them and their meaning from different angles. By doing that, I hope to understand the stone circles in relation to the society and landscape that surrounds them. These places are unique because there are only stone circles as a burial form there. It is also more then four stone circles on both grave sites. In order to understand these places I will compare them with each other and by others research. I will interpret the monuments through an identity perspective, in relation with the norse mythology. 

  • 168.
    Li, Cairong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    The Western Philosophical View of Contemporary Chinese Archaeoogical Research and Historiography2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 169.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Prehistoric diet transitions: an archaeological perspective1995Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a study of prehistoric diet transitions within the Baltic area during the Stone Age. More specific the changes in diet expected to be found when hunter-gatherer subsistence is changed into a farming subsistence. This transition should be able to detect in the bone material as changes in trace element amounts and changes in stable isotopes.

    There is an advantage of using quantitative methods compared to qualitative ones when analysing diet patterns, where prehistoric bones have proven to be an excellent archive for long-term quantitatve dietary information.

    This study is based on analyses of stable isotopes and trace elements on more than 120 human bone samples originating from different geographical locations and different time periods. Collagen is the bone protein used for stable isotope analyses. The carbon in collagen originates from the proteins digested and will consequently provide dietary information. Thus it is important that the analysed carbon originates from collagen only. There are, however, other bone constituents that can confuse the measurements, e.g., lipids. They have a deviating isotope value and must be removed before isotope analysis.

    Another problem of using stable carbon isotopes as dietary indicator in the Baltic area has been the complicated natural history of the Baltic Sea. The varying marine influence has affected the isotopic signature, i.e., the marine end-value. However, as long as an end-value is determined at the specific time period of interest, the method works just as in the big oceans (but with a modified end-value).

    In this thesis the isotope studies were combined with trace element analysis of copper and zinc.

    The transition from hunter-gatherers to farmers is one of the most discussed topics in Stone Age archaeology. By using trace elements and stable isotopes it was shown that there was no general picture of the diet during the Stone Age. There was no temporal change, neither was there any correlation between diet and culture. The strongest correlation was instead between diet and geographical location, mostly coastal or inland.

    One hypotheses regarding the transition from hunter-gatherers to farmers is the stress hypothesis. This stipulates that sedentary hunter-fishing populations in northern Europe suffered from nutritional stress. Stable isotope analyses on a sedentary subneolithic Slone Age population from the Aland islands showed that they lived mainly on marine resources. However, from palaeopathological analyses on the skeletal material, it was concluded that this population did not show sufficient indications of stress to support the stress hypothesis.

    Some authors claim that high social complexity is a prerequisite for the introduction of farming. The erection of megaliths is a sign of such a high social complexity and has been suggested to have been built by a cereal cultivating population. Application of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes on two megalith populations (Rössberga, Västergötland, and Resmo, Öland) showed that the introduction of farming in this area was based on domesticated animals but with only a minor influence on cereals. A continued use of marine resources was apparent in the megalith population from coastal areas.

    Finally, a specialized utilization of crustaceans could be shown in settlements at, or nearby, a lagoon, as seen in the populations at Mesolithic Skateholm and at Neolithic Resmo.

  • 170.
    Lind, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Fossiliserade frön för en bra Antropocen: Action-arkeologi för hållbarhet och miljö med förslag för applicering i svenska landskap2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with issues on how archaeology might participate in transdisciplinary research andwork towards sustainable development. Three main themes are explored based on sustainabilitywork mainly from Stockholm Resilience Centre and previous archaeological texts about theutilisation of archaeology for environmental benefits. The themes are nature/culture-dichotomies,deep time perspectives and heritage. Each theme is continously adding unto the next one,whereafter applicability scenarios are discussed in three Sweden-specific environmental contexts:The Baltic Sea, agricultural landscapes and the alpine environment. Implications include: thedevelopment of a heritage perspective that bridges the nature-culture divide and focuses oncontinuity rather than preservation and includes human usage of heritage, possibilities forarchaeology to be used to inform environmental management and to counter NIMBY-ism

  • 171.
    Lindqvist, Jessica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Från jägare till bönder: Hur en urbefolkning i Västerbotten har utvecklats och en kulturdualism vuxit fram2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The main purpose with this essay is to understand how the coastal zone in the Gulf of Bothnia (Västerbotten County) was used, and by whom, before the strong farming district expanded during the medieval period. The sealing sites in the shore zone and the archaeological finds that have been found suggest that both a hunting culture and a farming culture may have used the sites.  To truly understand one must examine the hinterland sites, the coastal sites, the shore sites and the local placenames as well.

  • 172.
    Ljung, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Runstensfynd och tidiga kyrkliga miljöer i Sigtuna2019In: Tidens landskap: En vänbok till Anders Andrén / [ed] Cecilia Ljung, Anna Andreasson Sjögren, Ingrid Berg, Elin Engström, Ann-Mari Hållans Stenholm, Kristina Jonsson, Alison Klevnäs, Linda Qviström, Torun Zachrisson, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2019, p. 183-185Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 173.
    Ljung, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Skiftet. Vikingatida sed och kristen tro. Ett mångvetenskapligt perspektiv på kristnandeprocessen i Mälarområdet. Red. Sten Tesch. Skellefteå 20172017In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 112, no 3, p. 193-195Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 174.
    Ljung, Cecilia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Andreasson Sjögren, AnnaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.Berg, IngridStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.Engström, ElinHållans Stenholm, Ann-MariJonsson, KristinaKlevnäs, AlisonStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.Qviström, LindaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.Zachrisson, TorunStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Tidens landskap: En vänbok till Anders Andrén2019Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 175.
    Ljunge, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Rock art and the meaning of place: some phenomenological reflections2010In: Changing pictures: rock art traditions and visions in Northern Europe / [ed] Joakim Goldhahn, Ingrid Fuglestvedt & Andrew Jones, Oxford and Oakville: Oxbow Books , 2010, p. 88-107Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 176.
    Löfstedt, Natalie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Hovgårdsgravfältet på Adelsö: En analys av gravfältets relation till Birkas kungsgård2017Student paper second term, 5 credits / 7,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 177.
    Mattsson McGinnis, Meghan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Ring Out Your Dead: Distribution, form, and function of iron amulets in the late Iron Age grave fields of Lovö2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the distribution, forms, and function(s) of iron amulets deposited in the late Iron Age gravefields of Lovö, with the goal of ascertaining how (and so far as possible why) these objects were utilized in rituals carried out during and after burials. Particular emphasis is given to re-interpreting the largest group of iron amulets, the iron amulet rings, in a more relational and practice-focused way than has heretofore been attempted. By framing burial analyses, questions of typology, and evidence of ritualized actions in comparison with what is known of other cult sites in Mälardalen specifically– and theorized about the cognitive landscape(s) of late Iron Age Scandinavia generally– a picture of iron amulets as inscribed objects made to act as catalytic, protective, and mediating agents is brought to light.

  • 178.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    A Study of Punctuality: Using typo-chronology as Barthes’ studium and punctum2012In: Matters of Scale: Processes and courses of events in the past and the present / [ed] Nanouschka Myrberg Burström, Fredrik Fahlander, Stockholm: Department of archaeology and classical studies, Stockholm university , 2012, p. 75-89Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 179.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    A tale of buried treasure, some good estimations, and golden unicorns: The numismatic connections of Alan Turing.2015In: Myntstudier: Festskrift till Kenneth Jonsson. / [ed] Talvio, Tuukka and Wijk, Magnus, Stockholm: Svenska Numismatiska Föreningen , 2015, p. 226-230Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1940 a man decided to take some precautionary measures to protect his savings against the imminent threat of the Battle of Britain. To avoid being left without means in the event of a German invasion, prevent devaluation of his savings and possibly also to speculate in rising silver prices he bought two large silver ingots, worth £250 and weighing about 90 kilograms, loaded them into a pram, and went out to bury them in a small wood nearby. The man was Alan Turing (1912–1954), famous for his wartime success in breaking the German Enigma code with his team, and for his groundbreaking work on electric machines which were to develop into the first real computers. Turing is also well-known to many who work with coins as one of the scholars behind the Good-Turing frequency estimation formula, used within numismatics to calculate the number of coins of a specific type produced from an identified number of dies. This paper meanders from Alan Turing's hidden treasure on to his scientific work and to his various connections with numismatics: the Good-Turing formula, Joan Clarke, and commemorative coins.

  • 180.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Brita Ingrid Maria Malmer2018In: Svenskt kvinnobiografiskt lexikon, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 181.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Divina Moneta: coin finds in religious contexts2017In: XV International Numismatic Congress, Taormina, 2015, volume 2: proceedings / [ed] Maria Caccamo Cantalbiano, Roma: Arbor Sapientae , 2017, p. 1309-1316Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Coin finds in religious contexts raised a significant number of questions concerning the conception and use of coins and money in different geographical and temporal settings. Votive offerings, ritual minting and donations are but a few examples of how coins were, and still are, used as material mediators between humans and gods. In the Divina Moneta Round Table, the use of coins and money for religious purposes was discussed from an understanding of the particular material qualities of coins (such as metal, size or iconography) in combination with their connotations in the light of different socio-cultural phenomena (such as abundance, kingship or protection). These material and ideological aspects were related to patterns of deposition in religious contexts and to detailed numismatic evidence, drawing on cases of coins from various historical, geographical and numismatic contexts.

  • 182.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Divina Moneta: Coin finds in religious contexts2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 183.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Elina Screen, Sylloge of Coins of the British Isles, Nor­wegian Collections, part I (vol. 65) & II (vol. 66), Oxford 2013 & 20152016In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 111, no 1, p. 66-68Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 184.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Eva Marie Ulla Margareta Ehrensvärd2018In: Svenskt kvinnobiografiskt lexikon, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 185.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Florent Audy har disputerat2018In: Nordisk Numismatisk Unions medlemsblad, ISSN 0025-8539, no 3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 186.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Florent Audy har disputerat2018In: Svensk numismatisk tidskrift, ISSN 0283-071X, no 5, p. 121-121Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 187.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Från brödbyte och silverpenningar till kontantuppror2020In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Att lära medeltidens nordbor att använda mynt tog hundratals år. Nu står vi först i kön till det kontantlösa samhället, vilket lär få oanade konsekvenser för vår relation till pengar – och varandra.

  • 188.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Händelser vid vatten: Maritima studier med allmänarkeologisk relevans2012In: Marinarkeologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1100-9632, no 3, p. 11-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Är den maritima arkeologin fast i ”specialiseringens dilemma”? På vilket kulturhistoriskt område kan maritim arkeologi säga något väsentligt som inte kan belysas utifrån andra premisser? Här föreslås en ökad, snarare än minskad, närhet till det empiriska materialet, men även till allmänarkeologisk teori och problemformuleringar. I skärningspunkten mellan människa, vatten och ting finns den maritima arkeologins särskilda förutsättningar och unika kvalitéer att förvalta och utveckla.

  • 189.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Imitation as citation: coin imitation as rhetoric and discourse2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Coinage began to be used from around AD 995 in Scandinavia. These early coins imitated contemporary Anglo-Saxon coins but not in a passive or unquestioning way, but as part of complex chain of citations by which imported artefacts were adapted and re-contextualized. For more than thirty years the English and Scandinavian coinages were closely connected through a network of humans and objects that moved, physically and conceptually, between mints and kingdoms. Different iconographical models were used in a strategic/rhetorical way by commissioners and artisans to create relations between cognitive nodes through association, referencing, paraphrasing and appropriation. When circulating, the coins linked users to an official and shared discourse, and maintained the created relations through the impact of their materiality. While many re-contextualizing practices in the Viking Age seem to deal with reconnection with the past, the coin-imitation practice apparently worked mainly within a contemporary conceptual framework, although there are components of ‘ancientness’ as well. Object agency and the hybrid, creative, characters of these coins provide starting points for a deeper understanding of the coins’ wider connotations and meanings, as well as for the imitative practice itself.

  • 190.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Introduction: Faith and Ritual Materialised: Coin Finds in Religious Contexts2018In: Divina Moneta: Coins in Religion and Ritual / [ed] Nanouschka Myrberg Burström, Gitte Tarnew Ingvardson, Abingdon: Routledge, 2018, p. 1-10Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Coins have played an important role in religious and ritual practice ever since they started to be produced. The claim is sustained by numerous sources: coin finds in archaeological contexts,written sources and images. Why people deposit coins is therefore a fundamental question for understanding both the use of the material object and the conceptual framework within which ritual activity occurred.

  • 191.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Jonathan Lindström, Biskopen och korståget 1206. Om krig, kolonisation och Guds man i Norden (Stockholm: Norstedts 2015)2017In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 137, no 2Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 192.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Linn Eikje Ramberg har disputerat2018In: Svensk numismatisk tidskrift, ISSN 0283-071X, no 1, p. 21-21Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 193.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Linn Eikje Ramberg har disputerat2018In: Nordisk Numismatisk Unions medlemsblad, ISSN 0025-8539, no 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 194.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Money, Coins and Archaeology2018In: Money and Coinage in the Middle Ages / [ed] Rory Naismith, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2018, p. 231-263Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter focuses on three themes: conceptions of "money" and "coins" within archaeology, coins as archaeological material, and coins as part of archaeological research history. The argument builds on many illuminating cases and examples from old and recent research within archaeology and numismatics, and theory and method are emphasised.

  • 195.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Shared Values: Links and hybridity in the Anglo-Scandinavian coin-web2017In: 18th Viking Congress, Denmark, 6–12 August 2017: Abstracts – Papers and Posters, 2017, p. 13-13Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In present-day Scandinavia a coinage was initiated about AD 995, which imitated contemporary Anglo-Saxon coins. For more than thirty years the English and Scandinavian coinages were closely connected through a network of humans and objects that moved, physically and conceptually, between mints and kingdoms. Coinage is often seen as articulating sovereign rights in a certain area, but the Anglo-Scandinavian coinage network instead cut across kingdoms from west to east. Despite ongoing state-formation processes, key valuables like artisans and dies were shared in the network, causing change in power relations and conceptions of value.

    Different iconographical models were used in a strategic/rhetorical way by commissioners and artisans to create relations between cognitive nodes through association, referencing, paraphrasing and appropriation. When circulating, the coins linked users to an official and shared discourse, and maintained the created relations through the impact of their materiality. While many re-contextualizing practices in the Viking Age seem to deal with reconnection with the past, the coin-imitation practice apparently worked mainly within a contemporary conceptual framework, although there are components of ‘ancientness’ as well. Die-link studies here provide a source of theoretical inspiration for how to study linear as well as non-linear connections and networks in the past. Through the repetitive practices of coin-making, artefact types experience gradual changes and thus new categories and articulations are created. Object agency and the hybrid character of these coins provide starting points for a deeper understanding of the coins’ wider connotations and meanings, as well as for the imitative practice itself.

  • 196.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Sture Bolin, medeltidsforskare mellan historia och arkeologi2012In: Nordisk Numismatisk Unions medlemsblad, ISSN 0025-8539, no 4, p. 64-69Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 197.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Sylloge of Coins of the British Isles, British Museum Anglo-Saxon Coins. Part I: Early Anglo-Saxon Gold and Anglo-Saxon and Continental Silver Coinage of the North Sea Area, c.600–760 (Vol. 63), by Anna Gannon; Part II: Southern English Coinage from Offa to Alfred, c.760–880 (Vol. 67), by Rory Naismith2018In: English Historical Review, ISSN 0013-8266, E-ISSN 1477-4534, Vol. 133, no 564, p. 1274-1277Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The latest volume in the series Sylloge of Coins of the British Isles (Vol. 67) deals with the substantial and high-quality collections held by the British Museum. It is here reviewed jointly with the first part dedicated to the same collection (Vol. 63). The two volumes provide an important summary and update on the research on Anglo-Saxon coinage, and make it available and accessible to a general audience, collectors and scholars.

  • 198.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Sylloge of Coins of the British Isles, Norwegian Collections, Parts I (Vol. 65) and II (Vol. 66), by Elina Screen2017In: English Historical Review, ISSN 0013-8266, E-ISSN 1477-4534, Vol. 132, no 554, p. 102-103Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 199.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    The Chair: Situating knowledge and authority in Viking and Medieval Scandinavia2019In: Tidens landskap: En vänbok till Anders Andrén / [ed] Cecilia Ljung, Anna Andreasson Sjögren, Ingrid Berg, Elin Engström, Ann-Mari Hållans Stenholm, Kristina Jonsson, Alison Klevnäs, Linda Qviström, Torun Zachrisson, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2019, p. 153-155Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Scientia potentia est — knowledge is power. Few things embody this sentence better than the chair. We will explore it through an amulet from the Eketorp hoard (Närke, Sweden), deposited in a wetland in the 960s.

  • 200.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    The Hatched Cross: Gotlandic Coins of the 13th century Baltic Sea area2012In: Monetary History of the Baltic in the Middle Ages (12-16th C.) / [ed] Ivar Leimus, Tallinn: Eesti Ajaloomuuseum , 2012, p. 180-196Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the 12th century, some authority on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea started off a coinage, the first ever on Gotland and the first medieval coinage of Sweden as a whole. Quite remarkably, these and any following coins minted on the island never adjusted to the Swedish mainland royal coins in weights or iconography, but seem to have been independently administered even though the island was within Swedish power (for any period when it was not under somebody else’s control). In the 12th century and well into the 13th, Gotlandic coins had a strong impact on certain areas of the mainland, and in the 13th century they were even used as a model for new coinages in the Baltic Sea area. Interestingly, these first Gotlandic coins in several ways show where their inspiration came from, and thus perhaps who or what motivated their coming into being: trading partners and other guests from the southwestern parts of the Baltic and North Sea.

123456 151 - 200 of 272
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