Change search
Refine search result
1234567 151 - 200 of 2099
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 151.
    Bentancour Garin, Pedro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    "Alla vägar leder till Rom": Antiken i Australien: en oförutsedd resa2015In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 2, p. 7-12Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 152.
    Berg, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Abu Simbel – ett kulturarv från det kalla kriget2019In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 24-31Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 153.
    Berg, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Athen mellan dåtid, nutid och framtid2013In: Hellenika, ISSN 0348-0100, no 145, p. 11-13Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 154.
    Berg, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Den Sundwallska korrespondensen2019In: Tidens landskap: En vänbok till Anders Andrén / [ed] Cecilia Ljung, Anna Andreasson Sjögren, Ingrid Berg, Elin Engström, Ann-Mari Hållans Stenholm, Kristina Jonsson, Alison Klevnäs, Linda Qviström, Torun Zachrisson, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2019, p. 269-271Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 155.
    Berg, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Dumps and Ditches: Prisms of archaeological practice at Kalaureia in Greece2013In: Making cultural history: New prespectives on Western heritage / [ed] Anna Källén, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2013, p. 173-183Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 156.
    Berg, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    "Fälttåg" och "kappsäckslif" - arkeologiska självbilder och borgerlig manlighet runt sekelskiftet 19002014In: Svensk antikforskning vid Medelhavet: Gustaf VI Adolf och fältarkeologi i historiskt perspektiv / [ed] Frederick Whitling, Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, 2014, p. 40-44Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 157.
    Berg, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Kalaureia 1894 - den första svenska utgrävningen i Grekland2012In: Hellenika, ISSN 0348-0100, no 142Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 158.
    Berg, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Kalaureia 1894: A Cultural History of the First Swedish Excavation in Greece2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The excavation of the Sanctuary of Poseidon at Kalaureia in 1894 marks the beginning of Swedish archaeological fieldwork in Greece. During a couple of hot summer months, two philologists from Uppsala University, Sam Wide (1861-1918) and Lennart Kjellberg (1857-1936), worked in the sanctuary together with the architect Sven Kristenson (1858-1937), the Greek foreman Pankalos and around twenty local workmen. In 1997, the Swedish Institute at Athens began new excavations at the sanctuary.

    This thesis examines the beginnings of Swedish fieldwork in Greece. Within the framework of a cultural history of archaeology, inspired by archaeological ethnography and the New Cultural History, it explores how archaeology functioned as a cultural practice in the late nineteenth century. A micro-historical methodology makes use of a wide array of different source material connected to the excavation of 1894, its prelude and aftermath.

    The thesis takes the theoretical position that the premises for archaeological knowledge production are outcomes of contemporary power structures and cultural politics. Through an analysis of how the archaeologists constructed their self-images through a set of idealized stereotypes of bourgeois masculinity, academic politics of belonging is highlighted. The politics of belonging existed also on a national level, where the Swedish archaeologists entered into a competition with other foreign actors to claim heritage sites in Greece. The idealization of classical Greece as a birthplace of Western values, in combination with contemporary colonial and racist cultural frameworks in Europe, created particular gazes through which the modern country was appropriated and judged. These factors all shaped the practices through which archaeological knowledge was created at Kalaureia.

    Some excavations tend to have extensive afterlives through the production of histories of archaeology. Therefore, this thesis also explores the representations of the 1894 excavation in the historiography of Swedish classical archaeology. It highlights the strategies by which the excavation at Kalaureia has served to legitimize further Swedish engagements in Greek archaeology, and explores the way in which historiography shapes our professional identities.

  • 159.
    Berg, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Kalaureia 1894: Nytt ljus över svensk arkeologihistoria i Grekland2012In: Att återupptäcka det glömda: Aktuell forskning om forntidens förflutna i Norden / [ed] Påvel Nicklasson, Bodil Petersson, Lund: Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens historia, Lunds universitet , 2012Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 160.
    Berg, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Ny bokserie öppnar antikvetenskapernas "svarta låda"2017In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 43-44Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 161.
    Berg, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Ola Wolfhechel Jensen (ed.): Histories of Archaeological Practices: Reflections on Methods, Strategies and Social Organisation in Past Fieldwork2014In: Norwegian Archaeological Review, ISSN 0029-3652, E-ISSN 1502-7678, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 223-225Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 162.
    Berg, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Wongs anklagelser mot arkeologer absurda2017In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 4 oktoberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 163.
    Berg, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Allmän arkeologi.
    Early Swedish Mining: a presentation of a post-graduate research subject2007In: Norberg - Nora. 700 years of Iron Production: Papers resented at an International Conference in Norberg and Nora August 18-22, 2003, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 164.
    Berg, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Allmän arkeologi.
    Svensk gruvhantering ur ett europeiskt tidsperspektiv2004In: Aktuell Arkeologi VIII, 2004Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 165.
    Berg, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Allmän arkeologi.
    Östra Silvberget och det medeltida kolonisationsförloppet2003In: Bebyggelsehistorisk tidskrift, no 43Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 166.
    Berg, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Allmän arkeologi.
    Forshell, HelenaSöderberg, Anders
    I gruva och grav: Metallhantering från bronsålder till nyare tid2003Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 167.
    Berg Nilsson, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Myller vid ett malmberg: en betraktelse kring titelsidan av en medeltida gruvkantional från Kutná Hora.2008In: Med hammare och fackla, ISSN 0543-2162, no XL, p. 31-44Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 168.
    Berg Nilsson, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Allmän arkeologi.
    Nilsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Allmän arkeologi.
    Hålrum och hyttslagg: källor till det medeltida bergsbruket i Tjust2006In: Koppar vid Östersjökusten: Föredrag presenterade vid ett seminarium på Jernkontoret den 24 mars 2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 169.
    Berg Nilsson, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Nilsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Sharing Space: Medieval Mining at Vikaberg and Garpenberg in Dalecarlia2009In: From Ephesos to Dalecarlia: Reflections on Body, Space and Time in Medieval and Early Modern Europe / [ed] Elisabeth Regner, Cecilia von heijne, laila Kittzler Åhfeldt, Anna Kjellström, Stockholm: Historiska museet, Stockholms universitet , 2009, p. 227-245Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 170.
    Bergerbrant, Sophie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. allmän arkeologi.
    Body, Sex and Gender – Constructing Appearance in Archaeology.1999In: Aktuell Arkeologi, ISSN 1101-3087, Vol. VII, p. 147-154Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 171.
    Bergerbrant, Sophie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Bronze Age Identities: Costume, Conflict and Contact in Northern Europe 1600-1300 BC2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation deals with male and female social identities during the Middle Bronze Age (1600-1300 BC) in southern Scandinavia and northern Germany. South Scandinavian Bronze Age research has traditionally focused on the male sphere, while women have seldom been seriously considered or analysed in terms of their roles, power or influences on society. This study addresses the imbalance through discussing the evidence for gender relations, social structures and identity. The topic will be approached using case studies from different areas of northern Europe and from a variety of angles (e.g. costume and appearance, age, violence, long distance contacts), always drawing on the rich material from burials.

    How people presented themselves varied not only between different areas, but also over time. Groups that treated material culture in a fairly similar way during Period IB (c. 1600-1500 BC) start treating it in different ways during Period II (c. 1500-1300 BC). In southern Scandinavia during Period II the material culture is fairly similar on the whole, but the different geographical groups use the artefacts in different ways. The level of violence seems to have fluctuated in the area during the Middle Bronze Age, with some areas showing more signs of violence at certain times. On the other hand the view on ageing seems to have been fairly similar over a large part of central and northern Europe, and from age 14 one seems to have been regarded as an adult. The dissertation also shows that long distance contacts were important and wide-ranging, and people seem to have moved across large areas of Europe, even if the visible exogamous marriage pattern seems to have decreased in distance from Period IB to Period II. In conclusion, although there seems to have been a general European pattern concerning e.g. the view on age, the archaeological record reveals many local variations in how this was expressed, e.g. on the body.

  • 172.
    Bergerbrant, Sophie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Difference in the Elaboration of Dress in Northern Europe during the Middle Bronze Age2010In: The North European Symposium for Archaeological Textiles NESAT X / [ed] Anderson Strand, E; Gleba, M; Mannering, U, Munkholt, C & Ringgaard, M, Owbow Books: Oxford , 2010, p. 21-25Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 173.
    Bergerbrant, Sophie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. allmän.
    Female interaction during the early and middle Bronze Age Europe, with special focus on bronze tubes2005In: Gender locales and local genders in Archaeology, 2005, p. 13-23Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 174.
    Bergerbrant, Sophie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. allmän.
    Fremde Frau eller i lånade fjädrar?: Interaktion mellan Sydskandinavien och norra Europa under period I och II2005In: Mellan sten till järn: Rapport från det 9:e Nordiska bronsålderssymposiet, Göteborg oktober 2003-10-09/12, 2005, p. 229-240Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 175.
    Bergerbrant, Sophie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. allmän.
    Gender and the use of bronze production during the Early Scandinavian Bronze Age.2002In: Bronzi Antichi: Produzione e technologia: Atti del XV Congresso Internazionale sui Bronzi Antichi, organizzato dall’Università di Udine, sede di Gorizia Grado-Aquileia 22-26 maggio 2001, 2002, p. 31-34Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 176.
    Bergerbrant, Sophie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Allmän Arkeologi. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Genus, identitet och kulturtillhörighet under äldre bronsåldern i Sydskandinavien: ett diskussionsinlägg om hur vi ser på närbronsåldern börjar2009In: Det 10. Nordiske bronzealdersymposium: Trondheim 5. - 8. Okt 2006, trondheim: Tapir Akademisk Forlag , 2009, p. 116-123Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses how the early south Scandinavian Bronze Age chronological systems have been created based on the evidence of raw material and artefacts as well as a gendered perspective. When does the south Scandinavian Bronze Age start? Are our chronologies gender-specific, and therefore fundamentally biased, or do they cross sex boundaries? This question is explored drawing mainly on burial material from the Sögel-Wohlde and Valsømagle cultures. The aim of this article is to inspire discussion and debate about how we classify the south Scandinavian Bronze Age.

  • 177.
    Bergerbrant, Sophie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. allmän arkeologi.
    Weaving Identity: Cultural Belonging and Cultural Change, 1600-1100 BC in Southern Scandinavia and Northern Germany2008In: Lund Archaeological Review, ISSN 1701-2189, Vol. 13-14, p. 5-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article considers technical, cultural and gender-related aspects of textile production in southern Scandinavia and northern Germany during the Middle Bronze Age. Specifically, female networks and weaving technology are discussed through the different combinations of s- and y- spun thread. It is argued that textile technology is a cultural phenomenon that was spread through female interaction. These lines of communication and interaction shift over time, but at a rate that is demonstrably different from other changes in the society as seen on e.g. bronze objects that are more likely to be a result of male interactions and exchange networks. The study as a whole demonstrates that the textile evidence is a rich and informative source for Middle Bronze Age society, providing a key to understanding female identity and cultural change

  • 178. Bergerbrant, Sophie
    et al.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Editorial2018In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 26, p. 7-9Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 179. Bergerbrant, Sophie
    et al.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Editorial2019In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 27, p. 7-10Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 180.
    Bergerbrant, Sophie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. allmän.
    Malmius, Anita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. AFL.
    A hidden treasure – Bronze Age textile remains from Lower Saxony2006In: Archaeological Textile News, Vol. 43, p. 2-3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 181.
    Bergh, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Landscape of the monuments: a study of the passage tombs in the Cúil Irra region1995Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 182.
    Bergström, Liselotte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Gräddat: Brödkultur under järnåldern i östra Mälardalen2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines the carbonised bread findings from sites and cremation graves dated to the first millennium AD occurring in the eastern Mälar Valley region. The finds have been analysed by various methods including cell-structure analysis, chemical analysis, experimental and reconstructive examination, 14C-dating and statistical comparison. An attempt is made to identify the different stages and actors in the bread-making process. The finds of different utensils and other equipment usually related to food preparation, bread-making and a vegetable diet are presented.

    Bread was introduced into central Sweden at the same time that a series of food-technical artefacts turn up in the north-Germanic cultural sphere. When bread first appears during the Late Roman Iron Age it most likely is as a sign of power applied to official occasions. The introduction of bread seems to be connected with the rotary quern which is strongly associated with defended settlements in Scandinavia where finds of utensils and activities indicate a specialization of food-production and related processes.

    Bread burial appears to have been reserved for specific individuals in society and this custom seems to have continued over several centuries in the same cemetery. Bread obviously served as a social marker in the burial ceremony, playing a role which was obvious to the participants but not meant to be visible to outsiders after the burial. This probably indicated a distinguishing quality of the deceased’s specific earthly status rather than a burial tradition of general use.

  • 183.
    Bergström, Liselotte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Hus och hantverk: Arkeologisk undersökning av de övre terrasserna i Birkas Garnison. RAÄ 173, Björkö, Adelsö sn, Uppland, 2001-20042013Report (Other academic)
  • 184.
    Bergström, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Block och skärvig sten. En arkeologi av det abiotiska: Ett symmetriskt perspektiv på blockanläggningar från yngre bronsålder - äldre järnålder med utgångspunkt i Kättsta i Uppland.2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation investigates how a symmetrical approach to archaeology can be applied to identify the properties and effects of the non-living, abiotic materials. And to reconfigure the relationship between humans and non-human objects, bridging the divide between what has been termed ‘cultural’ and ‘natural’ and thus placed in different ontological realms. This is examined by studying the practices surrounding “boulder graves”, from the Late Bronze Age - Early Iron Age (approx. 1000 – 0 BC) in Kättsta, Ärentuna parish in Uppland, Sweden. The boulders tend to be studied from an anthropocentric point of view, in which they are seen primarily as passive objects, interpreted only for what they represent. The objective of this research, however, is to gain new insights into the agency of boulders, and how they contributed to the practices carried out adjacent to them. The dissertation is based on a case study where a thematic analysis is performed, focusing on the properties and characteristics of boulders, their affordances, the distribution of finds and their interrelations, and the effects their relations generated. The results show that the boulders themselves contributed in human-stone relations and were vital in the formation of the grave-like features they became part of. It is argued that a symmetrical, non-anthropocentric approach to these features will broaden our view on materialities in the past, affording ontological as well as ecological implications.

  • 185. Bernard, Aude
    et al.
    Kolk, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for Cultural Evolution. Institute for Future Studies, Sweden.
    Are Young Swedes Moving More? A Cohort Analysis of Internal Migration by Move Order2019In: European Journal of Population, ISSN 0168-6577, E-ISSN 1572-9885Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While levels of migration within countries have been trending down in a number of advanced economies, Sweden has recorded a rise in internal migration among young adults. An increase in aggregate migration levels can be the result of a decline in immobility (i.e. the absence of migration), an increase in repeat movement or a combination of both. In this paper, we draw on retrospective survey and longitudinal register data to explore the demographic mechanisms underpinning the rise in internal migration among young Swedes born in the 30 years to 1980 and we compare the migration behaviour of the youngest cohort to that of their European counterparts. Of all 25 European countries, Sweden reports the highest level of migration among young adults, which is the result of very low immobility combined with high repeat movement. The increase in migration has been particularly pronounced for inter-county moves for the post-1970 cohorts. Analysis of order-specific components of migration shows that this is the result of a decrease in immobility combined with a modest rise in higher-order moves, whereas it is the rise in higher-order moves that underpins the increase in inter-parish migration. This upswing has been accompanied by a shift in the ages at migration, characterised by an earlier start and later finish leading to a lengthening of the number of years young adults are mobile. The results indicate that change in migration behaviour is order-specific, which underlines the need to collect and analyse migration by move order to obtain a reliable account of migration trends.

  • 186.
    Berndt Ersöz, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Noise-making rituals in Iron Age Phrygia2015In: Natur-Kult-Raum: Akten des internationalen Kolloquiums Paris-Lodron-Universität Salzburg, 20-22 Jänner 2012 / [ed] Katja Sporn, Sabine Ladstätter, Michael Kerschner, Wien: Österreichisches Archäologisches Institut , 2015, p. 29-44Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 187.
    Berndt, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Cutting the Gordion knot: The iconography of Megaron 2 at Gordion2015In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 8, p. 85-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the incised drawings of Early Phrygian Gordion, and in particular those of Megaton 2. Aspects of their iconographic and archaeological contexts are taken in to consideration, as well as literary sources and especially the story of the Gordian knot. The focus of the study is a series of incised labyrinths, which have hitherto not been recognized as such, but which are of particular interest for the analysis of this building. The myth of Theseus and the Minotaur in the labyrinth helps to throw light on both the images of Megaton 2 but also on the story of the Gordion knot, and how these are interlinked with each other. It is suggested that Ariadne's ball of thread and the Gordian knot are two different expressions of a similar concept; both represent sovereignty provided by a Goddess. Megaron 2 seems to have been a building that was intimately connected with both the king and the Phrygian Mother Goddess.

  • 188.
    Berndt, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    The hand gesture and symbols of Sabazios2018In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 11, p. 151-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The material evidence left from the cult of Sabazios is meagre, apart from sculpted bronze hands dating to the Roman Empire. The hand is held in a certain pose, the so-called benedictio Latina gesture, and the hand was often covered with depictions of various objects and symbols. The bronze hands were probably attached to staffs and carried around in processions. This practice most likely spread via the channels of the Roman army during the Early Imperial period, but the gesture existed much earlier. The gesture is found on Attic black- and red-figured pottery, and is frequently associated with Hermes in his role as instructor and Psychopompos. From the beginning of the Hellenistic period the gesture was mainly used as an indication of speech, and for knowledge transmitted through speech. There are several examples of how the gesture was used to indicate the knowledge revealed through the initiations of mystery cults. Hermes is closely associated with Sabazios and is represented on the bronze hands, probably because of his role as instructor and Psychopompos; i.e. the position played by the mystagogue in the Sabazian mysteries. The gesture of the hands simply denoted the knowledge acquired through the initiation. The symbols on the hands are often associated with the Underworld, and it is suggested that knowledge acquired in the Sabazian mysteries dealt with life after death and the Underworld.

  • 189.
    Berndt, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    The Historical Geography of Phrygia: The Settlement of Leonton Kephalai2018In: Orbis Terrarum, ISSN 1385-285X, Vol. 16, p. 23-53Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 190.
    Berndt, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    The King has ass’ears! The myth of Midas’s ears2018In: The Adenture of the Illustrious Scholar: Papers presented to Oscar White Muscarella / [ed] Elizabeth Simpson, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2018, p. 49-66Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 191.
    Berndt-Ersöz, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Arkeologiska nyheter från Turkiet2006In: Medusa, no 4, p. 32-37Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 192.
    Berndt-Ersöz, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Arkeologiskt nyhetsbrev från Turkiet2007In: Medusa, no 4, p. 34-38Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 193.
    Berndt-Ersöz, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Arkeologiskt nyhetsbrev från Turkiet2005In: Medusa, no 3, p. 28-35Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 194.
    Berndt-Ersöz, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    "In search of a Phrygian Male Superior god"2004In: Offizielle Religion, lokale Kulte und individuelle Religiosität: Akten des religionsgeschichtlichen Symposiums "Kleinasien und angrenzende Gebiete vom Beginn des 2. bis zur Mitte des 1. Jahrtausends v. Chr." (Bonn, 20.-22. Februar 2003), 2004, p. 47-56Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 195.
    Berndt-Ersöz, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Kaya anıtları, Matar'ın tapınakları2006In: ArkeoAtlas, Vol. 5, p. 35-39Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 196.
    Berndt-Ersöz, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Kung Midas och modergudinnan: Om klipphelgedomar och gudomliga idoler i järnålderns Frygien, Mindre Asien2006In: Populär arkeologi, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 12-14Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 197.
    Berndt-Ersöz, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Kybebe on fire! The significance of the Goddess in the Ionian Revolt2013In: Perspectives on ancient Greece: Papers in celebration of the 60th anniversary of the Swedish Institute at Athens / [ed] Ann-Louise Schallin, Stockholm: Svenska Institutet i Athen , 2013, p. 153-171Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 198.
    Berndt-Ersöz, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Medusa kastar en sidoblick1990In: Medusa, no 4Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 199.
    Berndt-Ersöz, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Phrygian rock-cut cult façades: A study of the function of the so-called shaft monuments1998In: Anatolian Studies, Vol. 48, p. 87-112Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 200.
    Berndt-Ersöz, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Phrygian rock-cut shrines: Structure, function and cult practice2006Book (Refereed)
1234567 151 - 200 of 2099
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf