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  • 151.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Fahlander, FredrikStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.Sjöstrand, YlvaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Encountering Imagery: Materialities, Perceptions, Relations2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pictorial and visual elements are special types of archaeological data that transgress boundaries: between us and the past and between the material and immaterial. Traditionally, images have been discussed in terms of what they represent, mean or symbolize. In this volume, the authors explore other ways in which images aect and engage the beholder and the modes in which they are entangled in past worlds. The articles comprise examples from various regions and time periods and include a diverse array of topics including northern European rock art of the Neolithic and Bronze Age, anthropomorphic aspects of ceramic pots and figures in gold, erotic themes on children’s burial vessels, and nineteenth-century rock art created by quarantined sailors in Australia.

  • 152.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Sjöstrand, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Imagery beyond Representation2012In: Encountering Imagery: Materialities, Perceptions, Relations / [ed] Ing-Marie Back Danielsson, Fredrik Fahlander, Ylva Sjöstrand, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2012, p. 1-12Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 153.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Gustin, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Larsson, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Thedéen, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Preface2009Other (Other academic)
  • 154.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Thedéen, Susanne
    Gender Questions2012In: To Tender Gender: The Pasts and Futures of Gender Research / [ed] Ing-Marie Back Danielsson, Susanne Thedéen, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2012, p. 9-16Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 155.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Thedéen, Susanne
    To Tender Gender: The Pasts and Futures of Gender Research in Archaeology2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Almost thirty years have passed since gender studies entered archaeological discourse in earnest. What is the current status of gender research? One of the aims of this book is to contribute to answering this and other related questions. Another is to shed some light on the pasts and possible futures of gender research. Contributions deal with publication statistics in journals over the last thirty years, neo-realist discussions of Mayan body-politic, intersectional analyses of current Swedish museum exhibitions and Viking Periodbox brooches, masculinities in practice at a cultural heritage site, Viking period bodily abilities and disabilities and experiments regarding how once-lived bodies and lives may be materialized.

  • 156.
    Back-Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Gustin, IngridStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.Larsson, AnnikaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.Myhrberg, NanouschkaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.Thedéen, SusanneStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Döda personers sällskap: Gravmaterialens identiteter och kulturella uttryck2009Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 157. Bagerius, Henric
    et al.
    Ekholst, Christine
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    A disobedient sodomite: Magnus Eriksson and the concept of heteronormative kingship2007In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 73, no 3, p. 7-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses how accusations of sodomy were used as a political weapon during the late Middle Ages. With St. Birgitta's accusations of sodomy against the Swedish king Magnus Eriksson in the I36os as a starting point,we study how sodomy was used as political propaganda and why it was effective. We argue that these allegations must be seen as part of a wider European political pattern. Numerous cases of similar charges can be found throughout late medieval Europe. All arise in troublesome political situations when the power struggle between king and aristocracy had reached a high point. We claim that a queer reading of the medieval texts reveals the great importance of heteronormative sexuality manifested in marital intimacy. To diverge from what we call a heteronormative kingship was regarded so seriously that it could be the very foundation of criticism against a king. The sodomite was an established figure of thought that captured all the faults of king Magnus Eriksson: his heresy, his thoughtlessness, his lasciviousness, his indecisiveness and his inclination to keep young and depraved men as advisors. The sodomite threatened the gender order and by doing so he jeopardized the entire social order. In other words, the accusations of sodomy made it possible for Magnus'critics to articulate his inability to be master in his own marriage and consequently master of his realm. A sodomite was clearly not suited to be king and the charges of sodomy could thus be used to justify a dethronement.

  • 158.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    A honfoglalás és kora Árpád-kori állattartás régészeti emlékei [Archaeological evidence of animal keeping in the time of the Hungarian Conquest and Period of the Árpád Dynasty]2017In: Hétköznapok a honfoglalás korában / [ed] Petkes Zsolt, Sudár Balázs, Helikon Kiadó , 2017, p. 52-58Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 159.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    A régészeti állattan "állatorvosi lova"2018In: Sötét idők túlélői: A kontinuitás fogalma, kutatásának módszerei az 5–11. századi Kárpát-medence régészetében: 2014-ben Debrecenben megrendezett konferencia kiadványa / [ed] Tamara Katalin Hága, Barbara Kolozsi, Debrecen: Déri Múzeum Régészeti Tár , 2018, p. 83-107Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 160.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Animal Remains in the Avar cemetery of Szegvár-Szőlőkalja2018In: Lebenswelten zwischen Archäologie und Geschichte: Festschrift für Falko Daim zu seinem 65. Geburtstag / [ed] Jörg Drauschke et al., Mainz: Verlag des Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseums , 2018, p. 43-56Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 161.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Archaeology in Hungary 1948–19892017In: Archaeology of the Communist Era: A Political History of Archaeology of the 20th Century / [ed] Ludomir R. Lozny, New York: Springer, 2017, p. 195-233Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 162.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    "Forever young": neoteny and design2018In: Annalen des Naturhistorischen Museums in Wien, Serie A., ISSN 0255-0091, no 120, p. 19-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The evolutionary relevance of neoteny, the concept that adults displaying youthful proportions evoke caregiving instincts, has frequently been questioned. The biological roots of the problem lead to the expression of age, sex and inheritance in size and shape. Formalist interpretations, however, can be misleading as the idea itself is anthropocentric. This weakness (in natural science) makes historic reflections on neoteny more interesting in material culture shaped by humans themselves. Archaeozoological examples include animal breeds, especially dogs. The attraction to "youthful" proportions also seems to have been exploited in both the creative and applied arts. Researchers of this eminently interdisciplinary subject cannot ignore overarching questions regarding complex and mutual interactions between nature and culture.

  • 163.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Génmódosított állatok nyomában2019In: Régészeti nyomozások Magyarországon 2.0 / [ed] Gábor Ilon, Budapest: Martin Opitz Kiadó , 2019, p. 33-44Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 164.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Hungarian grey cattle: Parallels in constituting animal and human identities2018In: Interspecies Interactions: Animals and Humans between the Middle Ages and Modernity / [ed] Sarah Cockram, Andrew Wells, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 190-213Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 165.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Hunting injuries in prehistoric game2016In: Southeast Europe and Anatolia in prehistory : Essays in honor of Vassil Nikolov on his 65th anniversary / [ed] K. Bacvarov, R. Gleser, Bonn: Verlag Dr. Rudolf Habelt GMBH, 2016, p. 501-508Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 166.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    "Kleine Fische, gute Fische": But Sturgeon is Great2018In: Genius Loci: Laszlovszky 60 / [ed] Dora Mérai, Ágnes Drosztmér, Kyra Lyublyanovics, Judith Rasson, Zsuzsanna Papp Reed, András Vadas, Csilla Zatykó, Budapest: Archaeolingua Foundation , 2018, p. 121-125Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 167.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Like a Headless Chicken: Meaning, Medium and Context in Medieval Urban Taphonomy2017In: Animaltown: beasts in medieval urban space / [ed] Alice M. Choyke, Gerhard Jaritz, Oxford: BAR Publishing , 2017, p. 19-26Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 168.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Resurrecting Roe Deer: Skeletal Weight Ratios At Prehistoric Paks–Gyapa, Hungary2017In: From Hunter-Gatherers to Farmers: Human adaptations at the end of the Pleistocene and the first part of the Holocene / [ed] Mărgărit, M. and Boroneanț, A., Targoviște: Editura Cetatea de Scaun , 2017, p. 465-481Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 169.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    The ghost in the corridor…: Some remarks on “Animal Secondary Products”, edited by Haskel J. Greenfield2015In: Germania, ISSN 0016-8874, Vol. 93, p. 233-245Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 170.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    The palaeopathology of wild mammals in archaeology = Vadon élő emlősállatok betegségei a régészetben2016In: Archeometriai Műhely, ISSN 1786-271X, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 19-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Domestication is known to have increased animal morbidity. Wild animals, however, should not be looked upon romantically like Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s “noble sauvage”, untainted by civilisation. Rare pathological lesions found on the bones of wild animals in archaeozoological assemblages, they offer valuable information both from a zoological and a archaeological point of view. In addition to discussing problems of sampling, this paper is a review of major factors such as taphonomy, environment, and heritability that determine the manifestation of disease in wild animals in archaeological assemblages. A simple classification, specifically developed for wild animals, is presented that helps better understand these conditions. Numerous examples from both the author’s own work and the broad base of international literature (especially on Europe and the Southwest Asia) are cited to help illustrate how disease is manifested on the bones of wild animals recovered from a variety of archaeological periods. The results of this paper show that although domestication undoubtedly brought about an increase in animal morbidity, depending on the chances of survival of a game species and the functional importance of the body part affected, a variety of pathological lesions regularly occur on the remains of wild animals as well.

  • 171.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Zooarchaeology in the Carpathian Basin and adjacent areas2017In: The Oxford Handbook of Zooarchaeology / [ed] Umberto Albarella, Mauro Rizzetto, Hannah Russ, Kim Vickers, Sarah Viner-Daniels, New York: Oxford University Press, 2017, p. 99-112Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Carpathian Basin, situated between the Alps, the Carpathians, and the Dinaric Alps, has been a geographically and culturally diverse area throughout its history. Research intensity in all periods and places is likewise heterogeneous. A complete review of animal–human relationships is, thus, impossible. Following a historical overview of research, characteristic examples of animal exploitation between the Neolithic and the early eighteenth century will be highlighted. Special emphasis is placed on the way migrations and imperial politics impacted the composition of animal bone assemblages. The role of animals in self-representation and other forms of symbolic communication are also considered.

  • 172.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Bonsall, Clive
    Herd mentality2018In: Social Dimensions of Food in the Prehistoric Balkans / [ed] Social dimensMaria Ivanova, Bogdan Athanassov, Vanya Petrova, Desislava Takorova, Philipp W. Stockhammer, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 173.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Choyke, Alice M.
    Reynolds, Ffion
    Stag do: ritual implications of antler use in prehistory2017In: The Neolithic of Europe: papers in honour of Alasdair Whittle / [ed] Penny Bickle, Vicki Cummings, Daniela Hofmann, Joshua Pollard, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2017, p. 107-119Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 174.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Gál, Erika
    Ottoman Turkish influences on animal exploitation in 16th-17th century Hungary2018In: Archaeozoology of the Near East XII: proceedings of the 12th international symposium of the ICAZ Archaeozoology of Southwest Asia and Adjacent Areas Working Group, Groningen Institute of Archaeology, June 14-15 2015 / [ed] Canan Çakırlar, Jwana Chahoud, Rémi Berthon, Susan Pilaar Birch, Groningen: Barkhuis Publishing & University of Groningen , 2018, p. 191-206Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 175.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lisk, Elicia
    Zohar, Irit
    Non-mammalian Vertebrate Remains2018In: Quedem Reports, ISSN 0793-4289, Vol. 10, p. 119-128Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 176.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Nyerges, Éva Ágnes
    Prehistoric Animal Remains from Grotta Scaloria2016In: Archaeology of Grotta Scaloria: Ritual in Neolithic Southeast Italy / [ed] Ernestine S. Elster, Eugenia Isetti, John Robb, Antonella Traverso, Los Angeles: University of New Mexico Press , 2016, p. 75-90Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 177.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Swift, Keith
    Coleman Carter, Joseph
    Animal Remains from the Sanctuary and Adjacent Areas at Pantanello2018In: The chora of Metaponto 7: The Greek Sanctuary at Pantanello, volume I : The excavation and site / [ed] Joseph Coleman Carter, Keith Swift, Austin: University of Texas Press, 2018, p. 447-464Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 178.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Animal palaeopathology: Between archaeology and veterinary science2019In: Animals: Cultural identifiers in ancient societies? / [ed] Joris Peters, George McGlynn, Veronika Goebel, Verlag Marie Leidorf, 2019, p. 27-36Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 179.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Animal remains from the Langobard cemetery of Ménfőcsanak (NW Hungary)2015In: Antaeus, ISSN 0238-0218, Vol. 33, p. 249-264Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 180.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Animal remains from the late medieval castellum of Őcsény-Oltovány, Southern Hungary2016In: “per sylvam et per lacus nimios” The Medieval and Ottoman Period in Southern Transdanubia, Southwest Hungary: The Contribution of the Natural Sciences / [ed] Gyöngyi Kovács, Csilla Zatykó, Budapest: Institute of Archaeology Research Centre for the Humanities Hungarian Academy of Sciences , 2016, p. 155-176Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 181.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    “Every skin teeth aint a laugh”: Medieval leopard find from Hungary2015In: Hungarian Archaeology, ISSN 2416-0296, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The unexpected recovery of a worked skull fragment from a large male leopard at the medieval urban site of Segesd–Pékóföld during the 1980s raises important questions. These concern zoogeographical distribution, as well as issues of manufacturing, status, and the circulation of luxury goods. In recent years these aspects of the special artefact could be revisited on the basis of an increasing body of data and new insights into the symbolic use of this artefact in high-status self-representation.

  • 182.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Halaf Period Animal Remains from Tell Aqab, Northeastern Syria2016In: Bones and Identity: Zooarchaeological Approaches to Reconstructing Social and Cultural Landscapes in Southwest Asia / [ed] Nimrod Marom, Reuven Yeshurun, Lior Weissbrod, Guy Bar-Oz, Oxbow Books, 2016, p. 125-155Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A small assemblage (NISP=3,217) of 5th millennium BC Halaf and subsequent Ubaid Period animal bones and molluscan remains was recovered during the 1975 and 1976 field seasons at the site of Tell Aqab (Jezirah province, northeastern Syria) some 100 km west of the Tigris River forming the current border between Turkey and Syria. The ca. 9.5 m high mound is located alongside a small seasonal stream that forms part of the Wadi Dara drainage system. Excavations were carried out by a University of Edinburgh team following a survey in the Khabur River floodplain. The purpose of excavations at the time was to clarify regional patterning in ceramic assemblages during the periods for which Tell Aqab had well-stratified layers, especially the Middle Halaf Period.

    Unsurprisingly, the poorly preserved faunal material was dominated by the bone fragments of small ruminants, evidently sheep and goat. Remains of cattle and pigs were also recovered. Hunting was indicated by the sporadically occurring remains of wild ass and gazelle, possibly also contributing to the heavily fragmented small ruminant remains. High fragmentation precluded the detailed metric analysis of bones. Meanwhile, in addition to the number of identifiable specimens (NISP) individual bone weights were taken in an effort to better appraise the dietary contributions of the species identified. Adding faunal information to this archaeological work contributes yet another data point to the map of prehistoric animal exploitation in the Fertile Crescent.

  • 183.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Hinnies in sync?2019In: Tidens landskap: En vänbok till Anders Andrén / [ed] Cecilia Ljung, Anna Andreasson Sjögren, Ingrid Berg, Elin Engström, Ann-Mari Hållans Stenholm, Kristina Jonsson, Alison Klevnäs, Linda Qviström, Torun Zachrisson, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2019, p. 30-32Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 184.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Johnny Karlsson: Spill: Om djur, hantverk och nätverk i mälarområdet under vikingatid och medeltid [[Waste: Osseous Materials, Craft and Networks in the Mälaren Region during the Middle Ages]2018In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 26, p. 254-261Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 185.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Környezet okozta állatbetegségek a régészetben2016In: Természet Világa, ISSN 0040-3717, Vol. 147, p. 40-45Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 186.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lóhalál [They shoot horses, do they?]: A nagytermetű háziállatok levágásának egyik hagyományos módja [A traditional way of slaughtering large livestock]2016In: Beatus homo qui invenit Sapientiam: Ünnepi kötet Tomka Péter 75. születésnapjára / [ed] Teréz Csécs, Miklós Takács, Győr: Lekri Group Kft. , 2016, p. 71-76Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 187.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Measuring skeletal weight ratios of red deer in archaeology2019In: Mikroszkóppal, feltárásokkal, mintavételezéssel, kutatásokkal, az archeometria, a geoarcheológia és a régészet szolgálatában / [ed] László Bartosiewicz, Katalin T. Bíró, Pál Sümegi, Tünde Törőcsik, Szeged: Geolitera , 2019, p. 35-48Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 188.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Szívszorító hasonlóságok: Gondolatok a rituális állatvágás kapcsán2015In: Ókor, ISSN 1417-8532, Vol. 4, p. 77-81Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 189.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Súlyos állatságok [Weighty matters]: A hatvani kultúra húsfogyasztása Jászdózsa-Kápolnahalmon [Meat consumption during the Hatvan culture occupation at Jászdózsa-Kápolnahalom, Hungary]2016In: Tiscium: a Jász-Nagykun-Szolnok megyei múzeumok évkönyve, ISSN 1217-4165, Vol. XXV, p. 303-307Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 190.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Taphonomy and Disease Prevalence in Animal Palaeopathology: The Proverbial “Veterinary Horse”2018In: Care or Neglect? Evidence of Animal Disease in Archaeology: Proceedings of the 6th Meeting of the Animal Palaeopathology Working Group of the International Council for Archaeozoology (ICAZ), Budapest, Hungary, 2016 / [ed] László Bartosiewicz, Erika Gál, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2018, p. 185-207Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 191.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Gál, Erika
    Care or Neglect? Evidence of Animal Disease in Archaeology : Proceedings of the 6th Meeting of the Animal Palaeopathology Working Group of the International Council for Archaeozoology (ICAZ), Budapest, Hungary, 2016 2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Animals have always been integral to culture. Their interaction with humans has intensified since the onset of domestication resulting in higher incidences of animal disease due to human intervention. At the same time, human care has counterbalanced pressures of natural selection, reducing morbidity among wild animals. Prior to the emergence of a veterinary record, animal disease can only be traced by analyzing pathological symptoms on excavated animal remains. This volume presents a collection of studies in the discipline of animal palaeopathology. An international team of experts offer reviews of animal welfare at ancient settlements from both prehistoric and historic periods across Eurasia.

    Several chapters are devoted to the diseases of dog and horse, two animals of prominent emotional importance in many civilizations. Curious phenomena observed on the bones of poultry, sheep, pig and even fish are discussed within their respective cultural contexts. Many poorly healed bones are suggestive of neglect in the case of ordinary livestock. On the other hand, a great degree of compassion may be presumed behind the long survival of seriously ill companion animals. In addition to furthering our better technical understanding of animal disease in the past, this volume also mirrors the diversity of human attitudes towards animals during our millennia-long relationship. Some animal bones show signs of extreme cruelty but others also reveal the great attention paid to the recovery of sick animals. Such attitudes tend to be largely hidden yet are characteristic aspects of how people relate to the surrounding world and, ultimately, to each other.

  • 192.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lillie, Malcolm
    Subsistence Practices in Central and Eastern Europe.2015In: The Oxford Handbook of Neolithic Europe. / [ed] Chris Fowler, Jan Harding and Daniela Hofmann, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015, p. 411-428Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 193.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Nyerges, Éva A.
    Biller, Anna Z.
    Palaeopathology at the Eneolithic tell settlement of Polyanitsa (Bulgaria) investigated by Sándor Bökönyi2018In: Care or Neglect? Evidence of Animal Disease in Archaeology: Proceedings of the 6th Meeting of the Animal Palaeopathology Working Group of the International Council for Archaeozoology (ICAZ), Budapest, Hungary, 2016 / [ed] László Bartosiewicz, Erika Gál, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2018, p. 23-44Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 194. Beck, Anna Severine
    et al.
    Dengsø Jessen, Mads
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Murray Lucas, Gavin
    Fuglestvedt, Ingrid
    Herva, Vesa-Pekka
    Will there be a next Nordic TAG? Reflections on theoretical archaeology in the Nordic countries today2019In: Arkæologisk Forum, ISSN 1399-5545, no 41, p. 17-19Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The first meeting in Nordic Theoretical Archaeology Group (Nordic TAG) was held in 1985. The – so far – last meeting in Nordic TAG was held in Copenhagen in 2015. At this meeting, the theme was “the Next 30 years in Theoretical Archaeology” – or in other words the aim wasto discussin which direction theories in the archaeological discipline will develop and especially what new theories, methodologies and perspectives might influence the field in the future. Tragicomically – or prophetically – no meetings have been organized since then. Now almost five years later we must ask: what is the future of Nordic TAG, and what does the lack of it tell us about the development of theoretical archaeology in the Nordic countries today?

  • 195.
    Bengtsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    La proposition participiale en moyen francais: le cas de la chose de la chevalerie et de Gargantua2009In: Regards sur la France du Moyen Âge: mélanges offerts à Gunnel Engwall à l'occasion de son départ à la retraite / [ed] Olle Ferm et Per Förnegård, Stockholm: Sällskapet Runica et Mediævalia , 2009, p. 225-245Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 196.
    Bengtsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages.
    L'Essor de la proposition participiale dans la prose historique2013In: The medieval chronicle VIII / [ed] Erik Kooper, Sjoerd Levelt, Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2013, Vol. VIII, p. 113-134Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 197.
    Bengtsson, Fanny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Tidigkristen diet: En XRF-analys av strontium på skelettmaterial från Varnhems gårdskyrka2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to study 31 individuals from an early christian cemetery in Varnhem, Sweden and through the use of XRF, study the strontium concentrations and the strontium to calcium ratios in bone and use that as an indicator for diet. The material consists of femurs and teeth and through analyzing this I will compare previous dietary studies using stable carbon, nitrogene and sulphur isotope analyses to see wether quantitative strontium analysis can be used as a way to study diet in prehistoric societies. The conclusion is that XRF is not as thorough as an isotope study but it provides a general knowledge of what the population has been eating where we can determine which individuals has had diet consisting of more meat or terrestrial plants.

  • 198.
    Bengtsson Melin, Pia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Jonsson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Medeltida kollekttavlor från Gotland2019In: Myntstudier, ISSN 1652-2303, E-ISSN 1652-2303, no 2, p. 1-90Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    På Gotland finns 55 medeltida kollekttavlor bevarade (helt eller delvis). I ett skandinaviskt och även i ett europeiskt perspektiv utgör de ett enastående material. Medeltida mynt som hittas i kyrkor anses bero på spill i samband med offer. Kollekttavlorna på Gotland visar att fynden även beror på mynt som tappats i samband med kollekt. De äldsta kollekttavlorna är från 1200-talets början och det var sannolikt då som kollekt infördes på Gotland. Kollekt nämns även i kyrkliga räkenskaper från det svenska fastlandet.

  • 199.
    Berg, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Att skriva sig fri: Om "psykopatiska" patienters förhandlingsutrymmen i 1930-talets Sverige2016In: Inspärrad: Röster från intagna på sinnessjukhus, fängelser och andra anstalter 1850-1992 / [ed] Roddy Nilsson, Maria Vallström, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2016, p. 315-355Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 200.
    Berg, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Birgitta Almgren, Dröm och verklighet: Stellan Arvidsson - kärleken, dikten politiken, Stockholm: Carlssons 20162018In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 138, no 3, p. 588-590Article, book review (Other academic)
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