Change search
Refine search result
1234567 151 - 200 of 783
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 151.
    Ursini, Francesco-Alessio
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Mahmutovic, AdnanStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.Bramlett, Frank
    Visions of the Future in Comics: International Perspectives2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Across generations and genres, comics have imagined different views of the future, from unattainable utopias to worrisome dystopias. These presaging narratives can be read as reflections of their authors' (and readers') hopes, fears and beliefs about the present. This collection of new essays explores the creative processes in comics production that bring plausible futures to the page. The contributors investigate portrayals in different stylistic traditions-manga, bande desinees-from a variety of theoretical perspectives. The disparate yet coherent picture that emerges documents the elaborate storylines and complex universes comics creators have been crafting for decades.

  • 152.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Wilde's Plagiarism in the Essay on "Historical Criticism”2017In: Notes and Queries, ISSN 0029-3970, E-ISSN 1471-6941, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 139-141Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 153.
    Wrethed, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    ʻWhere danger is, there rescue growsʼ: Technology, Time, and Dromology in Tom McCarthy’s C.2017In: C21 Literature: Journal of 21st-century writings, E-ISSN 2045-5224, Vol. 5, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On one level, Tom McCarthy’s C comes out as a postmodern intertextual patchwork that borrows the form of the Bildungsroman. Accordingly, the protagonist Serge travels from birth to death in a forthrightly chronological narrative, but that journey is accompanied by the fact that the text’s modernist historical context is partly embedded in a posthuman and postmodern ontology. Technologically speaking, this version of modernity displays itself as technē, both in terms of artistic creation and as technology innovation (the radio transmitter, the car, the aeroplane, the cinema). Moreover, the novel equates technology with dromology (from Gr. dromos: race course) dealing with increasing speed as economic and political advantage, but it also reveals its human downside in terms of disaster (war, car crash, aeroplane crash). Through the protagonist, C forwards technology as death drive and the human as always already being ahuman (technē as primordial attribute of bios). In terms of time, the narrative seemingly incarnates the occidental obsession with teleology and eschatology. This article goes through these dimensions, but in addition it contends that there is another level at work in the narrative. Considered as artistically rendered philosophical cognition, the novel puts forth the Stoic apathea (equanimity), Husserlian flux, and anachronistic temporality as giving way to a peculiar kind of faith. This is closely tied to the artistic creativity of technē, including the activity of writing, which rescues a form of transcendence from conventional postmodern elimination. Dominant discourses of technology and time—apocalyptic and utopian—are challenged in this reading.

  • 154.
    Tissari, Heli
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Christian Kay & Kathryn Allan, English Historical Semantics. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press 20152016In: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen, ISSN 0028-3754, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 487-490Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 155.
    Ekelund, Bo G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Citing the world: A geometric data analysis of Swedish literary scholars' use of foreign critical resources2016In: Poetics (Amsterdam. Print), ISSN 0304-422X, E-ISSN 1872-7514, Vol. 55, p. 60-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The academic study of literature constitutes one institutional site for the production and reproduction of conceptions of literature. In a semi-peripheral country such as Sweden, this production partly relies on foreign intellectual goods. To analyze this transnational dimension of Swedish scholarship in a period marked by increasing internationalization, a Geometric Data Analysis (GDA) (Le Roux & Rouanet, 2004) was carried out on the bibliographies of 318 PhD dissertations, defended in the period 1980-2005, at Swedish departments of literary studies (litteraturvetenskap). The analysis of citational choices showed only an insignificant increase in the reliance on foreign sources in this period. The GDA revealed how these privileged references were distributed in a tripolar opposition, reflecting fundamentally different conceptions of literature, interpreted in this study as the three poles of textual singularity, secular particularity and anthropological universality. The analysis of supplementary variables shows that these oppositions are subtended by different geolinguistic orientations and that they correlate strongly with gender, which is overwhelmingly in evidence as one moves from the male-dominated textual pole to the strongly feminist and female social pole of the first axis. The lack of increasing internationalization measured by citations is attributed to the national cultural mission of these departments.

  • 156.
    Soler-Carbonell, Josep
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Complexity perspectives on linguistic landscapes: A scalar analysis2016In: Linguistic Landscape, ISSN 2214-9953, E-ISSN 2214-9961, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 1-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Linguistic landscape studies (LLS) have become popular tools to investigate multilingual settings; yet they often lack theoretical elaboration. This paper tries to contribute to filling this gap by combining the postulates of complexity theory with the concept of ‘scale’. Taking Tallinn as a case study, I conceptualise scales as nodes of complexity, dynamically produced and reproduced by the inter-connection of different agents in interaction. The results show a significant degree of language heterogeneity in Tallinn’s LL, but one that adopts different forms in different places, something that indexes the diverse types of mobility in those settings. What appears as multilingual messiness becomes logically coherent when we look at how different semiotic resources are mobilized to co-construct different scalar frameworks. In conclusion, it is argued that a scalar analysis informed by a complexity perspective can be beneficially exploited for theoretical and methodological purposes in LLS.

  • 157.
    Höglund, Mikko
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Syrjänen, Kaj
    Corpus of Early American Literature2016In: ICAME Journal/International Computer Archive of Modern English, ISSN 0801-5775, E-ISSN 1502-5462, Vol. 40, p. 17-38Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 158.
    Beckman, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Culture Control Critique: Allegories of Reading the Present2016Book (Refereed)
  • 159.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Den spjälkade tiden: Kolonial modernitet och litterärt berättande2016In: Historiens hemvist. 1, Den historiska tidens former / [ed] Victoria Fareld, Hans Ruin, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2016, p. 191-214Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 160.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    English as a Lingua Franca in the business domain (BELF)2016In: Investigating English in Europe: Contexts and Agendas: English in Europe, Volume 6 / [ed] Andrew Linn, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2016, p. 89-92Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 161. McGrath, Lisa
    et al.
    Kaufhold, Kathrin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    English for Specific Purposes and Academic Literacies: Eclecticism in academic writing pedagogy2016In: Teaching in Higher Education, ISSN 1356-2517, E-ISSN 1470-1294, Vol. 21, no 8, p. 933-947Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Academic Literacies and English for Specific Purposes perspectives on the teaching of academic writing tend to be positioned as dichotomous and ideologically incompatible. Nonetheless, recent studies have called for the integration of these two perspectives in the design of writing programmes in order to meet the needs of students in the increasingly diverse and shifting landscape of academia. The aim of the present paper is to reflect on how this theoretical integration could be put into practice. Drawing on the design of a research-based writing workshop for postgraduate anthropology students, we argue that rather than a ‘hybrid’ model of writing pedagogy, a theoretically grounded but eclectic approach is needed in order to respond to students’ personal, local, and disciplinary contexts.

  • 162.
    Soler-Carbonell, Josep
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    English in the language ecology of Europe2016In: Investigating English in Europe: Contexts and Agendas: English in Europe, volume 6 / [ed] Andrew Linn, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2016, p. 53-58Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 163.
    Vejdemo, Susanne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Vandewinkel, Sigi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Extended uses of body-related temperature expressions2016In: The Lexical Typology of Semantic Shifts / [ed] Päivi Juvonen, Katarina Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Mouton de Gruyter, 2016, p. 249-284Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter presents the results of a cross-linguistic study where we examined body-related temperature expressions (brtes), like “warm heart” and “cold eyes”, in English, Ibibio, Japanese, Kannada, Mandarin Chinese, Ojibwe, and Swedish. We found that all the studied languages have brtes, even metaphor-poor Ojibwe, and that certain body related expressions recur in the brtes, mostly ‘heart’, ‘head’, ‘voice’, ‘smile’ and ‘eyes’. We found support for two conceptual metaphors: control is cold/lack of control is hot and caring is warm/uncaring is cold. The temperature scales were found to be translated to scalar target domains, mostly emotions. However, we found little support for the hypothesis that local cultural/climate factors, such as the temperature related humoral theory or the mean temperature of a region, would affect the brtes.

  • 164.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Fields in Formation: English Studies and National Literature in South Africa (with a Brazilian Comparison)2016In: Bourdieu and Postcolonial Studies / [ed] Raphael Dalleo, Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2016, p. 159-174Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 165.
    Erman, Britt
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Forsberg Lundell, Fanny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Lewis, Margareta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Formulaic language in advanced second language acquisition and use2016In: Advanced proficiency and exceptional ability in second languages / [ed] Kenneth Hyltenstam, Boston: Mouton de Gruyter, 2016, p. 111-147Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 166.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Genre Analysis2016In: The Routledge Handbook of English for Academic Purposes / [ed] Ken Hyland, Philip Shaw, Routledge, 2016, p. 243-255Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 167.
    Mahmutovic, Adnan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Global Citizenship in Mohsin Hamid's The Reluctant Fundamentalist2016In: Transnational Literature, ISSN 1836-4845, E-ISSN 1836-4845, Vol. 8, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 168.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Negretti, Raffaella
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Graduate students' genre knowledge and perceived disciplinary practices: Creating a research space across disciplines2016In: English for specific purposes (New York, N.Y.), ISSN 0889-4906, E-ISSN 1873-1937, Vol. 41, p. 36-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disciplinary differences in academic writing have been addressed in applied linguistics from multiple perspectives. This article focuses on the rhetorical strategies used by multilingual graduate students from the sciences, the social sciences, and the humanities to create a research space in academic introductions. Adopting an in-depth qualitative approach, we draw on three data sources: graduate learners' analyses of model texts, their reflections on their own writing strategies, and a textual analysis of their introductions, to better understand how genre knowledge is connected to perceived disciplinary practices. Our findings indicate that the students' formal and rhetorical knowledge of genre is linked to their perception of knowledge-making practices in their respective disciplines. We discuss pedagogical implications for EAP professionals working with students from different disciplines in multilingual contexts.

  • 169.
    Tissari, Heli
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Hans-Jürgen Diller, Words for Feelings: Studies in the History of the English Emotion Lexicon. Heidelberg: Winter 20142016In: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen, ISSN 0028-3754, Vol. CXVII, no II, p. 481-486Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 170.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    How Writing Becomes (World) Literature: Singularity, the Universalizable, and the Implied Writer2016In: Institutions of World Literature: Writing, Translation, Markets / [ed] Stefan Helgesson, Pieter Vermeulen, New York: Routledge, 2016, p. 23-38Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 171.
    Johannesson, Nils-Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    'Hreran mid hondum hrimcealde sæ': On verb attraction in Old English2016In: Fact or fiction? Studies in honour of Solveig Granath / [ed] Elisabeth Wennö, Marie Tåqvist, Peter Wikström, Johan Wijkmark, Karlstad: Karlstad University Press, 2016, p. 1-18Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with a phenomenon in Old English syntax labelled ‘verb attraction’. In an Old English clause with two verbs, such as an auxiliary verb and the following non-finite verb, or an object-control verb such as hatan ‘to command’ plus the infinitive verb form in the infinitive clause governed by hatan, verb attraction makes the non-finite verb form leave its canonical syntactic position to become adjoined to the higher finite verb. The paper explores some properties of clauses where verb attraction is at work, and ends with a consideration of the usefulness of verb attraction in poetry.

  • 172.
    Egerer, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Insects, worlds, and the poetic in Coetzee's writing2016In: Textual Practice, ISSN 0950-236X, E-ISSN 1470-1308, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 493-508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    J. M. Coetzee's literary universe creates a space for creatures often thought so insignificant that they are mostly overlooked or, if noticed at all, discarded as useless pests. In his writing, we repeatedly experience moments of wonder when insects take centre-stage, touching characters and readers alike with awe at their power of transformation. These moments are like poetic epiphanies, flashes into worlds otherwise closed to human experience. But Coetzee's imagining of insects vis-à-vis his characters also challenges the way we think about the world in general and the environment in particular, not least our own role in it. Martin Heidegger is but one in a long line of philosophers at pains to reinforce the boundary drawn between human and animal, arguing that the animal, unlike the human, only has limited access to its surroundings. Yet it is also Heidegger who is early in his recognition of the repercussions of human arrogance on the environment. Zoologist Jakob von Uexküll's research into insect worlds challenges the understanding that the human has access to the world in its entirety, stressing the relational aspect that all living beings have with their surroundings, their Umwelt, the human animal included. Agamben brings to this the idea that all animals, even insects, experience a certain openness within their environment, a capacity that Heidegger granted only to the human. This diversity of environmental worlds shaped by species-specific needs and abilities suggests that humans are subject to the same mechanisms that limit access to the Umwelt of other creatures, from which follows that any attempt to know another being's Umwelt would involve a venture into territory which requires different and novel ways of seeing. Literature is the space which invites us into unknowable worlds and supplies us with the tongue to touch on the not-yet-formulated. Coetzee's poetic imagination draws our attention to what I would like to describe as an extraordinary rapport between insects and the poetic in his texts, both marked by being at once recognisable yet infinitely other, providing us with rare glimpses into unknowable worlds and our own implication in them.

  • 173.
    Ursini, Francesco-Alessio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Jerrold M. Sadock. 2012. The Modular Architecture of Grammar. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press2016In: The Canadian Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0008-4131, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 225-228Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 174.
    Soler-Carbonell, Josep
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Gallego-Balsà, Lídia
    Corona, Víctor
    Language and education issues in global Catalonia. Questions and debates across scales of time and space2016In: Language, Culture and Curriculum, ISSN 0790-8318, E-ISSN 1747-7573, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 175.
    Bolton, Kingsley
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    Linguistic outsourcing and native-like performance in international call centres: An overview2016In: Advanced proficiency and exceptional ability in second languages / [ed] Kenneth Hyltenstam, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2016, p. 185-214Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 176.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Mia Couto and Translation2016In: A Companion to Mia Couto / [ed] Grant Hamilton, David Huddart, Woodbridge: James Currey Publishers, 2016, p. 140-156Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 177.
    Vermeulen, Pieter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    On World Literary Reading Literature, the Market, and the Antinomies of Mobility2016In: Institutions of World Literature: Writing, Translation, Markets / [ed] Stefan Helgesson, Pieter Vermeulen, Routledge, 2016, p. 79-92Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 178.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    PhD adviser and student interactions as a spoken academic genre2016In: The Routledge handbook of English for Academic Purposes / [ed] Ken Hyland, Philip Shaw, Routledge, 2016, p. 348-361Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 179.
    Mezek, Spela
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Swales, John
    PhD defences and vivas2016In: The Routledge Handbook of English for Academic Purposes / [ed] Ken Hyland, Philip Shaw, Milton Park: Routledge, 2016, p. 361-375Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 180.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Policies in the European Higher Education Arena2016In: Investigating English in Europe: Contexts and Agendas: English in Europe, Volume 6 / [ed] Andrew Linn, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2016, p. 145-152Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 181. McGrath, Lisa
    et al.
    Berggren, Jessica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Mezek, Spela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Reading EAP: Investigating high proficiency L2 university students’ strategy use through reading blogs2016In: Journal of English for Academic Purposes, ISSN 1475-1585, E-ISSN 1878-1497, Vol. 22, p. 152-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the reading strategies used by academically novice, but high proficiency L2 students of English enrolled in a teacher education programme at a major Swedish university. Data were obtained from personal reading blogs kept by the students as they undertook course reading at home. An analysis revealed that students employed various reading strategies; however, there was limited evidence to suggest that students employed these strategies routinely. The most common strategy reported was connecting to short-term writing task. While students reported reflecting on their reading, they did not appear to amend unsuccessful strategy use, or re-use successful strategies. The study reveals the difficulties and limitations of high proficiency L2 students who lack experience of reading academic literature in English, and discusses pedagogical implications for reading blogs.

  • 182.
    Mc Million, Alan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Reading proficiency in advanced L2 users2016In: Advanced proficiency and exceptional ability in second languages / [ed] Kenneth Hyltenstam, Mouton de Gruyter, 2016, p. 149-184Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 183.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Research blogs, wikis, and tweets2016In: The Routledge Handbook of English for Academic Purposes / [ed] Ken Hyland, Philip Shaw, London: Routledge, 2016, p. 433-445Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 184.
    Tissari, Heli
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Review of  Handbook of Cognitive Linguistics2016In: Linguist List, E-ISSN 1068-4875, no 27, article id 1509Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 185.
    Sundkvist, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Gao, Man
    Rhoticity in Yunnan English2016In: World Englishes, ISSN 0883-2919, E-ISSN 1467-971X, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 42-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a study of the pronunciation of English by speakers from Yunnan Province in Southwest China. Eight non-English major undergraduate students participated in three tasks: an informal interview, reading a text, and a dialectological-style questionnaire. The degree of rhoticity was assessed based on auditory analysis, with an inter-rater agreement of 97 per cent. The results revealed significant inter-speaker variation: two informants were virtually non-rhotic whereas the remaining six were rhotic to a considerable degree. Intra-speaker variation among these six was furthermore systematic: the degree of rhoticity was lowest in the interview, intermediate in reading, and highest in the questionnaire. These results are discussed with reference to several factors, including the level of formality and attention to speech triggered by the tasks, potentially emerging norms for rhoticity, and the stage of development of a local form of ‘Yunnan English’.

  • 186.
    Soler-Carbonell, Josep
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Gallego-Balsà, Lídia
    The internationalisation of higher education in two different contexts: Catalan and Estonian sociolinguistic perspectives2016In: Language, Culture and Curriculum, ISSN 0790-8318, E-ISSN 1747-7573, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 40-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The topic of the internationalisation of academia has recently attracted attention from sociolinguists and language-policy scholars. In this paper, we compare two different universities from two contrasting contexts in Europe in order to find out more about their projected stance [Jaffe, A. (2009). Stance in a Corsican School: Institutional and Ideological Orders and the production of Bilingual Subjects. In A. Jaffe (Ed.), Stance: Sociolinguistic perspectives (pp. 119–145). New York, NY: Oxford University Press] and attitudes towards the different languages present in their immediate contexts. In particular, we compare the University of Tartu (Estonia) with the University of Lleida (Catalonia, Spain), analysing several key parameters. The purpose of the comparison is to contrast, from a sociolinguistic point of view, the higher education setting of two medium-sized language contexts in Europe [Vila, F. X., & Bretxa, V. (Eds.). (2015). Language policy in higher education. The case of medium-sized languages. Bristol: Multilingual Matters] with different demolinguistic and language political features. The results show that both institutions adopt a similar stance in connection to their respective national language (a protectionist attitude), but they take different approaches towards the other societal language and English. We read these differences in light of the broader historical and socio-political backgrounds, which we suggest are reflected in the microcosm of the universities here analysed.

  • 187.
    Wrethed, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The Invisible Apocalyptic City: The Affectivity of Urbanity, Movement, and Desire in William Blake’s ‘London’, Don DeLillo’s Cosmopolis, and Ivan Vladislavić’s The Exploded View2016In: Hungarian Journal of English and American Studies, ISSN 1218-7364, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 305-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates apocalyptic aspects of William Blake’s “London”, Don DeLillo’s Cosmopolis, and Ivan Vladislavić’s The Exploded View. The analysis explores the suitability of the urban and suburban settings of these works as backdrops for religious, semi-religious, and secular versions of apocalyptic structures. Furthermore, the central argument utilizes a Heideggerian conceptualisation of desire in distinguishing between ontical craving (the striving for materialist security and pleasure) and ontological desire (the need of a spiritual life-dimension). These aspects reveal underlying affective layers of the primarily negative images of urban and suburban life in these three works. Moreover, the concept of desire is in DeLillo’s and Vladislavić’s works linked to the notion of speed (and lack thereof) in order to highlight modern dilemmas of ontical craving in capitalist urban settings. The investigation suggests that urbanity provides an adequate venue for apocalyptic narratives in three interrelated ways. Firstly, urbanity intensifies individual suffering, egotism, and alienation in a context which has the potential of providing the ground for collaboration, community, and fraternity. Secondly, it intensifies the affectivity of capitalist ruthlessness and speed in an environment that paradoxically supports and rejects these forces (hence the memento mori motif in all three literary texts). Thirdly, by presenting such a dark vision of fallen mankind it concurrently forwards a redemptive or cathartic perspective in the form of a literary response to materialist decay.

  • 188.
    Han, Gül Bilge
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The Poetics of Relational Place-Making and Autonomy in Stevens2016In: Wallace Stevens Journal, ISSN 0148-7132, E-ISSN 2160-0570, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 143-171Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 189. Hyland, Ken
    et al.
    Shaw, PhilipStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    The Routledge Handbook of English for Academic Purposes2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 190.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Three types of zoological common names and their formation-processes2016In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1654-6970, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 171-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Known biological species have a standard (if frequently adjusted) international scientific name. Many species also have more or less fixed common names in one or (usually) more languages. We can identify three groups of common names in terms of their form and formation-processes, here called folk, collector, and popularizing Species (or genera or families) of economic or other importance have old , often opaque, folk names in use by everyone( wolf, mouse, rye)  or by those making use of the species (betony, coley, pochard). Species which became of interest to collectors or enthusiasts after the Renaissance have partially systematic  common names often involving metaphor and metonymy (Peacock butterfly, Yellow Underwing, Camberwell Beauty). Finally species that already have established scientific names and no traditional common name are often assigned two-part “calqued” common names whose information content includes the established genus or family assignment. Thus Aeshna viridis  is “Green Hawker/Grön mosaikslända”  because the necessary and sufficient criterion for Hawker/mosaikslända is belonging to the Aeshnidae.

    The folk names have long been studied in detail. The collector names have attracted little attention although they show an interesting variety of formation processes and cross-linguistic contrasts reveal interesting social differences. The popularizing names are the most mechanically formed, but the naming patterns reflect interesting aspects of their origin in a nineteenth-century liberal project, in particular nationalism.

    The collector names reflect the importance of the gentleman-amateur in England and France compared with that of the scientific researcher in Germany and Sweden. They may also reflect naming practices designed to maintain a social group rather than educate a public. The popularizing names reflect nationalism both at the level of the existence of independent US and British common dragonfly genus names and at  that of the decision of Swedish biologists to give every multicellular organism in Sweden a Swedish name, while English-speaking biologists seek rather to give an English name to every interesting animal or plant worldwide, neglecting, for example, micromoths, however British.

    In this study I examine these types of name and naming process s on the basis of popularizing names for (uncollectable) dragonflies and (mainly) collector names for moths and butterflies and partly seashells.  Comparisons are made among English, French, German, and Swedish,  elucidating the formation processes and the differences in society they may reflect.

     

  • 191.
    Kunitz, Silvia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Markee, Numa
    Understanding the fuzzy borders of context in conversation analysis and ethnography2016In: Discourse and education / [ed] Stanton Wortham, Deoksoon Kim, Stephen May, Springer, 2016, 3, p. 1-13Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Context is one of the most difficult and contentious issues in the disciplines that study language and social interaction. While, from a historical point of view, it is possible to situate ethnographic and conversation analytic ideas about context in the different intellectual traditions of anthropology and ethnomethodological sociology, the originally sharp contrasts between these disciplines’ analytic treatments of context have become increasingly more nuanced. Furthermore, a compelling argument can be made within conversation analysis that the traditionally rather narrow conceptualization of context that is often used in analyses of ordinary conversation often needs to be expanded in institutional contexts of talk. In this chapter, we trace early developments in work on context and review major contributions to this important topic within the study of language and social interaction. Next we sketch out current work in progress, identify key problems and difficulties, and finally identify future directions for language educators and applied linguists to explore as we seek to understand this singularly difficult construct that underlies so many of our disciplinary endeavors.

  • 192.
    Havu, Jukka
    et al.
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Höglund, Mikko
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. University of Tampere, Finland.
    A Cross-Linguistic Perspective on Complementation in the Tough Construction2015In: Perspectives on Complementation: Structure, variation and boundaries / [ed] Mikko Höglund, Paul Rickman, Juhani Rudanko, Jukka Havu, Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, p. 52-74Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years the increasing availability of large electronic corpora has led to a methodological shift in linguistics from intuition-based research to work that utilises electronic corpora as a source of data. This shift has given rise to a new perspective on work on complementation. This book presents the latest work in the field of complementation studies. Leading scholars and upcoming researchers in the area approac… show moreh complementation from various perspectives and different frameworks, such as Cognitive Grammar and construction grammars, to offer a broad survey of the field and provide thought-provoking reading accessible to anyone interested in complementation, novice or expert.

  • 193.
    Domange, Raphaël
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    A language contact perspective on Indian English phonology2015In: World Englishes, ISSN 0883-2919, E-ISSN 1467-971X, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 533-556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The direction taken by research on Indian English (IE) phonology has been largely determined by the ‘non-native’ status which is attributed to this variety. Its form is generally considered to be governed by the combined effects of an idealised model serving as the target in acquisition, and transfers from the different language backgrounds of the speakers. This article adopts a different perspective on the issue, and intends to show the crucial importance of acknowledging the diachronic dimension when discussing varieties, native and non-native alike. It is proposed that features of present-day IE vowel inventory can be traced back to non-southern British English input in the dialect formation processes, thus suggesting continuity through time rather than ever-repeated deviations from the hypothesised target.

  • 194.
    Sundkvist, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Gao, Man
    A regional survey of the relationship between vowel and consonant duration in Shetland Scots2015In: Folia linguistica, ISSN 0165-4004, E-ISSN 1614-7308, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 57-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The local dialect spoken in the Shetland Isles constitutes a form of Lowland Scots. It has been suggested that stressed syllables in Shetland Scots tend to contain either a long vowel followed by a short consonant (V:C) or a short vowel followed by a long consonant ( C:), and furthermore that this pattern constitutes a trace of complementary quantity in Norn, a Nordic language spoken in Shetland approximately until the end of the eighteenth century. The existence of such a pattern has also been supported by acoustic measurements. Following a summary and overview of Norn's demise in the Shetland Isles, this paper presents a regional survey of the relationship between vowel and consonant duration in stressed syllables in Shetland Scots. Based on acoustic data from 43 speakers, representing ten separate regions across the Shetland Isles, the inverse correlation between vowel and consonant duration is assessed. The results reveal that the inverse correlation is strongest in the northern part of Shetland and weakest in the south, and displays a general north-to-south decline across Shetland. The results are thus generally consistent with predictions that follow from regional variation concerning Norn's death; evidence suggests that it survived the longest in the northern parts of Shetland.

  • 195.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    A Scholar’s Guide to Getting Published in English2015In: Journal of English for Academic Purposes, ISSN 1475-1585, E-ISSN 1878-1497, Vol. 17, p. 77-78Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 196.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Academic English as “nobody’s land": The research and publication practices of Swedish academics2015In: English as a scientific and research language: Debates and discourses. English in Europe, Volume 2 / [ed] R. Pló Alastrué and C. Pérez-Llantada, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2015, p. 261-280Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume examines the role of English in academic and research settings in Europe and provides recommendations on the challenges posed by the dominance of English over national languages as languages of science and research dissemination; the need for language support for academics that need to disseminate their research in English; and the effect of past and present language policies.

  • 197.
    Soler-Carbonell, Josep
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Alexandre Duchêne, Melissa Moyer and Celia Roberts (eds), Language, Migration and Social Inequalities: A Critical Sociolinguistic Perspective on Institutions and Work2015In: Discourse & Society, ISSN 0957-9265, E-ISSN 1460-3624, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 782-784Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 198.
    Beckman, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Ambivalent Screens: Quentin Tarantino and the Power of Vision2015In: Film-Philosophy, ISSN 1466-4615, E-ISSN 1466-4615, Vol. 19, p. 85-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reveling in the self-reflexive and the metacinematic, Quentin Tarantino's films are often associated with a Baudrillardian postmodernity. His most recent Inglorious Basterds (2009) continues in the same self-referential vein as his earlier films but adds a blatant falsification of history which pushes the question of the reality and images even further. But, this essay asks, is a Baudrillardian perspective the most fruitful one in comprehending the creative potential of Tarantino's latest film? Moving from Baudrillard through Virilio to Deleuze and Guattari, the essay explores ways in which the film's investment in vision and screens opens for a creative and enabling engagement with images - not cinema as truth, as Deleuze would have it, but the truth of cinema. As such, Tarantino's in many ways outrageous film provides an important contribution to analyzes of the relation between perceptions of the image and conceptions of the real and contributes to the politically crucial endeavor of understanding what images 'want.'

  • 199.
    Ursini, Francesco-Alessio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Another look at preposition stranding2015In: From clerks to corpora: essays on the English language yesterday and today: essays in honour of Nils-Lennart Johannesson / [ed] Philip Shaw, Britt Erman, Gunnel Melchers, Peter Sundkvist, Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2015, p. 319-343Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 200.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Attitudes towards English in university language policy documents in Sweden2015In: Attitudes towards English in Europe: English in Europe, Volume 1 / [ed] Andrew Linn, Neil Bermel, Gibson Ferguson, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2015, p. 115-138Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper presents a discourse analytic study of the existing language policy documents from nine Swedish universities with regard to attitudes towards English. The discourse of the language policy documents has been studied carefully to investigate how the use of English is mentioned, what main themes it occurs in and what these themes seem to indicate with regard to attitudes towards the use of English in Swedish higher education. Four main themes for English emerge from the results of the investigation: 1) English as an important language that one is required to be proficient in; 2) English is here to stay, but it needs to be used alongside the local language Swedish and other languages where possible, aiming for parallel language use; 3) English poses a threat to Swedish (and other languages); and finally 4) English used in such university settings needs to be plain, comprehensible and intelligible. The theme with the strongest presence in the documents overall is theme 2, which is also explicitly stated in the rules, regulations and guidelines in these documents. Although there are few explicit instances of theme 3 in the data, the strong presence of theme 2 reveals the underlying attitudes in the documents: Swedish as an academic language is under threat and therefore must be “maintained”, “promoted” and “protected”. The results suggest that, despite the everyday language practices (as defined by Spolsky 2004) of the individuals in these higher education settings and which language they need for their everyday tasks, the use of English seems to be encouraged only if it occurs with the local language Swedish.

1234567 151 - 200 of 783
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf