Change search
Refine search result
1234567 151 - 200 of 2098
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 151.
    Blomberg, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Syndikalistiska modelejon2012In: Ett sekel av syndikalism: Sveriges arbetares centralorganisation 1910-2010, Stockholm: Federativs förlag , 2012, p. 126-129Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 152.
    Blomberg, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Ur den förnedrande träldomens grift: SAC och människovärdet2012In: Ett sekel av syndikalism: Sveriges arbetares centralorganisation 1910-2010 / [ed] Kristina Boréus, Ann Ighe, Maria Karlsson, Rikard Warlenius, Stockholm: Federativ , 2012, p. 105-115Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 153.
    Blomberg, Eva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Niskanen, KirstiStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Arbete & jämställdhet: förändringar under femtio år2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vid internationella jämförelser framstår Sverige som ett av världens mest jämställda länder. De flesta kvinnor förvärvsarbetar idag och har en egen inkomst. Särbeskattning, föräldraförsäkring, dagis och pappamånader gör att både kvinnor och män kan förena lönearbete och familjeliv. Hur har vi kommit så här långt? Vad återstår att göra? Antologin tar avstamp i 1960-talets jämställdhetsdiskussion då boken Kvinnors liv och arbete (SNS 1962) bidrog till att starta debatten om könsroller. Arbete och jämställdhet belyser vad som hänt i arbetslivet och i jämställdhetsdiskussionen under femtio år. Den innehåller såväl problematiserande kapitel som kapitel med kunskapsöversikter och vänder sig till alla som vill öka sina kunskaper om arbetsmarknadsfrågor och jämställdhet. Elva forskare från sex discipliner medverkar. Frågor som författarna behandlar är: förändring i teoretiska förståelser av kvinnor som lönearbetare, historien om invandrade kvinnors arbete, de mångfacetterade grunderna för diskriminering i arbetslivet, nya mönster av arbetskraftsmigration och arbetsgivar–arbetstagarrelationer i servicesektorn, genusmönster i kvinnors företagande, könsrollstänkandets utveckling samt pappapolitikens historia.

  • 154.
    Blomberg, Eva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Niskanen, Kirsti
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Arbete och jämställdhet: förändringar under femtio år2013In: Arbete & jämställdhet: förändringar under femtio år / [ed] Eva Blomberg, Kirsti Niskanen, Stockholm: SNS förlag, 2013, p. 7-25Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 155.
    Blomgren, Alvar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    'Shew Yourselves as Men': Gender, Citizenship and Political Propaganda in the 1773 and 1774 Worcester Election Contests2017In: Parliamentary History, ISSN 0264-2824, E-ISSN 1750-0206, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 346-360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This case study of the 1773 and 1774 election contests in the city of Worcester investigates how members of the local oligarchy, and the political opposition to that oligarchy, drew on contemporary discourses on citizenship to convince the electorate that their candidate would become a worthy representative of their city in parliament, and to refute the claims of their opponents. Since independence was absolutely essential to the voters' identities as male householder citizens, this became the main issue of conflict. The candidate of the opposition interest, Sir Watkin Lewes, sought to establish himself as the guardian of the independence of the citizens of Worcester against the corrupt corporation. The candidates of the corporation, Thomas Bates Rous and his successor, Colonel Nicholas Lechmere, instead claimed that Lewes was the real threat, as his anti-corruption campaign deprived the voters of the usual fruits of the election. While such claims also entailed an appeal by the local elite to the financial interest of the voters, the need to justify this incentive ideologically, and the high portion of voters who turned their backs on their patrons, does suggest the power embedded in the concept of citizenship in the political life at the level of the localities. Gendered and classed conceptions of citizenship, furthermore, were employed as offensive weapons in the political propaganda surrounding the elections, as each faction sought to discredit the other by claiming that they were neither manly enough, nor of the proper social status, to qualify as worthy political subjects. Thus, citizenship was not only fundamentally gendered in the masculine, but also highly hierarchical and equally intertwined with contemporary notions of class.

  • 156.
    Blomkvist, Per
    Stockholm University.
    Den goda vägens vänner: väg- och billobbyn och framväxten av det svenska bilsamhället 1914-19592001Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 157.
    Blomqvist, Anders E. B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Economic Nationalizing in the Ethnic Borderlands of Hungary and Romania: Inclusion, Exclusion and Annihilation in Szatmár/Satu-Mare 1867–19442014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The history of the ethnic borderlands of Hungary and Romania in the years 1867–1944 were marked by changing national borders, ethnic conflicts and economic problems. Using a local case study of the city and county of Szatmár/Satu-Mare, this thesis investigates the practice and social mechanisms of economic nationalizing. It explores the interplay between ethno-national and economic factors, and furthermore analyses what social mechanisms lead to and explain inclusion, exclusion and annihilation.

    The underlying principle of economic nationalizing in both countries was the separation of citizens into ethnic categories and the establishment of a dominant core nation entitled to political and economic privileges from the state. National leaders implemented a policy of economic nationalizing that exploited and redistributed resources taken from the minorities. To pursue this end, leaders instrumentalized ethnicity, which institutionalized inequality and ethnic exclusion. This process of ethnic, and finally racial, exclusion marked the whole period and reached its culmination in the annihilation of the Jews throughout most of Hungary in 1944.

    For nearly a century, ethnic exclusion undermined the various nationalizing projects in the two countries: the Magyarization of the minorities in dualist Hungary (1867–1918); the Romanianization of the economy of the ethnic borderland in interwar Romania (1918–1940); and finally the re-Hungarianization of the economy in Second World War Hungary (1940–1944).

    The extreme case of exclusion, namely the Holocaust, revealed that the path of exclusion brought nothing but destruction for everyone. This reinforces the thesis that economic nationalizing through the exclusion of minorities induces a vicious circle of ethnic bifurcation, political instability and unfavorable conditions for achieving economic prosperity. Exclusion served the short-term elite’s interest but undermined the long-term nation’s ability to prosper. 

  • 158.
    Blomqvist, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Nation, ras och civilisation i svensk arbetarrörelse före nazismen2006Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ideas of nationalism, race and anti-Semitism are usually connected to right wing ideology and politics. This thesis, however, is studying them in the context of the socialist labour movement. That a radical left wing patriotism, inspired by the French revolution, developed intertwined with workers’ internationalism is well known. But this left wing nationalism has, in the Swedish case, been characterised as an “internal” tool for obtaining democratic rights and social reforms and not directed against other peoples and nations. Inspired by postcolonial studies of whiteness the thesis examines the views of development of mankind and of national difference expressed in Swedish socialist publicity since the 1850’s up to the late 1920’s. Empirical studies of magazines, brochures and books show that it is possible to distinguish a trace of socialist whiteness in the production of ideas from the labour movement, influenced by liberal radicalism. Here, by socialist whiteness is not primarily meant identities of skin colour but ideas that the working class was the true and purest part of the nation and that socialism primarily was of concern to the white races on top of the chain of development. How this whiteness could be counter-posed to peoples and races considered different or “lower placed”, such as Slavs and Jews, has been of particular interest. In opposition to import of foreign labour, “usury Jews” and Tsarist Russia, arguments of socialist whiteness could be developed. With the Russian October revolution in 1917 bolshevism could be described as an Asian threat under Jewish leadership, alien to Swedish labour. Eugenic concerns for the Swedish race also found spokespersons in the socialist milieu of the 1910’s and 20’s. When fascism in the 1920’s captured the most radical themes of socialist whiteness ideas of Jewish threat and race purity could no longer be combined with defence of democratic ideals and find a public space in social democracy.

  • 159.
    Blomqvist, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Contrasts of Captivity: Prisoners of war in Torgau and Uppsala during the Great Northern War (1700-1721)2019In: War and Imprisonment, Paderborn, Germany: Verlag Ferdinand Schöningh, 2019Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 160.
    Blomqvist, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Det Olykkelige Slag: Helsingborg 17102017In: Karolinska förbundets årbok, ISSN 0348-9833, p. 147-150Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 161.
    Blomqvist, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Hans Christopher Becker: Migrant och krigsfånge i Karl XII:s Sverige2019In: Aktuellt om historia, ISSN 0348-503XArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 162.
    Blomqvist, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Migrant, officer och fosterlandsförädrare: Dödsdomen mot Fredrich Sahlgård och föreställningar om nationell tillhörighet i stora nordiska krigets Sverige2018In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, no 3, p. 391-420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Migrant, officer and traitor to the motherland: the death sentence against Fredrich Sahlgård and perceptions of national belonging in Sweden during the Great Northern War

    In September 1717 a Swedish court martial accused the Danish officer Fredrich Sahlgård of treason, and during this trial defining Sahglård’s nationality was a focal question. Sahlgård had been born in Sweden, but had moved to Norway as a child and the defendant therefore claimed that he could not be considered a Swede. His judges, however, argued that Sahlgård was a Swede by birth and therefore bound by both god and nature to protect his native land. Based on this argument the court sentenced Sahlgård to death and a few days later he was shot.

    This court martial from the great northern war reveal the limitations of studying perceptions of national identity through normative sources. Student of national identity in early modern Sweden have primarily focused on what ideas of swedishness were communicated in state propaganda and elite discourse. Several authors have claimed that contemporary perceptions of loyalty were strongly centred on the person of the monarch and expressed through the politically potent term "fatherland" (sw. fädernesland). These sources, however, tell us little of how notions of nationality were applied in practice. During Sahlgård’s trial the military court defined swedishness in a way that not just ran counter to, but expressly rejected, contemporary norms. The judges disavowed the foundations of natural law, despite its status as contemporary legal dogma, and formulated an essentialist definition of nationality, based around the concept of “motherland” (sw. fosterland) – completely disregarding the royal propaganda.

    On the one hand, the case study suggests that the intense military mobilization in early 18th century Sweden had a significant impact on perceptions of national identity within the Swedish army, as the arguments of the court stands out from both contemporary Swedish and European norms defined by previous research. On the other hand, the study questions what actual role national identity played during the court martial. Sahlgård was sentenced to death for being a Swede, but notions of oaths and rank seem to have been just as important in defining bonds of loyalty as definitions of nationality – if not more so.

  • 163.
    Blomqvist, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Utblick Tyskland2018In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, no 3, p. 526-535Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 164.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Adam Moore, Peacebuilding in Practice: Local Experience in Two Bosnian Towns2016In: International Journal of Turkish Studies, ISSN 0272-7919, Vol. 22, no 1/2, p. 222-226Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 165.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies.
    Battles of Nostalgic Proportion: The Transformations of Islam-as-Historical-Force in Western Balkan Reconstitutions of the Past2018In: Nostalgia, Loss and Creativity in South-East Europe: Political and Cultural Representations of the Past / [ed] Catharina Raudvere, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 37-71Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 166.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Destroying Yemen: What Chaos in Arabia Tells Us About the World2018Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since March 2015, a Saudi-led international coalition of forces—supported by Britain and the United States—has waged devastating war in Yemen. Largely ignored by the world’s media, the resulting humanitarian disaster and full-scale famine threatens millions. Destroying Yemen offers the first in-depth historical account of the transnational origins of this war, placing it in the illuminating context of Yemen’s relationship with major powers since the Cold War. Bringing new sources and a deep understanding to bear on Yemen’s profound, unwitting implication in international affairs, this explosive book ultimately tells an even larger story of today’s political economy of global capitalism, development, and the war on terror as disparate actors intersect in Arabia.

  • 167.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Edin Hajdrapašić, Whose Bosnia?: Nationalism and Political Imagination in the Balkans, 1840-19142016In: International Journal of Turkish Studies, ISSN 0272-7919, Vol. 22, no 1/2, p. 213-217Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 168.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Gewalt und Koexistenz: Muslime und Christen im spätosmanischen Kosovo (1870–1913). By Eva Anne Frantz2017In: Hungarian Historical Review, ISSN 2063-8647, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 240-242Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 169.
    Blumi, Isa
    Georgia State University, USA.
    Kent F. Schull, Prisons in the Late Ottoman Empire: Microcosms of Modernity2015In: American Historical Review, ISSN 0002-8762, E-ISSN 1937-5239, Vol. 120, no 5, p. 1998-1999Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 170.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Michael Provence, The Last Generation of the Making of the Modern Middle East, Cambridge University Press, 20172017In: ChoiceReviews, ISSN 0009-4978, Vol. 55, no 7Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 171.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Mohammad Hashim Kamali, The Middle Path of Moderation in Isalm: The Qur’anic Principle of Wasatiyyah2015In: ChoiceReviews, ISSN 0009-4978, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 210-210Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 172.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Peter Adamson, Philosophy in the Islamic World: A Very Short Introduction2016In: ChoiceReviews, ISSN 0009-4978, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 1232-1232Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 173.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Reorientating European Imperialism: How Ottomanism Went Global2016In: Die Welt des Islams, ISSN 0043-2539, E-ISSN 1570-0607, Vol. 56, no 3-4, p. 290-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholars have long studied Western imperialism through the prism of pre-World War I literature and journalism. Characterizing this literature as Orientalist has become programmatic and predictable. The sometimes rigid analysis of this literature often misses, however, the contested dynamics within. This is especially the case with analyses of Ottoman contributions to the rise of a Western colonialist ethos – orientalism, imperialism, and racism – reflecting the political, structural, and economic changes that directly impacted the world. Essentially, colonial pretensions – servicing the ambitions of European imperialism at the expense of peoples in the ‘Orient’ – were articulated at a time when patriotic Ottomans, among others, were pushing back against colonialism. This article explores the possibility that such a response, usefully framed as Ottomanism, contributed regularly to the way peoples interacted in the larger context of a contentious exchange between rival imperialist projects. What is different here is that some articulations of Ottomanism were proactive rather than reactive. In turn, some of the Orientalism that has become synonymous with studies about the relationship between Europe, the Americas, and the peoples “East of the Urals” may have been a response to these Ottomanist gestures.

  • 174.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Stephan Conermann (Hrsg.): Everything is on the Move. The Mamluk Empire as a Node in (Trans-) Regional Networks (= Mamluk Studies, vol. 7), Bonn 20142016In: Comparativ. Zeitschrift für Globalgeschichte und vergleichende Gesellschaftsforschung, ISSN 0940-3566, no 2, p. 103-105Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 175.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    The Transformation of Islam in Kosovo and its Impact on Albanian Politics2015In: Religion in the Post-Yugoslav Context / [ed] Branislav Radeljić, Martina Topić, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2015, p. 173-196Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 176.
    Blumi, Isa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies.
    Hacısalihoğlu, Mehmet
    Introduction to the Special Issue: Islamophobia in Europe2015In: IRCICA Journal, ISSN 2148-2772, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 13-28Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 177.
    Bodin, Per-Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.
    Blåkulla låg på en åker vid byn Utnäs2012In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Tvärs över en åker i byn Utnäs är Botniabanan planerad att gå. Men just där låg Blåkulla, enligt vittnesprotokollen från häxprocesserna år 1674–1675. Per-Arne Bodin har läst dokumenten från processerna där tre av hans släktingar stod anklagade.

  • 178.
    Bodin, Per-Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German, Slavic Languages.
    Den ukrainska kampen om det förflutna: Yuliya Yurchuk, Reordering of Meaningful Worlds: Memory of the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists and the Ukrainian Insurgent Army in Post-Soviet Ukraine2015In: Respons : recensionstidskrift för humaniora & samhällsvetenskap, ISSN 2001-2292, no 3Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 179. Bohman, Stefan
    Arbetarkultur och kultiverade arbetare: en studie av arbetarrörelsens musik1985Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 180.
    Bolling, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Sin egen hälsas smed: Idéer, initiativ och organisationer inom svensk motionsidrott 1945–19812005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation studies the spread of sports for all in Sweden during the years 1945 to 1981. The purposes of the dissertation are twofold: in part to survey the forms of physical activities which were launched as sports for all after 1945, in part to answer the question: Why have almost all voluntarily organized sports in Sweden been part of one organization since the 1970s?

    In order to handle the diversities of activities that can fall within the concept of sport, two principal abstractions of the concept are used: one rigorous and one flexible. Which definition one uses influences how physical activities are organized in a society.

    Earlier research into the history of the Swedish sports movement has concluded that it has had a relatively high degree of autonomy in relation to the state. This finding is questioned in this dissertation. Sveriges Riksidrottsförbund (RF) was the largest Swedish sports organization throughout the 20th century and at same time the organization the government relied on to develop sports policies and distribute the financial contribution from the state to the sports movement. This means that RF has played two roles, as an umbrella organization within the Swedish sports movement and as leader of the organizations within the Swedish sports movement, popular movement and semi-public authority.

    The dissertation shows that the two roles, that RF played, have caused conflicts of interest within the organization. That is made plain when one studies the spread of sports for all. Most members of the organization just wanted to practise different sports and were not interested in the leading organization’s desire to promote a great many different kinds of physical acitivites according to a flexible concept of sport. These members were not interested in strengthening the organization’s leading position within sports.

    There are not many conceptions that are so universally and uncritically accepted as the conception of the connection between physical activity and health. Sports for all came to age in a society where more and more people were told to use part of their leisure time to take part in physical activities. A societal consensus prevailed that the population’s health was on the decline due to the increased standard of living, which was creating an inactive and unhealthy population. This has meant that sports for all have been an asset of power for the sports organizations and that they have fought for authority and control over sports for all; a struggle fought over the language and thoughts as much as over sport activities. Since 1945 large campaigns to get the population to become more physically active irrespective of physical ability have been common.

  • 181.
    Bortz, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    "I wanted to know how this deed was done": Raul Hilberg, the Holocaust and History2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Raul Hilberg was a pioneer of Holocaust studies and for many decades the Holocaust scholar par excellence. He embarked upon the study of the Nazi genocide after the war, and established the understanding of the Holocaust as a bureaucratically administered “destruction process,” carried out by men who were not different from the German population in general. The present study analyzes and contextualizes his understanding of the Nazi genocide and the Jewish victims’ response to it, as well as the reception of Hilberg’s magnum opus, The Destruction of the European Jews, in relation to scholarly, political and personal contexts. It shows that Hilberg’s major work was far more favorably received than previously believed and that the negative reactions to his thesis on Jewish reactions was a response to the positive reception of his book, as well as an expression of a wider shift in scholarly and popular perceptions of the behavior of Jewish victims during the Holocaust.

    Hilberg’s interest in bureaucracy allowed him to depart from the focus on the Nazi leadership and the interpretation of the Holocaust as a premeditated and centrally organized genocide. The connection to modernity made him interpret it as a form of ominous progress, carrying implications for modern societies in general, as opposed to the interpretation of Nazism and the Holocaust as a form of atavistic aberration. However, Hilberg’s emphasis on the modern character of the genocide also led to a form of veneration of its efficiency.

    Hilberg has been much criticized for his argument that the Jewish victims contributed to their own demise by repeating an outdated and historically conditioned reaction to persecution, which assisted the perpetrators. This study explores his thesis regarding the “Jewish reaction pattern,” as an integral part of his work, which he used as a contrast to what he regarded as the successful and future oriented destruction process. It moreover advances a novel interpretation of this controversial part of Hilberg’s research, seeing it as a call for political action emptied of its positive di­mension, and a form of negative historiographical empowerment of the victims.

  • 182.
    Bortz, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Raul Hilberg, Germany, and the Perpetrators2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 183.
    Bortz, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Raul Hilberg, the Holocaust, and German National Identity2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 184. Bregnsbo, Michael
    et al.
    Jensen, Kurt Villads
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Introduction2016In: Schleswig Holstein: contested region(s) through history / [ed] Michael Bregnsbo, Kurt Villads Jensen, Odense: University Press of Southern Denmark , 2016, p. 7-14Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 185. Bregnsbo, Michael
    et al.
    Jensen, Kurt VilladsStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Schleswig Holstein: contested region(s) through history2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Schleswig and Holstein have been contested regions for more than thousand years, but contested between different peoples and groups, and for very different reasons. In modern times, they have been closely connected to the building up of national identity and the formation of the modern nation state. Since the division in 1920 of Schleswig into a northern, Danish part and a southern, German part, this region has also been an interesting example for international studies on whether it is possible to maintain regional cultural and economic cooperation across a modern state border, and on the rights and duties of linguistic minorities. Schleswig Holstein – contested region(s) through history aims at viewing the areas in their own right over a period of thousand years, and not simply as appendages to modern Danish and German nation-building. This does not imply that they are seen as isolated entities, still less that the regions around them and many strong and varied influences from outside are ignored. Rather, the book aims at investigating how Schleswig and Holstein have constantly been contested places, situated where different interests and forces have collided.

  • 186. Broberg, Gunnar
    et al.
    Tydén, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Oönskade i folkhemmet: rashygien och sterilisering i Sverige2005 (ed. 2)Book (Other academic)
  • 187.
    Brun, Laurent
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages. Franska.
    Recension av: Michelle Bubenicek. 2002. Quand les femmes gouvernent. Droit et politique au XIVe siècle: Yolande de Flandre2004In: Cahiers de recherches médiévales, ISSN 1272-9752, Vol. 11, p. 305-306Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 188.
    Brylla, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German.
    Der semantische Kampf um den Begriff des Nordens in Schweden zur Zeit des Nationalsozialismus2009In: Facetten des Nordens: Räume - Konstruktionen - Identitäten / [ed] Jan Hecker-Stampehl, Hendriette Kliemann-Geisinger, Berlin: Nordeuropa-Institut der Humboldt-Universität , 2009, p. 159-174Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 189.
    Brylla, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German.
    Die schwedische kommunistische Partei und der Eurokommunismus2010In: Jahrbuch für historische Kommunismusforschung, ISSN 0944-629X, Vol. XVI, no 23, p. 81-91Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 190.
    Brylla, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German.
    Sozialistische Utopie oder bedrohlicher Oststaat?: Darstellungen der DDR im schwedischen öffentlichen Diskurs 1961-19892007In: Nordeuropa und die beiden deutschen Staaten 1949-1989: Aspekte einer Beziehungsgeschichte im Zeichen des Kalten Krieges / [ed] Jan Hecker-Stampehl, Leipzig & Berlin: Edition Kirchhof & Franke , 2007, p. 199-214Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 191.
    Brylla, Charlotta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German.
    Almgren, BirgittaKirsch, Frank-Michael
    Bilder i kontrast: Interkulturella processer Sverige/Tyskland i skuggan av nazismen 1933-19452005Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 192. Burman, Anders
    et al.
    Sanner, IngaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Upplysningskritik: Till Bosse Holmqvist2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 193. Bysted, Ane L.
    et al.
    Jensen, Carsten SelchJensen, Kurt VilladsUniversity of Southern Denmark, Denmark.Lind, John H.
    Jerusalem in the North: Denmark and the Baltic Crusades, 1100-15222012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘God wills it, God wills it!’ – this was the response to the sermon of Pope Urban II at Clermont in 1095, in which he exhorted his audience to take the cross and liberate Jerusalem. And his words spread, even to the remotest islands in the north of Christendom. For the first time since the mid-nineteenth century, historians have investigated Latin, Danish, German, and Russian source materials about the Danish Crusades in the Baltic region. This team of four Danish medievalists describe how the idea of crusading reached the North and how Scandinavia became involved in the Western European crusading movement. Crusading ideology inspired Danish wars for hundreds of years against the Wends, Prussians, Lithuanians, Estonians and other pagan peoples along the coasts of the Baltic Sea so that in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries Denmark became the dominant crusading power in the region: a Jerusalem in the North. Indeed, crusading remained an important political reality in Denmark until the Lutheran Reformation in the early seventeenth century.

  • 194.
    Byström, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    En broder, gäst och parasit: Uppfattningar och föreställningar om utlänningar, flyktingar och flyktingpolitik i svensk offentlig debatt 1942-19472006Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Earlier studies have proposed that Swedish refugee policy started to change around 1942, when a restrictive refugee policy became more generous and humanitarian. From a quantitative point of view this statement is true: there were about ten thousand refugees in 1941, compared to almost two hundred thousand by the end of the war. However, this does not tell us whether the well-known discourses of Swedish inter-war anti-Semitism, nationalism and xenophobia underwent the same changes. The aim of this dissertation is to analyse the public debate concerning foreigners, refugees and refugee policy in 1942–1947.

    The dissertation puts forward the hypothesis of The Nordic prerogative. In brief, this prerogative meant that Sweden primarily held itself obliged to accept ethnical Northeners as refugees, and looked upon this obligation as more important than other considerations, such as the refugee’s ideological views, need of protection or humanitarian needs. Symptomatically, the groups which could not be entirely encompassed within the idea of a Nordic prerogative, particularly the Balts and the Danish Jews, were perceived as the most problematical refugee groups, both on a general level of the debates, and in specific issues.

    The idea of a Nordic prerogative did not derive from a sense of ethnical fraternity and humanitarian considerations alone, however. Several undertakings were also brought about by pragmatic considerations. Sweden sought goodwill, and reception of refugees was seen as one way of winning it.

    The dissertation also shows that the idea of a Nordic prerogative seems to become less important when the refugee comes closer to the everyday life of Sweden, where the Nordic refugees too were referred to as ”foreigners”, ”aliens” etc. As such, they had to put up with being spoken of in negatively loaded expressions, in the same way as other foreigners.

  • 195.
    Byström, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    "Final call to a race in pain". Afroamerikansk musik, politik och religion2011In: Sign o' the times.: Introduktion till populärmusik som historia / [ed] Johan Bergman, Mikael Byström och Nikolas Glover, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 196.
    Byström, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    The Nordic prerogative – An explanatory perspective on Swedish refugee policy 1942-19472008In: Norsk tidsskrift for migrasjonsforskning, ISSN 1502-4008, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 197. Byström, Mikael
    et al.
    Frohnert, Pär
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Invandringens historia: från "folkhemmet" till dagens Sverige2017Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Med denna kunskapsöversikt, som sträcker sig från folkhemsbygget under 1930-talet fram till dags dato, vill Delmi bidra till att ge en överskådlig bild av migrationen och dess betydelse. Översikten baserar sig på ett rikt urval av befintlig forskning på olika områden och den behandlar tre större frågekomplex: Hur utformades invandrings- och invandrarpolitiken? Vilka bakomliggande föreställningar styrde debatter, media och beslutsfattare? Hur såg praktiken ut när det gäller mottagande, försörjning, bemötande och deltagande i samhälls- och arbetsliv?

  • 198.
    Byström, Mikael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Frohnert, PärStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Reaching a state of hope: Refugees, immigrants and the Swedish welfare state, 1930-20002013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 199. Büntgen, Ulf
    et al.
    Krusic, Paul J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography. University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Verstege, Anne
    Sanguesa-Barreda, Gabriel
    Wagner, Sebastian
    Julio Camarero, J.
    Ljungqvist, Fredrik Charpentier
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Zorita, Eduardo
    Oppenheimer, Clive
    Konter, Oliver
    Tegel, Willy
    Gärtner, Holger
    Cherubini, Paolo
    Reinig, Frederick
    Esper, Jan
    New Tree-Ring Evidence from the Pyrenees Reveals Western Mediterranean Climate Variability since Medieval Times2017In: Journal of Climate, ISSN 0894-8755, E-ISSN 1520-0442, Vol. 30, no 14, p. 5295-5318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Paleoclimatic evidence is necessary to place the current warming and drying of the western Mediterranean basin in a long-term perspective of natural climate variability. Annually resolved and absolutely dated temperature proxies south of the European Alps that extend back into medieval times are, however, mainly limited to measurements of maximum latewood density (MXD) from high-elevation conifers. Here, the authors present the world's best replicated MXD site chronology of 414 living and relict Pinus uncinata trees found >2200 m above mean sea level (MSL) in the Spanish central Pyrenees. This composite record correlates significantly (p <= 0.01) with May-June and August-September mean temperatures over most of the Iberian Peninsula and northern Africa (r = 0.72; 1950-2014). Spanning the period 1186-2014 of the Common Era (CE), the new reconstruction reveals overall warmer conditions around 1200 and 1400, and again after around 1850. The coldest reconstructed summer in 1258 (-4.4 degrees C compared to 1961-90) followed the largest known volcanic eruption of the CE. The twentieth century is characterized by pronounced summer cooling in the 1970s, subsequently rising temperatures until 2003, and a slowdown of warming afterward. Little agreement is found with climate model simulations that consistently overestimate recent summer warming and underestimate preindustrial temperature changes. Interannual-multidecadal covariability with regional hydroclimate includes summer pluvials after large volcanic eruptions. This study demonstrates the relevance of updating MXD-based temperature reconstructions, not only back in time but also toward the present, and emphasizes the importance of comparing temperature and hydroclimatic proxies, as well as model simulations for understanding regional climate dynamics.

  • 200.
    Callergård, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Thomas Reid's Newtonian Theism: his differences with the classical arguments of Richard Bentley and William Whiston2010In: Studies in history and philosophy of science, ISSN 0039-3681, E-ISSN 1879-2510, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 109-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reid was a Newtonian and a Theist, but did he found his Theism on Newton’s physics? In opposition to commonplace assumptions about the role of Theism in Reid’s philosophy, my answer is no. Reid prefers to found his Theism on a priori reasons, rather than on physics. Reid’s understanding of physics as an empirical science stops it from contributing in any clear and efficient way to issues of natural theology. In addition, Reid is highly sceptical of our ability to discover the efficient and final causes of natural phenomena, knowledge of which is essential for natural theology. To bring out Reid’s differences with classical Newtonian Theists Richard Bentley and William Whiston, I examine their use of the law and force of general gravitation, and reconstruct what would be Reidian objections.

1234567 151 - 200 of 2098
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf