Change search
Refine search result
1234567 151 - 200 of 424
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 151.
    Holmes, Luke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Language, hospitality, and internationalisation: exploring university life with the ethical and political acts of university administrators2023In: Current Issues in Language Planning, ISSN 1466-4208, E-ISSN 1747-7506, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 42-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on the ethico-political framework of hospitality, this paper investigates the communicative practices of three administrative support staff as they attempt to manage the twin challenges of working in adherence to state and institutional language policies while communicating ethically in an internationalising workplace. Academic administrative staff rarely feature in studies on internationalisation yet are crucial to understanding the complex day-to-day realities of contemporary university life. Empirically, this study reports on 18 months of ethnographic fieldwork, including observations, interviews, and email records. The data demonstrate language work being carried out on an ethical basis, before the consideration of any particular languages, beyond the participants’ political obligations, and in excess of institutional support. The current national and institutional responses to the multilingual realities of Swedish university life, I argue, are failing to do justice to and facilitate the ethically grounded, bottom-up language policy-making as practised by this study’s participants. This paper thus promises to open up debate on hospitality within language policy and planning for internationalising Higher Education, and, in its re-evaluation of the ethical and political dimensions of hospitality, it emphasises the framework’s critical potential within sociolinguistic research, more generally.

  • 152.
    Hu, Guohua
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Svenska studenters uppfattningar av tonerna i kinesiska tvåstaviga ord2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Foreign adult students with atonal language usually have, in the beginning of their Chinesestudy, difficulties to identify the Chinese tones. On one side, only monosyllabic tones arementioned in course books during this earlier stage and to illustrate the tone contours withhands has been treated as an effective pedagogy. On the other side, research on Chinese hasfor long been solely concentrated upon the values of the fundamental frequency (F0) of thevowels in monosyllabic words. In cross-linguistic studies many factors, among others the effectsof consonants on F0 that native speakers are not aware of, have still not been paidspecial attention to.There is no consensus regarding the explanation to tone confusion patterns. Earlier theoriesof Second Language Acquisition (SLA) like Perception Assimilation Model (PAM) andSpeech Learning Model (SLM) are no longer suited for tone perception. Recently, PAMSuprasegmenthas tried to approach that the intonation of the learners’ native language is assumedto be assimilated to the Chinese tone system. However, this model ignores the wordprosody. Nowadays, when the modern Chinese vocabulary consists of a majority of disyllabicwords, research has to be re-directed to find other criteria e.g. temporal and stress for explainingthe complexity of Chinese tone perception, i.e. how two tones behave when they arecombined in one word.The purpose of this essay is to explore how native Swedish speakers learning Chinese assecond/foreign language perceive the Chinese tones of disyllabic words. The experiment isnot based on elaborated test words. The results show that tones are first of all affected by theinitial consonants and sequentially influenced by the surrounding tones with accordance toChinese. It further reveals that Swedish accent I/II patterns might be a reasonable explanationfor the Chinese tone confusion patterns since partially acoustic properties of Chinese disyllabicwords overlap the Swedish accents.These results mean that tone perception is a dynamic and complex process. Further researchon tone perception should explore profoundly and widen interaction between sounds andword prosody, which paves the way for more effective prosodic practice in language education.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 153.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Advanced Proficiency and Exceptional Ability in Second Languages2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 154.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Andraspråk på skilda villkor: variationer i slutnivå hos barn och vuxna2013In: Profession, Politik och Passion: Inger Lindberg som andraspråksforskare – en vänbok / [ed] Monica Axelsson, Marie Carlson, Qarin Franker, Karin Sandwall, Göteborg: Institutionen för svenska språket, Göteborgs universitet , 2013, p. 21-35Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 155.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Att förstå tal i bullriga miljöer: ’nästan infödda’ andraspråksanvändare i experiment med vitt brus och cocktailsorl2013In: Text, tal och tecken: några perspektiv inom språkforskningen / [ed] Björn Lindblom, Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, 2013, p. 94-113Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 156.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Introduction: Perspectives on advanced second language proficiency2016In: Advanced Proficiency and Exceptional Ability in Second Languages / [ed] Kenneth Hyltenstam, Boston/Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2016, p. 1-14Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 157.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Läs- och skrivsvårigheter hos tvåspråkiga2014In: Ungdomar läser och skriver / [ed] Fischbein, S., Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2014, p. 207-241Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 158.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Polyglotism: A synergy of abilities and predispositions2018In: High-level language proficiency in second language and multilingual contexts / [ed] Kenneth Hyltenstam, Inge Bartning, Lars Fant, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018, p. 170-195Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 159.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Second language ultimate attainment: Effects of maturation, exercise, and social/psychological factors2018In: Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, ISSN 1366-7289, E-ISSN 1469-1841, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 921-923Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mayberry and Kluender (2017) offer a rich review of empirical research that contributes to the understanding of age-related effects on first and second language acquisition. Their keynote article compiles current, primarily linguistic and neurolinguistic, research on the notion of a critical period for language (CPL). The authors conclude “that the putative CPL applies to L1 learning, and that L2 effects are a consequence of this prior learning” (Mayberry & Kluender, 2017: p. 6). As they propose a clear role for CPL in L1 learning, and because their exact position on its role in L2 learning is, to my mind, not as clearly articulated, I will take the opportunity to argue the following: If a CPL exists at all, it should have identifiable implications for all kinds of language acquisition (cf. Gleitman & Newport, 1995). In the case of L2 acquisition what needs to be identified is how maturational constraints (implicated by a CPL) interact with other conditions that are at hand when the second language comes onto the scene.

  • 160.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    The exceptional ability of polyglots to achieve high-level proficiency in numerous languages2016In: Advanced Proficiency and Exceptional Ability in Second Languages / [ed] Kenneth Hyltenstam, Boston/Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2016, p. 241-272Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 161.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    The polyglot – an initial characterization on the basis of multiple anecdotal accounts2016In: Advanced Proficiency and Exceptional Ability in Second Languages / [ed] Kenneth Hyltenstam, Boston/Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2016, p. 215-240Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 162.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Vilket undervisningsspråk favoriserar vilka elever?2008In: Sprogforum, Temanummer: Førstesproget som ressource, ISSN 0909-9328, no 43, p. 44-48Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 163.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Älvdalskan inte bortglömd 2008In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no 6, p. 75-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 164.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Âge de l’exposition initiale et niveau terminal chez des locuteurs quasi-natifs du Suédois L22003In: Acquisition et Interaction en Langue Étrangère, Vol. 18, p. 99-127Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 165.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Bartning, IngeStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.Fant, LarsStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Avancerad andraspråksanvändning: slutrapport från ett forskningsprogram2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 166.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Bartning, IngeStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.Fant, LarsStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    High-Level Language Proficiency in Second Language and Multilingual Contexts2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 167.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Bartning, Inge
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Fant, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Introduction: High-level proficiency and the concept of nativelikeness in second language and multilingual research practice2018In: High-Level Language Proficiency in Second Language and Multilingual Contexts / [ed] Kenneth Hyltenstam, Inge Bartning, Lars Fant, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018, p. 1-15Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 168.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Ganuza, Natalia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Linguistic Rights in Education - Country Report on Sweden2012In: Linguistic Rights in Education: Country Reports / [ed] Gracienne Lauwers, Jan De Groof, Brussels: European Union , 2012, p. 165-173Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 169.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Foreword: Linguistic Citizenship: unlabeled forerunners and recent trajectories2022In: Struggles for Multilingualism and Linguistic Citizenship / [ed] Quentin Williams; Ana Deumert; Tommaso M. Milani, Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 2022, p. xvii-xxvChapter in book (Refereed)
  • 170.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Lindberg, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Förord2013In: Svenska som andraspråk: i forskning, undervisning och samhälle / [ed] Hyltenstam, K. & Lindberg, I., Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 2. uppl., p. 7-18Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 171.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Lindberg, IngerStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Svenska som andraspråk: i forskning, undervisning och samhälle2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 172.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Salö, Linus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Språkideologi och det ofullbordade språkbytet: Den språkliga försvenskningen av det meänkielitalande området2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Föreliggande rapport redovisar ett uppdrag åt Sannings- och försoningskommissionen förtornedalingar, kväner och lantalaiset (Ku 2020:01). Studien ska utifrån tidigare forskning omspråkbytesprocesser beskriva faktorer som påverkat de historiska skeenden då befolkningen imeänkielitalande områden genomgick en språklig försvenskning under 1800-och 1900-talen.Studien ska beskriva hur centrala politiska beslut och det lokala genomförandet av dessa underett långt tidsförlopp har kommit att påverka minoritetens språkanvändningsmönster liksområdande ideologiska trenders betydelse för språkbytet. Detta knyts till gruppinterna faktorersom berör demografi, genus, förekomst av religiösa rörelser, näringsstruktur, institutioner medmera. I fokus finns även de socialpsykologiska effekterna av språkkontakten mellan minoritetoch majoritet och särskilt i relation till ojämna maktförhållanden.Studien ska även belysa införandet av begreppet ”halvspråkighet” och dess påverkan förspråkbytesprocessen från 1960-talet och framåt samt halvspråkighetsbegreppets uppkomst,innebörd och spridning utanför den norrbottniska kontexten.Slutligen innefattar uppdraget att mot ovanstående bakgrund resonera om dagens situationoch de möjligheter för språkrevitalisering som föreligger utifrån aktuell lagstiftning om nationella minoriteter och minoritetsspråk. 

  • 173.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Salö, Linus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Språkideologi och det ofullbordade språkbytet: Den språkliga försvenskningen av det meänkielitalande området2023In: Som om vi aldrig funnits: Tolv tematiska forskarrapporter, Stockholm: Regeringskansliet , 2023, , p. 143p. 9-152Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 174.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    At the nexus of vulnerability: Multilingualism in development2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The majority of the world’s nations are multilingual, although many of the languages spoken have little or no official recognition in the conduct of everyday affairs of State, nor do they figure in any major way in development discourses. For example, although UNESCO and other World and regional organizations frequently underscore the desirability and importance of multilingualism, it is often in the context of education and cultural heritage rather than development more generally. Lack of recognition, however, does not mean that multilingualism does not play an essential role in the public and private lives of citizens. In this short text, we hope to drive home the point that local linguistic resources also directly bear upon democracy, economy, and health. And this is not just by proxy through the known beneficial effects of educating in local languages. We will suggest that more attention be paid to the various ways in which development can benefit from the use of local multilingualisms. Language is important in development precisely because it is at the nexus of vulnerability. Poverty stricken groups in developing contexts are not only the least resourced. They • are also the least visible • lack political and cultural recognition on official arenas • frequently suffer stigma and ambivalence with respect to their cultural heritage • have a paucity of educational capital • experience poor health. One major factor contributing to this cycle of vulnerability – and for which solutions are within easy reach – is that the linguistic and cultural systems these groups have ready access to are not officially recognized. Non-recognition of the languages in which groups organize their everyday life and socialize their children means that they are denied the tools to make their voices heard or to find empowerment through political agency. They also have few opportunities to influence their day-to-day material conditions. The ultimate consequence of this situation is extreme vulnerability to political, economic and ecological (including health) developments. In this document, we shall argue, by way of illustration, that issues of language in general and multilingualism specifically need to be seen as core facets of such diverse areas as democracy, economy, health, and education.

  • 175.
    Isaksson, Petrus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Relationellt resonerande på ett L2: Visuella representationers roll i en andraspråkseffekt2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    På senare tid har andraspråksforskning visat att användningen av ett främmande språk reducerar tendenser till intuitivt resonerande och beslutsfattande. En sådan främmandespråkseffekt – en s.k. foreign language effect (FLE) – innebär med andra ord en förminskad tendens till resonerande utifrån magkänsla till fördel för ett mer analytiskt resonerande. FLE har dock främst varit förknippad med beslutsfattande som är knutet till känslor, och lite uppmärksamhet har ägnats logiskt resonerande, trots att det finns anledning att tro att FLE är verksam även inom detta område. Logiskt resonerande med transitiva relationer antas ofta underlättas av hur lätt det är att framkalla en inre mental bild av relationerna i fråga, men bl.a. Knauff & May (2006) har visat att visuella detaljer i sådana bilder kan störa slutledningsförmågan. Det tycks nämligen möjligt att relationella termer som är lätta att föreställa sig visuellt, som t.ex. renare och smutsigare, är kognitivt belastande. Nyligen har emellertid Hayakawa och Keysar (2018) visat på en reduktion av detaljer i visuella representationer hos användare av ett främmande språk, vilket torde innebära att användningen av ett främmande språk reducerar den negativa effekten av att resonera med s.k. visuella termer. Denna främmandespråkseffekt undersöks här i ett experiment med användare av ett L1 (svenska) och ett L2 (engelska). Experimentets första del – formuppgiften – testar huruvida en reduktion av detaljer i visuella representationer föreligger hos L2-användare. Den andra – slutledningsuppgiften – prövar huruvida visuella termer hindrar resonerande med transitiva slutledningar, med fokus på skillnader mellan L1 och L2. Resultaten från formuppgiften visar inget signifikant stöd för reduktion av detaljer i visuella representationer hos L2-användare. Dock uppvisade deltagarna i föreliggande undersökning sådana svarstendenser. I resultaten från slutledningsuppgiften finns däremot ett stöd för en främmandespråkseffekt. Det tog längre tid på L1 att lösa de slutledningar som innehöll visuella termer, jämfört med slutledningar som inte innehöll sådana termer. Denna trend var, enligt utökade resultat från en variansanalys, signifikant på L1 men inte på L2, där typ av slutledning inte hade någon signifikant effekt på responstid. Dessutom visade sig en signifikant effekt för språk i motsatt riktning än den förväntade, sådan att det överlag tog längre tid att lösa slutledningsproblemen på L1 än på L2. Dessa fynd indikerar tillsammans en främmandespråkseffekt för logiskt resonerande med transitiva slutledningar. Särskilt fanns ett visst stöd för att detaljer i visuella representationer utgör ett hinder på L1 men inte på L2. Dock är detta sistnämnda påstående i behov av vidare prövning då stödet för det endast visade sig signifikant utan avvikande svar, och den förmodade orsaken – reducerad livlighet i visuella föreställningar på L2 – inte var tillräckligt tydligt framträdande.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 176.
    Johnsson, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Language requirements for Swedish citizenship: Adult language learners' attitudes towards the Swedish language test for immigrants2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In line with the global trend of increased language requirements for naturalization, the Swedish government decided in 2019 to introduce a language test for citizenship. Drawing on Norton Peirce’s (1995) notion of investment and Fraser’s (2000) definition of participatory parity, this study investigates adult second language learners’ attitudes towards the test and analyzes how investment in language learning and perception of possibilities for participatory parity influence their views. Furthermore, the study considers some of the potential consequences of the new policy, for example, for acts of linguistic citizenship (Stroud, 2018). Eighteen SFI-students at level 3C, one of the highest levels at the language course, responded to a questionnaire. Nine respondents favored the test, four opposed it, four were neutral, and one was unsure. Interviews were conducted with six volunteers out of these participants, five out of six were supporters of the language test. The qualitative data was analyzed thematically. While all participants were motivated to learn Swedish, the findings indicate how diverse forms of capital, ideologies, and desired or actual identities in Swedish, that is, the nature of their investment and perceived possibilities for economic and social participation, influenced their attitudes towards the language test. Furthermore, supporters of the test considered that the language requirement would improve possibilities for participatory parity, whereas the opponents emphasized the risk of misrecognition and misrepresentation. The policy redefines Swedish citizenship: by making a test of Swedish language mandatory for prospective citizens, it formally demands that immigrants learn Swedish provided they want to integrate. As the results suggest, however, the participants in this study were engaged in a wide range of acts of linguistic citizenship in Swedish and had similar reported proficiency levels, regardless of their opinions of the Swedish test. The study calls for more research on the effects of language requirements for naturalization to examine to what extent and in what ways a language test for citizenship affects already motivated language learners.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 177.
    Johnsson, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Language requirements for Swedish citizenship: Adult language learners’ attitudes towards the Swedish language test for immigrants2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In line with the global trend of increased language requirements for naturalization, the Swedish government decided in 2019 to introduce a language test for citizenship. Drawing on Norton Peirce’s (1995) notion of investment and Fraser’s (2000) definition of participatory parity, this study investigates adult second language learners’ attitudes towards the test and analyzes how investment in language learning and perception of possibilities for participatory parity influence their views. Furthermore, the study considers some of the potential consequences of the new policy, for example, for acts of linguistic citizenship (Stroud, 2018). Eighteen SFI-students at level 3C, one of the highest levels at the language course, responded to a questionnaire. Nine respondents favored the test, four opposed it, four were neutral, and one was unsure. Interviews were conducted with six volunteers out of these participants, five out of six were supporters of the language test. The qualitative data was analyzed thematically. While all participants were motivated to learn Swedish, the findings indicate how diverse forms of capital, ideologies, and desired or actual identities in Swedish, that is, the nature of their investment and perceived possibilities for economic and social participation, influenced their attitudes towards the language test. Furthermore, supporters of the test considered that the language requirement would improve possibilities for participatory parity, whereas the opponents emphasized the risk of misrecognition and misrepresentation. The policy redefines Swedish citizenship: by making a test of Swedish language mandatory for prospective citizens, it formally demands that immigrants learn Swedish provided they want to integrate. As the results suggest, however, the participants in this study were engaged in a wide range of acts of linguistic citizenship in Swedish and had similar reported proficiency levels, regardless of their opinions of the Swedish test. The study calls for more research on the effects of language requirements for naturalization to examine to what extent and in what ways a language test for citizenship affects already motivated language learners.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 178.
    Jonsson, Carla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Förord2018In: Translanguaging: Flerspråkighet som resurs i lärandet, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 179.
    Jonsson, Carla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Power and resistance: Language mixing in three Chicano plays2014In: International Journal of Bilingualism, ISSN 1367-0069, E-ISSN 1756-6878, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 118-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article offers insights into how multilingual resources such as language mixing can be used in theater to address power relations such as, for instance, domination, resistance and empowerment. Three plays by Chicana playwright Cherrie Moraga (Giving up the ghost, Heroes and saints, and Shadow of a man) will be used to illustrate language mixing in Chicano theater. Moraga's work has been selected since she is regarded as a representative of Chicano theater both by people within and by people outside the Chicano community. Chicano theater arose in the United States during the 1960s as an act of resistance. The aim was to empower Chicanos/Mexican Americans by informing them about their rights in the society in which they resided. Chicano theater has thus since its inception been linked to issues of power. Theoretically, this article builds upon philosopher Michel Foucault's view of power, which fits well with the study of Chicano theater since it acknowledges that power exists in all social relations and is negotiated in each relation and context. Foucault's view of power also asserts that power and resistance go hand in hand. This, then, can be translated to the Chicano context, where struggles take place on different levels in order to resist power. Chicano theater, also referred to by Moraga as theater of resistance is one such form of resistance. However, power is not merely resisted. It is also reproduced in a new form. Foucault's view of power and resistance and his emphasis on the productive functions of power allow for a possibility of empowerment.

  • 180.
    Jonsson, Carla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Skrivande över språkliga gränser2022In: Skrivdidaktik i grundskolan / [ed] Eva Lindgren; Carina Hermansson; Annika Norlund Shaswar; Sofie Areljung, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2022, p. 215-238Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 181.
    Jonsson, Carla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Translanguaging and ideology: Moving away from a monolingual norm2017In: New Perspectives on Translanguaging and Education / [ed] BethAnne Paulsrud; Jenny Rosén; Boglárka Straszer; Åsa Wedin, Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 2017, p. 20-37Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 182.
    Jonsson, Carla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Translanguaging and multilingual literacies: Diary-based case studies of adolescents in an international school2013In: International Journal of the Sociology of Language, ISSN 0165-2516, E-ISSN 1613-3668, no 224, p. 85-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A diary is often a personal and private matter, a well-kept secret. This article discusses findings from ethnographic research in which language diaries and diary-based interviews were used as a means to collect qualitative data. The article is based on case studies of six high school students who at the time of the study were enrolled at an international boarding school in Sweden. During the interviews, the students spoke about personal matters associated with languages, identities and discriminatory practices in school and in society.

    The aim of the paper is twofold: (1) to investigate and describe the students' language practices, their translanguaging practices and their multilingual literacies, and (2) to analyze diary-based case studies – based on language diaries and diary-based interviews – from a methodological viewpoint as a means to collect data. The study wishes to contribute to the growing body of ethnographic research on literacy that highlights and nuances the intricate ways in which languages are being used by bilingual and/or multilingual adolescents in their everyday lives in a globalized world.

    The diaries together with the diary-based interviews reveal significant findings about multilingualism both on a micro and macro level. On a micro level these findings relate to, for instance, the use of translanguaging that forms part of the students' multilingual repertoires and the construction of identities in a transnational space such as the school. On a macro level, the findings relate to, for instance, language ideologies, language policies and teaching and learning in a transnational space.

    The results of the study have implications for language policies and teaching practices in schools with bilingual/multilingual students. The study shows how the students' language practices differ from that of the school. Furthermore the study contributes to the methodological advancement of ethnographic research methods and shows how the use of language diaries can enable the production of self-reflection based on students' language practices.

  • 183.
    Jonsson, Carla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Transspråkande och språkliga ideologier bland lärare och elever2018In: Transspråkande i svenska utbildningssammanhang / [ed] Bethanne Paulsrud, Jenny Rosén, Boglárka Straszer, Åsa Wedin, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 184.
    Jonsson, Carla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    'What is it called in Spanish?': Parallel Monolingualisms and translingual classroom talk2019In: Classroom Discourse, ISSN 1946-3014, E-ISSN 1946-3022, Vol. 10, no 3-4, p. 323-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a bilingual school, the linguistic and semiotic resources of students who speak one, two or several languages can be used in classroom discourse in order to embrace and strengthen the multiplicity of voices and languages in teaching and learning. In this article, four English language lessons ? where the medium of instruction mainly oscillates between Swedish and English, and where Spanish is also used ? are analysed with the aim of generating knowledge about how translanguaging is or could be used as a pedagogical resource in the classroom. The data were collected through ethnographic fieldwork in a 5th grade class at a bilingual school in the Stockholm area and consist of recordings of classroom observations, photos and field notes.

  • 185.
    Jonsson, Carla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Blåsjö, Mona
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Translanguaging and multimodality in workplace texts and writing2020In: International Journal of Multilingualism, ISSN 1479-0718, E-ISSN 1747-7530, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 361-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Professionals working in international companies in Sweden are expected to speak, read, and write in Swedish and English in their daily work. This article discusses professional writing in different languages. Through the use of methods from linguistic ethnography, we aim to enrich the understanding of workplace literacy by studying writing and texts in multilingual business contexts. Our results show that professionals are expected to navigate between a translanguaging mode and a more monolingual mode in everyday communication. Also, when they opt for producing monolingual texts, literacy practices that surround those texts are often multilingual. Moreover, they imagine a future, secondary audience for their texts, often resulting in the choice of English for reaching out, or in the choice of Swedish as a way of keeping matters local. Knowing when to choose a translanguaging mode or a more monolingual mode is a necessary skill or competence in this type of workplace. Our results also show that the use of multimodal resources includes the material placement of texts, and that old materialities such as pen and paper are still essential. Different linguistic and semiotic resources are used, including resources from academic, business and personal discourse.

  • 186.
    Jonsson, Carla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Muhonen, Anu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German.
    Multilingual repertoires and the relocalization of manga in digital media2014In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 4-5, p. 87-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to analyze multilingual repertoires of young adolescents and the relocalization of manga on Facebook. The focal points of our analysis are: how young adolescents relocalize manga in digital media, the multilingual repertoires these adolescents use in the relocalization of manga, and the manner in which the relocalization of manga and the multilingual repertoires in digital media contribute to indexing the identity of these adolescents.

    The results show that digital media opens up for and encourages dialogue through which the identity performances of young adolescents are invigorated. Through their repertoires, the adolescents perform local, global and glocal identities that reflect superdiverse conditions. The participants׳ choice of, e.g., Japanese screen names highlights their indexing of identities in which local and global aspects are blended and where Japanese aspects are highlighted, whereas other heritage cultures are backgrounded. From the adolescents׳ engagement in a global and transnational manga culture, we learn that, in superdiverse conditions, global transcultural flows can affect the lives of adolescents to the extent that these become a central part of their identity performance.

    In the article, we propose a sociolinguistic online ethnography approach in which we combine (socio)linguistic ethnography with online ethnography. The study shows how the ethnographic data supports, deepens and nuances the analysis. Sociolinguistic online ethnography thus offers a lens through which we as researchers can access not only multilingual repertoires per se but also the participants׳ voices and interpretations.

  • 187.
    Jonsson, Carla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Olvegård, Lotta
    Tingsell, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism.
    Flerspråkighet i arbete: En vägledning från Språkrådet2021Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Det här är en vägledning om språkinlärning – med konkreta tips om hur du som har svenska som förstaspråk kan planera möten, sköta rekrytering och hantera det dagliga arbetet på en arbetsplats där det talas många språk.

    Du får också veta mer om hur du kan öka den ömsesidiga förståelsen i kommunikationen med människor som håller på att lära sig svenska som andraspråk.

  • 188.
    Jonsson, Carla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Rosenfors, Mona
    'I have struggled really hard to learn Sami': Claiming and regaining a minority language2017In: International Journal of the Sociology of Language, ISSN 0165-2516, E-ISSN 1613-3668, Vol. 248, p. 49-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article sheds light on the issue of new speakerness via a case study focusing on one adolescent – “Elle” – and her efforts to claim and regain Sami, a national minority language in Sweden. Elle did not acquire Sami at home, but attended Sami school from first grade to sixth grade, where she learned to understand, read, and write the language. Ever since childhood, Elle has “struggled” to learn more Sami and to be acknowledged as a Sami speaker. It was only recently that Elle started using Sami actively in speech, reclaiming her Sami voice and breaking a silence to which she had been involuntarily submitted. A condition that for Elle could have resulted in language loss was, thus, by her efforts to regain the language, turned into a condition of language revitalization. This article shows how Elle’s narratives are linked to language ideologies and language policies in Swedish society, to negative attitudes towards Sami culture, and to discrimination. By learning and actively using Sami in writing and in speech, Elle exercises agency, and by taking the important step to start speaking, Elle proclaims her right to speak Sami and to her representation. The agency that Elle exercises by using Sami is beneficial for her own language development, but could also potentially contribute to the language revitalization of Sami and to the linguistic empowerment of other speakers/learners of Sami.

  • 189.
    Järnefelt, Pia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Examining transfer and prototypes in L1 Swedish learners of Spanish: The case of aspect: The simple present and the present progressive2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study is focused on the transfer accounts and the prototype accounts, and examines aspect through looking at L1 Swedish learners of Spanish who are at early stages of acquisition. The prototype accounts postulate that adult learners will acquire the most prototypical forms of a grammatical feature first, and then, as proficiency increases, less prototypical features, called extended meanings, will be acquired incrementally (Shirai & Andersen, 1995, Geeslin & Fafulas, 2012). The transfer accounts claim that all grammatical features of the L1 will transfer at initial stages, and that this will either facilitate or impede acquisition, depending on if there are structures that are realized differently or similarly in the L1 and in the L2 (Kellerman, 1979, Gass & Ard, 1984, Schwartz & Sprouse, 1996, Gabriele et al., 2015). The study uses the stimuli and experiment used in Gabriele et al. (2015), a study that tested L1 English learners of Spanish and found evidence that support the transfer accounts. Results from the present study shows positive evidence of L1 transfer, which is taken as support for the transfer account. The results are not compatible with the prototype accounts. A finding of a marginal difference might be indicative of L2 transfer, which is also taken as evidence for the transfer accounts. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 190.
    Järnefelt, Pia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Nog är ju viktigt: The role of modal particles nog and ju in responsibility attribution in L1 and L2 speakers2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates whether advanced adult L2 speakers comprehend the subtle linguistic cues that modal particles entail and seek to find if modal particles affect them in their responsibility attribution. Two groups of advanced L2 speakers of Swedish were tested; one group of L1 German speakers and one group of L1 English speakers. In an experiment that investigated responsibility attribution, participants read short stories that were manipulated with the modal particles nog and ju, to see if the use of these modal particles affected how they attributed  responsibility to a character in the short story. The L2 learners were tested to see if L1 background affects the L2 acquisition of modal particles. A control group of native Swedish speakers were also tested. As an exploratory and complementary measure, reading times were recorded for the critical sentences modified with ju and nog. The results show a main effect of group and a main effect of condition, but no interaction between the two. However, upon closer inspections of the numerical values in the groups, possible trends and curious directions are seen. The results yielded no significant differences between groups and conditions, and are presented as possible trends, and discussed. Contrary to the hypotheses, these trends are indicative of the English speakers being affected by the modal particles in the way that natives were expected to, while Germans showed a pattern that was different from native speakers. The results show no significant differences for the different conditions in the native control group. The results show no support for L1 transfer facilitation in the acquisition of modal particles.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 191.
    Karlander, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Authentic Language: Övdalsk, metapragmatic exchange and the margins of Sweden’s linguistic market2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This compilation thesis engages with practices that in some way place stakes in the social existence of Övdalsk (also älvdalska, Elfdalian, Övdalian), a marginal form of Scandinavian used mainly in Sweden’s Älvdalen municipality. The practices at hand range from early 20th century descriptive dialectology and contemporary lay-linguistics to language advocacy and language political debate. The four studies focus on the logic by which such practices operate, on the historically produced visions that they bring into play, as well as on the symbolic effects that they have produced. Study I provides a zoomed-out account of the ordering of Övdalsk in Sweden’s linguistic market. Focusing on a relatively recent debate over the institutional regimentation of Övdalsk, it analyses the forms of agreement upon which the exchange in question has come to rest. The contention has mainly developed over the classification of Övdalsk, percolating in the question of whether Övdalsk ‘is’ a ‘language’ or a ‘dialect’. Analysing this debate, the study takes interest in the relationship between state power and metapragmatic exchange. Study II deals with the history of linguistic thought and research on Övdalsk. It analyses the genesis of some durable visions of the relationship between Övdalsk and linguistic authenticity, focusing on the research practice of the Swedish dialectologist Lars Levander (1883–1950), whose work on Övdalsk commands representative authority to this day. By engaging with Levander’s techniques of scholarly objectivation, as well as with their language theoretical fundaments, the study seeks to create some perspectives on, and distance to, the canonical representations of Övdalsk that have precipitated from Levander’s research. Study III looks into the reuse and reordering of such representations. It provides an ethnographic account of a metapragmatically saturated exchange over Övdalsk grammar, in which descriptivist artefacts play an important part. Through an analysis of texts, in situ interaction, and interviews, the study seeks to grasp the ways in which textual renditions of grammar interrelate with practically sustained, socially recognized models of language and language use (i.e. registers). Study IV tracks the ways in which such visions of authenticity have been drawn into institutionally and politically invested metapragmatic exchanges. It looks into a process of naming of roads in Älvdalen, in which ideas about the contrast between Swedish and Övdalsk played a central part. In all studies, various visions of Övdalsk authenticity and authentic Övdalsk constitute a central theme. The thesis maintains that such visions must be understood in relation to the practices in which they hold currency. Following Silverstein, this epistemological stance entails an engagement with the dialectic between historical formations and situated exchange. Through this analytical orientation, the studies seek to account for the visions of authenticity that have been at the forefront of various symbolic struggles over Övdalsk. Thus, in addition to their respective analytical accounts, the separate studies seek to add shifting temporal horizons to the superordinate heuristic, combining a deep historical backdrop with accounts of protracted institutional processes and analyses of situated linguistic interaction. Ultimately, this mode of analysis provides an in-depth understanding of the object of inquiry.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Authentic Language
    Download (jpg)
    Omslagsframsida
  • 192.
    Karlander, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Backjumps: writing, watching, erasing train graffiti2018In: Social Semiotics, ISSN 1035-0330, E-ISSN 1470-1219, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 41-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with mobile semiotics. First and foremost, it discusses mobility as a semiotic device. The analysis engages with backjumps, a genre of train graffiti that draws inventively on various forms of movement. The term backjump refers to any fairly elaborate graffiti piece painted on trains in traffic, notably during the trains’ extended stops at terminal stations. The examples focus on the Stockholm metro, where a rigorous anti-graffiti policy has been firmly in place: graffiti is quickly cleaned off trains and a range of strategies is implemented to keep graffiti writing under wraps. By slyly inserting graffiti into the metro system, the mobility-driven backjump practice allows graffiti writers to temporarily subvert this semiotic regime. Furthermore, the forms of semiotic mobility at play are not limited to the movement of the trains. As the present study shows, mobile backjumps are entangled in other patterns of mobility, which jointly underwrite a number of interlinked semiotic processes.

  • 193.
    Karlander, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Fleeting graffiti: Backjumps, mobilities and metro semiotics2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses mobility as a semiotic device. Drawing mainly on examples from Stockholm, it analysesbackjumps, a genre of train graffiti that inventively makes use of various forms of movement. The social, spatial existence of backjumps is underlined by mobility, from the moment they are created on temporary stationary trains until the point they are removed as part of regimented semiotic ordering of public space. As backjumps move through the metro system, their appearances and disappearances rework the visual composition of a number of interlinked spaces, briefly succeeding in transgressing the semiotic regimentation of public space. For properly grasping these semiotic transformations, mobility needs to be placed at the forefront of inquiry. Building on lines of thought from human geography and spatially interested sociolinguistics, the analysis demonstrates that a sensitization to the workings of mobility is apt for creating a more fine-grained understanding of the interplay between space and semiotic practice. In this vein, it seeks to introduce further nuance toa sociolinguistics that has focused extensively on the notion of landscape.

  • 194.
    Karlander, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Mobile semiosis and mutable metro spaces: Train graffiti in Stockholm's public transport system2018In: Making Sense of People and Place in Linguistic Landscapes / [ed] Amiena Peck, Christopher Stroud, Quentin Williams., London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 195.
    Karlander, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Regimenting Övdalsk: Sociolinguistic differentiation and the spectre of the European Charter in Sweden’s language politics2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with symbolic power and the European Charter for Regional and Minority Languages (ECRML). Tracing some recent developments in Sweden’s language politics (1997–2015), it focuses primarily on the politics of sociolinguistic differentiation and the politicisation of metalinguistic categories. It analyses the contention that has developed over the regimentation of Övdalsk, a minor non-standardised form of Scandinavian mostly spoken in a rural parish in western central Sweden (Älvdalen). Over nearly two decades, the question of what Övdalsk ‘is’ – a ‘language’, a ‘dialect’ or something else – has surged repeatedly in political, public and scholarly debates, in expert reports, in policy documents and in scientific publications. Yet, the fact that the debate has centred almost exclusive on this muddled taxonomic issue has not been addressed. This paper seeks to cover this ground. Drawing on Bourdieu’s work on the state, it attends on the ways in which the exchange over Övdalsk has paid tribute to an increasingly entrenched symbolic order. Commenting on the ECRML more generally, the paper accounts for how and why an officialised vision of linguistic division is rendered symbolically effective. In this vein, the paper argues that a sensitisation to the tacit agreement upon which all contention rests is apt for grasping the maintenance of a political order as legitimate and symbolically effective.

  • 196.
    Karlander, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Register and artefact: Enregistering authenticity in an engagement with Övdalsk descriptivist texts2015In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 45, p. 12-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the symbolic and material formation of an authenticated register of Ovdalsk - a Scandinavian local language - unfolding in a situated engagement with grammatical artefacts. Seeking to refine the often underspecified category of the indexically 'pre-shift,' traditional,' 'old' or, in some other way, temporally authenticated register, it intercalates an analysis of linguistic exchanges with histories of production of authoritative discourse. Through a stepwise analysis of the production of metapragmatic discourse, it explores the indexically presupposing and entailing relationship between artefactual objectivation and novel registers of language. Thus examining the enregistering interpretation of genred regimentations of language-as-form, it argues that such focus is apt for creating a reflexive and less essentializing understanding of linguistic authenticity.

  • 197.
    Karlander, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Roads to regimentation: Place, authenticity and the metapragmatics of naming2017In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 53, p. 11-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social agents often stake claims to the naming operations that are embedded in officialdiscourse. The present article explores the metapragmatics of such investments. Drawingon post-Austinian theories of naming (Kripke, Harris, Bourdieu, Silverstein), the articleanalyses the contentious process of naming roads in a rural community in Sweden. In thisprocess, one major stake was the entextualisation of names in Övdalsk, a locally used formof Scandinavian. Focusing on an extended exchange over spatial and linguistic authenticity,the article elucidates several ways in which the semiotics of place are bound up with arange of symbolic struggles and antagonisms. More generally, the article argues that suchfocus is necessary for grasping the semiotisation of space and spatialisation of semiosis.

  • 198.
    Karlander, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    State categories, state vision and vernacular woes in Sweden’s language politics2018In: Language Policy, ISSN 1568-4555, E-ISSN 1573-1863, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 343-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the politics of classification in contemporary Sweden. It analyses the language political dispute that has developed over the language political regulation of Övdalsk, a non-standard form of Scandinavian spoken in Älvdalen in northern central Sweden. The analysis focuses on the ways in which a discursive exchange over metalinguistic categories contributes to the efficacy of a state vision of linguistic divisions. In the wake of Sweden’s ratification of the European Charter for Regional and Minority Languages (ECRML), and the language political reforms in which the ratification was embedded, Övdalsk has emerged as a contentious issue. Over three decades (1990s–2010s), the question of what Övdalsk ‘is’—a ‘language’, a ‘dialect’ or something else—has surged repeatedly in political, public and scholarly deliberations (i.e. in expert reports, in policy documents and in scientific publications). Nevertheless, the interests placed in this muddled taxonomic issue have not yet been subjected to any sociolinguistic analysis. Drawing on Bourdieu’s work on the state, the article attends to the ways in which the exchange over Övdalsk has paid tribute to an increasingly entrenched symbolic order. Commenting on Sweden’s commitment to the ECRML more generally, the article accounts for how and why an officialised vision of linguistic division has been rendered symbolically effective. Accordingly, the article argues that a sensitisation to the forms of tacit agreement that underwrite contention is a suitable lens for grasping the maintenance of a political order as legitimate and effective.

  • 199.
    Karlander, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    The linguistic prerequisites for cultural analysis: Lars Levander’s reocentric ethnographies of Swedish peasant life and languageIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 200.
    Karlander, David
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Milani, Tommaso M.
    Jonsson, Rickard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Gränsdragningar som språkideologisk praktik2017In: Varför språkvetenskap? kunskapsintressen, studieobjekt och drivkrafter / [ed] David Håkansson, Anna-Malin Karlsson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017, p. 237-253Chapter in book (Refereed)
1234567 151 - 200 of 424
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf