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  • 151.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Testing the demand approach to reconstruct pre-industrial agricultural output2016In: Scandinavian Economic History Review, ISSN 0358-5522, E-ISSN 1750-2837, Vol. 64, no 3, p. 202-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common method to reconstruct historical national accounts is the demand approach, which calculates agricultural consumption from the development of wages and prices of agricultural and non-agricultural products assuming constant income, own price and cross price elasticities of demand. This study uses agricultural data for Sweden 1802–1950, which is more reliable than for other countries, to put the approach to test. Time series analysis shows that the demand approach could be modelled as a cointegrating relationship between per capita demand and the deflated wage. Income elasticity is estimated to +0.4. Using the estimated parameters to extrapolate Swedish agricultural consumption back to the Middle Ages accords quite well with other indicators. However, out-of-sampling shows that the 90% confidence interval is as large as ±0.15–0.25 natural logarithms.

  • 152.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    The Gross Domestic Product of Sweden within present borders, 1620–20122014In: House prices, stock returns, national accounts and the Riksband balance sheet 1620-2012 / [ed] Rodney Edvinsson, Tor Jacobson, Daniel Waldenström, Stockholm: Ekerlids förlag, 2014, p. 101-182Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 153.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    The international political economy of early modern copper mercantilism: rent seeking and copper money in Sweden 1624 17762012In: Explorations in economic history (Print), ISSN 0014-4983, E-ISSN 1090-2457, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 303-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1624-1776 Sweden minted intrinsic value copper coins, alongside silver coins. One purpose behind introducing the copper standard was to use its monopoly position at the European markets to manipulate the international copper prices, implementing a kind of copper mercantilism. This paper presents a model of an early modern copper monopolist that could price discriminate between two different uses for copper: copper for export and copper for minting. The paper concludes that authorities did not completely conform to this rent-seeking model, since there were also other considerations behind minting policy, such as providing a stable monetary system. The model shows that under profit-maximisation minting should have been even higher and the price of copper money lower, but at periods minting and prices approached the optimal state. In the 17th century, the market for copper money was probably too small relative the huge copper production, but by the 17205 and 1730s, when copper production had declined, the copper standard functioned more smoothly.

  • 154.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    The multiple currencies of Sweden-Finland 1534-18032010In: Exchange rates, prices, and wages, 1277-2008 / [ed] Rodney Edvinsson, Tor Jacobson, Daniel Waldenström, Stockholm: Ekerlids förlag, 2010, p. 133-237Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 155.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    The Swedish crisis year 1809 in long-term economic historical perspective2010In: Monetary boundaries in transition: A North European economic history and the Finnish War 1808-1809 / [ed] Tuukka Talvio & Cecilia von Heijne, Stockholm: Statens historiska museum , 2010, p. 37-54Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 156.
    Edvinsson, Rodney B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Swedish GDP 1620-1800: stagnation or Growth?2013In: Cliometrica, ISSN 1863-2505, E-ISSN 1863-2513, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 37-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reconstructs an annual volume series of GDP and GDP per capita for Sweden within present borders 1620-1800, extending the annual series that exist from 1800 onwards. Annual fluctuations of GDP are estimated from the annual fluctuations of harvests, which in the nineteenth century were strongly correlated with each other. Long-term trends are determined based on estimates of the values added of various activities for a few benchmark years. The paper shows that the long-term trend of GDP per capita increased modestly during the studied period, a different development from real wages that fell substantially. Henceforth, available data on real wages are at best a quite weak indicator of the development of GDP per capita. If Sweden is representative of Western Europe, the new data indicate a somewhat slower growth than assumed by Maddison. The increase in GDP per capita occurred in the seventeenth century and came entirely from non-agricultural activities, especially mining, public services, trade and transports. The lack of dynamism in the aggregate economy is explained by the dominance of agriculture. Per capita agricultural production displayed a stagnating tendency. Nevertheless, the expansion of the population in the eighteenth century was largely made possible by the increased use of iron tools in agriculture. Without technological progress, the strong population growth would probably have led to decreased per capita production.

  • 157.
    Edvinsson, Rodney Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Recalculating Swedish pre-census demographic data: was there acceleration in early modern population growth?2015In: Cliometrica, ISSN 1863-2505, E-ISSN 1863-2513, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 167-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The world population growth increased in the eighteenth century, which caused real wages to decline in most countries. Eli Heckscher held the view that Swedish population growth was quite low in the seventeenth century, similar to the development in the rest of Europe, and that there was a substantial acceleration after 1720. Recent data for Sweden by Lennart Andersson Palm entail that population growth was stronger in the seventeenth century than in the eighteenth century. However, this is at variance with other types of economic data. For example, Swedish real wages increased during the seventeenth century and fell in the eighteenth century. This study attempts to resolve the anomaly and argues that Palm's estimates of Swedish population and mortality rates are too low for the seventeenth century. It presents revised annual demographic data for Sweden for the pre-census period, back to 1630. The new data indicate that there was a small acceleration in early modern population growth, due to the decreased occurrence of mortality crises, but the acceleration was not as pronounced as in the rest of the world.

  • 158.
    Edvinsson, Rodney Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    The response of vital rates to harvest fluctuations in pre-industrial Sweden2017In: Cliometrica, ISSN 1863-2505, E-ISSN 1863-2513, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 245-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines whether there was a Malthusian equilibrium mechanism in Sweden in the pre-industrial period. A unique data set on harvests, deaths, marriages and births going back to 1630 is used to calculate cumulative elasticities of vital rates with respect to harvest. While earlier studies have mostly focused on the impact of real wage, this study uses the calorie content of per capita harvests as an indicator of living standards. It finds that there indeed was a response of vital rates to harvest fluctuations, but there were important structural breaks. While positive checks attenuated after 1720, preventive checks were strengthened. After 1870 preventive checks disappeared, and possibly also positive checks. The results are robust to different models and trend specifications, with one crucial difference: while the distributed lag model shows that positive checks were significant up to 1920, the SVAR model shows that positive checks disappeared after 1870.

  • 159.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Blöndal, Sölvi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Söderberg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    A price index for residential property in Stockholm, 1875–20112014In: House prices, stock returns, national accounts and the Riksband balance sheet 1620-2012: / [ed] Rodney Edvinsson, Tor Jacobson, Daniel Waldenström, Stockholm: Ekerlids förlag, 2014, p. 63-100Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 160.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History. Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study (SCAS), Sweden.
    Franzén, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Sveriges tidiga formella penningväsende2015In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 135, no 3, p. 377-400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Föreliggande uppsats analyserar framväxten av ett formellt penningväsende i Sverige 995–1525. Ett av de tidigaste tecknen på monetarisering inträffade under andra halvan av 1200-talet och innebar att betalningar i bevarade källor huvudsakligen anges i mynt som räknats i stället för att vägas. Skillnaden mellan ett mynts nominella värde och dess värde som silver utgjordes av slagskatt. Myntförsämringen under 1300- och 1400-talen motverkades av att silvrets köpkraft ökade kraftigt.

  • 161.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Franzén, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Söderberg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Swedish Payment Systems 995–15342010In: Exchange Rates, Prices, and Wages, 1277-2008 / [ed] Edvinsson, Rodney, Tor Jacobsson, Daniel Waldenström, Stockholm: Ekerlids förlag, 2010, p. 67-132Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 162.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Jacobson, Tor
    Fregert, Klas
    Waldenström, Daniel
    Genmäle till Pihl och Winton2018In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, Vol. 46, no 7, p. 3p. 55-57Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 163.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Jacobson, TorWaldenström, Daniel
    Exchange rates, prices, and wages, 1277-20082010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 164.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Jacobson, TorWaldenström, Daniel
    House prices, stock returns, national accounts and the Riksband balance sheet 1620-20122014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 165.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Jacobson, Tor
    Waldenström, Daniel
    Introduction2018In: Sveriges Riksbank and the History of Central Banking / [ed] Rodney Edvinsson, Tor Jacobson, Daniel Waldenström, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018, p. 1-25Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 166.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Jacobson, Tor
    Waldenström, Daniel
    Introduction to Historical Monetary and Financial Statistics for Sweden, Volume II: House Prices, Stock Returns, National Accounts, and the Riksbank Balance Sheet, 1620–20122014In: House prices, stock returns, national accounts and the Riksband balance sheet 1620-2012: / [ed] Rodney Edvinsson, Tor Jacobson, Daniel Waldenström, Stockholm: Ekerlids förlag, 2014, p. 9-25Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 167.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Leijonhufvud, Lotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Söderberg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Väder, skördar och priser i Sverige2009In: Agrarhistoria på många sätt: 28 studier om människan och jorden. Festskrift till Janken Myrdal på hans 60-årsdag / [ed] Liljewall, Britt, Iréne A. Flygare, Ulrich Lange, Lars Ljunggren, Johan Söderberg, Stockholm: Kungl. Skogs- och lantbruksakademien , 2009, 1, p. 115-136Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 168.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Nordlund Edvinsson, Therese
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Explaining the Swedish ‘housewife era’ of 1930–1970: joint utility maximisation or renewed patriarchy?2017In: Scandinavian Economic History Review, ISSN 0358-5522, E-ISSN 1750-2837, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 169-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study shows that the Swedish ‘housewife era’ roughly occurred in 1930–1970. During the 1950s, the ratio of women’s worked hours to men’s worked hours reached a low point. In the early 1970s, it rose to above 50%. We argue that models of joint utility maximisation, assuming equal gender power relations unrestrained by cultural and institutional settings, cannot alone explain this era. The two principal structural mechanisms behind the rise of the breadwinner household were the decline of the farm household and the increased proportion of married women. Both weakened the bargaining position of women. Three results in our study weaken the claims of the joint utility maximisation model. Firstly, marriage was much more important than motherhood in determining the probability of women’s labour force participation, although the age of the child is then not taken into account. Secondly, the labour force participation of married women was similar across different social strata outside of the farm and top income households, indicating a prevalent capitalist patriarchal structure. Thirdly, women’s leisure was valued less than men’s, demonstrating that the preferences of the husband were prioritised over those of the wife.

  • 169.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Nordlund Edvinsson, Therese
    New estimates of time use in Sweden 1950–20122017In: Journal of European Economic History, ISSN 0391-5115, E-ISSN 2499-8281, Vol. XLVI, no 2, p. 77-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The official statistics on GDP and the labour market exclude unpaid domestic services. Yet there are good theoretical reasons why historians should study unpaid work. This paper reconstructs annual estimates of time use in Sweden from 1950 to 2012 among women and men. It finds substantial convergence between the genders in time use from the 1960s to the early 1980s. During the pe-riod of inquiry, the gender difference in total working time vanished. The double burden for women did not increase when they entered the labour market. The reduction in the time women spent on unpaid work is explained about equally by the shortening of the total amount of unpaid work and by increasing male participation inhousehold chores. In 1950-1963, the reduction was explained mainly by the decline in the making and mending of clothes at home and the spread of domestic appliances. In the 1963–1984 period, instead, it was due chiefly to men’s greater participation in household work. These mechanisms were largely historically contingent, suggesting that it is impossible to single out just one factor to explain why Sweden today has less gender inequality than other countries.

  • 170.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Söderberg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    A Consumer Price Index for Sweden, 1290–20082011In: The Review of Income and Wealth, ISSN 0034-6586, E-ISSN 1475-4991, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 270-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a Consumer Price Index for Sweden 1290–2008. Constructing an index that covers more than seven centuries poses conceptual and empirical problems, and demands some methodological innovations. For example, during numerous occasions the currency unit was changed, and in some periods multiple currencies were used at floating exchange rates relative to each other. This paper also presents two different price indices, one that mainly serves the purposes of estimating real prices and real wages, and another that provides a measure of inflation. While the former follows the main currency unit, the latter also takes into account that debased coins were devalued during recoinage.

  • 171.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Söderberg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    A Consumer Price Index for Sweden 1291-20062007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to describe the construction of a Consumer Price Index for Sweden 1290-2006. The focus is not to present any new empirical material, but rather to use the very rich empirical material collected in earlier studies on the price history of Sweden to construct a price index that as far as possible use a consistent method through time. This paper also discusses some theoretical and conceptual problems in relation to constructing a historical consumer price index.

  • 172.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Söderberg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Prices and the Growth of the European Knowledge Economy, 1200-20072009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 173.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Söderberg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Prices and the growth of the knowledge economy in Sweden and Western Europe before the industrial revolution2011In: Scandinavian Economic History Review, ISSN 0358-5522, E-ISSN 1750-2837, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 250-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article uses long-term series of real prices for various goods and services to analyse the evolution of the knowledge economy before the Industrial Revolution by focusing on Sweden in comparison with other European countries. During the early modern period, the relative price of knowledge-intensive goods and services, such as iron, paper, salt, sea transports and silver, decreased relative to a Consumer Price Index. The increased productivity levels of these goods and services were caused by increased division of labour and accelerated diffusion of knowledge. However, the real price of foodstuff tended to increase, implying that living standards declined with increased population. Early modern Western Europe acquired a peculiar price structure, characterized by low prices of industrial goods relative to the price of food. Only with the advent of industrial society could the knowledge economy escape the Malthusian entrapment.

  • 174.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Söderberg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    The evolution of Swedish consumer prices 1290-20082010In: Exchange Rates, Prices, and Wages, 1277-2008 / [ed] Edvinsson, Rodney, Tor Jacobsson & Daniel Waldenström, Stockholm: Ekerlids Förlag & Sveriges Riksbank , 2010, p. 412-452Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 175.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Ögren, Anders
    Swedish money supply, 1620–20122014In: House prices, stock returns, national accounts and the Riksband balance sheet 1620-2012: / [ed] Rodney Edvinsson, Tor Jacobson, Daniel Waldenström, Stockholm: Ekerlids förlag, 2014, p. 293-338Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 176.
    Edvinsson, Therese Nordlund
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Söderberg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Servants and Bourgeois Life in Urban Sweden in the Early Twentieth Century2010In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 427-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By 1900, most Swedish servants had a rural background. They had migrated to the city from the countryside to perform domestic service in private households. Here they met bourgeois ideals of the comfortable home where the masters could demand home-cooked meals, clean clothes and pleasant surroundings. Servants were needed in order to fulfil this ideal. Yet, the number of domestic servants declined strongly in urban Sweden during the first half of the Twentieth Century. This development is often called ‘the servant crisis’. We explore the background to the scarcity of servants, the relationships between masters and servants, and the role of servants in creating economic and cultural distinctions. We analyze the various adaptations of bourgeois households to the decline of domestic servants. Qualitative sources from private letters, diaries and autobiographies are combined with quantitative evidence from censuses.

  • 177.
    Eggeby, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Vandringsman, här ser du en avmålning av världen: vårdade, vård och ekonomi på Danvikens dårhus 1750-18611996Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 178.
    Ekenved, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    The Role of Education and Political Participation For Women’s Rights in Ethiopia2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper concerns women's rights in Ethiopia, and focuses on how education and political participation can work as an instrument to increase women's rights. It is an interesting subject since the level of education in Ethiopia is very low, and the country has a very patriarchal culture with heavily measured norms where women are considered inferior to men. Research on women's education in Africa has been performed before but not with the women's rights angle and not in Ethiopia. Political participation is also interesting since this can make an impact on women's rights and this subject has been researched on in Ethiopia earlier as well, not with human rights as a focus though.

    The method I have used is a qualitative analysis which investigates books, reports and articles as well as some statistics which I have used as tools to highlight certain factors that I believed were important and interesting for the study.

    The theories I have used are primarily the liberal feminist and radical feminist theories which have helped me to strengthen the answers to my hypothesis. Furthermore, Douglass North's reflections on formal and informal institutions have also been interesting, especially regarding cultural norms and values and legislative law.

    According to my research the results show that education in Ethiopia can prevent girls from being married off at an early age, which increases their chances to personal empowerment as well as gives them greater possibility to eliminate the stereotypical identity of girls being shy and silent. Education can also inform girls about their rights and this knowledge can be spread and encourage girls and women to demand their rights. The possibility to proceed and obtain a career also increases with education, and political participation is an extension of this. As education and political participation go hand in hand, when entering politics in Ethiopia the probability to get involved in women's rights is greater. The best chance to improve women's rights seems though to get involved in the leadership of an NGO or a CBO where the best opportunities of making a difference are. Women's rights organizations defend and affirm the rights of women and they have the possibility to spread the norm of international human rights for women, and increase the implementation of these norms in different nations.

  • 179.
    Elmhorn, Camilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Brussels – the Emergence of a Political World City: Social and Economic Change in a New Historical Context1998Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 180.
    Elmhorn, Camilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Brussels: a reflexive world city2001Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation analyses the consequences of seemingly placeless processes like the European integration and the increasing economic globalisation on Brussels and the people living there. The study shows that Brussels has become one of our time's most important international political capitals and a leading business node in Europe. European institutions, international organisations, headquarters and subsidiaries of transnational corporations are increasingly locating themselves in Brussels. Simultaneously there has been an influx of transnational professionals working in the international sector.

    This research shows that with the internationalisation of Brussels there has been concomitant economic restructuring with the emergence of an advanced service economy. The labour market has become polarised between those who have jobs and those who do not. Brussels has also experienced a spatial and socio-economic polarisation along ethnic lines. The thesis explores the connections between these changes and Brussels' international role.

    Drawing on the world / global city thesis of Saskia Sassen and John Friedmann, a theoretical framework is developed to analyse this. One of the important results of this study is that the world / global city thesis needs to be complemented with a thorough analysis of the place: the political and historical context, and also the role of the local agents, to enable an explanation of the observed development. The interplay between global and local processes needs to be clarified. It is also argued that to properly understand cities with an international role like Brussels, we need to know why international agents locate there. Michael Storper's concepts of 'economic reflexivity' and 'territorial specificities' are used to analyse the rise of Brussels into a reflexive world city - a city vibrating with specific knowledge, produced through inter alia social interaction and critical reflection, that some transnational agents find extremely vital to tap into.

  • 181.
    Elmhorn, Camilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Brussels als politike wereldstad2004In: Agora: Tijdschrift voor sociaal-ruimtelijke vraagstukken, ISSN 1380-6319, Vol. 20, no 5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 182.
    Elmhorn, Camilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Brussels in the European Economic Space: The emergence of a World City1998In: Bulletin de la Société Belge d’Etudes Geographiques, ISSN 0037-8925, no 1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 183.
    Elmhorn, Camilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Framväxten av en avancerad tjänsteekonomi och en ny urban elit i Stockholm:  2008In: Tillväxt och tradition: Perspektiv på Stockholms moderna ekonomiska historia / [ed] Håkan Lindgren & Tom Peterson, Stockholm: Stockholmia , 2008, p. 45-76Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 184.
    Elmhorn, Camilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Från hot till löfte: Stockholms ekonomiska omvandling 1945-20102013Book (Other academic)
  • 185.
    Elmhorn, Camilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Förslag för framtida forskning om Stockholms Ekonomiska 1900-talshistoria2005Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 186.
    Elmhorn, Camilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Internationell politisk ekonomi, globalisering och migration2013In: Internationella relationer - könskritiska perspektiv / [ed] Paulina de los Reyes, Maud Eduards, Fia Sundevall, Stockholm: Liber, 2013, p. 14-33Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 187.
    Elmhorn, Camilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Migrating female workers and informal work in Stockholm2007In: The 2007 Global Forum on Civilization and Peace, Seoul: Academy of Korean Studies , 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 188.
    Elmhorn, Camilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Migrerande arbeterskor: informellt arbete och papperslösa invandrare i Stockholm2008In: Den kalla och den varma staden : migration och stadsförändringar i Stockholm efter 1970 / [ed] Håkan Forsell, Stockholm: Stockholmia , 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 189.
    Elmhorn, Camilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Sweden : Literature review on irregular regular migrant domestic workers2010Report (Other academic)
  • 190.
    Elmhorn, Camilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Urbana eliter och kvinnliga migranter: Utvecklingen av Stockholms postindustriella ekonomi2007In: Fronesis, ISSN 1404-2614, no 24Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 191.
    Eriksson, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Stadshypoteks plats och bana inom det svenska kreditväsendet 1909-1970: en socialhistorisk studie2004Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 192.
    Essén, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Challenges in the early stages of quality improvement research: defining the focus and adjusting to events in the services studied2008In: Quality in Healthcare Network Anthology / [ed] Orvetveit, J, Portugal: QUIRN , 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 193.
    Essén, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Wikström, Solveig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Seniors perception of telecare services: An introductory study2005In: Innovation and the Knowledge Economy: Issues, Applications, Case Studies / [ed] Paul Cunningham and Miriam Cunningham, Amsterdam: IOS Press , 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 194.
    Feldman, Jonathan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Can British defense firms diversify?: The case of Nanoquest and the limits to dual-use theories2008In: Economics of Peace and Security Journal, ISSN 1749-852X, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 56-63Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 195.
    Feldman, Jonathan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Civil Rights and Transportation2014In: Encyclopedia of Transportation: Volume 1 / [ed] Mark Garrett, Sage Publications, 2014, p. 367-371Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 196.
    Feldman, Jonathan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    From Warfare State to ‘Shadow State: Militarism, Economic Depletion and Reconstruction2007In: Social Text, ISSN 0164-2472, E-ISSN 1527-1951, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 143-168Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 197.
    Feldman, Jonathan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Green transportation2014In: Encyclopedia of transportation: social science and policy / [ed] Mark Garrett, Los Angeles: Sage Publications, 2014, p. 640-647Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 198.
    Feldman, Jonathan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Light rail transit2014In: Encyclopedia of transportation: social science and policy / [ed] Mark Garrett, Los Angeles: Sage Publications, 2014, p. 879-884Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 199.
    Feldman, Jonathan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    The Foundations for Extending Green Jobs: The case of the rail-based mass transit sector in North America2010In: International Journal of Labour Research, ISSN 2076-9806, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 269-291Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 200.
    Feldman, Jonathan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    The Limits and Possibilities of Ethnic Entrepreneurship : The Case of ICT Firms in Sweden2006In: International Journal of Multicultural Studies, ISSN 1817-4574, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 84-101Article in journal (Other academic)
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